Saturday, April 24, 2021

Outlaw Aviation: Jailbird Sent Back to Prison for Flying Without a License

A Virginia man with five past convictions was sentenced to 14 months for flying a plane without a pilot’s license. His company, fittingly, was called Outlaw Aviation.



ALEXANDRIA, Va. (CN) — Three years ago, small-business owner Ryan Guy Parker was hired to assemble a plane by Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Virginia. The plane, with the tail number N4463F, was in poor shape: It had duct tape holding certain parts of the machine together and a plastic water bottle catching overflow from the radiator. 

But before he could finish the job, he took off for a 10- to 15-minute joyride over suburban Washington, D.C. 

The Fredericksburg man was charged in early 2020 for flying the plane without a pilot’s license, and by Jan. 22, 2021, he had pleaded guilty. U.S. District Judge T. S. Ellis III sentenced the 31-year-old on Friday to 14 months in prison.

As quoted in the affidavit against Parker, onlookers who saw his 2018 spectacle from the ground were worried that Parker would crash the “bucket of bolts.”

“Multiple witnesses stated the weather and poor visibility that day made conditions too unsafe to fly N4463F, given its lack of instrumentation,” wrote Special Agent Bret Stolle. 

The plane only reached about 50 feet off the ground.

It wasn’t the first time Parker had flown: He told another witness that he’d flown Tomahawk and a Beechcraft Bonanza, the latter of which required special qualifications on top of a license to fly. On top of that, he registered his aircraft-cleaning business with the name Outlaw Aviation.

Prior to his latest foray, Parker faced five previous felony convictions, one involving another aircraft. In early September 2018, three weeks before the joyride now landing him behind bars, Parker tried to fly a plane out of Stafford Regional Airport. He walked onto the terminal apron, removed the cockpit cover and the engine manifold covers, and untied the plane’s wings and tail.  

“These actions are consistent with preflight checks,” the affidavit said. “According to W-1, as a safety measure, pilots will not untie the wings and tail of an aircraft unless they intend to taxi or fly it.” 

Parker tried to start the engine a few times, but to no avail. 

The U.S. Attorney’s office declined to comment. 


Contract divers, private planes keep on search for Seacor Power crewmen: 'We're still out there'

President of Seacor Marine John Gellert speaks during a press conference about the capsized Seacor Power boat, at the Greater Lafourche Port Commission in Cut Off, Louisiana. The Seacor Power lift boat capsized in the Gulf of Mexico on April 13 after a storm, leaving 5 dead, 8 missing and 6 rescued.
 


The founder of the United Cajun Navy said Tuesday that private divers working for the owner of the capsized Seacor Power lift boat in the Gulf of Mexico had entered the submerged galley area of the ship on Tuesday, as family members of eight missing crewmen held out hope that life remains inside.

The civilian rescue fleet had two seaplanes in the air Tuesday, said Cajun Navy founder Todd Terrell, and continued the search across a wide area around the Seacor Power, which capsized hours after leaving Port Fourchon on April 13.

“We’re still out there,” Terrell said. “It’s about the fact there’s still hope.”

The U.S. Coast Guard suspended its search by air and sea for more survivors at sunset Monday after its seventh day. Six of the 19 crewmen aboard the Seacor Power were rescued within hours of it capsizing in a squall that came on fast and packed hurricane-force winds. The bodies of five crewmen, including that of the ship’s captain, have been recovered since.

Terrell said private planes were also ferrying family members of some of the eight missing crewmen to the hobbled jack-up barge, eight miles south of Port Fourchon.

Scott Daspit, the father of missing 30-year-old crewman Dylan Daspit, has been out daily to the scene of the catastrophic capsizing, by boat or plane, said Terrell, who said the mission was to at least “bring closure to these people.”

A relative of the Daspits, Katelyn Bienvenu, said family members were waiting to know if airtight doors to the galley were sealed off, thinking that might have kept crewmen alive.

“The families are holding onto hope,” she said.

Terrell and Bienvenu both said later Tuesday that divers had cleared the galley by mid-afternoon and had two rooms remaining to be searched, in a painstaking crawl through murky water. No other crew members had been found Tuesday, they said.  

A spokesperson for Seacor Marine declined to provide details on the progress of the dive team but said that the divers work will continue until “they’ve exhausted their search.”

John Gellert, president and CEO of Seacor Marine Holdings Inc., said Monday that the search of the vessel would continue even as the National Transportation Safety Board takes the lead in investigating the fatal capsizing.

Gellert said the "go/no-go decision" to depart Port Fourchon in bad weather was "entirely the captain's.” He described the boat’s captain as a "very prudent and conservative" mariner with five decades of experience.

Gellert noted that the storm came on fast and far exceeded projections. Unlike some other ports in Louisiana, there's no harbor master system at Port Fourchon to clear vessels to come and go, according to Chett Chiasson, executive director of Port Fourchon.

Speaking at an anniversary event in New Orleans for the Deepwater Horizon disaster 11 years ago, retired U.S. Army Lt. General Russel Honoré of Baton Rouge, who led the Katrina response, saw parallels to that marine tragedy. 

"Let me get to the bottom line: We have a problem in Louisiana with safety when it comes to the oil and gas business," Honoré said. "Anything is okay. Here we have, in 11 years, two of the biggest accidents in the Gulf off the coast of Louisiana."

The Deepwater Horizon disaster killed 11 workers.

Honoré saw a lack of oversight in relying on the captain.

"I hope the NTSB will recommend that there be a Captain of the Port assigned to Port Fourchon. That when there is a weather warning, he cannot only tell boats to come into harbor, but he can tell them don’t leave," Honoré said. 

Gellert pointed to an unexpectedly ferocious storm on Monday, saying the positioning of an exposed leg from the lift-boat suggested the captain had made a brief attempt to extend those legs to the seafloor before the Seacor Power capsized. 

Those legs extend almost 200 feet in normal use, allowing the jack-up barge to service oil platforms from above the water. 



Cessna 414A Chancellor, N600TH: Incident occurred April 16, 2021 at Manassas Regional Airport (KHEF), Washington, District of Columbia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia

Aircraft became stuck in the grass after trying to maneuver around another aircraft.


Date: 16-APR-21
Time: 19:56:00Z
Regis#: N600TH
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 414
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: WASHINGTON
State: DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Cessna 172E Skyhawk, N3031U; accident occurred April 30, 2019 in Wasilla, Alaska





Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Wasilla, Alaska 
Accident Number: GAA19CA236
Date & Time: April 30, 2019, 19:00 Local
Registration: N3031U
Aircraft: Cessna 172 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The flight instructor reported that, during the preflight inspection, he asked the student pilot, who was the owner of the airplane, how much fuel was onboard the airplane and that the student replied that there was enough fuel for about 3 hours of flight. He added that, during the flight, he became concerned about the fuel level because he saw that the right fuel gauge needle displayed "little movement." After a brief conversation with the student about the fuel burn, the instructor decided to return to the airport.

The student stated that he visually checked the fuel tanks during the preflight and estimated that there was about 1/2 tank (19 gallons), which was enough for about 2.5 hours of flight based on a fuel burn of 7.5 gph. The student reported that, during the flight, the instructor commented that the fuel gauge looked low and that he responded that it was working "intermittently," at which point, the instructor decided to return to the airport.

The student reported that, about 5 nautical miles from the airport, the airplane "ran out of fuel at 3,000 ft MSL [mean sea level]." Subsequently, the instructor landed the airplane on a road, and the right wing struck a power line pole.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor's failure to verify the fuel level, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion and a subsequent forced landing and collision with a power line pole. Contributing to the accident was the student pilot's inadequate preflight fuel planning.

Findings

Personnel issues Preflight inspection - Instructor/check pilot
Environmental issues Pole - Effect on operation
Aircraft Fuel - Inadequate inspection
Aircraft Fuel - Fluid level
Personnel issues Fuel planning - Student/instructed pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute-cruise Fuel exhaustion
Enroute-cruise Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)
Landing Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 66, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/11/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/18/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 87 hours (Total, all aircraft), 87 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3031U
Model/Series: 172 E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1963
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17250631
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/28/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2562 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAWS, 354 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0056 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 238°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 400 ft agl
Visibility:  8 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 70°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.4 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 0°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Wasilla, AK (PAWS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Wasilla, AK (PAWS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1730 ADT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 61.599167, -149.450556 (est)

Lancair IV-P , N163BR: Incident occurred April 21, 2021 at Henderson Executive Airport (KHND), Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada

Aircraft scraped both wing tips after hard landing due to wind gust.


Date: 21-APR-21
Time: 21:10:00Z
Regis#: N163BR
Aircraft Make: LANCAIR
Aircraft Model: IV P
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LAS VEGAS
State: NEVADA

Piper PA-28: Incident occurred April 20, 2021 in Maricopa, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft on departure, gear collapsed and ground looped. 

Date: 20-APR-21
Time: 19:55:00Z
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: MARICOPA
State: ARIZONA

Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane RG, N5494T: Accident occurred April 21, 2021 at Falcon Field Airport (KFFZ), Mesa, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft went off the runway then onto taxiway.  

One Two Zero Mike Echo LLC


Date: 21-APR-21
Time: 17:15:00Z
Regis#: N5494T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: MESA
State: ARIZONA

Nose Over: Luscombe 8F Silvaire, N1866B; accident occurred April 20, 2019 in Bremen, Cullman County, Alabama






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Bremen, AL

Accident Number: GAA19CA224
Date & Time: 04/20/2019, 1630 CDT
Registration: N1866B
Aircraft: Luscombe 8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during takeoff from a 2,400-ft-long private, grass airstrip, he was concerned the airplane would not clear the wires at the end of the runway, so he aborted the takeoff. The airplane overran the departure end of the runway, crossed a road, and went through a barbed wire fence. Subsequently, the airplane come to rest inverted.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and wing lift strut.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

About the time of the accident, the pilot estimated that the wind was from 290° at 8 knots. The pilot was departing from runway 18.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's delayed decision to abort the takeoff, which resulted in a runway overrun, impact with a fence, and a nose-over.

Findings

Personnel issues Delayed action - Pilot
Environmental issues Fence/fence post - Effect on operation
Personnel issues Decision making/judgment - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff-rejected takeoff Runway excursion
Takeoff-rejected takeoff Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Takeoff-rejected takeoff Nose over/nose down (Defining event)


Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/07/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/29/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 700 hours (Total, this make and model), 3500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Luscombe
Registration: N1866B
Model/Series: 8 F
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1948
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 6293
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/15/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5568.67 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C-90-12K
Registered Owner: Ronald J Morrison
Rated Power: 90 hp
Operator: Ronald J Morrison
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJFX, 483 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2135 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 249°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Bremen, AL (PVT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Bremen, AL (PVT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1415 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Private Airport (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 564 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2400 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.983611, -87.059444 (est)

Piper PA-28-151, N4676F: Incident occurred April 21, 2021 at Albert Whitted Airport (KSPG), St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft struck a bird on landing damaging right wingtip strobe light cover. 


Date: 21-APR-21
Time: 18:45:00Z
Regis#: N4676F
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ST PETERSBURG
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 140, N2506N: Fatal accident occurred April 15, 2021 near H. A. Clark Memorial Field (KCMR), Williams, Coconino County, Arizona

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Las Vegas, Nevada
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas 

Location: Williams, AZ 
Accident Number: WPR21LA166
Date & Time: April 15, 2021, 19:30 Local
Registration: N2506N
Aircraft: Cessna 140 
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On April 15, 2021, about 1930 mountain standard time, a Cessna 140, N2506N, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident in Williams, Arizona. The pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

According to the pilot’s social media postings, he had recently purchased the airplane. He and his passenger, who was also his spouse, departed Bermuda Dunes, California on April 12, with the planned destination of Sedona, Arizona. The exact itinerary could not be ascertained, but it is likely that on the accident flight they intended to land in Williams for the night and then land in Grand Canyon, Arizona the following day.

Recorded radar data covering the area of the accident was supplied by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and was analyzed for time frame and proximity to the anticipated flight track of the airplane en route from Sedona to Williams. The radar data consisted of approximately equidistant radar returns from about 1855 to 1934. The data was consistent with the airplane departing Sedona and traveling about eight nautical miles (nm) west before turning north (see Figure 1 below). The radar returns displayed a climb to about 10,000 feet mean sea level (msl) and continued on the north-northwest course for about 20 minutes. As the radar returns approach the proximity of Williams, the altitude had descended to 8,150 ft msl, equating to about 1,520 ft above ground level (agl).

As the radar returns approached the H. A. Clark Memorial Field Airport, the airplane made a right turn to the north consistent with the airplane making a 45° entry to adjoin the downwind leg for runway 18 (see Figure 2 below). The radar data was consistent with the airplane continuing on the base leg and exhibited significant altitude fluctuations within a 30 second timespan.



Between 1933:27 and 1933:37, the radar returns are consistent with the airplane transitioning from a northerly course to a west course and the speed decreasing from 82 kts to 60 kts while descending 525 ft. At 1933:51 the altitude increased 750 ft and the airspeed increased by 16 kts. At 1934:51, the last radar hit, located about 2,860 feet northeast of the accident site, showed a ground speed of 43 kts and an altitude of 570 ft agl.

The airplane impacted the ground about 1,430 ft east of the runway threshold. The left and right wings exhibited compression damage along the entirety of their leading edges (see Figure 3 below). The wing flaps visually appeared to be in an extended position. The flap control linkage and cockpit flap-position indicator sustained damaged consistent with impact, prohibiting investigators from being able to ascertain the position of the flaps at the time of impact.



Data from the United States Naval Observatory indicated that the phase of moon for the town of Williams was a waxing crescent with less than 25 percent of the moon’s disk illuminated. Sunset occurred at 1902, with civil twilight ending at 1928. The moon rise occurred at 0838 and moon set at 2333; at the time of the accident the moon was about 31° below the horizon (including refraction) on an azimuth (heading) of 343°.

The airport was located just north of the city of Williams; both were situated in a wide valley surrounded by mountainous terrain. The area surrounding the airport and the city was primarily desert with very sparse illumination. A review of the airport facility directory revealed that airport elevation was 6,630 feet msl and the runway was 100 feet wide by 6,000 feet in length. The airport operated a lighted white-green beacon that was operational from sunset to sunrise. The airport was equipped with a precision approach path indicator light system designed to provide safe obstruction clearance. Pilot-activated medium intensity runway lights illuminated runway 18, and runway end identifier lights were installed.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2506N
Model/Series: 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.312778,-112.1878 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

 Timothy Michael Gill and Joylani Roseann Kamalu


SAN DIEGO COUNTY, California  — It has been one month to the day as of Thursday since a pilot raised in San Diego County and his wife died in a plane crash in Arizona.

The duo was on vacation, flying to Sedona for the wife, Joylani's 40th birthday in their Cessna -140. That's a pretty light aircraft and was fairly new to them.

Today we are learning more about Tim, the private pilot who was a man of many talents.

Timothy Gill grew up in Vista. He was a private pilot and a well-known swing jazz musician who played all over Southern California.

"He's always been an old soul and very musically inclined - never had a piano lesson, guitar lesson, voice lesson, nothing like that. He was a natural," said Cindy Gill, Tim's mother.

Cindy and Mike Gill remember their son as being great at anything he was passionate about. Music was his first love.

"He was 14 years old and developed his first swing band," said Cindy.

Tim went to Roosevelt Middle school, Vista High school and graduated from Cal State Fullerton. His passion for aviation started about six or seven years ago.

"He was a planes, trains, and automobiles kind of guy at a young age and just found his passion in the sky," said Cindy.

The 37-year-old and his wife Joylani started a popular grassroots aviation YouTube channel and Instagram page called Tango and Juliet. They took viewers along their journeys to off-the-beaten-path destinations.

Their last Instagram post was on April 12. 

Their last YouTube video titled "Brunch and Beer Crow-Hopping" was posted on March 20.

"They both left the Sedona airport at 7 pm on Thursday, April 15 and the last radar ping was 7:19," said Cindy.

Authorities found the wreckage on Monday, April 19, in a wooded area.

"Which was the worst phone call any parent has to receive," said Cindy.

No one has any idea what when wrong.

The NTSB is investigating, which could take 18 months to two years to complete. 

Cindy said Tim and Joylani would want all their fellow aviators to continue living out their dreams in the sky.

"Continue to enjoy what they made. Please don't stop," said Cindy.

Gil leaves behind the children who live with their biological mother out of state. A GoFundMe page was set up to help the children with their educational and medical needs.




Coconino County Sheriff's Office
For Immediate Release 
Subject: Overdue Aircraft Located Crashed Near Williams HA Clark Field 

WILLIAMS, Arizona – On Sunday, April 18th around 6:00 PM, deputies from the Coconino County Sheriff’s Williams Sub-Station received a report of an overdue aircraft from Vista, California. A family member of one of the overdue occupants indicated that the missing parties had not reported for work as scheduled on Sunday. The occupants have been identified as Timothy Michael Gill, 37, and Joylani Roseann Kamalu, 38, of Vista, California.

The reported destination for the aircraft was the Grand Canyon Airport for a scheduled appointment in the Tusayan area at 9:00 AM, having departed from the Sedona Airport. Investigators immediately focused on attempting to search for the aircraft at the Sedona and Grand Canyon airports.

Due to the potential of the aircraft being in multiple jurisdictions, the State Search and Rescue Coordinator was notified, who in turn requested assistance from the US Air Force Civil Air Patrol to determine the last known direction and location of the aircraft. This information from the US Air Force directed search efforts to an area northeast of the Williams airport, also known as HA Clark Airfield.

Deputies requested the assistance of the Arizona Department of Public Safety Air Rescue helicopter out of Kingman. 

On Monday, April 19th at 1:40 AM, DPS Air Rescue located the aircraft crashed in a wooded area in near the Williams Airport. Two occupants were confirmed deceased in the downed aircraft.

The incident is currently under investigation by the NTSB, FAA, the Coconino County Sheriff’s Office, and the Coconino County Medical Examiner’s Office. No further information is available at this time.


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California


March 19, 2021:  Aircraft aborted takeoff and ground looped. 

Timothy Michael Gill


Date: 19-MAR-21
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N103HD
Aircraft Make: GREGA
Aircraft Model: AIR CAMPER
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: FALLBROOK
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-28RT-201T Turbo Arrow IV, N4303G: Fatal accident occurred April 20, 2021 in Brownsville, Haywood County, Tennessee

Chad Garland and his mother, Marjorie Garland.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Memphis, Tennessee
Piper Aircraft Company; Vero Beach, Florida 

Charles W. Garland


Location: Brownsville, TN
Accident Number: ERA21FA189
Date & Time: April 20, 2021, 20:52 Local
Registration: N4303G
Aircraft: Piper PA-28RT-201T 
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On April 20, 2021, at 2052 central daylight time, a Piper PA-28RT-201T airplane, N4303G, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Brownsville, Tennessee. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the student pilot’s flight instructor, he and the pilot met mid-morning on the day of the accident to discuss a solo cross-country flight from Pearland Regional Airport (LVJ), Houston, Texas to Kyle-Oakley Field Airport (CEY), Murray, Kentucky. The flight instructor reported that the pilot told him the purpose of the trip was to visit a family member that had recently been admitted to the hospital. The flight instructor stated that “it was supposed to be a daytime flight” and he expected the pilot to depart no later than 1300 or 1400, due to the weather coming in later in the day and nighttime conditions.

Review of preliminary flight track and Automatic Dependent Surveillance – Broadcast (ADS-B) data found that the student pilot departed LVJ at 1720, proceeded southbound for a few minutes, and then headed northeast. After leaving the Houston metro area, the enroute course showed few deviations for a track consistent with a direct route of flight to CEY.

At 2051:20, the airplane’s altitude was about 7,300 ft mean sea level (msl), the course turned to the right which was eastbound, and groundspeed was 165 knots. For the subsequent 30 seconds the course continued eastbound, and altitude and groundspeed remained generally constant. At 2052:17, the airplane’s heading had continued the right turn and was headed south, altitude had descended to about 6,700 ft msl, and groundspeed slowed by 20 knots.

Subsequently, the airplane entered a rapidly descending and accelerating right 360° spiral. In the spiral, groundspeed reached a maximum of 247 knots. At 2052:47, the final data point was recorded about 1/4 mile northeast of the accident site which showed the airplane headed south, at 1,450 ft msl and 224 knots groundspeed. Figure 1 shows the final minutes of the ADS-B flight track.

Review of preliminary air traffic control communications provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that in the final minutes of the flight the pilot was communicating with Memphis Air Route Traffic Control Center. About 2 minutes and 30 seconds prior to radar contact being lost, the pilot radioed to Memphis Center stating that he was flying at 7,500 ft mean sea level (msl), his final destination was CEY, and added that he was planning to “start my descent now” for his final approach and he was going to make it a “gradual descent.” The controller responded by providing the CEY altimeter setting and advised the pilot of moderate precipitation “starting now lasting all the way to the [destination] airport.” The controller further stated in part that “everything between now and [CEY] is on the verge of being [instrument meteorological] conditions, it looks likes ceilings are down to about 1,500 ft most everywhere.”

The pilot responded, “ok affirmative I’m gonna still descend down” to “2,000-3,000 ft”. He further added that he was looking at a screen for weather and he would begin his final descent once he was within 10 miles of CEY. The controller responded by advising the pilot to maintain visual flight rules and then provided additional weather observation reports for airports along the pilot’s route of flight that were reporting instrument meteorological conditions. The controller advised that a course to the east may help him remain clear of the weather. The pilot acknowledged the controller. About 50 seconds later a “mayday” call was announced over the radio. There was no call sign associated with the distress call, nor any further information given with the call. The controller attempted to reach the pilot several times after the mayday call, however, no further communications were received.

The FAA issued a missing aircraft alert shortly after radar contact was lost. Local authorities discovered the wreckage about 0730 the next morning. 

According to FAA airman records, the pilot held a student pilot certificate. He was issued a third-class medical certificate on January 14, 2019. The flight instructor estimated the student pilot had about 90 flight hours of experience. He added that the student pilot had a solo cross country route endorsement for the flight and an endorsement to solo the accident airplane.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the 4-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1983. It was powered by a Continental TSIO-360-FB 201-horsepower engine. According to the FAA registration records, the student pilot purchased the airplane in July 2019.

The main wreckage was located partially submerged in a creek and along a muddy ravine in a forest. All major components of the airplane were located within about a 100-ft-long debris path, and the wreckage was heavily fragmented. There was no evidence of a postimpact fire. Flight control cable continuity could not be established from the flight control surfaces to the cockpit due to the heavy fragmentation of the wreckage. The control cables that were observed displayed fracture features that were consistent with separation due to overload.

The main and nose landing gear were found in the debris. The left main landing gear actuator was consistent with an up position. The right and nose main landing gear actuators were not located. The flap control cable remained attached to the flap; however, a flap position could not be determined due to the impact damage. The fuel selector valve had separated from the airframe and was selected to the right fuel tank valve.

The cockpit and instrument panel were heavily fragmented. The standby attitude indicator was found in the debris. When disassembled, the gyro remained intact, and its housing exhibited rotational scoring. No other flight instruments, including the primary flight display, were observed or readable.

The engine was found co-located with the main wreckage mostly submerged in water and thick mud. The engine displayed significant impact damage and the crankshaft could not be rotated due to the damage. Each cylinder, with the exception of the No. 5 cylinder, showed that the valves remained intact and were unremarkable. The No. 5 cylinder sustained significant impact damage. The forward valve was impact damaged and was found loose in the cylinder and its spring had separated. All top sparkplugs displayed normal combustion signatures, with exception to the No. 5 cylinder sparkplug, which was impact damaged and could not be removed.

The fuel manifold was found partially attached to the engine; when disassembled fuel was observed in the unit and the screen was clean, with exception of a small glob of mud that was consistent with the mud observed on the outer casing of the unit.

The rear and bottom portions of the crankcase were fractured allowing an unobstructive view of the engine’s drive gears, which all appeared unremarkable. 

The propeller flange and propeller hub had separated from the engine and were located within a few feet of the main wreckage. Partial s-bending, leading edge gouges, and chord wise scratches were observed on the propeller.

The 2055 recorded weather observation at Covington Municipal Airport (M04), Covington, Tennessee, located about 10 miles west of the accident site, included an overcast ceiling at 1,200 ft above ground level, visibility 5 statute miles, mist, wind 350° at 18 knots. The temperature was 5° C, and the dew point was 4° C.

Preliminary review of radar and satellite data indicated that precipitation and cloud cover was located near the accident site. According to Leidos Flight Service and Foreflight, there was no record that the pilot filed a flight plan or requested an official weather briefing via telephone or online.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N4303G
Model/Series: PA-28RT-201T NO SERIES 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown 
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KM04,280 ft msl 
Observation Time: 20:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 5°C /4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 1200 ft AGL 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 18 knots / , 350°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1200 ft AGL
Visibility: 5 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Houston, TX (LVJ) 
Destination: Murray, KY (CEY)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.554109,-89.391813 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Charles Chad Wayne Garland
August 10, 1965 - April 20, 2021

Mr. Chad Garland, 55, of Friendswood, TX, passed away on Tuesday, April 20, 2021.

Chad was born on August 10, 1965 in Murray, KY to Paul Garland and Marjorie McDaniel Garland. Chad loved living life in the fast lane. From hot rods, Harley's, dirt bikes, boats, planes, he wanted to experience everything he could as fast as he could before he got too old. He loved his family and would have given anyone the shirt off of his back. He had such a giving heart. Chad was a member of the Calloway County High School class of 1983. His mantra was "Fly Higher Than High".

He is preceded in death by his mother, Marjorie Garland.

Chad had recently had a second child name Axel Miguel Wayne Garland. His first baby boy was born in June of 2020. Many who knew Chad up close and personal, knew that he had cherished and loved his first son dearly. Chad had been in his little angel's life for 10 months and if you had asked his family about him, we assured you that he would respond with pure happiness and excitement of his child. He spoiled and adored his baby. Axel had filled his father's last 10 months  with joy and laughter. Although Axel wasn’t Majorie's First grandson, he still part of the Garland Family, and still was a grandson.  The baby boy was loved by his late father and grandmother.

Also left to cherish many wonderful memories include his daughter, Kelsey Garland of Friendswood, TX; his father, Paul Garland (Vickie) of Murray; brothers, Brad Garland (Debbie) of Cypress, TX, Trent Garland (Erin) of Murray; sisters, Angie Garland of Tomball, TX, Kandis Morris (Trey) of Murray; nephews, Nick Wuest, Zack Hale, Landen Hale, Brandon Garland, Strader Garland; nieces, Sydney Hale, Lexi Garland and Madi Garland; aunts, Barbara Barnett (J.L.) of Murray, Lottie Garland of Murray and Joyce Vance (Tommy) of Murray. 

Service times are pending and will be announced in the coming weeks.

Please join family and friends in honoring the life of Mr. Chad Garland by visiting www.imesfh.com and posting your tributes and memories.

The Heritage Chapel of Imes Funeral Home is entrusted with caring for the family of Mr. Chad Garland.


Ms. Marjorie Garland, 74, of Friendswood, TX, formerly of Murray, passed away on Tuesday, April 20, 2021.

Ms. Garland was born on January 15, 1947 in Miami Beach, FL to the late Charles and Geraldine Paschall McDaniel.

Marjorie loved being outdoors. Fishing, camping and anything that involved being outside. Her pride and joy were her two dogs, Prissy and Holly. She was a member of the Murray High School class of 1965 and of Sinking Spring Baptist Church. She lived life to the fullest and will be missed dearly.

In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by a son, Chad Garland.

Those she lovingly leaves behind include a son, Brad Garland (Debbie) of Cypress, TX; a daughter, Angie Garland of Tomball, TX; a sister, Barbara Barnett (J.L.) of Murray; grandchildren, Kelsey Garland, Nick Wuest, Zack Hale, Landen Hale, Syndey Hale, Brandon Garland, Lexi Garland, Axel Miguel Wayne Garland.

Services times are pending and will be announced in the upcoming weeks.

Please join family and friends in honoring the life of Ms. Marjorie Garland by visiting www.imesfh.com and posting your tributes and memories.

The Heritage Chapel of Imes Funeral Home is entrusted with caring for the family of Ms. Garland.


Haywood Sheriff

It’s with heavy heart to express our condolences to the two victims that passed in a plane crash in Haywood County today. A big thank you goes out to our deputies, the Rescue Squad volunteers, Mr. Pat Hughes and others who helped locate the plane wreckage and recover the victims. Our thoughts and prayers are with the family.




Vultee BT-13A Valiant, N53331; fatal accident occurred April 21, 2021 and accident occurred August 12, 2016

Mark Lyn Lewallen
July 15, 1951 ~ April 21, 2021 (age 69)


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon


Location: Camas, WA
Accident Number: WPR21FA170
Date & Time: April 21, 2021, 15:13 Local
Registration: N53331
Aircraft: Consolidated Vultee BT-13A
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On April 21, 2021, about 1513 Pacific standard time, a Consolidated Vultee BT-13A, N53331, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at the Grove Field Airport (1W1), Camas, Washington. The pilot receiving instruction was fatally injured and the flight instructor sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

The instructor reported that the purpose of the accident flight was recurrent training for the pilot receiving instruction. They departed 1W1, flew to a nearby airport and conducted several takeoffs and landings before they returned to 1W1. The instructor stated that their first approach to landing on runway 25 resulted in a go-around. On the second approach to land, the pilot receiving instruction performed a 3-point landing. During the landing roll, the airplane veered left and exited the runway. The instructor stated that no attempt was made by the pilot receiving instruction to return the airplane to the runway. However, at an airspeed of about 35 miles per hour, the pilot receiving instruction added full power and immediately “pitched up.” The airplane climbed in ground effect to approximately 30 ft, then entered a stalling left turn. The instructor stated that the bank angle continued to increase before the airplane impacted the ground. The instructor further added that he had been guarding the flight controls but because of the low altitude, he did not have time to correct. 

Postaccident examination of the accident site by a National Transportation Safety Board investigator revealed that the airplane impacted terrain about 890 ft from the approach end of runway 25, and 95 ft south of the runway. A damaged runway light was observed about 570 ft from the runway threshold. The first identified point of contact with terrain was a ground scar that was about 6 ft in length and contained red navigational lens fragments. The debris path extended about 120 ft from the initial point of contact to the main wreckage, oriented on a heading of 215° magnetic. The airplane came to rest in a near vertical attitude against a hangar on a heading of 141° magnetic. The fuselage and wings were mostly intact, however, the forward portion of the fuselage exhibited impact damage; with the engine and engine mount separated from the firewall. Flight control continuity was established from both cockpit controls to all primary flight control surfaces. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Consolidated Vultee 
Registration: N53331
Model/Series: BT-13A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTTD,29 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C /0°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Hood River, OR (4S2)
Destination: Camas, WA 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious Latitude,
Longitude: 45.627829,-122.40431 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

On Wednesday, April 21, 2021, Mark Lyn Lewallen, loving husband, father and grandfather, passed away in an airplane accident in Camas, Washington at the age of 69.

Mark was born on July 15, 1951 on the kitchen table of his home in Appleton, Washington to Donald and Jodean Lewallen. On December 29, 1976 he married Charlene Younger. They raised a son, Mark Jr.  He later remarried Sandra Tunison on April 7, 2012.

He received an Electronics degree at Clackamas Community College before serving in the US Navy on the USS Oriskany from 1971-1975. Following that he worked as an HVAC sheet metal worker and then was involved in dredging the Columbia River. From 1978-1980 he worked on the maintenance cranes at the Bonneville dam. He then worked at Winco as a grocery store technician for the rest of his career. 

Mark had a passion for flying. He saw his first BT13 at the age of 4, announced that he wants it, and fulfilled his lifelong dream in 2012 at the age of 60. His plane, nicknamed “The Mistress” and various vintage cars including a Model A and 1934 Ford were among his strongest passions.  He also enjoyed sailing the Columbia.  He was known for his generous nature, love of life and infectious smile.

Mark was preceded in death by a young son Charles, his first wife Charlene and a step sister Gaye Beené.  He is survived by his wife Sandra (68), son Mark (40) and Crystal Lewallen, step-daughter Rebecca Perala, grandchildren Tacye (6) and Carson (3).

Funeral services will be held Saturday, May 1, 10:00 am at Riverview Abbey Funeral Home on Taylors Ferry Rd, with interment at Oregon City Mountain View Cemetery at 11:30.





 
A Vancouver man was killed Wednesday afternoon when his vintage aircraft crashed into a hangar on the northwestern end of Grove Field airport north of Camas.

His daughter, Rebecca Perala of Vancouver, identified him Thursday as 69-year-old Mark Lewallen.

The National Transportation Safety Board posted on Twitter that the involved plane was a Consolidated Vultee BT-13A, a World War II-era trainer aircraft. The Federal Aviation Administration registry shows the plane was manufactured in 1941 and had been registered to Lewallen since October 2012.

A passenger in Lewallen’s aircraft, whose name has not been released, was taken by ambulance to a local hospital with traumatic injuries, according to the authorities.

The man was a friend of Lewallen’s and a flight instructor, who has a nearly identical plane and tens of thousands of hours of flying experience, said Perala, 45.

Lewallen was also an experienced pilot, she said, and he had flown off and on since he was a teenager, with hundreds of flying hours under his belt.

Clark County sheriff’s deputies and East County Fire & Rescue personnel responded at 3:13 p.m. for the aircraft emergency at Grove Field, 632 N.E. 267th Ave., about 3 miles north of Camas.

Initial reports indicated that one person was trapped inside the aircraft and another was outside of it. Two ambulances were called to the scene, but one was later canceled, according to emergency radio traffic monitored by The Columbian.

East County Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Mike Carnes said the pilot later identified as Lewallen was seated in the front of the plane and receiving training from the pilot in the rear of the aircraft. Carnes said he was unsure if the plane was connected to the flight school at Grove Field.

The cause of the crash is unknown. The NTSB and FAA were on scene Thursday investigating.

Perala said the family doesn’t know much about what happened, other than the crash occurred either on the landing or final touch-and-go before landing for the day.

She said, according to the passenger, Lewallen came in a bit fast, landed and started to take off into the grass.

“He powered up with the hope of pulling back up into the air and going back around to correct the landing. That’s when he lost control,” Perala said in an email. “We don’t know yet whether it was airplane, person or environment, or all three.”

Grove Field is owned and operated by the Port of Camas-Washougal. The airfield was closed most of Thursday for the crash investigation.

“Our hearts go out to the victims and the family and friends of the deceased,” Sadie Hayes, the Port’s community relations specialist, said in a statement.

 






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Mark L. Lewallen


Location: Joseph, Oregon
Accident Number: GAA16CA429
Date & Time: August 13, 2016, 14:20 Local 
Registration: N53331
Aircraft: Consolidated Vultee BT13 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot of the tailwheel equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll he lost directional control, which resulted in a ground loop to the left, a runway excursion, both main landing gear collapse, and substantial damage to the airplane's left aileron and elevator.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion and damage to the left aileron and elevator.

Findings

Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion
Landing-landing roll Landing gear collapse

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 65,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Last 
FAA Medical Exam: October 1, 2015
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 180 hours (Total, all aircraft), 50 hours (Total, this make and model)

Passenger Information

Certificate: 
Age:/ Female
Airplane Rating(s): Seat
Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Consolidated Vultee
Registration: N53331
Model/Series: BT13 A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1941 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 1491
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel 
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: July 8, 2016 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4670 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2788.2 Hrs 
Engine Manufacturer: P & W
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: R-985 SERIES
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 450 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLGD,2717 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 32 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 21:15 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 262°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 360° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: AURORA, OR (UAO) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Joseph, OR (JSY)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 12:15 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: JOSEPH STATE JSY
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4121 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 33
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5200 ft / 60 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 45.357223,-117.253334(est)