Friday, November 23, 2018

SkyWest Airlines, Embraer 170/175: Incident occurred January 18, 2020 at Tri-Cities Airport (KPSC), Franklin County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aircraft slid off runway striking hold short sign.

Date: 18-JAN-20
Time: 01:53:00Z
Regis#: SKW3934
Aircraft Make: EMBRAER
Aircraft Model: E75
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
Flight Number: SKW3934
City: PASCO
State: WASHINGTON

Robinson R44: Fatal accident occurred November 11, 2019 in Tunis, Tunisia

NTSB Identification: WPR20WA021
14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial
Accident occurred Monday, November 11, 2019 in Tunis, Tunisia
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Tunisia has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a ROBINSON R44 helicopter that occurred on November 11, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Tunisia's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Tunisia.

National Infrared Operations: Mapping from above the flames

Kyle Felker works from his home on infrared images taken of both the Camp Fire and the Woolsey Fire. 


From the vantage point of a comfortable desk chair in his own home study, one Plumas County resident is doing sophisticated computerized infrared map work that thousands rely on both in the fire zones, at command centers and on the web.

Kyle Felker of Quincy works for NIROPS — the National Infrared Operations — a nationwide program that uses aircraft to fly over wildfires at night for thermal infrared detection and mapping. While Felker has been doing this kind of work for 15 years, NIROPS has been in existence since 1969.

To put it simply, a NIROPS aircraft flies the mission at night, sends the highly detailed information to Felker who then puts his spin on it and releases it to fire command centers. “I’m the guy on the ground who does the maps,” he explained.

How it works

NIROPS has two aircraft, a Cessna Citation jet and a twin engine Beechcraft King Air, Felker explained. At this time, one aircraft is working the Camp Fire in Northern California; the second is working the Woolsey Fire in Southern California.

At another location, Felker said he has a partner in working maps. Rachael Brady in Redding has her name on the fire map information from the Camp Fire. Felker’s name appears on everything for the Woolsey Fire, although they both work on all maps.

At the request of a fire agency for an incident like the Camp Fire, the incident places and Infrared Flight (IR) request in to NIROPS.

In turn a number is generated with a local dispatch unit and incident orders and Infrared Interpreter (IRIN) such as Felker.

A plane then flies the fire at night and delivers the imagery to the IRIN.

Fires generally tend to die down or lie down at night, plus there isn’t the added air traffic of helicopters and planes dropping water and fire retardant onto the fire. Air command also doesn’t fly at night, so it’s the perfect time for NIROPS to be in the air.

Felker (IRIN) interprets the imagery with his specialized computer program and delivers maps, logs and GIS-ready files to the incident command center.

Inside each aircraft is the Phoenix Imaging Systems and AirCell telecommunications equipment, Felker explained.

These produce two thermal bands that distinguish fire from hot background objects in a 6-mile swath, while the aircraft is at an altitude of about 10,000 feet, according to Felker. “It’s all in the sensors,” he said about the thermal bands. “We only do two kinds of red (infrared) and we do it really, really well.”

Each aircraft is capable of doing 300,000 acres an hour, although the jet is far faster. And they can easily cover several fires in one night. In fact NIROPS has been able to work 30 incidents or more in a night’s work, Felker explained. The highest number they’ve worked in a night was 52.

“It’s really a cool job because I could be anywhere,” he said about his location. He just needs the Internet link, his computer and the appropriate program.

Overlapping resources

Scanners and technicians are based at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise, Idaho, Felker explained. The pilots are based at the U.S. Forest Service Intermountain Region. And IRINs, like Felker, are from many federal, state and local agencies. Felker’s background is with the Mt. Hough Ranger District on the Plumas National Forest where he worked in GIS or Geographic Information Systems.

Technical support for research and development is provided by the USFS Remote Sensing Application Center, NASA and private industry, Felker explained. Program oversight, Geographic Area Liaisons, and training cadre come from the pool of IRINs such as Felker.

Coordination is facilitated by the Aircraft Desk at the National Interagency Coordination Center at NIFC. During fire activity regional or national infrared coordinators are used and that includes private vendors. Nationwide there are about 30 people involved in the program, according to Felker.

Capabilities

Infrared detection is capable of detecting a heat source as small as six inches from a high altitude. “You could pick up a dinner plate-sized spot,” Felker said about defining a slightly larger hot spot.

Showing some of the red circles indicating heat on one of the maps on his computer screen, Felker said that what was being seen was probably a stump or a post that was burning.

The map imaging can put a firefighter within 20 feet of a burning object, he said. “I can’t tell you if your house is burnt or not,” Felker said. “I can tell if it’s hot.”

As Felker looks over the images he’s working with he can tag specific areas. For instance, he’s keeping a close eye on the Bucks Lake Wilderness Area.

“That’s my baby,” he said. And, understandably, he’s keeping an eye on the cabin he’s been building for the past 12 years in the Bucks Lake area. At this stage of the Camp Fire, slow-growing flames were inching toward the Four Trees area, a favorite spot for snowmobilers and others along the Quincy/Oroville Highway.

Showing one image on his computer, Felker said that the aircraft flew the Camp Fire between 5 and 7 p.m. on Nov. 9. The fire had already passed over a large portion of Paradise. The perimeter of the fire showed up in red where active flames were occurring as the blaze continued toward Chico and other parts. Paradise itself was white and yellow indicating how hot the area still was.

The great thing about today’s technology is that Felker can send his information to fire command. There someone can break it down so that anyone in the field with an iPhone can receive mapping information for their particular section.

While showing the maps, Felker has more detailed information available. He can show the history of fires within an area or he knows dozer lines or hand lines made by people on the ground. These don’t just happen. By using the fire maps, people can determine exactly where to put their resources.

The maps

Felker got special permission to share some of the maps used by incident command and in the field by firefighters for this story. Some are classified and those aren’t included.

Indicating a plume of smoke coming off the initial phase of the fire, Felker said that the smoke was not only filled with toxins, but embers. Those embers also glow red. The clouds “drop fire out of the sky,” he said about how wind and the atmosphere work to spread hot fires.

Indicating a black and white map — a sharp contrast to the full color maps he’s been showing — Felker said that it “helps me define the edges” of the fire. The white indicates cold areas on this map, while the black shows the hot areas.

Felker sees landscapes and routes on his maps. He sees that something has moved he said he’s immediately on the phone to his lead contact. He just had occasion to do that very thing on the Woolsey Fire.

And when this happens, fire command wants to have the information immediately.

Original article can be found here ➤   http://www.plumasnews.com

Study looks at vulture patterns, danger to aircraft near Martinsburg, West Virginia



MARTINSBURG, West Virginia — Officials are seeking the public’s assistance to spot vultures that could endanger aircraft at the 167th Airlift Wing of the West Virginia Air National Guard.

About 50 black vultures that roost nearby at the Argos Cement Plant on Queen Street have been fitted with red tags bearing alphanumeric codes on their right wings, according to a news release from the Air National Guard.

The tags help track the birds and provide research about how they move and interact with the local environment.

“They do have their spot in the ecosystem — cleaning up dead animals and roadkill,” said Chad Neil, a wildlife specialist for U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal Plant Health Inspection Service Wildlife Service-West Virginia.

Birds can hit the windshield of aircraft or get sucked into engines, which could cause a plane to crash.

Black vultures are a protected migratory bird that usually nest in dark cavities and feed on dead animals. They tend to soar in flocks to spot their food and roost together in trees or transmission towers.

The birds can be considered a nuisance in populated areas.

“Their feces is very acidic, killing everything on the ground,” Neil said. “There’s a disease risk there. They’ve been known to destroy property. Of course, the main threat here is the one to aviation.”

Black vultures often can be seen soaring around the tower at Argos, which is less than 2 miles from the end of the runway at Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport.

Black vultures are most common in Central America and the southeastern United States, but have extended their range beyond the mid-Atlantic region in the last several decades.

Sightings of the tagged vultures can be reported to vulture.tag@gmail.com. People are asked to include the location of the sighting, a tag number if visible and any behavioral information.

The birds should not be handled in an attempt to see their tag codes.

The study is being conducted by Argos, the West Virginia Air National Guard, and the United States Department of Agriculture.

Original article ➤  https://www.heraldmailmedia.com

Mission Aviation Fellowship gains new CEO David Holsten


NAMPA, Idaho — David Holsten and his family spent much of their life serving communities in Indonesia, but now they're beginning a new chapter in a very different environment — Nampa, Idaho. 

Holsten was recently named president and CEO of Mission Aviation Fellowship, a Christian nonprofit based in Nampa that flies resources to isolated parts of the world. Since its founding in 1945, the fellowship has worked in more than 30 countries and delivered nearly 7 million pounds of cargo. 

The organization, known as MAF, has about 180 people on staff, over 100 of whom are pilots, Holsten estimates. Holsten used to be one of those pilots, working in Indonesia for about 17 years until earlier this year when he and his family moved back to the U.S. after he was promoted. 

Holsten and his family moved to Indonesia in 2001. They spent the first eight months learning the language and settling into their new life before he took to the skies. 

The difference in his family's life in Indonesia from how they were previously living in Georgia was huge. He said most Indonesian households do not have a refrigerator or air conditioning, though he installed both through personal expenses. Electricity consistently went out, he said, and they typically got their food through trips to the local market, rather than a trip to Walmart. 

More specific needs often required a flight, as Indonesia is made up of more than 17,000 islands. 



"You can't just get on I-84," Holsten said. 

The people were also very kind, Holsten said, as Indonesian culture prioritizes community relationships. However, their first few months in the country were somewhat tense, because they moved right before 9/11. Indonesia being a largely Muslim country, Holsten said many people had a lot of compassion and some degree of sadness out of concern that they and others in their faith were going to be labeled as terrorists. 

Holsten began flying as a pilot for the fellowship a few months after moving to Indonesia. In the 17 years he lived there, Holsten served in several positions, including chief pilot, program manager and eventually regional director for Indonesia, overseeing more than 50 percent of MAF's overall operations. 

As a pilot, Holsten said he typically began his days at 4:30 a.m. and was flying by about 5:30 a.m. Most workdays saw Holsten in the air five to six hours, flying back and forth to transport supplies such as vaccines, translated Bibles and often passengers. 

Traveling from the city where he lived — populated by about 200,000 people living in tight quarters — to the communities he served — which typically had fewer than 500 people and were surrounded by miles of untouched forests — was like straddling two different worlds, Holsten said. 

"I would fly an hour, and it's like I traveled back in time 100 years," he said. 
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Although Holsten said he always wanted to be a pilot, he didn't have any driving ambition to become the organization's CEO. Last year, an MAF official approached Holsten about taking on the role, and he said he and his family spent a lot of time praying about it. Holsten and his wife, Natalie, have four children ages 13 to 21, some of whom were born in Indonesia, and moving back to the U.S. would mean another huge transition.

Ultimately, Holsten decided to go through with the application process, and after several weeks, he was offered the position with unanimous board approval. Brock Larson, who took over Holsten's previous position after he was promoted, said he was not surprised Holsten got the job. 

"You can't say enough good things about him," said Larson, who joined MAF after a 22-year Air Force career.

Larson first met Holsten in 2014 through a Skype call, and said his first impression of the man is that he seemed very selfless. Later on, Larson met Holsten in person in Nampa, when Holsten took time to sit down with him despite Larson not being on his official staff yet. 

Larson said Holsten had just flown into the Nampa headquarters — a 45-hour trip — for other business. But he saw Larson and knew he was heading to Indonesia, and took him aside to make sure everything was good with him, even though he was visibly exhausted from the trip, Larson said. 



Holsten ended up being Larson's flying instructor when he arrived in Indonesia, and several months later, Holsten asked him to take over the regional director position. He trained Larson for about seven months, which Larson said defined most of their relationship.  

Gene Jordan, MAF's vice president of personnel, was also not surprised at Holsten's selection. Jordan has been with the fellowship since 1977, serving for over 20 years in Ecuador, and knows Holsten as a good pilot and communicator who is wise for his age, he said. 

After living in Indonesia for almost two decades, moving to Nampa was another big change for Holsten and his family. He said Indonesia measures its annual rainfall in feet, usually getting 15 to 20 feet a year — a drastic change from Nampa's dry weather. Holsten's children were also used to walking around barefoot, and he said in their new house, he reminds them to wear shoes outside because of the goatheads.

As the new head of MAF, Holsten said he hopes to spread the word about the fellowship and its mission to build its employee base. He said his primary responsibility as CEO is to make sure the organization has financial support, and he plans to do so by forming closer partnerships with other organizations.

"The more people who know about us, the better," Holsten said. 

Holsten fills the shoes of former MAF President and CEO John Boyd, who led the organization for 10 years before retiring. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.idahopress.com

Driver Arrested After Crashing Through Gate onto Duluth International Airport (KDLH) runway

Christopher Lee Dunker, 36, of Duluth, is charged with criminal damage to property and fleeing police, both felonies, as well as driving under the influence, a misdemeanor.


A 36-year-old Duluth man faces multiple felony and possible federal charges after he crashed a vehicle through the gated fence near Cirrus Aircraft early Friday, before speeding onto the runway and forcing an emergency closure of the Duluth International Airport.

The closure remained in place until the man was apprehended.

“We shut the airport down for about 30-40 minutes today, obviously due to the possible threat and the unknown,” airport spokesperson Natalie Peterson said. “We’re happy it ended the way it did. It was the best ending we could ask for — with very little interruption and no injuries.”

One commercial flight was delayed and a FedEx plane had to circle overhead while the episode played out before sunrise, Peterson added.

The man was stopped in the airfield and taken into custody. He is scheduled to be charged with a pair of first-degree felony counts — criminal damage to property and fleeing police in a motor vehicle — and fourth-degree misdemeanor driving under the influence of a controlled substance.

While the Duluth police identified the suspect, the News Tribune does not generally identify suspects prior to them being charged in District Court.  

The FBI “does not believe that the incident was ‘terrorism’-related in any way,” a Duluth Police Department news release said.

Law enforcement could not get the driver to voluntarily pull over while pursuing the suspect on the runway, said the Duluth police news release. Hermantown police were able to use their vehicle to push the suspect’s vehicle from the road, ending the situation, added the Duluth police.

A member of the airport’s maintenance personnel was working in the airfield and heard the noise of the vehicle crashing through a gated section of security fence near Cirrus, Peterson said.

The worker immediately called 911, eliciting a large law enforcement response beginning just after 7 a.m. The Duluth and Hermantown police, St. Louis County Sheriff’s Office and, because the airfield is federally regulated, FBI responded to the unauthorized vehicle on the runway.

The man was being held at St. Louis County Jail following his apprehension and pending formal charges, said the Duluth police. He was interviewed by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and federal charges are pending review by the U.S. Attorney.

Peterson said fence and gate repairs had already commenced by midday. Peterson described the airfield as being completely fenced-in, per federal regulations. Anyone working in the airfield is required to have clearance, which includes a background check.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://duluthnewstribune.com





A 36-year-old man under the influence of drugs smashed through the gate of Duluth International Airport and took a joyride on a runway Friday morning before leading police on a short chase, authorities said.

Christopher Lee Dunker, of Duluth, was arrested and charged in St. Louis County District Court with criminal damage to property and fleeing police, both felonies, as well as driving under the influence, a misdemeanor.

He remains held without bail in the St. Louis County jail.

Officers were called to the airport at 4701 Grinden Dr. around 7 a.m. on a report of an unauthorized vehicle on the runway. The driver — who authorities say was obviously confused — was arrested after a short pursuit, said police spokeswoman Ingrid Hornibrook.

According to authorities, the joyride took place on an active runway while a commercial flight was boarding.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation interviewed Dunker and does not believe the incident was related to terrorism in any way. Federal charges are pending.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.startribune.com

Rans S-6ES Coyote II, N625JG: Incident occurred November 22, 2018 at Vernal Regional Airport (KVEL), Uintah County, Utah

https://registry.faa.gov/625JG




VERNAL — Two teenage boys were arrested Thursday after police say they stole a small airplane in rural Uintah County, successfully landing it in Vernal.

The boys, ages 14 and 15, left a group home on the Wasatch Front earlier this week and went to the Jensen area where they stayed with friends, according to the Uintah County Sheriff's Office.

Police say the teens gained access to a tractor, drove it to a private air strip in Jensen and stole a fixed-wing, single-engine light-sport aircraft. The plane was seen flying very low along U.S. 40 near Gusher, according to the sheriff's office.

Police believe the teens planned to fly back toward the Wasatch Front, but apparently changed their minds and landed at the Vernal Regional Airport, where where they were arrested.

They are being held at the Split Mountain Youth Detention Center in Vernal for investigation of multiple charges.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.deseretnews.com

Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane, N173AC: Accident occurred January 28, 2019 in Mount Eliza, Australia


Erickson Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N173AC

NTSB Identification: WPR19WA147
14 CFR Part 129: Foreign Erickson Inc
Accident occurred Monday, January 28, 2019 in Mount Eliza, Australia
Aircraft: Sikorsky S64, registration: N173AC
Injuries: 3 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.


On January 28, 2019, at 1956 local time, a Sikorsky S-64E, N173AC, sustained substantial damage after colliding into a pond near Mount Eliza, Australia. The pilot and two crewmembers were not injured.


The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Australia. This report is for information purposes and contains only information released by the Government of Australia. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB)
P.O. Box 967, Civic Square
Canberra A.C.T. 2608
Australia
Tel.: (61) 2 6230-4408 (24/7 Notifications)
(61) 2 6257-4150 (International liaison)
E-mail:atsbasir@atsb.gov.au (Notifications)
ATSBInternationalReporting@atsb.gov.au (International liaison)
Fax: (61) 2 6274-6434 (Notifications)
(61) 26247-3117 (International liaison)
Website: http://www.atsb.gov.au




The company operating a firefighting helicopter that crashed into a dam in eastern Victoria says the aircraft was "performing normally" moments before the accident.

Two pilots and one engineer were on board the Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane when it crashed into a dam at Jericho, in remote Gippsland, just after 7:00pm Monday.

The three men managed to swim to the edge of the dam.

Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp said the chopper "landed heavily" and the crew was flown to the Latrobe Valley Hospital for treatment.

"They were examined for some minor injuries and shock, as you'd imagine, but I believe they've been released from hospital now," he told ABC Radio Melbourne.

He said the cause of the crash was not yet clear.

The Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane helicopter is one of the largest water-bombing aircraft in the world, and Victoria contracts two Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane as part of its firefighting fleet.

Five similar Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane — in NSW, South Australia, Western Australia and Victoria — were grounded while the crash was investigated.

Kestrel Aviation managing director Ray Cronin, whose company manages the fleet, said the ground was a "precautionary measure" while the company interviewed the crew and determined a probable cause.

He said after an initial investigation, the company and authorities had agreed that the grounding of the Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane fleet would be lifted.

"The Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane will return to service almost immediately," Mr Cronin said.

"The crews are with the aircraft ready to rejoin the fire fight in Victoria."

He said while he did not want to pre-empt the outcome of the Australian Transport Safety Bureau's (ATSB) investigation, he understood "the serviceability of the Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane" was good at the time of the crash.

"[I'm] absolutely confident in the rotorcraft — they're a workhorse, they're a very reliable aircraft."

The Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane was refilling its water at the time, Forest Fire Management Victoria deputy fire officer Darrin McKenzie said.

"So they're actually quite close to water at that point. They have a snorkel which drops down into the water. They haven't fallen a great distance before they impacted with the water," Mr McKenzie said.

He said it was a "hazardous operating environment".

"This dam is surrounded by trees, and surrounded by hills. But it is quite rare that we have an event like this," he said.

"So they have to be really careful about what the wind conditions are, any downdrafts. So wind and visibility are the key things they need to think about from a safety view."

Work will begin in the next few days to try and work out how to get the Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane out of the water.

With a water-holding capacity of up to 9,000 litres, the Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane is popular with firefighting agencies around the world, CFA incident controller Mike Owen said.

"They're renowned across the world for their large firefighting capability and they operate in the USA, Canada, Australia, Greece, France and there's a fleet of about 20 of these worldwide at any time operating across firefighting," he told ABC Radio Gippsland.

"So very specialist equipment, very reliable, and Erickson are a well-known, well-respected company that operates them."

Each Sikorsky S-64E Skycrane is worth about $30 million, which Mr Owen said indicated the "sophistication" and "reliability" of the aircraft.

"It's very, very unusual to have an incident like this," he said.

The helicopter was one of 10 water bombers being used to contain the Thomson Catchment Complex fires, which are burning just north of Mount Baw Baw.

Mr Owen said the fires were in a rugged area, making it difficult to get equipment into the area.

"There are three fires that are in the catchment … and together they're about 700 to 800 hectares at the moment," he said.

"[Monday] was the start of a concerted effort to use lots of aircraft bombing it, trying to create lines and assisting firefighters on the ground when we can get them in."

Premier Daniel Andrews said the crash was "a really serious incident" and said any lessons learnt during the investigation would be taken on board.

"We're very pleased obviously that nobody was seriously injured. It could've been a very different outcome," he said.

WorkSafe has been notified of the crash.

https://www.abc.net.au





A Victorian water bombing helicopter has crashed into a dam while working to battle fires in a remote area of Victoria’s east.

The aircraft plunged into the dam in Jericho about three hours east of Melbourne about 7.15pm yesterday.

The three crew members – two pilots and an engineer – all safely escaped the aircraft and swam to the edge of the Thomson Dam, which is located next to Mount Gregory.

The was assisting a firefight, water-bombing the Thompson Complex Catchment fires which are burning across more than 1300 hectares of land in Gippsland.

The exact reason behind the crash landing of the $30 million aircraft is still unknown, but there are unconfirmed reports the aircraft may have flipped while attempting to scoop up a load of water.

The HELItack 341 known as Christine is one of 10 aircrafts fighting the Thompson fires and one of only two aircranes in Victoria.

Ambulance Victoria authorities were dispatched to the area to assess the crew members but no one was injured.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau and Worksafe have been notified and an investigation is under way.

“Over the past several days, the aircraft had been involved in fire suppression activities at the Thomson Catchment Complex fires,” The State Control Centre said in a statement.

“The Aircrane was one of ten aircraft working on the fire.

“Emergency Management Commissioner Andrew Crisp said that he was grateful that the crew are safe.”

There are currently 49 water fighting helicopters operating in Victoria.

It is the first bushfire where night-time water bombing has taken place, however it was still light when this incident occurred.

https://www.9news.com.au

Piper PA-31 Navajo, registered to Luftladder Inc and operated by the pilot, N722CF: Accident occurred December 03, 2017 at Clark Regional Airport (KJVY), Jeffersonville, Indiana

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N722CF

Location: Jeffersonville, IN
Accident Number: CEN18LA048
Date & Time: 12/03/2017, 1910 EST
Registration: N722CF
Aircraft: PIPER PA 31-310
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing gear not configured
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 3, 2017, about 1910 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-31-310, N722CF, was damaged during a wheels-up landing on runway 18 at the Clark Regional Airport (JVY), Jeffersonville, Indiana. The pilot and two passengers were not injured. The airplane received substantial damage to fuselage longerons and the aft flange of the main wing spar carry through. The aircraft was registered to Luftladder Inc. and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident. A visual flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from the Wellsville Municipal Airport (ELZ), near Wellsville, New York, about 1630, with JVY as the intended destination.

The pilot reported that when the airplane was about 5 miles from JVY, he lowered the landing gear and the right main landing gear was slow to extend, but within a few seconds all three gear down indicator lights illuminated. A normal descent was made and when the airplane was over the runway about to flare, the right main landing gear light went out. The pilot initiated a go-around, increasing engine power, pitching for climb, and retracting the landing gear and flaps. He stated that the airplane may have settled after the flaps were retracted and he heard a noise as if a propeller blade had contacted something. He decided to discontinue the go-around and landed the airplane straight ahead, coming to a stop on the runway with the landing gear retracted.

After the accident the airplane landing gear was tested under the supervision of Federal Aviation Administration inspectors. Before the test, an o-ring was replaced on the hydraulic reservoir, but this would not have prevented the right main landing gear from extending. The gear retraction tests were performed satisfactorily, with no defects in the landing gear operation noted.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/02/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  22516 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10481 hours (Total, this make and model), 22496 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 150 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 48 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N722CF
Model/Series: PA 31-310 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1973
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 31-7300968
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/18/2017, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6499 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 35 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 13489 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-540-A2C
Registered Owner: LUFTLADDER INC
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: LUFTLADDER INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: LOU
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2353 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 80°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: WELLSVILLE, NY (ELZ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Jeffersonville, IN (JVY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1630 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: CLARK RGNL (JVY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 474 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude:  38.365556, -85.738056

Van's RV-8, N248DF and Trudel GP-4, C-GTPX: Accident occurred September 17, 2017 at Reno Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

C-GTPX Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


C-GTPX   Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR17LA209A
Date & Time: 09/17/2017, 0820 PDT
Registration: C-GTPX
Aircraft: Trudel GP 4
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Midair collision
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Air Race/Show 

On September 17, 2017, about 0820 Pacific daylight time, a Trudel GP 4 airplane, C-GTPX and a Farnsworth RV-8 airplane, N248DF, collided in midair about 1 mile southeast of the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The GP 4's airline transport pilot and the RV-8's airline transport pilot were not injured. The GP 4 sustained minor damage to the propeller; the RV-8 sustained substantial damage to the right wing and aileron. The GP 4 was registered to a private individual and was operated as Race 96. The RV-8 was registered to the pilot and was operated as Race 26. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for either flight, which originated from RTS about 5 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot of the RV-8 reported that he was positioned in the number 7 slot of a line abreast formation during the start sequence for the sport medallion race. As the flight was completing their turn toward the race course, prior to the pace plane releasing the flight, he felt an air current push his airplane down; he reduced power and maneuvered to stop the closure toward the airplane in the number 6 slot. At this time, the pilot estimated he was about 5 ft low, and 3 to 5 ft in front of the number 6 airplane and estimated he had about 15 ft of wingtip clearance. About 5 to 7 seconds later, the pilot heard a buzz and thump sound, followed by an uncommanded roll to the left. The pilot stated that he was able to level the airplane and landed uneventfully on runway 32.

The pilot of the GP 4 reported that he was positioned in the number 8 slot of the formation, during the start sequence for the sport medallion race; he was located to the right of the RV-8. As the flight descended toward the race course, he saw the RV-8 drop below his wing, and he reduced power and initiated a slight right bank in an attempt to back out of the formation. The pilot stated that shortly after, his airplane collided with the RV-8. Following the collision, he pitched upward and rolled to the right to avoid the surrounding airplanes. Subsequently, the pilot landed uneventfully on runway 26.

The pilot located in the number 9 slot reported that he was located on the outside of the flight, and that they were entering the start of the chute via an echelon turn to the left, when he saw that both the RV-8 and GP 4 further behind the formation flight. The pilot stated that both the RV-8 and GP 4 were advancing forward toward the flight as the flight was beginning to fly a line abreast in preparation for release to enter the race course. The pilot further stated that the GP 4 moved forward, back into position very quickly. At that time, he saw the GP 4 try to slow or correct his position to the right using ailerons. Shortly after, the propeller on the GP 4 contacted the right aileron of the RV-8. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/22/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/29/2017
Flight Time:  9300 hours (Total, all aircraft), 110 hours (Total, this make and model), 7800 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 85 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Trudel
Registration: C-GTPX
Model/Series: GP 4
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2016
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: PT 572
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-A1A
Registered Owner: Paul Trudel
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS, 5053 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1515 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 324°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0815 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: RENO/STEAD (RTS)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 5050 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.651389, -119.858611 (est)

N248DF  Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N248DF Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N248DF

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR17LA209B
Date & Time: 09/17/2017, 0820 PDT
Registration: N248DF
Aircraft: FARNSWORTH RV-8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Midair collision
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Air Race/Show 

On September 17, 2017, about 0820 Pacific daylight time, a Trudel GP 4 airplane, C-GTPX and a Farnsworth RV-8 airplane, N248DF, collided in midair about 1 mile southeast of the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The GP 4's airline transport pilot and the RV-8's airline transport pilot were not injured. The GP 4 sustained minor damage to the propeller; the RV-8 sustained substantial damage to the right wing and aileron. The GP 4 was registered to a private individual and was operated as Race 96. The RV-8 was registered to the pilot and was operated as Race 26. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for either flight, which originated from RTS about 5 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot of the RV-8 reported that he was positioned in the number 7 slot of a line abreast formation during the start sequence for the sport medallion race. As the flight was completing their turn toward the race course, prior to the pace plane releasing the flight, he felt an air current push his airplane down; he reduced power and maneuvered to stop the closure toward the airplane in the number 6 slot. At this time, the pilot estimated he was about 5 ft low, and 3 to 5 ft in front of the number 6 airplane and estimated he had about 15 ft of wingtip clearance. About 5 to 7 seconds later, the pilot heard a buzz and thump sound, followed by an uncommanded roll to the left. The pilot stated that he was able to level the airplane and landed uneventfully on runway 32.

The pilot of the GP 4 reported that he was positioned in the number 8 slot of the formation, during the start sequence for the sport medallion race; he was located to the right of the RV-8. As the flight descended toward the race course, he saw the RV-8 drop below his wing, and he reduced power and initiated a slight right bank in an attempt to back out of the formation. The pilot stated that shortly after, his airplane collided with the RV-8. Following the collision, he pitched upward and rolled to the right to avoid the surrounding airplanes. Subsequently, the pilot landed uneventfully on runway 26.

The pilot located in the number 9 slot reported that he was located on the outside of the flight, and that they were entering the start of the chute via an echelon turn to the left, when he saw that both the RV-8 and GP 4 further behind the formation flight. The pilot stated that both the RV-8 and GP 4 were advancing forward toward the flight as the flight was beginning to fly a line abreast in preparation for release to enter the race course. The pilot further stated that the GP 4 moved forward, back into position very quickly. At that time, he saw the GP 4 try to slow or correct his position to the right using ailerons. Shortly after, the propeller on the GP 4 contacted the right aileron of the RV-8. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/01/2016
Flight Time:  16500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 227 hours (Total, this make and model), 16300 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 165 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FARNSWORTH
Registration: N248DF
Model/Series: RV-8
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 81751
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 10 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Mattituck
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS, 5053 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1515 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 324°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 350°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0815 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: RENO/STEAD (RTS)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 5050 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.651389, -119.858611 (est)

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA209B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 17, 2017 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: FARNSWORTH RV-8, registration: N248DF
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2017, about 0820 Pacific daylight time, a Trudel GP 4, C-GTPX and a Farnsworth RV-8, N248DF, collided in midair about 1 mile southeast of the Reno Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The GP 4's airline transport pilot and the RV-8's airline transport pilot were not injured. The GP 4 sustained minor damage to the propeller; the RV-8 sustained substantial damage to the right wing and aileron. The GP 4 was registered to a private individual and was operated as Race 96. The RV-8 was registered to the pilot and was operated as Race 26. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either flight, which originated from RTS about 5 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot of the RV-8 reported that he was positioned in the number 7 slot of a line abreast formation during the start sequence for the sport medallion race. As the flight was descending toward the race course, prior to the pace airplane pilot releasing the formation to start the race, he heard a loud noise followed by an immediate roll to the left. The pilot stated that he was able to level the airplane and landed uneventfully on runway 32.

The pilot of the GP 4 reported that he was positioned in the number 8 slot of the formation, located to the right of the RV-8. As the flight descended toward the race course, he saw the RV-8 "pop down quickly" and he attempted to "rudder right" while reducing power to avoid the RV-8 and another airplane to his right. The pilot stated that shortly after, his airplane collided with the RV-8. Following the collision, he pitched upward and rolled to the right to avoid the surrounding airplanes. Subsequently, the pilot landed uneventfully on runway 26.