Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Boeing E75, N58986 LLC, N58986: Incident occurred September 07, 2016 in DuPage County, Illinois

N58986 LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N58986

DURING TAXI THE AIRCRAFT STRUCK A PARKED AIRPLANE. DUPAGE, ILLINOIS.

Date: 06-SEP-16
Time: 17:43:00Z
Regis#: N58986
Aircraft Make: STEARMAN
Aircraft Model: E75
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: DUPAGE
State: Illinois

Mooney M20K, N231EV: Incident occurred September 06, 2016 in Port Angeles, California

http://registry.faa.gov/N231EV

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP. PORT ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.  

Date: 06-SEP-16
Time: 23:58:00Z
Regis#: N231EV
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20K
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PORT ANGELES
State: California

Maule M-4-220C Strata Rocket, N40661: Accident occurred September 03, 2016 in Talkeetna, Alaska (and) Incident occurred November 01, 2012 in Bethel, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N40661

Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA468 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 03, 2016 in Talkeetna, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: MAULE M4, registration: N40661
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a tailwheel equipped airplane reported that he was landing on a backcountry airstrip. He reported that after touchdown, about two-thirds of the way down the runway during the landing roll, the wind shifted to a tailwind. He further reported that the airplane over ran the runway, impacted a hill, and nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the empennage. 

The pilot reported no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

According to the pilot the wind was variable at 7-8 knots prior to the accident. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Advisory Circular (AC) 91-79A. This AC discusses the hazards associated with runway overruns and the effect of a tailwind on landing distance and states in part:

The pilot must be aware of airspeed during the approach and of the targeted reference landing airspeed (VREF)/airspeed, plus wind gust adjustments, over the runway threshold. An excessive approach speed may result in an excessive speed over the runway's threshold, which may result in landing beyond the intended touchdown point as well as a higher speed from which the pilot must bring the airplane to a stop.

The effect of a tailwind on landing distance is significant and is a factor in determining the landing distance required. Given the airplane will land at a particular airspeed, independent of the wind, the principal effect of a tailwind on operational landing distance is the change in the ground speed at which the airplane touches down.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to recognize and compensate for tailwind conditions during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway overrun and nose over.

November 01, 2012:  Aircraft force landed in the tundra - Bethel, Alaska 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: ANCHORAGE, AK (AL03)


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 40661        Make/Model: M-4       Description: MAULE M-4
  Date: 11/01/2012     Time: 2330

  Event Type: Incident   Highest Injury: None     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: None

LOCATION
  City: BETHEL   State: AK   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN THE TUNDRA, 30 MILES FROM BETHEL, AK

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0        
                 # Pass:   3     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0         
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0   
OTHER DATA
  Activity: Pleasure      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER

Sikorsky S-61N, EP Aviation LLC, N805AR: Fatal accident occurred September 06, 2016 in Palm Bay, Brevard County, Florida

EP AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N805AR

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA311
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, September 06, 2016 in Palm Bay, FL
Aircraft: SIKORSKY S61, registration: N805AR
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 6, 2016, about 1340 eastern daylight time, a Sikorsky S-61N, N805AR, was destroyed when it impacted a field under unknown circumstances near Palm Bay, Florida. The airline transport pilot, commercial copilot, and maintenance crewmember were fatally injured. The helicopter was registered to EP Aviation LLC and operated by AAR Airlift Group as a post-maintenance flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Melbourne International Airport (MLB), Melbourne, Florida, at 1324.

According to the operator, the helicopter's fore/aft pitch servo was recently removed and replaced. Subsequently, a functional check flight (FCF) was performed, which included maximum performance maneuvers at maximum gross weight. Ground witness videos recorded the helicopter performing maneuvers near the accident site uneventfully, about 100 feet above ground level. The helicopter then flew an orbit around the accident site about the same altitude, before the video ended. There were no known witnesses to the impact sequence.

The helicopter came to rest upright in a field with no debris path noted. The wreckage was oriented about a magnetic heading of 190 degrees. A postcrash fire consumed the cockpit and cabin. The tailboom transition section exhibited partial thermal damage and the tailboom remained intact. The five main rotor blades and five tailrotor blades remained attached to their respective rotor hubs. The main and tailrotor blades exhibited signatures consistent with low rotational energy. Four of the five main rotor blades exhibited partial thermal damage and one main rotor blade exhibited thermal damage along its entire span. One tailrotor blade was fractured about 1 foot outboard of the attachment bolt; the outboard section of the separated blade was found on the ground next to the tailrotor. Another tailrotor blade was partially separated about 1 foot outboard of the attachment bolt and its tip was embedded in the ground. Drivetrain continuity was confirmed between the main transmission and the tailrotor gearbox.

Both engines remained attached to the airframe and exhibited fire damage. Examination of the engines revealed that both engine stage one compressor blades exhibited little or no leading edge damage. Both engine fuel control units were found with their respective control shaft in the "FLIGHT" position. Both engines were separated from the main gearbox at the aft end of the high-speed shaft. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for rotorcraft helicopter. He also held a commercial pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land and instrument airplane. In addition, the pilot held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for rotorcraft helicopter and instrument rotorcraft. The pilot's most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued on December 5, 2015. According to company records, as of January 1, 2016, the pilot had accrued a total flight experience of approximately 6,053 hours; of which, 5,548 hours were in helicopters and 1,532 of those hours were in the same make and model as the accident helicopter.

The copilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for rotorcraft helicopter and instrument helicopter. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on May 16, 2016. According to company records, as of July 31, 2016, the copilot had accrued a total flight experience of 4,090 hours; all of which were in helicopters.

The 41-seat capacity, tricycle-gear helicopter, serial number 61717, was manufactured in 1974. It was powered by two General Electric CT58-140-2, 1500-horsepower turboshaft engines. The helicopter was maintained under a continuous airworthiness program. Its most recent inspection was a phase five check, which was completed on August 25, 2016. At that time, the airframe had accumulated 40,296.2 total hours of operation. The No. 1 engine had accumulated 711.6 hours since major overhaul and the No. 2 engine had accumulated 133.4 since light overhaul. The helicopter had flown about 1.2 hours, from the time of the last inspection, until the accident flight. Those hours comprised of two previous uneventful FCF flights during the day of the accident.

The MLB airport was located about 8 miles north of the accident site. The recorded weather at MLB, at 1353, included wind from 070 degrees at 11 knots, visibility 10 miles and few clouds at 5,000 feet.

A cockpit voice recorder was recovered from the wreckage and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, D.C, for data download.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.







Three people were killed in the fiery crash of a large, military-style helicopter conducting low-level flight test maneuvers over western Palm Bay on Tuesday, authorities report.

Palm Bay Fire-Rescue crews quickly responded to the crash of the Sikorsky S-61N helicopter at 1:55 p.m. near the so-called Compound of southwestern Palm Bay. The helicopter, owned by a division of a global aviation support company, took off from Orlando Melbourne International Airport, Federal Aviation Administration officials told FLORIDA TODAY.

"One of our Palm Bay Public Works workers were out here and she saw the helicopter go down," said Mike Bandish, a spokesman for the Palm Bay Police Department. "She called it in, and we responded out here. She said it was hovering at maybe about 500 feet. It appeared to be coming down a little bit and then all of a sudden, boom, it just hit the ground, burst into flames. She called 9-1-1 right away."

Bandish also said that their witness said the  helicopter did not appear to be in any distress before it crashed in an open field.

"It's an extensive crash," he said, adding that it took Palm Bay Fire Rescue crews about half an hour to put out the flames that engulfed the wreckage. The 1974-model helicopter has 28 seats and two turbine engines. Similar helicopters have been used by the U.S. Coast Guard in years past. It was not immediately known if the aircraft was experiencing mechanical issues. The cause of the crash is not immediately known at this time but already the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are in route to inspect the site.

The helicopter is privately owned and operated out of Orlando Melbourne International Airport, officials report. The crash victims have not been identified. The aircraft was operated by AAR Airlift Group Inc.  located on Commerce Drive in Palm Bay and advertises the operation of a fleet of medium and heavy rotary wing aircraft along with a fleet of fixed wing craft.

The aviation company is a division of the Wood Dale, Illinois-based AAR Corp, authorities reported. The Palm Bay division of the global company has in the past handled military contracts for U.S. operations in Africa and also search and rescue operations for the U.K. in the Falkland Islands. The company's total operations lists $2 billion in assets and has 7,000 employees spanning 17 countries, according to its website.

The helicopter crew operates out of an aircraft services hangar at the airport was performing test flights in the area, investigators reported.

A search of the surrounding area was also conducted while Brevard County Fire Rescue crews worked to clean up a localized hazardous spill.

All three people died in the helicopter crash and subsequent fire, Palm Bay police confirmed. The incident was reported near Freeburg Avenue, between Sapodilla Road and Wingham Drive. 

The aircraft was  engulfed in flames, on the ground, when the mangled heap was located, police reported. At least one person witnessed the immediate aftermath of the crash. Police said the helicopter - possibly seen doing its maneuvers earlier in the day over the same area - took off from Orlando Melbourne International Airport. Several witnesses told police that they say the helicopter descended in the area where it eventually crashed.

"I was on Emerson and all of a sudden, the police were coming up behind me," said Summer Light, who was driving in the area at the time. She saw the patrol cars speed off and then looked off past the tree line and spotted a growing plume of black smoke rising into the sky. She then snapped a photo of the smoke. "When I got to Bombardier, I saw the smoke. I just feel really bad for the family," Light said.

The helicopter crash was in the same area as where the city’s Tough Mudder event was held, officials reported.

The FAA is investigating the crash.

Story and video:  http://www.floridatoday.com

Diamond DA20-C1 Katana, Falcon Aviation Academy LLC, N85WP (and) Beechcraft F33A Bonanza, N6027K: Fatal accident occurred September 07, 2016 at West Georgia Regional Airport (KCTJ), Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Aviation Accident Preliminary Report:    http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Falcon Aviation Academy LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N85WP

William L. Lindsey: http://registry.faa.gov/N6027K

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: BEECH F33, registration: N6027K
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA20, registration: N85WP
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 7, 2016, at 1047 eastern daylight time, a Beech F33A, N6027K, and a Diamond Aircraft Industries DA20-C1, N85WP, collided in midair on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern to runway 35 at West Georgia Regional Airport (CTJ), Carrollton, Georgia. The Beech was substantially damaged and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Diamond was destroyed and the flight instructor and one student pilot were fatally injured. The Beech was registered to and operated by the private pilot. The Diamond was registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy LLC. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91; the Beech pilot was conducting a personal flight to CTJ and the Diamond pilots were conducting a local, instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for the Beech or the Diamond. The Beech departed from Fulton County Airport (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia about 1020, and the Diamond departed from Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO), Newnan, Georgia about 1000.

According to personnel from Falcon Aviation Academy, the pilots of the Diamond were practicing traffic pattern operations and landings at CTJ. The Diamond was the first airplane to enter the traffic pattern, followed a few minutes later by N263CF and then by N169PS, both Falcon Academy DA20s. The flight instructor and student pilot on board N263CF observed a Beech Bonanza on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern; however, the Beech pilot did not appear to be broadcasting his intentions on the CTJ common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF). Moments later, the flight instructor and student pilot on board N169PS entered the traffic pattern from the east. They looked down and to the left, in the direction of the final approach path for runway 35, and observed two airplanes merge, then collide. They also did not hear the pilot of the Beech broadcasting his intentions on the CTAF. All pilots on board both trailing DA20s heard the flight instructor on board the accident Diamond making her position calls in the traffic pattern prior to the collision, the last call being made on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern.

Initial radar data provided by air traffic control indicated that the pilot of Beech entered an extended downwind from the north, above and directly behind the Diamond, which was also on downwind leg of the traffic pattern. The ground speed of the Beech was about 50 knots greater than the Diamond. The last radar returns, were about 2,000 feet above mean sea level, or about 850 feet above the ground. The locations of the last radar returns were in an area on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, approaching the base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 35.

Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that both airplanes remained physically attached after the collision until ground impact. The main wreckage of both airplanes came to rest about 408 feet south of the approach end of runway 35, and on the extended centerline of the runway. The wreckage of the Beech was inverted and on top of the Diamond wreckage. Lightweight pieces of the Diamond were found on a northerly path, beginning 340 feet south of the main wreckage. All major structural components of both airplanes were accounted for within the wreckage path boundary. One of the most southerly pieces of wreckage debris was the right half of the Diamond's elevator. Closer examination revealed black transfer markings on the upper surface that were consistent in color and tread pattern with the right main landing gear tire of the Beech. Examination of the Diamond's horizontal stabilizer revealed similar transfer markings on its upper surface. The other small pieces of debris located south of the main wreckage were identified as sections of the Diamond's canopy and wing root/fuselage skin.

The pilot of the Beech, age 79, held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He held a FAA third class medical certificate with a restriction to have glasses available for near vision. He reported 2,500 total hours of flying experience on his medical certificate application that was dated October 5, 2015.

The flight instructor in the Diamond, age 24, held a FAA commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single engine land, and instrument airplane. She was seated in the right cockpit seat. She held a FAA flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single engine. She reported 600 total hours of flying experience on her FAA first class medical certificate application that was dated March 16, 2016.

The student pilot in the Diamond, age 20, held a FAA student pilot certificate. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate with no restrictions. He was seated in the left cockpit seat. He enrolled in the ab initio training program at Falcon Aircraft Academy on August 4, 2016, and had logged about 20 hours of flight time.

CTJ was a public, non-towered airport with a single runway, designated 17/35. The runway was 5,503 feet long and 100 feet wide. The published traffic pattern direction for runway 35 was to the left. Falcon Aviation Academy personnel reported that their pilots frequently used CTJ for training purposes. CTAF communications were not recorded.

The wreckage of both airplanes was retained by the NTSB for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Taylor Nicole Stone, 24, of Newnan, Georgia, died on Wednesday, September 7, 2016.

Taylor was born and raised in Chattanooga. She was a graduate of Chattanooga Christian School in 2010 and Middle Tennessee State University in 2014. She was a member of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church was employed at Falcon Aviation Academy in Newnan, GA, where she was a flight instructor. She was also a member of the ALPHA ETA RHO aviation fraternity, MU TAU Chapter.

She was preceded in death by her grandfather, Silas Rudolph Stone.

Surviving are her parents, Doug and Cindy Stone; sister, Shelby Ryan Stone; paternal grandmother, Mary Lois Stone; maternal grandmother, Mary Katherine Clarke and husband, William H. Clarke; and several aunts, uncles and cousins.

Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. on Sunday at the funeral home.

Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. on Monday at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 822 Belvoir Ave., Chattanooga, Tn. 37412, with Reverend Christopher Sheets and Reverend Clifford Herd officiating.

Memorial donations may be made to the Good Shepherd Youth Group.


Arrangements are by the East Chapel of Chattanooga Funeral Home, Crematory, and Florist, 404 South Moore Road.  


Taylor Nicole Stone



CARROLL COUNTY, Ga. -- One of the victims of a fatal plane crash is being remembered as a devoted airman.

Wednesday, William L. "Bill" Lindsey, 79, of College Park was killed along with two other people when planes collided while trying to land near the West Georgia Regional Airport, in Carrollton, Ga.

A day after the tragic accident, friends and family were remembering Bill for  his love of flying.

"Bill would call me, 'Sam, let's go flying'," one friend told 11Alive. "Man we would go flying just to get up in the air."

If there's one thing Bill loved, it was spending time in the sky.

"It was something about the wheels leaving the ground," his friend of 20 years said.

"I wouldn't go anywhere without first calling Bill," he said. "Say, 'Bill, I want you to look over my flight plan. See if there's anything I'm missing.' His knowledge was so extensive, I mean, he could tell you page and verse what's in the Airman's Information Manual."

Lindsey was also an 18-year member of the Georgia Wing's Fulton Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP). According to CAP, he served as commander of his squadron between 2007 and 2012.

“Bill Lindsey was a devoted member of Civil Air Patrol’s Georgia Wing,” said Georgia’s Wing Commander Col. Richard Greenwood.  “He was serious about his professional development training, and he applied the skills and knowledge he gained to benefit his squadron and his community on an ongoing basis." 

"Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and the members of his unit,” he said.  “He will be missed by all of us,” Greenwood said. The Civil Air Patrol is a all-volunteer auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force that, among other things, assists with search and rescue missions."

A long time employee of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Lindsay used his wings to help people. Even after he retired he was often mentoring young pilots, taking Angel Flights or just taking in the sky on his own.

That's what he was doing Wednesday morning when his plane collided with that of Taylor Stone - and her young student.

According to the FAA, a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 piloted by Stone, a flight instructor, and Lindsey's Beech F33A, collided just before 11 a.m.

The third passenger was a 20-year-old flight student from China. 11Alive has learned he came to Georgia to learn to fly.

Story and video:   http://www.11alive.com
















CARROLL COUNTY, GA (CBS46) -  Authorities confirm a 24-year-old flight instructor was one of three people killed when two small planes collided near the West Georgia Regional Airport Wednesday.

Taylor Stone, a native of East Ridge, Tennessee, worked for Falcon Aviation Academy in Newnan. She had a 20-year-old student-pilot in the plane with her. Authorities have not identified him, saying only that he was in the country on a visa.

"Two witnesses [saw] both aircraft collide midair. It appeared they both were on a landing pattern," Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue said.

Two single-engine aircraft, a Diamond DA20-C1 Katana and a Beechcraft F33A Bonanza, collided near the airport at 10:54 a.m. on Wednesday. One of the planes is registered to an address in College Park. The other is registered to Falcon Aviation school in Newnan.

William Barczak once took lessons from Stone.

"She was a really great teacher," Barczak told CBS46. "I was in disbelief because she was so strict in the cockpit.  She went by the books, everything step by step. I just couldn't believe it. I was in shock."

Falcon representatives arrived at the West Georgia Regional Airport but had no comment about the crash.

Authorities identified the pilot of the other plane as William Lindsey, 79, of College Park.

The FAA and the NTSB were on scene most of Wednesday evening gathering evidence to try to determine what led to the crash.

"Basically, both planes were coming in on a final approach at the same time, and it appears one may not have seen the other and sat down on top of it and they tumbled into the ground," Carroll County Sheriff's Deputy Captain Jeff Richards said.

Carroll county airport is "non-controlled"

West Georgia Regional Airport is what's called a non-controlled airport, which means there is no operating air traffic control tower. The FAA has regulations to control traffic, but pilots are largely responsible for taking care of themselves at the nearly 20,000 non-controlled airports that exist across the country.

Neither aircraft had a voice recorder on board, so investigators must rely on eyewitness accounts and evidence from the wreckage as they piece together what happened.

Joe Fagendes of LaGrange is a retired Delta Air Lines pilot and current General Aviation Pilot who has flown for more than 50 years. He said regional aircraft often take off and land at these airports.

Fagundes said, “At non-controlled airports, just because there’s no control tower, it doesn’t mean it’s unsafe. Safety of flying is the responsibility of the pilot. 

 “It’s not a dangerous operation just because you have certain patterns to fly at non-controlled towers, a certain altitude you have to fly,” he said.


Story and video: http://www.cbs46.com






A flight instructor, her student and a third person died Wednesday after two small airplanes collided in midair at a rural airport in western Georgia, where one witness told authorities the pilots may have been trying to land at the same time.

The single-engine planes crashed just before 11 a.m. near the end of the lone runway at West Georgia Regional Airport, said Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue. The airport is located in Carrollton, about 45 miles west of Atlanta.

Capt. Jeff Richards of the Carroll County Sheriff's Office identified the deceased flight instructor as 24-year-old Taylor Nicole Stone of East Ridge, Tennessee. Her student, who also died, was identified only as a male, pending notification of his family.

The third fatality, 79-year-old William Lewis Lindsey of College Park, was alone in the other plane, Richards said.

The cause of the deadly collision was under investigation. But Blue said a witness reported the planes looked like they were attempting to land simultaneously.

"Another pilot in the air said it appeared that both of them were trying to land and one came on top of the other," Blue told The Associated Press in a phone interview. "At this point in time we can't really confirm that."

The Federal Aviation Administration said both were single-engine airplanes — a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and a Beech F33A.

Blue said a lone pilot was killed in the Beech aircraft registered in College Park, about 40 miles east of the airport. A pilot and passenger died onboard the Diamond plane, which the fire chief said was registered to a company that trains pilots in Newnan, 22 miles to the southeast.

No one survived the crash.

First responders found the wreckage of the two planes all twisted and mixed together.

"Our unit when they first came thought it was one plane," Blue said. "They were intermixed so much it was hard to identify two planes at first."

The Federal Aviation Administration said it was investigating the crash in conjunction with the National Transportation Safety Board, which will determine the official cause.

Source:   http://abcnews.go.com

Two planes collided as they approached the runway of a suburban Atlanta airport Wednesday morning, leaving three people dead.

A flight instructor and her student were among those killed in the crash at West Georgia Regional Airport.

Carroll County Sheriff's Capt. Jeff Richards said the two planes were both coming in at final approach and "set down on top of the other."

"It appears one may not have seen the other one," Richards said.

The 10:54 a.m. accident was witnessed by other several other pilots in the area.

The female instructor and her male student were from a flight school in Newnan. The second plane contained a single male pilot.

Officials would not immediately provide more details about the victims. But a family pastor and friend identified the flight instructor as Taylor Stone, a Chattanooga native who lived in Newnan. Stone's Facebook page said she worked at Falcon Aviation Academy.

One aircraft was a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and the other was a Beech F33A.

The airport has no air-traffic controllers, and no control tower. Pilots communicate on a shared frequency.

"It's basically non-controlled airspace you report your movements as you come through," Richards said.

Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue said there was no fire when the planes crashed. He said it will take some work to identify the bodies because of the extensive damage.

The NTSB is securing the crash site and wreckage with plans to return in the morning. They will determine the cause of the crash. The FAA is also investigating.

Story and video:   http://www.ajc.com





CARROLLTON, GA. - Three people were killed after two single aircraft collided in midair Wednesday morning. 

The incident took place near West Georgia Regional Airport, in Carrollton, Ga.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and a Beech F33A, collided just before 11 a.m.

Carroll County Fire Rescue tells 11Alive's Ryan Kruger the two planes were trying to land at the same time when they collided. One of the planes is registered out of College Park, while the other is from Newnan.

The three people killed were all adults, two men and one woman. 

The FAA will investigate and the NTSB will determine the cause of the accident. 

Story and video:   http://www.11alive.com





Three people died Wednesday after two small airplanes collided in midair at a rural airport in western Georgia, where one witness told authorities the pilots may have been trying to land at the same time.

The single-engine planes crashed just before 11 a.m. near the end of the lone runway at West Georgia Regional Airport, said Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue. The airport is located in Carrollton, about 45 miles west of Atlanta.

The dead were two men and one woman, Carroll County Chief Deputy Coroner Ed Baskin said. The woman and a man were in one plane and the second man was alone in the other plane, he said.

Baskin said the names of the dead were being withheld until their families have been notified.

The cause of the deadly collision was under investigation. But Blue said a witness reported the planes looked like they were attempting to land simultaneously.

"Another pilot in the air said it appeared that both of them were trying to land and one came on top of the other," Blue told The Associated Press in a phone interview. "At this point in time we can't really confirm that."

The Federal Aviation Administration said both were single-engine airplanes — a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and a Beech F33A.

Blue said a lone pilot was killed in the Beech aircraft registered in College Park, about 40 miles east of the airport. A pilot and passenger died onboard the Diamond plane, which the fire chief said was registered to a company that trains pilots in Newnan, 22 miles to the southeast.

No one survived the crash.

First responders found the wreckage of the two planes all twisted and mixed together.

"Our unit when they first came thought it was one plane," Blue said. "They were intermixed so much it was hard to identify two planes at first."

The Federal Aviation Administration said it was investigating the crash in conjunction with the National Transportation Safety Board, which will determine the official cause.

Rotorway Exec, N48KM: Accident occurred August 26, 2016 at Lincolnton-Lincoln County Regional Airport (KIPJ), Iron Station, North Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N48KM

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA301
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 26, 2016 in Iron Station, NC
Aircraft: MEANS ROBER C ROTORWAY EXEC, registration: N48KM
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 26, 2016, about 1450 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Rotorway Exec helicopter, N48KM, was substantially damaged following a loss of control while in hovering flight at Lincolnton-Lincoln County Regional Airport (IPJ), Iron Station, North Carolina. The private pilot sustained minor injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local maintenance test flight which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the flight was to confirm the dynamic track and balance condition of the main rotor system following the replacement of elastomeric bearings in the main rotor hub. Four ground and hover tests had been performed previous to the accident flight.

In an interview with a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector, the pilot said that while at a hover, the helicopter pitched up, to the left, and began transitioning rearward. He corrected with a full, right-forward cyclic input, yet the helicopter continued to transition to its rear until it struck a hangar. The helicopter continued inside the open hangar, collided with an airplane, and came to rest on its left side. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the cockpit, fuselage, and tailboom.

Prior to the flights, the helicopter was configured with a ballast weight located on the right skid as prescribed in the pilot operating handbook (POH) for solo operation. Following the accident, the forward section of the right main landing gear tube, with counterweight ballast attached, was found between the positions of the helicopter where it hovered for the test, and where it came to rest.

Examination of the helicopter by FAA inspectors confirmed cyclic and collective control continuity. Additionally, the pilot reported that the helicopter had operated "flawlessly" up until the time of the accident.

The helicopter's most recent condition inspection was completed on July 22, 2016, at 254 total aircraft hours.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single engine land and rotorcraft-helicopter. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third-class medical certificate was issued on March 14, 2016. He reported 600 total hours of flight experience, of which 500 were in the accident helicopter make and model.

Weather reported at the time of the accident included winds from 080 degrees at 4 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 34 degrees C, dew point 17 degrees C, and an altimeter setting of 30.11 inches of mercury.