Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Port Authority of New York and New Jersey contracted security firm facing sexual misconduct claims

The Port Authority inked a two-year, $154 million contract with a security company — and then the firm was sued over sexual-misconduct allegations involving bosses at JFK Airport, The Post has learned.

And since the suit was filed, three more plaintiffs have joined the case with sordid claims of their own.

The PA’s deal with Allied Universal Security Services — which supplies guards for JFK, LaGuardia, Newark and Teterboro airports — went into effect last Sept. 1, records show.

On Oct. 20, the company was slapped with a federal civil-rights suit by a former employee who claims she was fired for complaining that her bosses were pressuring her for sex.

LaDonna Powell also accused Allied bosses of wasting taxpayer money by goofing off at work, where they spent hours watching closed-circuit video of subordinates having sex in security booths — and she said they forced her to watch as well.

In December, Powell’s suit was amended to add ex-Allied workers including Marsha-Nique Irving, who says she was put on a list of women whom supervisors had targeted for sex.

Another, Sheila Walton, says she was subjected to crude sexual comments, including how “you gotta make sure you know how to suck a d–k.”

The third, Roy Fields, claims he was demoted when his boss learned he was “in a romantic relationship with a female security guard with whom the supervisor was also having sex.”

Plaintiffs’ lawyer Elizabeth Saylor told The Post that Allied workers may have used their smartphones to capture surveillance video of some JFK sexcapades, and she’s hoping to obtain the recordings before the case goes to trial in Brooklyn federal court.

“I’m shocked that they haven’t put on leave or suspended any of the supervisors involved,” she said.

The PA’s deal with Allied extended a four-year, $221 million pact signed in 2013 for about 600 guards at JFK, LaGuardia and Newark.

In 2014, Allied got an additional $60 million to provide guards at the World Trade Center site.

The PA said the contract includes a provision that gives it the right to back out “at any time.”

“The Inspector General’s Office is carefully reviewing the allegations against the company and will take aggressive measures against the firm should the allegations be determined to be true, including exercising our right to terminate this contract,” the statement said.

Allied has denied all the claims in the suit, which is pending in Brooklyn federal court.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://nypost.com

Israeli Company Wants To Run Crop-Surveying Drone Out of Casselton, North Dakota: Would Gather Crop Information Across The Upper Midwest

CASSELTON, N.D. — An international defense and electronics company wants to launch a crop-surveying drone from the Casselton Regional Airport.

Airport Authority chairman Bob Miller says the Israeli company, Elbit Systems, would gather crop information across the Upper Midwest that would be analyzed and sold to farmers.

Elbit wants to lease hangar space for the large drone it flies, and install equipment it needs to fly it.

Lease costs are still being negotiated.

The company would have 9 employees based in Casselton during the months the flights are made.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kvrr.com

Norwegian Air: Easy Times, Desperate Measures; The long-haul airline disruptor has raised capital, but still looks financially precarious



The Wall Street Journal
By Stephen Wilmot
March 21, 2018 1:42 p.m. ET


If the airline industry were in desperate straits, Norwegian Air Shuttle would have a better excuse for the measures it announced late Tuesday to shore up its balance sheet.

The low-cost carrier, which is shaking up trans-Atlantic flying with sub-$250 flights, raised equity equal to almost a quarter of its total before the market opened Wednesday. This hardly came from a position of strength. The shares are down nearly 40% over the past year, despite the best industry conditions in years.

The capital increase took the form of a private placement of discounted shares with key investors, including founder and Chief Executive Bjørn Kjos. Diluted smaller shareholders get the chance to buy shares at the same price in May, but only about a sixth as many.

Norwegian has undertaken a breakneck expansion, applying the low-cost model pioneered by the likes of Southwest and Ryanair in short-haul to trans-Atlantic travel. But there’s a key difference: It has done it with a highly leveraged balance sheet that leaves little room for error.

The private placement will boost by 1.3 billion Norwegian krone Norwegian’s equity cushion, which finished 2017 at just 4.1 billion krone ($529 million). But net debt, which clocked in at 22.3 billion krone in December, will still be almost four times its expanded equity. And this doesn’t include the company’s even greater lease liabilities, which will need to be put on the balance sheet under new accounting rules starting next year.

A reclassification of the company’s stake in a bank holding company, Norwegian Finans, has also freed up capital on paper, but shows the depth of worry. The local regulator required the airline to change the accounting treatment of the stake, almost halving its total equity cushion. Norwegian Air Shuttle can now roll back that treatment since its chairman announced his resignation from the bank’s board last month.

Mr. Kjos raised the possibility of further moves to improve the company’s capital position, including selling its loyalty program and spare Airbus planes, though details were scant. Airline loyalty programs are valuable because of their data; but for the same reason it’s hard to see why a digitally minded airline would want to sell its program—except out of desperation.

At some cost to small shareholders, and with an eye on accounting technicalities, Norwegian has bought itself breathing room. It may need it: With fuel prices rising, the operating environment for airlines is getting stormier. Norwegian’s need to beef up its books after one of the industry’s best years on record raises the uncomfortable question: How will it weather a tough year for the industry?

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsj.com

Eurocopter EC120B Colibri, VH-WII, Whitsunday Air Services: Fatal accident occurred March 21, 2018 near Hardy Reef pontoon, north-east of Hamilton Island, Whitsunday Islands, Queensland



Worsening weather in Queensland's Whitsundays region could hamper efforts to retrieve a helicopter which crashed this week, killing an American couple.

Peter and Sue Hensel, aged 79 and 65, had been on their dream honeymoon when the tourist helicopter they were travelling in crashed into waters near Queensland's Whitsunday Islands on Wednesday.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau is assessing the recovery of the EC120 helicopter to help piece together what led to the crash.

The ATSB says no firm date has been set to try to raise the wreckage and weather is being monitored for potential impact on plans.

"A decision on whether or not the ATSB requires the helicopter wreckage to be recovered as part of its investigation will be made in the coming days," the bureau said in a statement to AAP on Friday.

Police are speaking to witnesses on Hamilton Island as they continue to assist the ATSB with the investigation and recovery of the aircraft.

A preliminary report will be published in late April.

Operator Whitsunday Air Services has suspended all operations and will work with authorities to determine the cause of the crash.

The crash happened a day after the ATSB released its findings into a November incident involving the company, in which no one was injured.

Pete and Sue Hensel married in December and were on their honeymoon in Queensland when they were killed in a helicopter crash.


Peter and Sue Hensel were newlyweds enjoying their Australian honeymoon when the helicopter they were in crashed into waters near Queensland's Whitsunday Islands, killing them and injuring three others on board.

The couple from Hawaii, Mr. Hensel, 79, and his wife, 65, had married in December and traveled to Queensland on their dream honeymoon when the Eurocopter EC120B Colibri they were in went down near a Great Barrier Reef pontoon on Wednesday.

It is understood Mrs. Hensel's 33-year-old daughter and her partner, 34, were also on the helicopter and escaped with minor injuries.

Mr. Hensel's friend of about 25 years Vern Ungerecht said the couple was 'so happy'.

"They were just so excited to be able to go on their honeymoon trip and it would have been a new experience for them," he said.

Mr. Ungerecht and the Hensels were both members of the Kona Elks Lodge and had shared many meals together at the club.

"They would come to the dinners and socialised quite a bit ... they had a lot of friends," he said.

"It was such a good thing for both of them and we were all so happy for them."

Mr. Ungerecht described Mr. Hensel as 'pretty quiet' and a sports fan while his new wife was "very bubbly and outgoing".

"They were very much in love and having such a good time and having so much fun," he said.

Kona Elks Lodge member Ronald Cole broke the sad news to fellow club members via its Facebook page.

"They were newlywed, and we know them as Pete and Sue, and were frequent visitors of the lodge and usually sitting at the Mauka end of the bar," he wrote, sharing a picture of the happy couple.

The club intends to hold a memorial to honour the Hensels.

Investigators on Friday will try to recover the wreckage of the helicopter.

Four investigators - two from Brisbane and two from Canberra - were on their way to the scene at Hardy Reef, Australian Transport Safety Bureau chief commissioner Greg Hood said on Thursday.

They will recover and examine the wreckage, interview witnesses, and examine flight data and training and maintenance logs.

The 35-year-old pilot, who also escaped serious injury and pulled Mrs Hensel from the helicopter, while others performed CPR on both victims under instruction by phone from emergency services officers.

"It's absolutely essential in this type of accident that we get as many perspectives we possibly can from any witnesses," Mr. Hood said as he asked for anyone who had seen anything to come forward.

A preliminary report will be published in late April.

Operator Whitsunday Air Services has suspended all operations and will work with authorities to determine the cause of the crash.

The crash happened a day after the ATSB released its findings into a November incident involving the company, in which no one was injured.

Original article ➤  https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au



This Eurocopter EC120B Colibri was involved in a fatal crash at Hardy Reef in the Whitsundays.


Collision with water involving Eurocopter EC120B, VH-WII, Hardy Reef, Qld., on March 21, 2018

Investigation number: AO-2018-026

Summary

The ATSB is investigating the collision with water of Eurocopter EC120B, VH-WII, which occurred near the Hardy Reef pontoon, north-east of Hamilton Island, Whitsunday Islands, Queensland on March 21, 2018.

At approximately 1543 EST, the helicopter was on approach to land on the pontoon when it collided with the water.

A team of four Transport Safety Investigators have been deployed to the accident location to commence the evidence collection phase of the investigation. There, investigators will interview witnesses, examine any available recorded data, review operational and maintenance records and technical documentation amongst other investigation activities.

The evidence collection phase will also define the size and scope of the investigation and determine the expected timeframe for the completion of a final report.

Preliminary information about this accident is expected to be released in late April 2018 to provide an overview of the evidence collected.

Should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify relevant parties so appropriate safety action can be taken.

Witnesses are encouraged to contact the ATSB, through our webpage www.atsb.gov.au/witness or phone 1800 992 986.

https://www.atsb.gov.au



The pilot of a helicopter that crashed and sank near the Whitsundays Islands pulled one of his passengers from the wreckage, though desperate attempts to revive her failed.

The 65-year-old woman died along with a 79-year-old man, both from Hawaii, when the Airbus H120, owned by Whitsunday Air Services, crashed near the Hardy Reef pontoon off Hamilton Island.

All four passengers on the helicopter were American and known to each other.

The other two - a 34-year-old man and a 33-year-old woman from Colorado – and the pilot were taken to the mainland for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.

Police District Inspector Ian Haughton said the 35-year-old pilot pulled the woman from the helicopter, while those on the scene performed CPR on both victims under the instruction of emergency services.

It is believed bystanders risked their own safety to try and save them.

"This is a traumatic experience for any involved in the situation," Insp Haughton said.

The crash follows another incident involving a helicopter operated by the same company late last year.

On November 8, 2017, the pilot of a Robinson R44 helicopter, operated by Whitsunday Air Services, ditched about 49km north of Hamilton Island Airport with three passengers on board.

The pilot deployed the aircraft's emergency flotation system and all onboard were were rescued uninjured.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau found that the helicopter had experienced a "partial engine power loss", the reason for which could not be determined as the helicopter later sank. No one was found to be at fault.

Whitsunday Air Services has suspended all operations as it works with authorities to determine the cause of yesterday's crash.

"We are extremely saddened by this incident and our deepest condolences are with the families of all of the passengers," the company said in a statement.

"Whitsunday Air Services is continuing to work with the Queensland Police, the ATSB and CASA to assist with their investigations. Whitsunday Air Services will be suspending all operations while a full review process is undertaken."

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has confirmed it will be investigating the crash.

"A team of Transport Safety Investigators will soon travel to the accident location to commence the evidence collection phase of the investigation," an ATSB statement said.

"There, investigators will interview witnesses, examine any available recorded data, review operational records and technical documentation amongst other activities."

Whitsunday Mayor Andrew Wilcox says the local community has been devastated by the accident.

"It will be sombre day for us in the Whitsundays. My thoughts and prayers at this stage are with the families affected by this," he told ABC radio.

The Queensland premier said she felt for those affected by the tragedy.

"Visitors come to our state for its beauty and its safety. Their families should know how deeply we feel their loss," Annastacia Palaszczuk told state parliament.

The pontoon, 65km northeast of the Whitsundays, allows underwater viewing chambers. Tourist operators say the Hardy Reef offers an excellent combination of reef, coral and fish life for tourists.

The well-known Heart Reef is also nearby.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.9news.com.au




Police return with bodies after tragedy: Whitsunday Water Police return to Airlie Beach just after midnight after two people were killed in a helicopter crash at Hardy Reef on Wednesday afternoon. 

Earlier, police confirmed two international tourists, a man and a woman, died after the helicopter they were travelling in crashed off Hardy Reef.
Related Items

It was a long rescue mission for authorities, with the vessel only returning to Abell Point Marina just after midnight, where a funeral home was waiting to transport the bodies when they arrived back to the mainland.

At 4:10pm emergency services received reports of a helicopter crash that occurred about 65km north-east of the Whitsundays at about 3.35pm.

Police Vessel Damien Leeding and other vessels were dispatched to the site with police and other emergency services.

"A man and a woman who are believed to be international tourists were recovered from the helicopter and pronounced deceased at the scene," police said.

"Three other people, including the male pilot and a male and female passenger, also believed to be from overseas, will be transported by sea for medical attention for non-life threating injuries."

All passengers were recovered from the helicopter.

Police will continue to assist the Australian Transport Safety Bureau with the investigation and recovery of the aircraft.




Earlier: 

Five people were aboard the Eurocopter 120 which went down near Hardy Reef pontoon about 4.30pm.

One person is in a serious condition while two others have escaped with minor injuries. 

The helicopter is believed to have crashed into the water 250 metres from the Hardy Reef pontoon.

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority says five people were aboard the Eurocopter 120 which went down near Hardy Reef pontoon at about 4.30pm on Wednesday. One person is in a serious condition while the two others have escaped with minor injuries.

In a statement, the company that owns the helicopter, Whitsunday Air Services, confirmed the two fatalities.

"Whitsunday Air Services can confirm that a tragic accident involving a Whitsunday Air Services helicopter carrying four passengers and one crew member has occurred at Hardy Reef today," the statement said.

"The accident occurred while the helicopter was on final approach for a landing at it's Hardy Reef Heliport and resulted in two fatalities and two passengers sustaining minor injuries.

"We are extremely saddened by this incident and our deepest condolences are with the families of all of the passengers. Whitsunday Air Services is continuing to work with the Queensland Police, the ATSB and CASA to assist with their investigations.

"Whitsunday Air Services will be suspending all operations while a full review process is undertaken. Further information will be released in due course."

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau will begin investigating the crash of the single-engine EC120B helicopter.

"A team of Transport Safety Investigators will soon travel to the accident location to commence the evidence collection phase of the investigation. There, investigators will interview witnesses, examine any available recorded data, review operational records and technical documentation amongst other activities," the ATSB posted to social media Wednesday night.

"The evidence collection phase will also define the size and scope of the investigation and determine the expected timeframe for the completion of a final report.

"No further information is available at this time."

The ATSB added "should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify relevant parties".

The Hardy Reef pontoon allows underwater viewing chambers with tourist operators in the area saying Hardy Reef offers an excellent combination of reef, coral and fish life for tourists.

Councillor Ron Petterson at Whitsunday Regional Council took to Facebook expressing his sympathies for those involved.

"I ask that we all keep our thoughts and prayers tonight with those involved in today's tragic accident out at Hardy Reef. A sad heartbreaking day..." he said.

Whitsundays MP Jason Costigan said, "Absolutely shocked to hear this terrible news in our part of the world. Please keep the families and friends of the deceased in your prayers, as well as the injured."

It comes a day after the final investigation report into the partial engine power loss and ditching of a Robinson R44 helicopter near Hamilton Island on November 8.

Then, the pilot landed the helicopter on the water, with the emergency floats deployed, shut down the engine, and applied the rotor brake.

The pilot activated the emergency locator transmitter and instructed passengers to prepare to inflate their life jackets and to prepare to exit the helicopter if necessary. They were rescued about an hour later. The helicopter later sank and was unable to be recovered.

The report highlights that without an emergency floatation system the risk of the helicopter sinking with the occupants on board would have been greater.





Initial:

Police are currently en-route to Hardys Reef after reports of a helicopter crash.

The crash site is about 65km north east of the Whitsundays and it is believed that five people were on board however their condition is not known at this stage.

Police vessel leader Damien Leeding and other vessels are currently travelling to the site with police and other emergency services.

A helicopter has been reportedly dispatched from Townsville and police are on a police vessel with more officers on a ferry - none of which had arrived on scene yet. 




There have been other helicopter tragedies in the Whitsundays over the years, including:

17 October 2003: RACQ CQ Rescue Helicopter crash kills three

A three-men RACQ CQ rescue crew took off from their hanger in Mackay at 9.35pm on October 17 and was en route to Hamilton Island for a medical evacuation.  

Fifteen minutes into the flight, the Bell 407 went down in the sea between Cape Hillsborough and Little Green Island, off Shoal Point.  

Pilot Captain Andy Carpenter, 31, crewman Stewart Eva, 31, and ambulance paramedic Craig Liddington, 31, were killed.  

12 December 1985: Tourist killed in helicopter pontoon mishap

Two passengers were ejected, one of them killed, when the rotor blades of the Bell 206 helicopter they were in became tangled with another helicopter on a Blacks Reef pontoon.   

Four helicopters had been tasked that day to transport 21 people from Hamilton Island to Blacks Reef for a boat cruise.   

The Bell 206 [VH-HIL] was the fourth to park on the pontoon, which was authorised for only three aircraft.    An Australian Transport Safety Bureau investigation found insufficient space was available.    

Original article ➤ https://www.whitsundaytimes.com.au

Peruvian Airlines, Boeing 737-500, OB-2140P, Flight P9-211: Incident occurred January 25, 2018 in Lima, Peru

NTSB Identification: ENG18WA010
Scheduled 14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial
Incident occurred Thursday, January 25, 2018 in Lima, Peru
Aircraft: BOEING 737, registration:
Injuries: 99 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On January 25, 2018, a Peruvian Airlines Boeing 737-530, registered in Peru as OB-2140P, had an uncommanded shutdown of the No. 2 engine, a CFMI CFM56-3B1, after leveling off at FL370. The flight crew declared an emergency and diverted back to Lima, Peru. The flight crew made two unsuccessful attempts to restart the engine and the engine restarted on the third attempt. The airplane landed with both engines operating. The airplane was operating on a flight from Lima to Cuzco, Peru. There were no injuries to the 2 pilots, 3 flight attendants, and 94 passengers on board.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the Government of Peru. Further information can be obtained from:

Comision de Investigacion de Accidentes de Aviacion (CIAA)
Direccion General de Aeronautica Civil
Avenida Jiron Zorritos 1203
Lima 1 Peru Central: 15082
Website: www.mtc.gob.pe

Piper PA-25-235 Pawnee B, XB-FBN: Fatal accident occurred January 26, 2018 in Mocorito, Mexico

Cruz Alfonso Ortiz Machado




NTSB Identification: CEN18WA091
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Friday, January 26, 2018 in Mocorito, Mexico
Aircraft: PIPER PA25, registration:
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On January 26, 2018, at 1930 UTC, a Piper PA25-150, XB-FBN, impacted terrain under unknown circumstances in the Community el Recoveco in Mocorito, Mexico. The aircraft was destroyed, and the pilot was fatally injured. The flight had departed airdrome "El Rancho" in Mexico to conduct agricultural spraying operations.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC) Mexico. Under the provisions of Annex 13 of the Convention on International Civil Aviation as a State of Design, the United States has designated an accredited representative to participate in the investigation. Any further information may be obtained from:

DGAC Mexico 
Boulevard Adolfo López Mateos, #1990
Tlacopac, C.P. 01010 Ciudad de México
CDMX, Mexico
E-mail: cidaiac@sct.gob.mx
Investigator-in-Charge
Mr. José Armando Constantino Tercero
E-mail: jconstan@sct.gob.mx

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by, or obtained from, the DGAAC Mexico.

Sikorsky S-92A, G-CHHF: Incident occurred January 29, 2018 in Shetland, United Kingdom

NTSB Identification: CEN18WA105
14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial
Incident occurred Monday, January 29, 2018 in Shetland, United Kingdom
Aircraft: SIKORSKY S-92A, registration:
Injuries: 21 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On January 14, 2018, about 1413 universal time (UTC), a United Kingdom registered Sikorsky S-92A, G-CHHF, experienced a nose landing gear (NLG) anomaly during landing at Scatsta Airport, Shetland, United Kingdom. The NLG did not extend during the approach to landing. A ground engineer was able, with the helicopter in a hover, to lower the NLG, which was askew in the NLG well. The pilot, copilot, and nineteen passengers were not injured.

The investigation is under the jurisdiction of the government of the United Kingdom. Further information may be obtained from:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB)
Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom

This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Air Accidents Investigation Branch of the United Kingdom.

Robinson R44, PP-HLI: Fatal accident occurred January 23, 2018 in Recife, Brazil

Daniel Galvão

 
Miguel Brendo

Sargento Lia Maria Abreu de Souza







NTSB Identification: ERA18WA066
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Tuesday, January 23, 2018 in Recife, Brazil
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Brazil has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a ROBINSON R44 helicopter that occurred on January 23, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Brazil's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Brazil.

Malaysia Airlines, Airbus A330-300, 9M-MTM: Incident occurred January 18, 2018 near Curtin, Western Australia


Scheduled 14 CFR Non-U.S., Commercial
Incident occurred Thursday, January 18, 2018 in Alice Springs, Australia
Aircraft: AIRBUS A330, registration:
Injuries: 255 Uninjured.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On January 18, 2018, about 14:25 Western Australian standard time, a Malaysian-registered Airbus A330-323 airplane had the No. 1 engine, a Pratt & Whitney PW4168A engine shutdown by the flight crew after it had compressor stalls. The airplane, which was operating from Sydney, Australia to Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia diverted to Alice Springs, Australia for landing. There were no injuries to the 2 flight crew, 8 flight attendants, and 245 passengers on board.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) is investigating this incident.

All inquiries concerning this incident should be the directed to the ATSB.

Australian Transport Safety Bureau
62 Northbourne Avenue
Canberra ACT 2601
Website: www.atsb.gov.au



Investigation number: AO-2018-007

Engine failure or malfunction involving an Airbus A330, 9M-MTM, near Curtin, Western Australia on January 18, 2018

Summary

The ATSB is investigating an engine malfunction and in-flight shut down involving an Airbus A330, 9M-MTM, near Curtin, Western Australia on January 18, 2018. 

During cruise, the crew detected a malfunction with the left engine and elected to shut it down. They then diverted the aircraft to Alice Springs where an uneventful single-engine landing was conducted.

As part of the investigation, the ATSB will obtain information from the flight crew, engineering reports and recorded data and gather additional information as required.

A final report will be released at the end of the investigation.

Should a critical safety issue be identified during the course of the investigation, the ATSB will immediately notify those affected and seek safety action to address the issue.

https://www.atsb.gov.au

Cessna 182, XB-HRG: Fatal accident occurred February 12, 2018 in El Pozo, Mexico





















NTSB Identification: CEN18WA110
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Monday, February 12, 2018 in El Pozo, Mexico
Aircraft: CESSNA 182, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On February 12, 2018, about 1815 coordinated universal time, a Cessna 182B airplane, Mexican registration XB-HRG, crashed in a field under unknown circumstances near El Pozo, Mexico. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The local flight originated from an airport in El Pozo.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC). This report is for informational purposes only and contains information released by or obtained from the government of the Mexico.

Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC)
Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes
Boulevard Adolfo López Mateos
No. 1990, piso 4
Colonia Los Alpes, Tlacopac
Delegación Álvaro Obregón
Codigo Postal 01010
Ciudad de México
México
E-mail: cidaiac@sct.gob.mx
Website: http://www.sct.gob.mx/transporte-y-medicina-preventiva/aeronautica-civil/inicio/

Piper PA-28-161 Warrior III, LN-TOS, Tromsø Flyklubb: Fatal accident occurred February 11, 2018 near Svolvaer Airport, Helle, Norway

Einar Halvorsen (63) and Leif Jarle Stamnes (79)



Leif Jarle Stamnes and Einar Halvorsen





NTSB Identification: CEN18WA096
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, February 11, 2018 in Helle, Norway
Aircraft: Piper Aircraft, Inc. PA-28-161, registration:
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On February 11, 2018, about 2000 UTC, a Piper Aircraft, Inc. PA-28-161 airplane, Norwegian registration LN-TOS, impacted the waters near the Svolvaer Airport (ENSH), Helle, Norway. The pilot and passenger on board were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was owned and operated by a flying club. Night conditions prevailed during the flight. The flight departed from ENSH and was destined for Langnes, Norway.

This investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Norwegian government. Any further information may be obtained from:

Accident Investigation Board, Norway
Sophie Radichsvei 17
2003 Lillestrom
Norway

Cessna 140, N2011N: Accident occurred March 12, 2018 at Madison Municipal Airport (KMDS), Lake County, South Dakota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

http://registry.faa.gov/N2011N

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA166
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, March 12, 2018 in Madison, SD
Aircraft: CESSNA 140, registration: N2011N

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aborted takeoff and rolled into grass strip. 

Date: 12-MAR-18
Time: 22:15:00Z
Regis#: N2011N
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 140
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: MADISON
State: SOUTH DAKOTA

Another crash in Odisha’s Bermuda Triangle



Rairangpur: As an IAF plane met with an accident on Tuesday, this was another trainer aircraft that has crashed here in Odisha’s Bermuda Triangle. The last crash was of the Hawk fighter trainer from the Kalaikunda Air Base in 2015.

According to eminent researcher Anil Dhir, the triangle from Piardoba near Bankura to Chakulia in Jharkhand and Amarda Road Airfield in Odisha has witnessed nearly fifteen crashes since the airfields were set up in the last years of the World War II.

The earliest recorded crash was on May 4, 1944, when an American Liberator had collided with a Harvard de Havilland plane and crashed in flames at the Amarda Road airfield killing four crewmen. This spot is just 100 kms from today’s crash site. On the night of 7th May 1944, another Liberator had taken off from Digri on a special mission and had crashed 20 minutes after takeoff killing 10 crewmen. Digri tois 90 kms from the present crash spot. Another De Havilland fighter had crashed after takeoff from the Amarda Road Station on May 13, 1944, but the crew was saved.




On Oct 28, 1944, a Liberator had taken off on a night sortie and crashed near Salboni, approximately 90 kms from the present crash, killing eight of the crew. The biggest crash was on the 26th of July 1945 when two British Royal Air Force B-24 Liberator four-engine bombers, EW225 and EW247, had collided at low altitude. The aircraft were based at the Amarda Road airfield and were part of a six-plane contingent from the Air Fighting Training Unit engaged in a formation flying exercise. Fourteen airmen – the crews of the two aircraft – died due to the severity of the collision and resulting crashes which happened an altitude of less than 2000 feet. The debris fell into paddy fields swollen from the monsoon rains. The exact spot is now in West Bengal, just 70 kms from yesterday’s crash site.There are at least another half a dozen more crashes from these airfields in which the planes crashed in the Bay of Bengal and were never found.


In the last two years of World War II, the allied forces had anticipated the Japanese onslaught from the North-East and a string of airfields were made in the region. These included the airfields at Jharsuguda, Amarda Road, Charbatia, Hijli, Dudhkundi, Digri, Salua, Chakulia, Kalaikunda and Bishnupur Amarda Road was the biggest.

Hundreds of aircraft which took part in the Burma operations were managed from here. The Burma operations and the China Hump operations had the highest casualties; the Hump route was termed as the graveyard of aircraft. One in six pilots who operated this route lost his life. In all 594 aircraft were lost, missing, or written off and 1,659 crewmen killed or went missing. In fact crash wrecks are still being discovered in the hills of Arunachal Pradesh and Meghalaya. Most of the airfields are now disused and forgotten.



Dhir says that one can attribute the crashes to the reason that training crafts are stationed in the vicinity, but on scrutiny he has found that other training centres of the Indian Air Force have much higher flying sorties with lesser crashes. He says that most of these crashes in this area occurred in good weather conditions. Actually there is no single theory that can explain all disappearances. The airplanes that crashed have been victims to different circumstances and situations while flying over this triangle area. Half of the crashes remain unexplained, hence speculations are raised.

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