Sunday, April 21, 2019

Cessna 305A, flight conducted under the provisions of Federal Aviation Regulations Part 91, N5312G: Accident occurred November 25, 2015 near Southland Field Airport (KUXL), Sulphur, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Sulphur, LA
Accident Number: CEN16LA064
Date & Time: 11/24/2015, 1447 CDT
Registration: N5312G
Aircraft: CESSNA 305A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel contamination
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 24, 2015, about 1447 central daylight time, a Cessna 305 airplane, N5312G, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a loss of engine power after takeoff from the Southland Field Airport (UXL), Sulphur, Louisiana. The private pilot sustained minor injuries and his pilot-rated passenger was not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Aviation Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated about 1345 from the pilot's private airstrip (52LA), located in Bell City, Louisiana.

The pilot, who was also an A&P mechanic, had completed the installation of a CGR-30P engine monitor on November 20, 2015, in N5312G. After the installation, he flew the airplane from 52LA to UXL to check/reset the "K" factor for the fuel flow feature of the monitor. He reported that the flight to and from UXL lasted approximately 30 minutes and the entire flight was uneventful.

The pilot reported that the intent of the flight on November 24, 2015, was to deliver the airplane to its owner located at the Lake Charles Regional Airport (LCH), Lake Charles, Louisiana. Prior to departure from 52LA, the pilot decided that he would first fly the airplane to UXL to perform a few touch and go landings and refuel the tanks to recheck the "K'' factor of the new monitor prior to flying to LCH.

Upon completion of the second touch and go on runway 15 at UXL, the pilot applied full power for takeoff, pushed the carburetor heat control to the forward/cold position, rotated off the runway, and commenced a standard climb for pattern altitude. At some point at the south end of runway 15, the pilot started a left crosswind turn to set up for a full stop landing on runway 15. At this time, the engine instantaneously stopped firing, and the pilot determined that he would have to make an "off field" landing. The airplane landed ground upright in a field with dense, wet, vegetation. Emergency personnel evacuated the pilot and passenger. Both wings and fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot-rated passenger, who was seated in the rear seat, reported that the entire flight was normal until the loss of engine power and forced landing.

The nearest weather reporting station (Lake Charles LCH) was located about 20 miles northeast of the accident site. The reported weather observation METAR at LCH about the time of the accident was: KLCH 1435 CDT AUTO 09010KT 10SM SCT4000 19/7 A3019. According to the Icing Probability Chart, with a temperature of 19 degrees and dew point of 7 degrees, the aircraft engine could have been susceptible to moderate carburetor icing at cruise power or serious icing at descent power.

The engine was examined on August 8, 2017, at the facilities of Air Salvage of Dallas in Lancaster, Texas. The examination was conducted under the supervision of the FAA. The engine remained attached to the airframe and had no external damage, except for impact damage to the intake air box. The throttle and mixture controls were all connected. The crankshaft was rotated by hand and continuity was confirmed to all cylinders and to the rear of the engine. Good thumb compression was confirmed on cylinders one through five. The cylinders were examined with a lighted boroscope and the number six cylinder had heavy corrosion on the intake valve between the valve and the valve seat, so that the valve could not properly seat. The remainder of the cylinders had dark deposits on the cylinder domes and pistons. The aircraft had been modified with a STC allowing the use of auto gas. The magneto impulse couplings snapped at top dead center on the number one cylinder. The top spark plugs were removed and examined. They had normal wear when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug comparison card, and dark deposits in the electrode areas.

The carburetor was a Marvel Schebler, MA-4-5, PN-10-3859-1, SN-MF-V-AI. The carburetor was found not damaged. Rust and water were observed in the fuel inlet line. The inlet screen was wet with water and corrosion. The unit was disassembled, and the bowl was about half full of water and the bowl was also heavily corroded. The float and needle valve were intact and were free to move. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 54, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/17/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 2739 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3 hours (Total, this make and model), 15 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N5312G
Model/Series: 305A A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1951
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 22746
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/06/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2101 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1965 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470 SERIES
Registered Owner: MCFARLAND DAVID R
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LCH
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 1435 CDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4600 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 90°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: 
Departure Point: Bell City, LA (52LA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sulpher, LA (UXL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1345 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Southland Field Airport (UXL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 10 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5001 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.131389, -93.376111 (est)

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, owned by Echo 6 Incorporated and privately operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N733VB: Accident occurred October 11, 2015 in the Atlantic Ocean, Miami Beach, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N733VB


Location: Miami Beach, FL
Accident Number: ERA16LA009
Date & Time: 10/11/2015, 1537 EDT
Registration: N733VB
Aircraft: CESSNA 172N
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 11, 2015, at 1537 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 172N, N733VB, was substantially damaged during a ditching in the Atlantic Ocean about 11 nautical miles east of Miami Beach, Florida. The private pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that departed from the North Perry Airport (HWO), Hollywood, Florida, about 1513 and was destined for South Bimini Airport (MYBS), South Bimini, Bahamas. The airplane was owned by Echo 6 Incorporated and privately operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot reported that while en route to MYBS, at an altitude of about 3,500 ft mean sea level (msl) about 20 miles east of North Miami, he "felt a partial loss of power followed by a complete engine failure". He was unable to restore power, and decided to glide as close to the coastline as possible. He ditched the airplane about 11 miles east of Miami Beach, Florida.

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle-gear airplane, serial number 17268573, was manufactured in 1977. It was powered by a Lycoming, O-320, 150-horsepower engine. The airplane's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed on October 11, 2015. At that time, the airframe had accumulated 3,473 total hours of operation. The engine had also accumulated 3,473 total hours of operation; of which, 1,585 hours were since its last major overhaul. The airplane had flown about 1 hour since the annual inspection. The airplane's fuel system consisted of two 21.5- gallon fuel tanks, one in each wing, for a total capacity of 43 gallons; of which, 3 gallons were unusable. The pilot reported 30 gallons of fuel onboard at the time of takeoff.

The recorded weather at an airport located about 21 miles east of the accident site at an elevation of 29 ft msl, at 1553, included wind variable at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 3,500 ft, temperature 30° C, and dew point 19° C. Review of an FAA Carburetor Icing Chart for the given temperature and dew point revealed that the conditions were outside of the icing envelope. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 23, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/22/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/19/2015
Flight Time:  205 hours (Total, all aircraft), 185 hours (Total, this make and model), 152 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 60 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N733VB
Model/Series: 172N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 17268573
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/11/2015, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 1 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3473 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MIA, 29 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 21 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1553 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 25000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: HOLLYWOOD, FL (HWO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: South Bimini, FN (MYBS)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1513 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  25.790000, -79.925833 (est)

Low Altitude Operation / Event: Cessna 182, XB-YUH; accident occurred August 16, 2015 in Big Piney, Sublette County, Wyoming

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Casper, Wyoming

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Location: Big Piney, WY
Accident Number: CEN15LA403
Date & Time: 08/16/2015, 1030 MDT
Registration: XBYUH
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The private pilot reported that, during a preflight briefing, he and the pilot-rated passenger (who was the owner of the airplane) agreed that in the case of an emergency, the owner would take control of the airplane. After takeoff, the sightseeing flight was normal until the airplane approached a glacier at 12,000 ft mean sea level. The pilot stated that because the airplane engine was normally aspirated, there was not much power left to climb, but everything was "ok." As the airplane entered the glacier area through a canyon, it encountered a sudden downdraft and started to descend; the pilot recalled that the airplane's altitude above terrain was about 500 ft. The pilot tried to maintain a level attitude, but the airspeed began to decrease as the airplane continued to descend. The pilot-rated passenger then took control of the airplane and immediately lowered the nose to increase airspeed and set up for an emergency landing; the airplane appeared to be stalling. The airplane landed hard on ice ditches, separating the nose gear. The main landing gear dug in and the airplane came to a stop, which resulted in structural damage to the fuselage. No mechanical malfunctions or failures were reported by the pilot. Because the engine was normally aspirated, the performance of the engine was reduced at a high altitude. Further, the airplane was about 500 ft above terrain when the downdraft occurred. Considering that downdrafts in high mountainous terrain can exceed 1,000 ft per minute, the pilot did not maintain adequate altitude for the operating environment.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The pilot's failure to maintain adequate altitude while operating over high mountainous terrain, which resulted in an emergency landing after the airplane's encounter with a downdraft.

Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Use of equip/info - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Terrain - Contributed to outcome (Cause)

Terrain induced turbulence - Contributed to outcome (Cause)

On August 16, 2015 about 0930 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 182, XBYUH (Mexican Registry), impacted high mountainous terrain during a forced landing about 37 miles out from the Big Piney, Wyoming VOR (BPI) 015 Degree Radial. Both occupants, the pilot and pilot-rated passenger, sustained minor injuries. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the vicinity and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight originated from the Alpine Municipal Airport (46U) about 0800.

The pilot reported that the purpose of the flight was sightseeing. During a preflight briefing, the pilot-rated passenger (who was the owner of the airplane), and the pilot agreed that in the case of an emergency, the owner would take control of the airplane. After takeoff from 46U, the flight was normal until approaching a glacier at 12,000 feet MSL. The pilot stated that because the airplane engine was normally aspirated, there was not much power left to climb, but everything was "OK." As the airplane entered the glacier through a canyon, a sudden downdraft caught the airplane and the airplane started to descend. The pilot recalls that the altitude above terrain was about 500 feet.

The pilot tried to maintain a level attitude and the airspeed began to decrease as the airplane continued to descend. The owner then took control of the airplane. He immediately lowered the nose to increase airspeed. Since the airplane was still descending, he asked for flaps and announced that he would execute an emergency landing. The airplane appeared to be stalling. The airplane landed hard on ice ditches, ripping off the nose gear. The main landing gear dug-in and the airplane came to a stop.


Figure 1. Approximate flight path into the glacier forced landing area. 

An American Airlines commercial flight picked up a mayday call and relayed the information to Salt Lake City Air Traffic Control. The wreckage was located by mountain rescue personnel and the two occupants were transported to a local hospital.

No mechanical anomalies were reported by the pilot or owner. According to the FAA, downdrafts in high mountainous terrain can exceed 1,000 feet per minute and a normally aspirated engine's horsepower and performance is reduced at high altitudes. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied:Left 
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/14/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  1904 hours (Total, all aircraft), 454 hours (Total, this make and model), 25 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA 
Registration: XBYUH
Model/Series: 182 P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 182633285
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/11/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3093 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91  installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470R
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 46U
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time: 0930 MDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 14 knots / 25 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 260°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.31 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Alpine, CO (46U)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Alpine, CO (46U)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0900 MDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  43.159722, -109.658889

Cirrus SR22, registered to and operated by AIRCCS LLC Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight, N422PB: Accident occurred July 07, 2015 near George Bush Intercontinental Airport (KIAH), Houston, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Cirrus Aircraft Corporation; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama
Hartzell Propeller Inc; Piqua, Ohio
McCauley Propellers - Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N422PB




Location: Houston, TX
Accident Number: CEN15LA298
Date & Time: 07/07/2015, 1137 CDT
Registration: N422PB
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On July 7, 2015, about 1137 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR-22 single-engine airplane, N422PB, descended under the canopy of the cirrus airframe parachute system (CAPS) and landed in a residential neighborhood at Houston, Texas. The pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by AIRCCS, LLC; Humble, Texas, as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and a flight plan had not been filed. The airplane departed George Bush Intercontinental/Houston Airport (IAH), Houston, Texas, at 1133, and was destined for Austin Bergstrom International Airport (AUS), Austin, Texas.

The pilot reported that during initial climb, he noticed increasing engine temperatures, so he reduced power in an attempt to lower the engine temperatures. When the airplane was about 900 feet above ground level (agl), the engine started to "detonate," and soon after, there was a complete loss of engine power. With no suitable forced landing area, the CAPS was deployed, and the airplane impacted terrain and came to rest upright next to a residence.

An on-scene wreckage examination showed there was adequate fuel on-board, consistent with aviation low-lead fuel. At the facility where the airplane had most recently been refueled, refueling unit records and a review of security camera video showed that the airplane had been refueled with aviation gasoline and not with jet fuel.

Avionics components containing non-volatile memory (NVM), which included engine performance data, were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Division for download. A review of the data for the accident flight found the engine rpm reached at least 3,500 rpm (engine speed above 3,500 rpm would not be recorded, since the maximum valve for the sensor is 3,500 rpm). Per the engine's Type Certificate, the maximum engine speed is 2,700rpm.

A review of maintenance records for the airplane revealed the propeller governor had been removed and inspected for proper operation, prior to the accident flight. The records also noted that no defects were observed on the governor, and the governor was reinstalled by maintenance personnel.

During the post-accident examination, the governor was removed from the engine and tested at McCauley Propeller, Columbus, Georgia. The test revealed the governor operated within the specified parameters for the unit. The examination noted that the propeller governor attaching nuts were rounded off and the washers for the governor were improperly stacked.

The engine was also removed from the airframe and shipped to Continental Motors, Mobile, Alabama, for examination/disassembly. The examination found that the governor drive gear was fractured in half and located in the oil sump. The governor drive gear teeth exhibited damage consistent with the governor driven gear being misaligned. The governor drive gear teeth also exhibited damage. A broken governor drive gear would result in insufficient oil pressure to drive the propeller governor and cause an engine to over speed.



The pilot did not submit an NTSB Pilot/Operator Accident Report form (NTSB Form 6120.1). 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 30
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N422PB
Model/Series: SR22
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2379
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-N
Registered Owner: AIRCCS LLC
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: AIRCCS LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIAH, 105 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1055 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 85°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 25000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots / 20 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 24°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Houston, TX (IAH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: AUSTIN, TX (AUS)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace: Unknown

Airport Information

Airport: GEORGE BUSH INTERCONTINENTAL/H (IAH)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 96 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 12001 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  29.972500, -95.451111 (est)

Air Tractor AT-301, operated by Semper Fi Aviation LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137, N8564S: Accident occurred June 10, 2014 near Winner Regional Airport (KICR), Tripp County, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Rapid City, South Dakota

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N8564S



Location: Winner, SD
Accident Number: CEN14LA284
Date & Time: 06/10/2014, 2041 CDT
Registration: N8564S
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR AT-301
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

On June 10, 2014, about 2041 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT-301 airplane, N8564S, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff at Winner Regional Airport (ICR), Winner, South Dakota. The commercial pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated by Semper Fi Aviation, LLC, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local agricultural application flight that was departing at the time of the accident.

The pilot stated the airplane weighed about 5,000 lbs after being loaded with 200 gallons of insecticide and 90 gallons of fuel. The pilot reported there were no anomalies with the engine or the wheel brakes during his taxi and before takeoff runup. The takeoff was made on runway 31 (4,500 ft by 75 ft, concrete) and liftoff was achieved with about ½ of the runway remaining. The pilot reported that shortly after liftoff, at an altitude of 3-5 ft above the runway, he heard a loud bang and the airplane began to yaw left. The airplane descended and bounced off the left side of the runway. The pilot stated that he increased aircraft pitch to gain altitude, but the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall and the left wing dropped. As he attempted to dump the load of insecticide, the airplane nosed over and impacted the ground alongside the runway. The airplane subsequently came to rest inverted. The pilot was able to exit the airplane uninjured through the left-side window.

A postaccident examination was completed by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness inspector. Examination of the runway surface revealed a tire skid mark that began about 1,000 ft from the departure end of runway 31. The skid mark was consistent with the tread width of a main landing gear tire. The wavy tire marking continued about 30 ft until it departed the left runway edge. A second tire skid mark, about 10 ft right of the wavy tire marking, began about 10 ft from the left edge of the runway. The airplane exited the left runway edge about 970 ft from the end of the runway and entered a grass field. There were at least 12 propeller strike marks in the ground between where the airplane departed the left edge of the runway and main wreckage. The main wreckage was in a grass field about 100 ft left of the runway edge and about 750 ft from the end of runway 31. The airplane was inverted and was facing back toward the runway on a southeast heading. There were propeller strike marks and oil-covered grass immediately preceding the main wreckage. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, and the empennage. The aft fuselage was crumpled immediately forward of the horizontal stabilizer. The empennage remained attached to the aft fuselage. The vertical stabilizer and rudder were crushed when the airplane nosed over. The elevator remained attached to the horizontal stabilizer. The flaps and ailerons remained attached to the wings. Flight control continuity was confirmed at the accident site. The right landing gear and tailwheel remained attached to the fuselage. The left landing gear leg had separated from the fuselage; however, visual examination of the attachment fittings revealed signatures consistent with overstress separation. The engine had separated from the airframe and was found adjacent to the fuselage under the left wing. The propeller remained attached to the engine. An examination of the engine revealed impact-related damage and no mechanical malfunctions. The No. 5 exhaust valve body was fractured, its exhaust valve cover was deformed and crushed inward, and the valve cover attachment studs were bent. The observed damage to the exhaust valve body was consistent with impact-related damage and not a mechanical malfunction. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of a mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation during the flight.

At 2053, about 12 minutes after the accident, the ICR weather observing system reported wind from 130° at 8 knots, 10 miles surface visibility, clear sky conditions, temperature 21°C, dew point 13°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.77 inches of mercury. Further review of recorded wind data revealed a southeasterly wind of 8-13 knots during the 3 hours before the accident and the hour following the accident. The surface wind at the time of the accident, from 130° at 8 knots, had resulted in a direct tailwind during takeoff. In his accident report, the pilot reported that the surface wind was 130° at 2 knots.

The FAA Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, states that a normal takeoff is when an airplane is headed into the wind. The effect of a tailwind requires an airplane to achieve a greater groundspeed and to use additional runway length to attain the airplane's liftoff speed during takeoff. If a pilot attempts liftoff below the specified airspeed an airplane could be difficult to control, have a very low initial rate of climb, or enter an aerodynamic stall. Additionally, if an excessive angle of attack is used to achieve a premature liftoff, the airplane may not be able to climb out of ground effect.


Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/12/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/24/2014
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1491 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1158 hours (Total, this make and model), 1491 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AIR TRACTOR
Registration: N8564S
Model/Series: AT-301
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 301-0161
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/25/2014, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 23 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10616 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: R1340-59
Registered Owner: Semper Fi Aviation, LLC
Rated Power: 600 hp
Operator: Semper Fi Aviation, LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ICR, 2032 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2053 CDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 130°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.77 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Winner, SD (ICR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Winner, SD (ICR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2041 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Winner Regional Airport (ICR)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 2032 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4500 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.390278, -99.842222 (est)