Friday, July 8, 2016

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N444WM: Accident occurred June 08, 2016 in Cornelia, Habersham County, Georgia

http://registry.faa.gov/N444WM

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, June 08, 2016 in Cornelia, GA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N444WM
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that this was her fifth instructional flight with the student and that they were practicing takeoffs and landings in the pattern. She recalled that the previous landing accomplished by the student was "squirrelly." She reported that she reminded the student pilot "how/why not to use the pedals during the landing roll, and to stay off of the brakes." She recalled that the student completed the next approach and landing and both were stable. However, during the landing roll the airplane made an abrupt right turn, and exited the right side of the runway about the midpoint of the 5500 foot long by 100 foot wide runway. The flight instructor reported that she did not believe that she would be able to bring the airplane back to the left and aborted the landing. However, the airplane struck rising terrain, entered a 360 degree turn and struck an embankment. The flight instructor asked the student if he had his feet on the pedals during the landing roll, and he replied "I think so." The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, horizontal stabilizer and elevator. 

The flight instructor reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with any portion of the airplane during the flight that would have prevented normal flight operations.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's unnecessary pedal application and the flight instructor's delayed remedial action resulting in a loss of directional control, runway excursion and ground impact during the aborted landing.

Piper PA-32-300, Ledfordopolis II LLC, N1495J: Accident occurred July 08, 2016 in Windermere, Orange County, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

LEDFORDOPOLIS II LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N1495J

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA250
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 08, 2016 in Windermere, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32-300, registration: N1495J
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 8, 2016, at 1810 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA 32-300, N1495J, was substantially damaged while ditching in Lake Down, Windermere, Florida, following a total loss of engine power. The private pilot and passenger were seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Executive Airport (ORL), Orlando, Florida, about 1800, and was destined for Venice Municipal Airport (VNC), Venice, Florida.

According to the pilot, the accident flight was the third flight of the day. There were no issues noted with the airplane on the first two legs. The first was from ORL to Jacksonville Executive Airport at Craig (CRG), Jacksonville, Florida. The airplane was fully fueled at CRG, and he estimated that during the return flight to ORL, about 15 gallons of fuel was used from the right wing tip fuel tank. He recalled switching to the left wing tip fuel tank before departing on the accident flight. About 5 minutes after takeoff, while in cruise flight at 1,500 feet mean sea level (msl), the pilot began a climb to 4,500 feet msl. About 2 minutes later, he heard a "popping" sound from the engine. The pilot contacted the ORL air traffic control tower and stated "…I'm having engine trouble, need to return immediately." About 30 seconds later, he advised "I'm losing engine power, I may have to ditch." The pilot stated that initially the engine sustained a partial power loss, and he performed the "engine power loss in flight" checklist, but he was unable to diagnose the problem. The engine lost complete power shortly thereafter.

A witness who was located about one-half mile east of the accident site reported hearing an aircraft fly over his house near the time of the accident. As it did, the engine initially sounded like it was "running smoothly, but at reduced power", and then stopped for about four or five seconds. The noise then resumed for several seconds, and again sounded like an engine running at reduced power, and then the noise stopped again. At no time did the engine sound like it was "sputtering or surging."

A witness captured the last few seconds of the flight on video, as the airplane ditched in the lake about 10 miles southwest of ORL. The video depicted the airplane descending into the water in a nose low, left wing down attitude.

According to FAA records, the pilot's last FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 25, 2016, at which time he reported 275 hours of flight experience.

Maintenance records revealed that the airplane's most recent annual inspection occurred on October 1, 2015, at which time the engine had accrued a total of 3,750 hours, with 56 hours since overhaul. The airplane flew about 39 hours since that inspection.

The airplane was recovered to a secure facility where a post-accident examination was conducted by an FAA inspector and representatives from the airframe and engine manufacturers. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls through recovery cuts to their respective control surfaces, with the exception of the left aileron, which was continuous through one overload fracture at the aileron input rod end at the bellcrank. The left wing was found separated from the fuselage at the root end and exhibited leading edge damage and skin separations along the entire span. The left fuel tank was breached and absent of fuel. The left tip fuel tank was separated from the wing and was not recovered. The right wing was largely undamaged and remained attached to the fuselage, and was subsequently removed by recovery personnel for transport. About 25 gallons of fuel were recovered from the right main wing tank. According to recovery personnel, water poured from the right tip tank quick-drain during recovery. The three recovered fuel caps (left main, right main, right tip) were found secure with their vent valves in place. The three corresponding fuel pickup screens were free of debris and clear of obstruction when checked with low pressure air. The fuel selector valve was out of detent, between the right main and right tip tank positions.

The engine and nose gear were partially separated from the firewall. Both propeller blades were bent slightly aft at mid span. The engine crankshaft was rotated by hand at the propeller. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed to the rear accessory section and valve action was observed on all 6 cylinders. Thumb compression and suction were observed on all cylinders. The fuel lines leading from the engine driven fuel pump to the fuel servo and from the fuel servo to the flow divider, the flow divider valve and lines to the fuel nozzles, were absent of liquid. All 6 fuel nozzles were clear of debris and unobstructed. Neither of the two magnetos produced spark when rotated.


The fuel servo, both magnetos, electric fuel pump, and an engine monitor were retained for further examination.



A man and his 9-year-old daughter were injured Friday evening when a small plane plunged into Lake Down near Windermere, Orange County Fire Rescue said.

The Piper PA-32 plane, which departed from Orlando Executive Airport, plunged into the lake shortly before 6:15 p.m., officials said.

The man was brought to Orlando Regional Medical Center, and his daughter was brought to Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children.

Their conditions weren't known, officials said.

Neither person was publicly identified.

Two boaters were credited with rescuing the man and his daughter. Austin Keaton and João Pacheco said they immediately jumped into action to help them.

“When it started going down lower, we were, like, that doesn't look right, so we turned the boat around to boat over to them if they crashed,” Keaton said. “All he was concerned about was his daughter. 'Get her on board. Get her on board.' That's all he cared about.”

The Federal Aviation Administration said it received reports of engine problems from the plane before it crashed.

“It's just one of those things you'll never think you'll see until it happens,” Pacheco said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.


Story and video:   http://www.wftv.com



ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. —

Two people were injured Friday evening when a small plane crashed into Lake Down near Windermere, Orange County Fire Rescue said.

The twin-engine plane plunged into the lake shortly before 6:15 p.m., firefighters said.

One adult was brought to Orlando Regional Medical Center as a trauma alert.

A child was brought to Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children.

Their conditions weren't known, officials said.

No one else was in the plane.

It's not yet known what caused the plane to crash.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.wftv.com


ORANGE COUNTY, Fla. —The Orange County Sheriff's Office has responded to a report of a plane down, possibly in the West Orange County area, near Florida's Turnpike, according to officials.

Two people, including a juvenile, were pulled from the plane and taken to the hospital as trauma alerts.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wesh.com

WINDERMERE, Fla. (WOFL FOX 35) - Boaters rescued an adult pilot and a child passenger from a small plane that crashed in an Orange County lake early Friday evening.

Deputies responded to Lake Down, located in Windermere, in reference to an aircraft crash around 6:15 p.m.  The airplane was a single-engine aircraft occupied by a father, 49, and his daughter, 9.  Their identities were not immediately released.  

Two men fishing at the lake witnessed the crash.  They were able to rescue the two and bring them to shore in their boat.    The girl sustained a non life-threatening injury and was transported to Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children.  Her father was transported to Orlando Regional Medical Center with no visible injuries.  


The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified and will investigate the cause of the crash. 

Airbus A320-200, Delta Air Lines, N333NW: Incident occurred July 07, 2016 in Rapid City, South Dakota

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident. 

DELTA AIR LINES INC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N333NW

Aviation Incident Preliminary Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: DCA16IA200
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of DELTA AIR LINES INC (D.B.A. Delta Airlines)
Incident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Rapid City, SD
Aircraft: AIRBUS INDUSTRIE A320 211, registration: N333NW
Injuries: 129 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may not have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.


On July 7, 2016, at 8:42pm central daylight time, Delta flight 2845, an Airbus A320, N333NW, landed on runway 13 at the Ellsworth Air Force Base (RCA), Rapid City, South Dakota. The flights intended destination was Rapid City Regional Airport (RAP), Rapid City, South Dakota. The airplane was not damaged and none of the six crew members or123 passengers were injured. The flight was operating under 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 121 as a regularly scheduled passenger flight originating from Minneapolis–Saint Paul International Airport (MSP), Minneapolis, Minnesota. Visual weather conditions prevailed at the time of the incident.



WASHINGTON — A Delta Air Lines jetliner with 130 passengers on board landed at the wrong airport in South Dakota Thursday evening, said a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board, which is investigating the incident. 

The Delta A320 landed at Ellsworth Air Force Base at 8:42 p.m. Central Time Thursday, when its destination was an airport in Rapid City, board spokesman Peter Knudson said Friday. 

Ellsworth is about 10 miles due north of Rapid City Regional Airport. The two airports have runways that are oriented nearly identically to the compass, from northwest to southeast. 

Delta Flight 2845 had departed from Minneapolis. A passenger interviewed by the Rapid City Journal said she and her fellow passengers waited about 2½ hours in the plane at Ellsworth, where they were ordered to pull down their window shades as military personnel walked through the cabin with at least one firearm and a dog. 

This was not the first time airline pilots have mistaken the Air Force base for the Rapid City airport. In 2004, a Northwest Airlines flight carrying 117 passengers to Rapid City landed at Ellsworth. The plane remained on the ground for more than three hours as the pilots explained to Air Force security officers what went wrong, and a new crew was dispatched to continue the flight to Rapid City. 

Northwest and Delta merged 2008. 

Delta has contacted the passengers "and offered a gesture of apology for the inconvenience," the airline said in a statement. 

The crew has been taken off-duty while NTSB investigates, the statement said. "Delta will fully cooperate with that investigation and has already begun an internal review of its own," it added. 

The Air Force said in a statement that the base officials "followed the proper procedures to address the situation" and ensured the safety of those at the base and passengers. 

Citing security reasons, base officials declined to answer questions from The Associated Press regarding the specific procedures followed during the incident and whether air traffic controllers at the base were in contact with the pilot and authorized the landing. 

Landings at wrong airports by commercial pilots, while unusual, are still more common than many passengers may realize or airlines would like to acknowledge. 

An Associated Press search two years ago of government safety data and news reports since the early 1990s found at least 150 flights in which U.S. commercial passenger and cargo planes have either landed at the wrong airport or started to land and realized their mistake in time. 

Of the 35 documented wrong landings, at least 23 occurred at airports with shorter runways, creating potential safety issues. 

In most cases, the pilots were cleared by controllers to fly based on what they could see rather than relying on automation. Many incidents occurred at night, with pilots reporting they were attracted by the runway lights of the first airport they saw during descent. Some pilots said they disregarded navigation equipment that showed their planes slightly off course because the information didn't match what they were seeing out their windows — a runway straight ahead. 

On Jan. 12, 2014, the pilots of a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737-700 stopped their plane just short of a ravine at the end of a short runway in Hollister, Missouri, when they had meant to land on a runway twice as long at nearby Branson. 

A few months earlier, an Atlas Air Boeing 747 freighter landed at the tiny Jabara Airport in Wichita, Kansas, instead of McConnell Air Force Base about eight miles away. The runway is considered 3,000 feet less than ideal for the plane, one of the largest in the world. It took about 10 hours to turn the plane around and ready it for takeoff again. A nearby highway was shut down as a safety precaution. 

Original article can be found here:   http://www.wral.com

RAPID CITY, S.D. (KOTA TV) A Delta Airlines flight from Minneapolis to Rapid City landed by mistake at Ellsworth Air Force Base Thursday night.

The Airbus A320 aircraft had 130 customers on board when it made its errant landing.

Armed military personnel walked through the cabin with bomb sniffing dogs while the airplane was at the base.

Passengers were ordered keep their window shades down. The flight eventually took off from the base and arrived at the PROPER airport at 11:31 p.m.

One passenger on the flight said everyone stayed calm throughout the event though some young children were crying.

He said the most nerve wracking time was the brief flight from Ellsworth to Rapid City Regional.

“It's troubling when you have to trust the person that maybe got you into this situation in the first place,” said Rapid City resident Aaron Eisland. “It's not exactly comforting. … This is a decent size screw up.”

Delta Airlines says the crew has been taken off duty while the National Transportation Safety Board investigates the incident. The airline says it is also conducting an internal investigation.

Story and video:  http://www.kotatv.com

Piper PA-32R-300, N32KK: Fatal accident occurred July 08, 2016 near West Houston Airport (KIWS), Harris County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N32KK 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Houston FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA261
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 08, 2016 in Houston, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R-300, registration: N32KK
Injuries: 4 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 8, 2016, about 1615 central daylight time, a Piper model PA-32R-300 single-engine airplane, N32KK, was destroyed during a postimpact fire following a loss of control shortly after takeoff from the West Houston Airport (IWS), Houston, Texas. The private pilot and his three passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed for the personal cross-country flight that had an intended destination of Gillespie County Airport (T82), Fredericksburg, Texas.

There were numerous witnesses who reported observing the accident airplane while on takeoff from runway 15 (3,953 feet by 75 feet, asphalt). Several of the witnesses observed an open forward baggage compartment door shortly before the airplane rotated for liftoff. These witnesses reported that the forward baggage compartment door was in a vertical position. The airplane continued with the takeoff and climbed on runway heading to 100-150 feet above ground level (agl) before it entered a left crosswind turn. One witness estimated that the left crosswind turn began as the airplane crossed over the runway departure threshold. Several witnesses reported that the airplane maintained a bank angle of 30-45 degrees during the left crosswind turn. The airplane was observed to briefly roll into a wings level attitude, on a downwind heading, before it entered an aerodynamic stall/spin to the left and descended nose first into terrain. The witnesses did not report hearing any engine anomalies during the accident flight.

The accident site was located in a wooded residential area located about 1/2 mile east-northeast of the airport terminal building/ramp. The initial point-of-impact was identified as an approximately 60-foot tall pine tree that was fractured about 6-1/2 feet above the ground. A 100 foot wreckage debris path initiated from the pine tree on a 330-degree true heading. There were numerous broken pine tree branches located along the wreckage debris path. The main wreckage was located about 42 feet from the initial point-of-impact and was found upright on a 180-degree heading. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage (aft of the cockpit), both wings, and the empennage. A majority of the main wreckage had been destroyed by the postimpact fire. Flight control continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress. The mechanical flap control lever was found in the fully retracted position. All three landing gear actuators were fully extended, consistent with an extended landing gear. The fuel selector was found positioned to the right fuel tank. The cockpit, forward baggage compartment, engine, and the propeller were located about 58 feet past the main wreckage. The cockpit instrument panel was destroyed by fire. The landing gear selector switch was found in the "gear-down" position. The ignition switch was found in the "both" position. The forward baggage compartment exhibited impact and fire damage. The forward baggage compartment door was found about 15 feet from the baggage compartment. The door latch mechanism was observed unlatched and its corresponding key-lock assembly unlocked. A functional test of the latch mechanism did not reveal any anomalies. The forward baggage door frame latch catch/receptacle appeared to be undamaged. There were no observed anomalies with the forward baggage door latch mechanism, key-lock, or the door frame latch catch/receptacle.

The engine remained attached to the firewall and the propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange. The two-blade propeller exhibited torsional twisting, trailing edge S-shaped bending, and burnishing of the blade face and back. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The single-drive dual-magneto did not provide a spark when rotated; however, the magneto was damaged consistent with prolonged exposure to fire. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. A borescope inspection of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies. The fuel injection servo remained attached to the engine. There were no obstructions to the fuel injection servo or induction system. The servo fuel inlet screen was free of any contamination. No anomalies were observed with the mechanical fuel pump, fuel flow divider, or fuel injectors. The oil pump discharged oil in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. The oil suction screen was free of any contamination. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal engine operation.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot, age 41, held a private pilot certificate with a single engine land airplane and instrument airplane ratings. His last aviation medical examination was completed on April 14, 2016, when he was issued a second-class medical certificate with no limitations. The pilot reported having 1,350 hours total flight experience when he applied for his current aviation medical certificate. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. According to an insurance application, dated March 28, 2016, the pilot had logged 1,350 hours total flight time and 60 hours in a Piper PA-32R-300. The pilot also reported his last flight review, as required by FAA regulation 61.56, was completed on April 5, 2015. The pilot's recent flight history was reconstructed from airplane utilization records provided by the co-owners of the accident airplane. The pilot's first recorded flight in the accident airplane was completed on February 19, 2015. The pilot had accumulated 72.1 hours in the accident airplane. He had flown the accident airplane 41.8 hours during the previous 12 months, 15.0 hours during the past 6 months, and 7.5 hours during the previous 90 days. There was no record of the pilot flying the accident airplane during the 30 days before the flight.

The accident airplane was a 1976 Piper model PA-32R-300, serial number 32R-7680117. A 300-horsepower Lycoming model IO-540-K1A5D reciprocating engine, serial number L-14027-48A, powered the airplane through a constant-speed, two blade, Hartzell model HC-C2YK-1BF propeller, serial number CH35537B. The airplane had a retractable tricycle landing gear, was configured to seat five individuals, and had a certified maximum gross weight of 3,600 pounds. The airplane had a useful load of 1,376.75 pounds, according to the current weight-and-balance record dated November 30, 2012. The airplane was exported to Japan after being manufactured in January 1976. The airplane was subsequently imported back into the United States and issued an FAA airworthiness certificate on April 3, 1995. The current owners-of-record purchased and registered the airplane on April 30, 2015. The last annual inspection was completed on June 27, 2016, at 4,508.4 hours total airframe and engine time. The recording tachometer indicated 3,124.4 hours at the last annual inspection and 3,125.5 hours at the accident site. The airplane had accumulated 1.1 hours since the annual inspection. At the time of the accident, the airframe and engine had accumulated 4,509.5 since new. The engine had accumulated 465.5 hours since its last field overhaul, which was completed on August 9, 2012. The propeller had accumulated 561.5 hours since its last field overhaul, which was completed on February 7, 2012. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues. The airplane had two fuel tanks, one located in each wing, and a total fuel capacity of 98 gallons (94 gallons usable). A review of fueling records established that the airplane fuel tanks were topped-off before the accident flight.

The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at Houston Executive Airport (TME), Houston, Texas, about 12 miles west of the accident site. At 1615, the TME automated surface observing system reported the following weather conditions: wind 190 degrees true at 11 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 6,000 feet above ground level (agl), temperature 35 degrees Celsius, dew point 23 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting 30.00 inches of mercury.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.















HOUSTON - The Harris County Sheriff's Office is investigating a plane crash in west Harris County on Friday. The accident happened just after 4 p.m.

A small plane took off from West Houston Airport at 18000 Groschke Road and crashed in the woods nearby, according to officials. The plane caught fire in the woods a quarter-mile east of the runway. The plane was destroyed by fire after impact.

All four passengers died when the single-engine Piper PA-32 went down, officials said.

Gustavo Trevino recorded cell phone video seconds after the deadly crash.

Trevino works near West Houston Airport and saw the plane go down just after take off.

"The plane was taking off and I knew something was wrong," Trevino said.

He ran to the scene to look for people on board because he wanted to help.

"I tried to go in. I couldn't do anything," Trevino said. "The flames were too intense. Just too intense."

The plane crashed just a few feet from Sherry and George Turner's home.

They hear planes taking off and landing every day, but they knew something was wrong with this one.

"That didn't sound normal. As soon as I got outside, I saw the smoke and the heat signature from the fire," George said.

Investigators say they will use dental records and finger prints to identify them.

They haven't even confirmed the plane's tail number because it's so badly damage.

"The plane is completely destroyed and burned," DPS officer Stephen Woodard said. "Right now this is a terrible time for this community because this is a flight community. A lot of folks in this community own planes and they're pilots as well. So it's a trying time."

It is unclear what caused the plane to crash at this time.

"Right now, everything is being preserved. The aircraft engine and all the instruments are in place waiting for the experts to come in and do the proper investigation," Woodard said.

Story and video:  http://www.click2houston.com



HOUSTON (KTRK) --  A small plane crashed into a grassy area near West Houston Airport, killing four people, according to Westlake EMS. The aircraft is completely destroyed.

The fiery crash was reported at about 4:15pm. The wreckage was discovered amid some trees not far from the airport, and very close to some homes. Officials say the plane experienced some type of engine failure shortly after takeoff and fell from the sky.

Multiple agencies were called to the scene, including the Harris County Sheriff's Office and the Westlake EMS. The FAA is investigating.

Story and video:  http://abc13.com









Houston (KPRC) —Four people have died in a small plane crash Friday near Houston, reports KPRC-TV.

The Harris County Sheriff's Office is investigating the crash. The accident happened just after 4 p.m.

A small plane took off from West Houston Airport and crashed in the woods nearby, according to officials.

The plane caught fire in the woods a quarter-mile east of the runway. The plane was destroyed by fire after impact.

All four passengers died when the single-engine Piper PA-32 went down, officials said.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.wcvb.com

Cessna 177RG Cardinal RG, Redwing Aviation LLC, N2759V: Incident occurred July 07, 2016 at Abilene Regional Airport (KABI), Abilene, Texas

REDWING AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2759V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Lubbock FSDO-13


AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, ABILENE, TEXAS.

Date: 08-JUL-16
Time: 00:25:00Z
Regis#: N2759V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 177RG
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ABILENE
State: Texas

Mooney M20F, N6962V; incident occurred July 07, 2016 in Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N6962V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

Date: 08-JUL-16
Time: 04:03:00Z
Regis#: N6962V
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20F
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PHOENIX
State: Arizona

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND STRUCK A TAXIWAY SIGN, PHOENIX, ARIZONA.

Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair, N296PB; incident occurred July 07, 2016 in Lubbock County, Texas -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N296PB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Lubbock FSDO-13

Date: 07-JUL-16
Time: 16:18:00Z
Regis#: N296PB
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LUBBOCK
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING ROLLOUT WENT OFF THE RUNWAY INTO THE GRASS, LUBBOCK, TEXAS.

Mooney M20J 201, N87PM; incident occurred July 07, 2016 in Lincoln, Placer County, California -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.gov/N87PM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

Date: 07-JUL-16
Time: 21:25:00Z
Regis#: N87PM
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LINCOLN
State: California

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA.

Cessna 152, US Aviation Group LLC, N5331B: Accident occurred July 07, 2016 at Bridgeport Municipal Airport (KXBP), Wise County, Texas

US AVIATION GROUP LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N5331B

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA259
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in Bridgeport, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 152, registration: N5331B
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2016, about 2030 central daylight time, a Cessna 152 airplane, N5331B, was damaged during a landing at the Bridgeport Municipal Airport (KXBP), Bridgeport, Texas. The private rated pilot and pilot rated passenger were not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to US Aviation Group LLC and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Denton Enterprise Airport (KDTO), Denton, Texas, about 1945.

According to the pilot, on the third touch-and-go to runway 18 at KXBP, the ground run was longer and the airplane had difficultly climbing away from the runway. He noticed the flaps were still at 30-degrees despite the flap handle being in the up position. The pilot made a 180-degree turn to land on runway 36. After the airplane landed the pilot applied the brakes, the airplane swerved and exited the side of the runway. The nose wheel dug in the soil and the airplane nosed over coming to rest inverted.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Four-hour rescue 'not acceptable': Strathcona County Emergency Services -Kathryn's Report








A four-hour rescue mission may be deemed as unacceptable; however, Strathcona County Emergency Services made the right decisions.

On Tuesday, June 28, a 76-year-old pilot took off from South Cooking Lake Airport. Shortly after, the plane snagged the water of the lake, causing the plane to flip over into the water.

Once Strathcona County Emergency Services arrived on scene, the rescue did not work in their favor as several problems occurred, preventing the rescue team from getting to the pilot in a timely matter.

“The water rescue team attempted several different locations for accessing the lake,” said Iain Bushell, Strathcona County Emergency Services fire chief, during a presentation to county council on Tuesday, July 5.

“The first place they went was Range Road 214, they went back to the staging area, which was the Cooking Lake Sailing Club. Their first attempt was unsuccessful there.

“They moved to the airport and at one point, they did a drive by of the park that’s in South Cooking Lake; however, the access there was blocked by concrete barriers and there was no access to the lake from that point. They also attempted Range Road 213... that was where they got the airboat stuck the worst due to the mud.”

He said the water rescue team attempted three pre-planned launch locations and one alternate location for the airboat.

“We have been to Cooking Lake,” Bushell said. “We have practiced on Cooking Lake and we have identified three locations where we can and should be able to access the lake if we need to, so it is not that we showed up at the lake and we had no idea what we were doing or where we were going. We tried three different locations.”

The low water levels of South Cooking Lake presented several challenges for the rescue team and Bushell noted that if this rescue had occurred 25 years ago, the boat would have been in the water within five minutes.

“The team had last been at the lake and done a complete reconnaissance at the end of April,” Bushell said.

“Water levels had changed since the end of April. There was a bit of an expectation of success on the part of my water rescue team that they were going to go to their first, primary location, they were going to launch the boat, just like we did the last time we trained here, and this was going to go well.”

Road access conditions at the Sailing Club also presented challenges, as the road was not in good condition and was considered unsafe.

Strathcona County Emergency Services is going to conduct a thorough review of all their procedures, including the activation of the team, where the equipment is staged, how long it took to get the team to the location and how they identified where they should launch first.

“It is not that we don’t know what we are doing, this just didn’t go well,” Bushell said. “Every decision that was made, I reviewed it and I don’t disagree with each one of those individual decisions.”

He added that based on the review, Strathcona County Emergency Services will consider moving to Plan C and Plan D more quicker and activating resources a little more promptly.

“Viewed from the public and both my perspective, a water rescue that takes over four hours is not acceptable,” Bushell said. “I don’t think it is acceptable. I am not happy. The team is not very pleased with their own performance, so we understand the public scrutiny we received because on the face of it, why did it take us four hours to get to the middle of the lake?, that sounds pretty unreasonable... but there were a number of factors that led to that.”

As the councillor who oversees South Cooking Lake, Bonnie Riddell asked if the other lakes in the county would be considered for review and Bushell said the review will go beyond South Cooking Lake.

SCES will return to a future council meeting with a finalized review.

Original article can be found here: http://www.sherwoodparknews.com 

Story and video: http://globalnews.ca

Jackson-Medgar Wiley Evers International Airport (KJAN) mystery: Were runway lights on or off? -Kathryn's Report

Last week, two planes that flew to Jackson-Medgar Wiley Evers International Airport were rerouted back to their originating airports as they were descending. According to one of the airlines, the runway lights in Jackson were off.

Officials at the Jackson airport dispute that claim.

“All of the lights were fully functional,” said Bonnie Wilson, chief administrative officer of the airport.

American Airlines Flight 5333 left Charlotte, North Carolina, at 12:26 a.m. EDT June 28, according to flight-tracking website FlightAware. It was diverted back at Charlotte/Douglas International Airport, landing at 2:58 a.m. EDT.

Landon Kelly, of Hoboken, New Jersey, was onboard the American Airlines flight. Kelly said he dozed off mid-flight but awoke to the pilot saying the flight was diverting back to Charlotte because the lights on the runway were off.

When he heard the pilot's announcement, Kelly thought it was a "practical joke."

"I thought it was a joke, but that was absolutely the truth," Kelly said. "We turned around and went to Charlotte."

Wilson said American Airlines contacted the airport to report the problem. Maintenance crews immediately went to the runway, Wilson said, but found the lights in working order. Crews were then sent to the tower to check internal systems.

“We had absolutely no interruption in service,” she said.

The American Airlines media relations team said, via email, “The pilot was in contact with the FAA’s Memphis Center, who stated the lights were out of service. They also stated that other aircraft were having similar issues.”

American Airlines referred other questions to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The FAA said it did not receive reports of problems with the flight  landing at the Jackson airport.

In an official statement, the agency said, "The FAA will be looking into the diversion of both flights."

Mesa Air Group Flight 5629 was also diverted. According to FlightAware, the flight left Dallas at 12:12 a.m., Tuesday, June 28. The flight pattern shows the plane flying to Jackson then turning around and heading back to Dallas. It landed at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport at 12:53 a.m.

Mesa Air Group, which provides regional service for both American Airlines and United Airlines, did not return requests for comment.

Kelly and the other passengers on Flight 5333 slept at the Charlotte airport that night. He caught another flight to Jackson later that day. He also filed a complaint with the FAA, citing safety as a concern.

"I have flown thousands of flights, and I have never seen that," he said.

Original article can be found here: http://www.clarionledger.com

T-51 Mustang Kit, N548RR; accidents occurred July 07, 2016 and June 11, 2013 in St. Francis, Cheyenne County, Kansas -Kathryn's Report

http://registry.faa.govN548RR

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64 
  
NTSB Identification: CEN16LA253
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 07, 2016 in St. Francis, KS
Aircraft: ROGERS RICKY R T-51 MUSTANG KIT, registration: N548RR
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 7, 2016, about 0700 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur built Rogers T-51 Mustang, N548RR, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing after a loss of engine power during takeoff from the Cheyenne County Municipal Airport (SYF), St. Francis, Kansas. The pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The airplane was departing SYF on a local flight at the time of the accident. 

At 0655, the surface weather observation at SYF was wind calm, sky clear, 10 miles visibility, temperature 19 degrees C, dew point 13 degrees C, altimeter 29.83 inches of mercury. 

NTSB Identification: CEN13LA346
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 11, 2013 in St Francis, KS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/17/2015
Aircraft: ROGERS T-51 MUSTANG KIT, registration: N548RR
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot had been flying the amateur-built airplane for about 15 minutes at a cruise altitude of between 4,000 and 5,000 ft when he attempted to slow the engine rpm by pulling the propeller control back; however, this had no effect on the engine rpm. The pilot attempted to slow the rpm several times, but the propeller then cycled to “full bite” and remained that way until he performed a wheels-up landing on a rough road. 

The airplane had accumulated 50 hours of total flight time at the time of the accident. During a postaccident test run, the engine ran normally. Oil was drained from the propeller gearbox, and it presented a used appearance. The propeller governor was subsequently bench tested and did not meet the manufacturer’s test specifications. A disassembly of the governor revealed the presence of foreign debris and wear marks on several parts of the governor. After the governor was cleaned and reassembled, it was bench tested again, and it operated normally. The pilot reported that, after the accident, the airplane was repaired, the engine and a new governor were installed, and the airplane operated without any anomalies. The foreign debris likely caused excessive wear inside the propeller governor, which subsequently led to its in-flight failure. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Foreign debris in the propeller governor, which led to excessive wear in the governor and its subsequent in-flight failure.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 11, 2013, about 0915 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Rogers T-51 Mustang kit airplane, N548RR, impacted terrain during a forced landing following a loss of engine thrust near St Francis, Kansas. The pilot was uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Cheyenne County Municipal Airport (SYF), near St Francis, Kansas, about 0900.

The pilot reported that he had been flying about 15 minutes, at a cruise altitude of 4,000 to 5,000 feet, when the propeller control had no effect on engine rpm. He said, "After several attempts to slow the rpm's, the prop cycled to full bite, lugging the engine." The propeller remained that way until the pilot performed a wheels up landing on a rough county road.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The 65-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a single-engine land rating. He held a FAA third-class medical certificate that was issued on May 2, 2013, with a limitation to wear corrective lenses. He reported that he had accumulated 2,415 hours of total flight time and 50 hours of total time in the same make and model as the accident airplane. His last flight review was on August 1, 2011.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane, serial number M08SV6SOHK0142, was a low wing, tandem, two-seat, dual control kit airplane. FAA records indicated that its application for a U.S. airworthiness certificate 8130-6 form was endorsed on March 9, 2012. 

The airplane was powered by a Honda 3.5L V6 engine with serial number J35A6-1206695, which drove a composite, constant speed, 4-bladed, 84 inch, Whirl Wind Hydraulic Propeller with serial number 100-4-84-171. A Jihostroj P-910-028/A governor with serial 102-008 controlled the propeller's pitch. The pilot reported that the airplane had accumulated 50 hours of total time at the time of the accident, and it had 20 gallons of aviation gasoline on board when it departed on the accident flight.

According to the kit manufacturer, the T-51D was rated at a +6g / -4g load limit capability at a weight of 1,650 lbs. When equipped with the Honda 3.5L V6 engine and the landing gear retracted, the T-51D cruised around 180 mph and had a climb rate of approximately 2,500 feet per minute. In landing configuration, the stall speed was in the 50 mph range. The airplane had a fuel capacity of 25 gallons.

The P-910-028/A propeller governor is a centrifugal hydraulic governor designed for control of single-acting hydraulic aircraft engine propellers. The governor regulates the set speed of the propeller by means of adjusting the blade angle depending on immediate flight conditions. The governor uses high oil pressure to increase the propeller blade angle. The force of spring, aerodynamic moments of propeller blades, and mass moments of propeller blades or weights act against this pressure.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0935, the recorded weather at SYF was: Wind calm; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 27 degrees C; dew point 10 degrees C; altimeter 29.78 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined and documented the airplane at the accident site. A review of images revealed the airplane sustained substantial wing and fuselage damage consistent with a wheels up landing.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The accident engine was removed from the airplane by the pilot and was shipped to the airplane kit manufacturer where it was test run under the supervision of a FAA inspector. The engine was operational and gauge readings, taken from a pressure gauge plumbed into the line from output of propeller governor to gearbox, were observed. With uncontrolled engine rpm, oil pressure was constant and propeller pressure cycled as designed in its specified pressure range. After testing was completed, the propeller gearbox was drained of the fresh oil. The oil presented a used appearance consistent with oil that had not been changed as recommended by the manufacturer.

The propeller governor was bench tested. The governor did not meet test specifications. The governor was subsequently torn down. Separation of the actuator valve face from the body revealed the presence of foreign debris intrusion. Its spool valve movement was restricted and not self-retracting. The flyweights were unable to function as required due to the stiffness and resistance created by the spool valve. Witness marks consistent with wear were observed on the spool valve spring, spool valve spring face, and on the actuator valve face. The spool valve and flyweights did not move freely and were extracted with the use of pliers. The governor was cleaned and re-assembled. It was operational during a subsequent bench test.

The propeller hub was tested with the application of shop air and no anomalies were observed during its test.

The accident propeller governor was subsequently shipped to its manufacturer in the Czech Republic by the kit manufacturer. An investigator from the Air Accidents Investigation Institute oversaw the testing and examination of the accident propeller governor. The governor was operational during their testing, however a post-test disassembly revealed wear consistent with abrasion debris or impurities.

ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

The Jihostroj Operation and Installation Manual for Constant Speed Propeller Governors, in part, stated:

Dirty Engine Oil

Contaminants in dirty engine oil can cause blockage of close tolerance passages in governor, leading to erratic operation.

Solution: Flush the governor in order to cleaning out contaminated oil.

Pollution of Engine Oil

Excessive dirt in the engine oil pollution can cause governor seizure.

Solution: Overhaul the governor.

The kit manufacturer returned the accident engine to the pilot along with a replacement governor. The pilot reported that the accident airplane was repaired, the engine and new governor were re-installed, and the airplane is operating without any anomalies.