Saturday, March 21, 2020

Flight Control System Malfunction/Failure: Denney Kitfox Model 3, N73BH; accident occurred May 02, 2018 at Stovall Ranch Number 4 Airport (6TX9), Marathon, Brewster County, Texas

Accident Site Wreckage. 


Accident Site View of Wings and Damaged Flaperon Attach Points. 

Wing rib reinforcement.


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N73BH

Location: Marathon, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA157
Date & Time: 05/02/2018, 1100 CDT
Registration: N73BH
Aircraft: HARTLINE J BON HARTLINE KITFOX III
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Flight control sys malf/fail
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 2, 2018, about 1100 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Kitfox III airplane, N73BH, was substantially substantial damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from the Stovall Ranch Airport (6TX9), Marathon, Texas. The airline transport pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The airplane was privately owned and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that during takeoff, about 15 ft above the ground, the airplane rolled violently to the right. He applied full aileron and rudder opposite the direction of the roll, but the airplane continued to roll to the right. The airplane struck the ground with the right wing and then impacted a mesquite tree.

Examination of the wreckage after the accident revealed that 3 of the 4 hinges connecting the right flaperon hangar rib were loose. The wooden (spruce) material of the flaperon appeared to by dry rotted where the hinges attached. According to records provided by the owner, the airplane had last flown about 6 months prior to the accident flight. Records showed that the airplane had about 3 hours of flight time since its most recent conditional airworthiness inspection which was performed on May 23, 2017.

Denny Aerocraft Company Service Bulletin #9, dated September 12, 1991, had identified flaperon hangar rib failures on Kitfox models I, II, and III. The service bulletin recommended the addition of an aluminum reinforcement on each flaperon hanger rib end. The accident airplane did not have the reinforcement installed.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 74, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/15/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/05/2017
Flight Time:  20000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 130 hours (Total, this make and model), 35 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 29 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HARTLINE J BON
Registration: N73BH
Model/Series: HARTLINE KITFOX III III
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1991
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number:1000 
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:2 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/23/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 3 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1184.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 912
Registered Owner: BOURGEOIS BARRY S
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KE38
Distance from Accident Site: 100 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1055 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 21 knots / 34 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Marathon, TX (6TX9)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Marathon, TX (6TX9)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:1100 CDT 
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Stovall Ranch Airport (6TX9)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 3010 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 29.855000, -102.791667 (est)

Piper PA-23-250 Aztec E, N14178: Accident occurred March 21, 2020 near North Eleuthera Airport, Bahamas


https://registry.faa.gov/N14178

Police are investigating the circumstances of a plane crash which occurred Saturday, March 21st, 2020 in waters off North Eleuthera.

Reports are that shortly before 2:00 pm, a Piper PA-23-250 Aztec, N14178,  crashed into the sea, near the settlement of Lower Bogue, with three persons onboard – the pilot and two passengers, after departing the North Eleuthera Airport.

Nassau Air Traffic Control was reported to have contacted the Police Control Room in Nassau at approximately 1:55pm about the crash.  

Last contact was said to have been 500 ft. from the shore line of the waters off of the North Eleuthera High School in Lower Bogue. 

Officers from the North Eleuthera Police Station responded to the scene and discovered that all of the passengers were well, with no one injured in the incident.

The pilot reported mechanical issues with one of his engines, which necessitated him executing a water landing.

Authorities said this matter was referred to the Air Accident Investigation Department for further investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://eleutheranews.com

Controlled Flight into Terrain: Yakovlev Yak 52, N2YK; accident occurred April 26, 2018 near Portland-Hillsboro Airport (KHIO), Washington County, Oregon

View of the accident site.
Federal Aviation Administration


View of the accident site. 
Federal Aviation Administration





The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2YK


Location: Hillsboro, OR
Accident Number: WPR18LA127
Date & Time: 04/26/2018, 1620 PDT
Registration: N2YK
Aircraft: YAKOVLEV YAK 52
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

On April 26, 2018, about 1620 Pacific daylight time, a Yakolev Yak 52, N2YK, sustained substantial damage during an off-airport landing following a loss of engine power about 3 miles south of the Portland-Hillsboro Airport (HIO), Hillsboro, Oregon. The airline transport pilot and pilot rated passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by Classic Aircraft Aviation Museum Inc. as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 positioning/ferry flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight, which originated from Hobby Field (77S), Creswell, Oregon, about 1530, with an intended destination of Scappoose Industrial Airpark (SPB), Scappoose, Oregon.

Representatives of the pilot reported that he did not have any recollection of the accident flight.

According to a pilot (witness), who was flying in formation with the accident airplane, the flight was abeam the Corvallis Airport, at 4,500 ft mean sea level (msl), when the pilot of the accident airplane informed him that the engine was "starting to miss." The witness asked the accident pilot of his intentions, to which the accident pilot replied he would continue to Hillsboro. As the flight was south of McMinnville Airport (MMV), McMinnville, Oregon, the accident pilot informed the witness that he might need to declare an emergency; however, did not specify the nature of the problem. The witness stated that the flight continued north, despite his repeated attempts to communicate with the accident pilot and tell him to land at MMV with no response.

The witness further stated that at that time, the accident airplane started a moderate descent from 4,500 ft msl, passed his airplane on the right side, and continued a heading toward HIO. The witness then transmitted a position report of nearby airports, with no response from the accident pilot. Shortly after, the accident pilot asked the witness about his location, in which the witness responded that he was in the 5 o'clock position, high, and one mile in trail.

The witness stated that he was convinced that the accident airplane was going to crash into a mountain ridge, as it was still descending. As the flight was east of Yamhill, Oregon, the accident airplane turned left, paralleling the ridge, on a northwesterly heading; however, it had descended to what appeared to be about 150-200 ft agl. The witness again asked the accident pilot of his intentions, with no response. The witness continued to observe the airplane on a northwesterly heading, at a low altitude, before the accident airplane turned to a northeasterly heading. A short time later, the witness saw the accident airplane turn to the right, go under his wing, and impacted trees about 3 miles southwest of HIO.

The witness added that throughout the flight from when the pilot reported the engine "starting to miss" to the time of the accident, they had overflown 6 airports that were "a suitable emergency airport."

The passenger, who was also a rated pilot and mechanic, reported that he recalled arriving at 77S, and the accident airplane was already moved from the hangar. Following a preflight with the pilot, he had signed the special flight permit, so he could add it to the airframe's logbook upon their arrival to SPB. The passenger stated that the engine start and taxi out was normal, and they took off, and climbed to about 3,000 or 4,000 ft, in loose formation with another airplane. The passenger flew the airplane for a while, before turning the airplane control over to the pilot. The passenger stated that sometime after giving control of the airplane to the pilot, the engine began to sputter, followed by the pilot saying they weren't going to SPB, but instead they were headed to Hillsboro. The passenger further stated that he recalled the impact with trees.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the fuselage and left wing were structurally damaged. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Examination of the recovered wreckage by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) and representatives of the FAA revealed that both wings had been separated from the airframe to facilitate wreckage transport. Flight control continuity was established throughout the airframe to all primary flight controls. Separations in the aileron control system was due to removal of the wing and impact damage.

Examination of the cockpit revealed that the throttle, mixture, propeller, and control lever continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the engine. The landing gear lever was "up," magnetos were "off", cowl flaps open, oil cooler half door open, lock lever mid span, carburetor heat off, fire valve mid-way between open and closed, throttle full forward, propeller pitch about 1 inch forward of the aft stop, lock lever full aft, primer in and locked, ventilation control lever full aft. Throttle, mixture, and propeller control lever continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the engine.

The engine remained attached to the airframe via its mounts. All fuel and oil lines appeared to remain secure and attached to their respective fittings. The intake and exhaust systems were impact damaged. No evidence of any exhaust leaks/preexisting damage was observed. The number 8 front and number 3 front spark plugs were impact damaged. The propeller remained attached. One propeller blade separated at the hub, and the opposing propeller blade was fractured/splintered about mid span.

The front spark plugs were removed and examined. The nos. 1, 8, and 9 spark plugs exhibited black deposits within the electrode area. Nos. 7 and 3 were impact damaged. Nos. 6, 5, 4, and 2 were oil soaked.

Rotational continuity of the engine crankshaft and internal valve train was established throughout all cylinders. All intake and exhaust pushrods moved equally when the crankshaft was rotated by hand. The accessory gears rotated accordingly when the crankshaft was rotated by hand.

The fuel vents appeared to be free of debris. The airframe fuel filter was removed and contained a liquid, consistent with 100 low lead fuel within the screen housing. The screen was free of debris. Both wing fuel tanks had been breached.

The carburetor, engine driven fuel pump, and both magnetos were removed for further examination.

Examination of the carburetor, engine driven fuel pump, and magnetos was conducted at the facilities of M14 Inc., Kingman, Arizona, under the supervision of the NTSB IIC. The left and right magnetos were found to be within E-gap and point gap specifications. Both magnetos produced spark and all ignition leads when the magneto drive shafts were rotated. Both magnetos were placed in an oven and heated to 225° F, and subsequently reinstalled on the test stand; both magnetos operated normally for 15 minutes with no anomalies noted.

The engine driven fuel pump was operated and found to function normally with no anomalies noted.

The carburetor was disassembled and inspected visually. No evidence of any preexisting anomalies were noted with the carburetor.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/13/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 19800 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 88, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 1650 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: YAKOVLEV
Registration: N2YK
Model/Series: YAK 52 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1993
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 9311703
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/18/1994, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2899 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 372 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Ivchenko
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: M14P
Registered Owner: CLASSIC AIRCRAFT AVIATION MUSEUM INC
Rated Power: 360 hp
Operator: CLASSIC AIRCRAFT AVIATION MUSEUM INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HIO, 208 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1553
Direction from Accident Site: 225°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.83 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Creswell, OR (77S)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Scappoose, OR (SPB)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 1530 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: PORTLAND-HILLSBORO (HIO)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 208 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 45.515556, -123.014444

Cessna 310I, N8080M: Fatal accident occurred March 21, 2020 near Charleston Executive Airport (KJZI), Johns Island, Charleston County, South Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbia, South Carolina
Continental Motors; Mobil, Alabama
Textron; Kansas City, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N8080M

Location: Charleston, SC
Accident Number: ERA20LA132
Date & Time: 03/21/2020, 1859 EDT
Registration: N8080M
Aircraft: Cessna 310
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On March 21, 2020, about 1859 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 310I, N8080M, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident in Charleston, South Carolina. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

On March 18, 2020, the pilot departed Zephyrhills Municipal Airport (ZPH), Zephyrhills, Florida and landed at South Jersey Regional Airport (VAY), Mount Holly, New Jersey, about 2030. The airplane remained on the ramp until March 21, 2020, when the pilot departed VAY for ZPH. The pilot landed at Rocky Mount-Wilson Regional Airport (RWI), Rocky Mount, North Carolina about 1630 for fuel and then continued the flight to ZPH on an instrument flight rules flight plan.

A review of preliminary air traffic control communications and radar data revealed that, about 1852, the airplane was en route to ZPH at an altitude of about 8,000 ft mean sea level (msl). About that time, the pilot told Charleston approach that the airplane was experiencing a loss of engine power and he needed to land immediately at the nearest airport. The Charleston approach controller gave him vectors to Charleston Executive Airport (JZI), and then asked the pilot which engine he was having problems with. The pilot told him "should be my left but having problems with both engines." The Charleston approach controller provided vectors to the pilot for runway 9 at JZI and radar contact with the airplane was lost about 1/4-mile northwest of the approach end for runway 9 about 1859.

A witness in the Charleston area stated he was on his patio when the airplane flew directly overhead. He said it sounded like "the engine was revving fast to slow as if it was having fuel problems." He said the airplane sputtered on and off for 15-20 seconds and then he could no longer hear the airplane.

Another witness stated he was in his backyard when the airplane flew over and sounded like it was having issues. It "seemed to stall and then rev back up" several times, as if the airplane "was running out of fuel."

Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the airplane was inverted, and fuel was on the ground around the airplane. The fuel was consistent with 100 low lead aviation fuel.

Examination of the wreckage by a National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator revealed that both wings were fractured off by impact forces with the trees. Both the main and auxiliary fuel tanks were breached. The fuel selector valves were in the auxiliary fuel tank position. The airplane was equipped with Garmin GTN-750 and G500 multi-function display units, which were removed and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorders laboratory for data download.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N8080M
Model/Series:310 I 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJZI, 17 ft msl
Observation Time: 2315 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 18°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / 15 knots, 210°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8500 ft agl
Visibility:  9 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Rocky Mount, NC (RWI)
Destination: Zephyrhills, FL (ZPH) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 32.708056, -80.015556 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Andrew Meyer, 64, of Tampa, Florida

Andy Meyer, left, holds his newborn granddaughter Aria in a photo posted to his Facebook page on March 19th. Meyer, 64, was flying the Cessna 310 at right on the way back to Tampa from Philadelphia after meeting Aria from when the plane crashed near Charleston Executive Airport in South Carolina on March 21st. He died at the scene. 

TAMPA — Andy Meyer refused to let a pandemic stop him from seeing his first grandchild.

An avid pilot, Meyer considered taking a commercial flight to Philadelphia last week to visit his daughter and her new baby, Aria. But with the Coronavirus spreading rapidly, he didn’t want to risk the exposure to the virus, said friend Omar Medina.

“He said it was a $66 dollar flight he could have taken,” Medina said. “He told me, ‘I’m not going to not see my grandchild.’"

So Meyer, the 64-year-old owner of Continental Wholesale Diamonds in Tampa, took Medina’s twin-engine Cessna. On the way back to Florida, as Meyer flew over Charleston, S.C., something went wrong.

“I’m losing my engine, I need to land quickly, can you get me to the closest airport?” Meyer told an air traffic controller, his voice calm but urgent.

The controller gave Meyer course headings to the nearby Charleston Executive Airport and asked if the left or right engine was malfunctioning.

“It should be my left but I’m having trouble with both,” he replied.

Over the next several minutes, the controller helped guide Meyer toward the airport. Meyer said he wasn’t sure he could maintain the required altitude, then stopped responding altogether.

“He’s flown for thousands of hours, you could hear how calm he was,” said Meyer’s son Jacob. “I don’t think there was a single second that he didn’t believe he wasn’t going to be able to land that plane.”

Sitting at the controls on the way home to Tampa , Andy Meyer had plenty of reasons to be happy, his son said.

Born and raised in Philadelphia, Meyer had been in the jewelry business for 40 years. He loved sales, interacting with people and being his own boss. He also made his two kids, Jacob and Gabrielle, a priority.

“He worked hard and put his life into the business, but he did everything for me and my sister,” said Jacob, 35, of Chicago. “He never missed a single thing. Sports, school, any special occasion, he was there.”

Meyer’s business struggled at times and some of the problems spilled over into his personal life, his son said. He went through a divorce about 15 years ago.

In 2012, the owners of a 35-year-old Tampa jewelry store named Continental Jewelry decided to get out of the business. Meyer was one of the store’s largest wholesale suppliers at the time and helped the owners liquidate the store.

Impressed by the business’s reputation and client loyalty, he incorporated the name into his own venture, Continental Wholesale Diamonds, according to a news release issued at the time. A year later, Meyer moved the store to the Westshore Center on Westshore Boulevard.

A graduate of the University of Miami, Meyer had always wanted to own a home in Florida and in 2016 bought a Harbour Island townhouse on Sparkman Channel. He became active at the Rodeph Sholom synagogue on Bayshore Boulevard and supported local charities, often by sponsoring events, such as the Tampa Jewish Community Centers and Federation and the Tampa Woman’s Club.

Continental Wholesale business hit a rough patch in 2018, prompting Meyer to file for bankruptcy. In a court filing, Meyer said much of the problem stemmed from an employee who stole from the business. He was determined to keep the business open and went ahead with plans to move to a larger space in a building a few blocks to the south.

“He’d worked so hard and had ups and downs, but he’d finally got himself into a place where he was building something great for himself,” Jacob Meyer said.

In 1999, Meyer and a friend flew a twin-engine Baron from Philadelphia across the North Atlantic Ocean, making stops in Scotland, England and Rome.

The trip speaks to Meyer’s skills, said Medina, a Tampa attorney.

“It shows he’s a skillful navigator, a careful planner and knows the condition of the airplane he’s in," he said. He called Meyer a cautious pilot who “did everything by the book."

Meyer had owned planes in the past but in recent years had rented to fly. When he decided he wanted to own one again, he made plans to become part-owner of a 1964 Cessna 310 that Medina had owned for more than two decades. Medina said the engines and props on the six-seat plane had less than 200 hours on them and he recently replaced the instrument panel with new, state of the art technology.

Medina said Meyer had flown 15 to 20 hours in the plane, including 10 with an instructor, a requirement by Medina’s insurance company for Meyer to be covered while flying by himself.

On March 18, a day after his daughter Gabrielle Sullivan gave birth, Meyer took off from Peter O. Knight Airport in Tampa and flew north to Philadelphia. In a photo he posted on Facebook the next day, Meyer is smiling as he holds the baby swaddled in a blanket with a pattern of pink roses.

“Say hello to Aria,” the post says.

Meyer left Philadelphia on March 21, stopping for fuel at Rocky Mount-Wilson Regional Airport in North Carolina. He took off again at 5:31 p.m., according to flightaware.com, and would have touched down about 8:15 p.m. at Zephyrhills Municipal Airport, where he planned to refuel before continuing on to Tampa.

He was about five miles northeast of Charleston Executive Airport when he radioed air traffic control to report engine trouble.

During the radio transmission, available on atc.net, Meyer told the controller he was alone and had three hours of fuel on board. The controller said they were notifying the airport he was on his way and had an emergency.

Over the next several minutes, Meyer struggled to get a visual on the airport. The controller asked Meyer if he could guide him in from the south, requiring Meyer to turn around. Meyer said okay.

The controller told Meyer he was about a half mile southeast of the airport and asked if he could maintain an altitude of 2,000 feet.

“I don’t know what I can maintain, just please give me...please give me where I’m going,” Meyer replied, his tone more urgent.

The controller told him to turn right but Meyer didn’t answer. The controller told him to check his altitude immediately. No answer.

“If you hear this transmission," the controller said, “radar contact lost.”

Back in Tampa, Jacob Meyer was at his father’s townhouse with his dad’s girlfriend, preparing a dinner of steak, chicken, fish and shrimp. Jacob had flown in from Chicago and hadn’t seen his father since Thanksgiving.

When his father didn’t show up by 8:20 p.m., Jacob checked flightaware.com and was puzzled to see his father had stopped in Charleston. Then he saw how his speed and altitude dropped steeply. When Meyer called the airport and relayed the plane’s tail number, the person who answered began to stammer as if unsure what to say, then asked him to hold.

Jacob searched online and saw Charleston news outlets reporting that a plane had crashed into a wooded area near the airport.

“From that point, it was just confirming what we already knew,” he said.

Jacob Meyer learned later the plane hit a tree and went down about 2,000 feet short of the runway. He was told his dad did not suffer.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash and typically releases a preliminary report within a month or so. A final report, which outlines the cause of the crash if possible, takes at least a year.

As word of his death spread, friends took to Facebook to pay tribute and flooded Jacob Meyer’s phone with condolences. Many had a similar refrain: He was kind, generous and always there when we needed him.

Jacob Meyer said he immediately made sure the jewelry store and its contents were secure. The next step is to do a complete inventory and then decide the store’s future.

On Thursday, Jacob flew to Philadelphia to see his father buried in a family plot. Jewish tradition calls for burial within 24 hours, so they wanted to proceed as quickly as possible. Because of the Coronavirus, only Jacob and a friend attended, and the funeral director live-streamed the burial on Zoom. Jacob called his sister on FaceTime and held his phone during the service.

After the pine box was lowered into the grave, Jacob dropped a shovelful of soil onto it, another tradition. He held the phone up so Gabrielle could say some final words to her dad, then dropped some soil for her.

Just as the service ended, a small private prop plane flew over the cemetery, the buzz of its engines breaking the silence.

At some point, after the pandemic ebbs and people can gather and embrace again, the family will hold a life celebration in Tampa, Jacob said.

“That’s when we’ll really be able to memorialize him.”

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.tampabay.com


Andy Meyer, right, is pictured in this family photo with his son Jacob Meyer, left, daughter Gabrielle Sullivan and son-in-law Jason Sullivan. The owner of Continental Wholesale Diamonds in Tampa, Andy Meyer was killed died March 21st when the Cessna 310 he was flying crashed near Charleston Executive Airport in South Carolina.


JOHNS ISLAND, South Carolina (WCIV) — This is the latest information on a plane crash that occurred near the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island, South Carolina, on March 21st, 2020.

(5:45 p.m., March 22)

A pilot is dead after his small airplane crashed Saturday evening, March 21st, outside Charleston.

Andrew Meyer, 64, of Tampa, Florida, died from injuries suffered when his Cessna 310I aircraft crashed near the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island around 7 p.m. Saturday, according to the Charleston County Coroner's Office.

Meyer was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash.

Air traffic control audio provided to ABC News 4 indicates Meyer's twin-engine plane may have been experiencing mechanical problems in one of its engines as he made his way from Rocky Mount, North Carolina, to Zephyrhills, Florida.

Federal aviation authorities are investigating the official cause of the incident.

(9:45 p.m., March 21st)

A Cessna 310I with only the pilot aboard crashed Saturday night the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island (KJZI), according to officials with the Federal Aviation Administration and the Charleston County Aviation Authority.

The plane crashed around 7 p.m. in a wooded area about one mile north of KJZI, according to Spencer Pryor, communications director for the Charleston County Aviation Authority.

The aircraft had departed from an airport in North Carolina headed for an airport in Florida, according to Arlene Salac, a regional spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The pilot was attempting to land at KJZI when the accident occurred, Salac added. Authorities have not revealed details about the pilot's condition.

KJZI is a small two-runway airport serving the general aviation community. It is located about 7 miles southwest of Charleston.

The Federal Aviation Administration is continuing to investigate the crash. The National Transportation Safety Board will work to determine the most likely cause of the accident.

The Charleston County Rescue Squad, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Charleston, the Charleston County Aviation Authority Police, local fire departments other emergency responders were dispatched to aid in search and rescue efforts.

(8:15 p.m., March 21st)

U.S. Coast Guard Sector Charleston helicopter crews are assisting in search and rescue operations related to a plane reported to have gone down near the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island on Saturday night.

A USCG spokesperson says Sector Charleston crews are aiding the Charleston County Sheriff's Office and other local emergency responders in search efforts.

Initial reports show one person was aboard the Cessna 310I, according to a Coast Guard spokesperson.

A source tells ABC News 4 the plane is believed to have gone down in a wooded area near marsh north of the airport.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://abcnews4.com



JOHNS ISLAND, South Carolina (WCBD) -Charleston County Rescue Squad, Charleston County Aviation Authority, Charleston County Police and Fire, and multiple other agencies responded to a call of a downed plane shortly after 7 p.m. on Saturday.

Charleston County Aviation Authority Deputy Director and Chief Communications Officer, Spencer Pryor, says the small aircraft crashed in the area of Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island.

On scene, a Cessna 310I was located crashed one mile north of the Charleston Executive Airport.

The Charleston County Coroner’s Office says that Andrew Meyer, 64, died as a result of the accident.

Meyer was the only occupant of the plane.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Cessna 310I departed from Rocky Mount Airport in North Carolina and intended to land at Zephyrhills Municipal Airport in Florida.

A source told News 2 that they could hear the plane’s engine cutting on and off.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board will work to determine the probable cause of the accident.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.counton2.com


JOHNS ISLAND, South Carolina (WCSC) - The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash of a small plane near the Charleston Executive Airport on Johns Island Saturday night.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson Arlene Salac said a Cessna 310 crashed one mile north of the airport at 7 p.m.

“The pilot was attempting to land in Charleston when the accident occurred,” she said.

The aircraft departed from Rocky Mount Airport in North Carolina and was headed to Zephyrhills Municipal Airport in Florida, she said.

The pilot was the only person on the plane, Salac said.

Shortly after 7 p.m., multiple agencies responded to a call of a downed small aircraft near the airport, Charleston International Airport spokesman Spencer Pryor said.

Coast Guard crews confirmed they found a Cessna 310 crashed in the wood line.

The Charleston County Rescue Squad, Charleston County Aviation Authority Police and Fire and other agencies responded.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the probable cause of the accident.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.live5news.com





Authorities have identified the victim of a plane crash that occurred on Johns Island on Saturday night.

Andrew Meyer, 64, of Tampa, Florida was the only person onboard, according to the Charleston County Coroner’s Office.

The airplane crashed around 7 p.m. Saturday. Meyer died from injuries he sustained from the impact of the crash.

The plane was a Cessna 310I traveling from Rocky Mount, N.C., to Florida. It was trying to land at Charleston Executive Airport, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

As Meyer tried to land, the plane crashed into the woods about a mile north of the airport, the FAA said.

The FAA is investigating the incident.

Original article ➤ https://www.postandcourier.com

Visual Flight Rules Encounter with Instrument Meteorological Conditions: Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N814GV; accident occurred April 11, 2018 near Atqasuk Edward Burnell Sr. Memorial Airport (PATQ), Atqasuk, Alaska

Post-accident photograph of N814GV.
National Transportation Safety Board

Post-accident photograph of N814GV.
National Transportation Safety Board

Post-accident photograph of N814GV.
National Transportation Safety Board

Post-accident photograph of N814GV.
National Transportation Safety Board



















The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska
Honeywell Aerospace; Phoenix, Arizona
Ravn Alaska; Anchorage, Alaska
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Hartzell Propeller; Piqua, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N814GV 


Location: Atqasuk, AK
Accident Number: ANC18LA031
Date & Time: 04/11/2018, 0818 AKD
Registration: N814GV
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: VFR encounter with IMC
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 11, 2018, about 0818 Alaska daylight time, a single-engine, turbine-powered Cessna 208B airplane, N814GV, impacted snow-covered terrain about 2 miles north of the Atqasuk Airport (PATQ), Atqasuk, Alaska. The airline transport pilot sustained minor injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was being operated by Hageland Aviation Services, Inc., dba Ravn Connect, Anchorage, Alaska, as a visual flight rules (VFR) commuter flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) existed at the flight's point of departure, and company flight-following procedures were in effect. The flight departed about 0759 from the Utqiagvik (formerly Barrow) Airport (PABR), Utqiagvik Alaska, and it was destined for PATQ.

Utqiagvik and Atqasuk are about 58 miles apart, and the area between the towns is remote, flat, featureless, tundra-covered terrain, which is snow-covered in April.

The director of safety for the company stated that the purpose of the flight was to transport a load of U.S. Postal Service mail to Atqasuk. The accident pilot said that he departed from Utqiagvik with about 1,500 pounds of mail on board. He noted that weather conditions at the time of departure were clear skies, 9 miles visibility, and a light wind. After takeoff, the airplane climbed to 2,500 feet mean sea level (msl) and proceeded southbound toward Atqasuk.

The pilot said that as the airplane neared Atqasuk, he descended to about 1,500 feet msl with the autopilot engaged and then noticed an area of low fog around Atqasuk. He said that when the airplane was about 2 miles from the airport, he heard the audible autopilot disengagement annunciator tone sound, which was immediately followed by the pilot's control column pitching forward. The pilot said that he was unable to pull the control column back, and the airplane subsequently descended into instrument meteorological conditions. He said that the airplane continued to descend into the fog, before impacting the snow-covered tundra and nosing over. The pilot stated that he recalled "having the yoke back, the plane recovering, but impacting the ground before fully recovered."

During a later interview, the pilot stated that after descending from 2,500 ft to 1,500 ft, he lost sight of Atqasuk and decided to turn toward the initial approach fix for the RNAV runway 6 approach into PATQ "not to initiate the approach, but to set myself up for the approach in a way that I was going to get a pop-up clearance for the approach, either from center or from Barrow Flight Service…as a relay through them." He remembered hearing an audible tone indicating the autopilot had disconnected. He said that shortly thereafter, the airplane began an uncommanded descent. He said he felt resistance on the control wheel while trying to recover. He did not recall the control wheel pitching forward at all during the descent. He further stated that he could not recall if he heard a Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS) alert at any point.

When asked about the decision to get a clearance, he stated that he knew he would have to climb back up as the initial approach fix requires the airplane be at 2,000 ft. However, he added that in order to get a clearance, the minimum altitude for radio communication would be about 3,000 ft.

In a follow-up interview, the pilot stated that after being level at 1,500 ft he remembered hearing what he believed was the autopilot disconnect tone, followed by the airplane entering a "strong descent." He said "[t]he control wheel definitely went forward." He said that he remembered pulling on the control wheel and thought he had leveled off, but then the airplane impacted the terrain.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 60, held an airline transport pilot certificate with a multi-engine land rating and commercial pilot privileges for single-engine land airplanes. His most recent first-class Federal Aviation Administration medical certificate was issued on May 23, 2017 and was not valid for any class after May 31, 2018.

The pilot's personal logbooks were not obtained; however, the operator provided the following hours of flight experience for the pilot: 7,713 total hours, including 7,193 hours in single-engine airplanes; 230 hours in the Cessna 208 in the previous 90 days; 90 hours in the previous 30 days; and 5 hours in the previous 24 hours. His most recent pilot competency check conducted in accordance with 14 CFR 135.293 was completed on November 12, 2017.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was manufactured in 2002. At the time of the most recent approved aircraft inspection program (AAIP) inspection on February 25, 2018, the airplane had a total time in service of 9,778.2 flight hours. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accrued 168 flight hours since the AAIP inspection.

The airplane was equipped with a Pratt and Whitney PT6A-114 turboprop engine rated at 675 horsepower. The engine had a total time in service of 3,950 hours.

The airplane was equipped with a Bendix/King (now Honeywell) KFC 225 automatic flight control system (AFCS). The system provided pitch, roll, and yaw damper control using gyros, servos, and an autopilot computer. The KC 225 flight computer provided pitch and roll guidance output commands to the pitch, roll, yaw, and trim servos. A total of 17 flight control components were removed from the airplane for testing postaccident.

The airplane was also equipped with a Honeywell KGP 560 general aviation enhanced ground proximity warning system (EGPWS) and automatic surveillance dependent-broadcast (ADS-B) "in and out" equipment.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0753, PABR reported wind from 030° at 9 knots, visibility 9 statute miles (sm), sky clear under 12,000 ft, temperature -14°C, dew point -16°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.66 inches of mercury.

When the accident airplane departed PABR at 0759, an available METAR at PATQ was reporting wind from 340° at 5 knots, visibility 1 ¾ sm, in light snow and mist, temperature -19°C, dew point -21°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.65 inches of mercury. At 0818, PATQ reported wind from 340° at 4 knots, 3/4 mile visibility, light snow, mist, temperature -19° C, dew point -21°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.64 inches of mercury. Between 0730 and 0759, the visibility decreased from 7 sm to 1 ¾ sm at PATQ.

A North Slope Borough Search and Rescue helicopter pilot reported that, while en route from Utqiagvik to the accident site, he encountered ice fog, reduced visibility, and flat light conditions that made it difficult to discern topographical features on the snow-covered tundra. He noted that as the flight continued, both pilots noticed ice beginning to accumulate on the helicopter's windscreen, so the decision was made to abort the search and rescue flight, and the helicopter returned to Utqiagvik.

Beginning on March 19, 2018, the FAA noted that the local Atqasuk "Service A" (the telecommunications service (circuit) via which weather observations are disseminated from the PATQ AWOS) was inoperative during the days leading up to and including the accident day, which affected long-line dissemination of the PATQ AWOS observations and the Atqasuk FAA weather camera imagery. The FAA indicated that both VHF and telephone transmissions from the PATQ AWOS had been "serviceable." Review of historical PATQ weather observations revealed that the last observation disseminated longline to the public prior to the accident occurred at 1040 AKDT on March 18, 2018. A Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) that advised of the PATQ AWOS ceilometer being out of service was active between April 3, 2018, and April 21, 2018. This issue was first noted by the FAA on December 26, 2017. According to the FAA, there were no requirements to issue NOTAMs for Service A or FAA weather camera outages. Review of historical PATQ weather observations revealed that the last sky condition observation disseminated longline to the public before the accident occurred at 2145 on December 25, 2017. For additional weather information, see the weather study in the public docket for this accident.

The pilot stated that he checked the AWOS for updated weather as he was about 15 minutes from PATQ and the weather was reporting 7 miles visibility. In the 18 minutes before the accident, from 0800 until 0818, the visibility reported by the AWOS was never greater than 1 ¾ sm.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted the snow-covered tundra in a nose-low attitude before flipping and coming to rest inverted. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, vertical stabilizer and rudder. The cockpit area was intact with the floorboards buckled upward and the glass broken. The instrument panel was slightly buckled outward. The right control column was missing, and the left control column was fractured at the base and the switch cap separated into two pieces. The top half of the vertical stabilizer was bent to the left and the rudder was completely buckled. The horizontal stabilizers sustained minor damage. The elevators could not be moved due to impact damage.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit to the ailerons, elevators, and the rudder rear bell crank. The autopilot bridle cables were attached and secure around the capstans. All bridle cables were in place and secured to their associated bell cranks. The pitch, roll, yaw, and pitch trim servos and capstans were removed and all had freedom of rotation. The flaps were secure in the full-up position. The elevator trim actuators each measured about 1.95 inches, which correlates to a 0° deflection (neutral position).

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Postaccident Department of Transportation urine drug testing was negative for urinary metabolites of drugs of abuse.

The pilot stated in an interview that he received a "very slight bump" on the left top back of his head during the impact. He said he had no recollection of when he hit his head or what he may have hit. He stated that there was no period where he was unconscious.

Emergency room records from about 8 hours after the accident documented that the pilot was alert and awake and had suffered minor abrasions. The pilot denied loss of consciousness as a result of the accident. Other than superficial abrasions, the examination found no abnormalities. Specifically, the record documented normal mental activity and speech.

TEST AND RESEARCH

KFC 225 Automatic Flight Control System

The accident airplane's autopilot components were removed from the airplane and examined, tested, and downloaded at the manufacturer's facility. When power was applied, the autopilot system components passed the autopilot preflight test. The autopilot was engaged/disengaged without faults and the servo operation functioned properly. No error codes were generated.

When power was first applied, the flight computer indicator displayed 2,500 ft as the last selected altitude stored in the configuration module. Additionally, there were no logged errors between power cycle 63 and 89 (the accident power cycle) and there were no recorded error events between power cycles 33 and 89.

Of the flight control components removed and tested, no pre-impact malfunctions or anomalies were found that would have precluded normal operation. For additional information regarding the testing of the flight control system components, please see the airworthiness factual report in the public docket for this accident.

Aircraft Performance Study

The airplane's EGPWS unit was downloaded on May 2, 2018, at the Honeywell facility in Redmond, Washington. Multiple terrain-proximity alerts were generated shortly before the airplane impacted the ground, which triggered the system to retain 24 seconds of GPS-based speed and position information in its non-volatile memory before the loss of power to the unit. This information, together with ADS-B data was used to conduct an aircraft performance study.

The airplane departed PABR runway 7 about 0759, turned right to a ground track of about 196° (true), and climbed to about 2,300 ft msl. About 0817:00, the airplane started a descent from 2,300 ft, and a few seconds later made a slight right turn to a ground track of about 216°. The last ADS-B transmission from the airplane was at 0818:27.8, when the airplane was descending through 850 ft msl about 260 ft per minute (fpm), at a groundspeed of 168 knots, and turning slightly right through 220°.

The first EGPWS data point was recorded at 0818:55.8 as the airplane was descending through 504 ft msl at 687 fpm; the groundspeed was 159 knots and the ground track was 241°. At 0819:00, the airplane started to roll right as it descended through 400 ft msl at 500 fpm. It reached a computed roll angle of about 29° 11 seconds later. Following a brief roll rate reversal, the roll angle increased to about 33° at 0819:17, and the ground track turned right to 276°. Shortly after, the descent rate increased, reaching about 2300 fpm at 0819:18. The EGPWS-recorded final track direction was 289°.

At 0819:15.8, the first of three EGPWS alerts was triggered. This was a "Mode 1 Pull Up" alert and would have resulted in an aural "pull up!" warning in the cockpit. Two additional EGPWS alerts were triggered at 0819:16.8 and 0819:18.8, consisting of "TCF Too Low Terrain" and "TAD Terrain Pull Up" alerts. These alerts would have resulted in aural "too low, terrain!" and "terrain, pull up!" warnings. Between 0819:18.8 and the last EGPWS data point recorded at 0819:19.8, the recorded rate of descent decreased from 2300 fpm to 1460 fpm. The GPS altitudes recorded at these points were 132 and 82 ft msl, respectively. The last recorded groundspeed was 158.5 knots.

The performance study indicated a continuous descent from about 2,500 ft msl to the last data point about 12ft above the surface. (See figure 1.)


Figure 1. Airplane performance chart during last 3 minutes of flight. 

The pilot stated that he did not recall hearing the EGPWS warnings. For additional information please see the aircraft performance study located in the public docket.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/23/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/12/2017
Flight Time:  7713 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7628 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 230 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 90 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N814GV
Model/Series: 208B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 208B0958
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 8
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/25/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9062 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 168 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 9778.2 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: P&W CANADA
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-114A
Registered Owner: ICECAP LLC TRUSTEE
Rated Power: 675 hp
Operator: HAGELAND AVIATION SERVICES INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Commuter Air Carrier (135); On-demand Air Taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: Ravn Connect
Operator Designator Code: EPUA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Unknown
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PABR
Distance from Accident Site: 58 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0753 ADT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  9 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.66 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -14°C / -16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Unknown Precipitation; Moderate - In the Vicinity - Low Drifting - Fog
Departure Point: Utqiagvik, AK (PABR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Atqasuk, AK (ATK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0758 ADT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: ATQASUK EDWARD BURNELL SR MEMO (ATK)
Runway Surface Type: Snow
Airport Elevation: 101 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Unknown 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 70.489722, -157.504722 (est)