Saturday, August 15, 2015

Cessna 182F Skylane, N5738F, registered to a private individual and operated by Pacific Coast Flyers: Fatal accident occurred August 06, 2015 in Montecito, Santa Barbara County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 06, 2015 in Montecito, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182F, registration: N5738F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a cross-country business flight. While en route to the destination airport, the pilot reported to an air traffic controller that they were going to lose an engine. The flight was over mountainous terrain; the controller provided nearby airports to the pilot, and the pilot chose a diversionary airport. The pilot then reported that the airplane was experiencing vibrations and that he could not see anything due to oil on his windscreen, as well as smoke that had entered into the cabin. The controller told the pilot that he would report an emergency for him; no further communications were received from the pilot. The airplane was located the following morning in mountainous terrain. 

The airplane struck a mountain at an elevation of 3,554 ft. On-site examination of the wreckage revealed that the airplane came to rest inverted with the undercarriage covered in oil from the nose to the tail. An examination of the airframe revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The engine teardown examination revealed a hole in the engine crankcase above the No. 6 connecting rod. The No. 5 connecting rod had fractured and separated from the crankshaft, which caused internal damage to the engine and led to the loss of engine power. The internal components exhibited signs of oil starvation; however, the cause of the oil starvation could not be determined. 

Although a small amount of ethanol was detected in the pilot's cavity blood, no ethanol was detected in the vitreous or urine, indicating that the detected ethanol was likely due to postmortem production and did not contribute to the accident. Although the pilot's tissue samples tested positive for small amounts of the inactive metabolite of marijuana, no active drug was detected in the pilot's blood; therefore, the pilot was likely not experiencing significant effects from his marijuana use at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Oil starvation that led to the failure of the No. 5 connecting rod and a subsequent loss of engine power.




Birger Greg Bacino

David Keith Martz



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Operator: Pacific Coast Flyers


http://registry.faa.gov/N5738F




NTSB Identification: WPR15FA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 06, 2015 in Montecito, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182F, registration: N5738F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 6, 2015, about 2210 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182F airplane, N5738F, impacted mountainous terrain about 15 miles northeast of Montecito, California. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Pacific Coast Flyers as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 cross-country business flight. Night visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight had departed from the San Luis County Regional Airport, San Luis Obispo, California, at an undetermined time, and was destined for Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport, Carlsbad, California.

The pilot checked in with Point Mugu Approach Control at 2147:31. Less than 1 minute later, the pilot reported that there was a problem, and reported that he wasn't sure where they were going from here, and asked for directions. At 2148:26, the pilot reported that they were going to lose an engine, and then stated, "here something just happened." The controller and the pilot then discussed nearby diversionary airports, they chose Santa Barbara. At 2149:27, the pilot reported vibrations and that he couldn't see anything. He then reported an oil problem, "I think… we lost something." At 2150:21, the pilot reported that smoke was coming into the cabin; the controller told the pilot he was going to declare an emergency for him. No further communications were received from the pilot after 2150:58. At 2151:34, the approach controller reported to the Los Angeles Air Route Traffic Control Center that the accident airplane had blown something, that the windshield was covered with oil, that there was smoke in the cockpit, and that the pilot was attempting to get to Santa Barbara.

The Ventura County Sheriff's Department located the airplane wreckage the next morning at 0430 in mountainous terrain.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with a rotorcraft-helicopter rating, and private pilot privileges for airplane single- and multiengine land.
The pilot's personal flight records were not located. A review of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airmen medical records revealed that the pilot was issued a time-limited, special issuance, second-class on March 7, 2015. On his medical certificate application, the pilot reported 6,250 total flight hours and 50 hours in the previous 6 months. The Aerospace Medical Certification Division withdrew the special issuance and issued a general denial on April 27, 2015, for alcohol dependence and failure to report a 2013 DUI. On July 29, 2015, the pilot requested a reconsideration because he had completed alcohol treatment and was in aftercare, but a decision was pending at the time of the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number 18254796, was manufactured in 1963. It was powered by a Continental Motors O-470-R 230-horsepower reciprocating engine.

The airplane was purchased by a private owner on November 22, 2014, and was leased to Pacific Coast Flyers as a rental airplane.

A review of the airplane's maintenance logbook revealed that an annual/100-hour inspection was completed on May 1, 2015, at which time the airframe total time was 6,050.25 hours, and the engine time since major overhaul was 250.4 hours.

The engine was overhauled by Corona Aircraft Engines, Corona, California; test run, and returned to service on September 10, 2009, as a zero hours-SMOH engine. The engine was installed on the accident airplane on September 18, 2009, at an airframe total time of 5,529.85 hours.

A March 18, 2011, Blackstone Laboratories oil sample report noted that there was an excessive amount of metal in an oil sample; that had been submitted for testing, and suggested a thorough inspection of the engine before operating the airplane. An April 29, 2013, oil sample report noted that there was some improvement, but that an excessive amount of metal was still present in the oil sample, and that "this engine could have some serious issues in the works." The report suggested that the operator look for cylinder issues and/or exhaust valve guide problems, change the oil every 30 hours, and proceed with caution.

A December 9, 2013, Blackstone Laboratories oil sample report indicated that the amount of wear metals in the sample were "coming down" from previous samples, but recommended that the operator try a shorter oil run to wash out the excess metals and then resample the oil in about 30 hours. An April 15, 2014, oil sample report showed that the amount of wear metals in the oil sample were much lower, and that the improvements were promising. The laboratory suggested using another shorter oil run, and submitting another sample. A February 19, 2015, oil sample report stated that the oil sample was better than past samples, and that the wear metals were in the average range. There was no contamination identified at this time; engine total time was 486 hours since major overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest weather reporting station from the accident site was located 23 nautical miles southwest of the accident site at the Santa Barbara Municipal airport (SBA), Santa Barbara, California.

At 2153, the weather was reported as clear sky, visibility 10 statute miles. The temperature was 21 degrees C, dew point was 17 degrees C. The wind was from 100 degrees at 6 knots. The altimeter setting was 29.83 Hg.
The end of civil twilight occurred at 2023.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a mountain at an elevation of 3,554 ft. The airplane came to rest inverted on a near-vertical slope about 300 feet below the top of the ridgeline; the airplane came to rest about 50 ft below the impact point. The airframe examination revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Oil was observed on the airplane's undercarriage from the nose to the tail cone. A visual examination of the engine revealed a hole in the top of the engine case near the No. 6 cylinder. The engine was shipped to the manufacturer for further examination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Santa Barbara County Sheriff-Coroner, Coroner's Bureau, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was reported as "multiple traumatic injuries."

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The testing detected 0.0431 and 0.002 (ug/ml, ug/g) tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid, the inactive metabolite of marijuana in the liver and cavity blood respectively; no tetrahydrocannabinol (marijuana) was detected in the cavity blood.

No ethanol was detected in the urine or vitreous; 67 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol was detected in cavity blood.

TEST AND RESEARCH

An engine teardown examination was performed, and it revealed that the No. 5 connecting rod had fractured and separated from the crankshaft, which caused internal damage to the engine. The engine's internal components exhibited signs of oil starvation. Residual oil was found in the top and front of the engine crankcase.

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 06, 2015 in Montecito, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182F, registration: N5738F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 6, 2015, about 2210 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182F, N5738F, impacted mountainous terrain about 15 miles northeast of Montecito, California. The pilot operated the rental airplane from Pacific Coast Flyers, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a business cross-country flight. The pilot and one passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight had departed from the San Luis County Regional Airport (SBP), San Luis Obispo, California, at an undetermined time. The flight was destined for Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport (CRQ), Carlsbad, California. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight, and no flight plan had been filed. 

The pilot radioed a mayday call to an air traffic controller at Point Magu Naval Air Station, and indicated that he had oil on his windscreen and smoke in the cockpit. Subsequently radio and radar contact was lost. An Alert Notification (ALNOT) was issued at 2212. The airplane was located the following morning at 0430 in mountainous terrain by the Ventura County Sheriff's Department.

Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department and a Search and Rescue crew accessed the site, and reported that the airplane came to rest inverted about 300 feet from the top of the ridgeline. 

The National Transportation Safety Board, Federal Aviation Administration, and Cessna Aircraft responded to the site. The airplane had impacted the mountain about 50 feet above its final resting spot. Oil was observed from the nose of the airplane to the tail cone.  A further inspection of the airplane will take place following its recovery. Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 06, 2015 in Montecito, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/28/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 182F, registration: N5738F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting a cross-country business flight. While en route to the destination airport, the pilot reported to an air traffic controller that they were going to lose an engine. The flight was over mountainous terrain; the controller provided nearby airports to the pilot, and the pilot chose a diversionary airport. The pilot then reported that the airplane was experiencing vibrations and that he could not see anything due to oil on his windscreen, as well as smoke that had entered into the cabin. The controller told the pilot that he would report an emergency for him; no further communications were received from the pilot. The airplane was located the following morning in mountainous terrain. 

The airplane struck a mountain at an elevation of 3,554 ft. On-site examination of the wreckage revealed that the airplane came to rest inverted with the undercarriage covered in oil from the nose to the tail. An examination of the airframe revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The engine teardown examination revealed a hole in the engine crankcase above the No. 6 connecting rod. The No. 5 connecting rod had fractured and separated from the crankshaft, which caused internal damage to the engine and led to the loss of engine power. The internal components exhibited signs of oil starvation; however, the cause of the oil starvation could not be determined. 

Although a small amount of ethanol was detected in the pilot's cavity blood, no ethanol was detected in the vitreous or urine, indicating that the detected ethanol was likely due to postmortem production and did not contribute to the accident. Although the pilot's tissue samples tested positive for small amounts of the inactive metabolite of marijuana, no active drug was detected in the pilot's blood; therefore, the pilot was likely not experiencing significant effects from his marijuana use at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Oil starvation that led to the failure of the No. 5 connecting rod and a subsequent loss of engine power.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 6, 2015, about 2210 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182F airplane, N5738F, impacted mountainous terrain about 15 miles northeast of Montecito, California. The pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Pacific Coast Flyers as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 cross-country business flight. Night visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed. The flight had departed from the San Luis County Regional Airport, San Luis Obispo, California, at an undetermined time, and was destined for Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport, Carlsbad, California.

The pilot checked in with Point Mugu Approach Control at 2147:31. Less than 1 minute later, the pilot reported that there was a problem, and reported that he wasn't sure where they were going from here, and asked for directions. At 2148:26, the pilot reported that they were going to lose an engine, and then stated, "here something just happened." The controller and the pilot then discussed nearby diversionary airports, they chose Santa Barbara. At 2149:27, the pilot reported vibrations and that he couldn't see anything. He then reported an oil problem, "I think… we lost something." At 2150:21, the pilot reported that smoke was coming into the cabin; the controller told the pilot he was going to declare an emergency for him. No further communications were received from the pilot after 2150:58. At 2151:34, the approach controller reported to the Los Angeles Air Route Traffic Control Center that the accident airplane had blown something, that the windshield was covered with oil, that there was smoke in the cockpit, and that the pilot was attempting to get to Santa Barbara.

The Ventura County Sheriff's Department located the airplane wreckage the next morning at 0430 in mountainous terrain.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with a rotorcraft-helicopter rating, and private pilot privileges for airplane single- and multiengine land.
The pilot's personal flight records were not located. A review of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airmen medical records revealed that the pilot was issued a time-limited, special issuance, second-class on March 7, 2015. On his medical certificate application, the pilot reported 6,250 total flight hours and 50 hours in the previous 6 months. The Aerospace Medical Certification Division withdrew the special issuance and issued a general denial on April 27, 2015, for alcohol dependence and failure to report a 2013 DUI. On July 29, 2015, the pilot requested a reconsideration because he had completed alcohol treatment and was in aftercare, but a decision was pending at the time of the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, high-wing, fixed-gear airplane, serial number 18254796, was manufactured in 1963. It was powered by a Continental Motors O-470-R 230-horsepower reciprocating engine.

The airplane was purchased by a private owner on November 22, 2014, and was leased to Pacific Coast Flyers as a rental airplane.
A review of the airplane's maintenance logbook revealed that an annual/100-hour inspection was completed on May 1, 2015, at which time the airframe total time was 6,050.25 hours, and the engine time since major overhaul was 250.4 hours.

The engine was overhauled by Corona Aircraft Engines, Corona, California; test run, and returned to service on September 10, 2009, as a zero hours-SMOH engine. The engine was installed on the accident airplane on September 18, 2009, at an airframe total time of 5,529.85 hours.

A March 18, 2011, Blackstone Laboratories oil sample report noted that there was an excessive amount of metal in an oil sample; that had been submitted for testing, and suggested a thorough inspection of the engine before operating the airplane. An April 29, 2013, oil sample report noted that there was some improvement, but that an excessive amount of metal was still present in the oil sample, and that "this engine could have some serious issues in the works." The report suggested that the operator look for cylinder issues and/or exhaust valve guide problems, change the oil every 30 hours, and proceed with caution.

A December 9, 2013, Blackstone Laboratories oil sample report indicated that the amount of wear metals in the sample were "coming down" from previous samples, but recommended that the operator try a shorter oil run to wash out the excess metals and then resample the oil in about 30 hours. An April 15, 2014, oil sample report showed that the amount of wear metals in the oil sample were much lower, and that the improvements were promising. The laboratory suggested using another shorter oil run, and submitting another sample. A February 19, 2015, oil sample report stated that the oil sample was better than past samples, and that the wear metals were in the average range. There was no contamination identified at this time; engine total time was 486 hours since major overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The nearest weather reporting station from the accident site was located 23 nautical miles southwest of the accident site at the Santa Barbara Municipal airport (SBA), Santa Barbara, California.

At 2153, the weather was reported as clear sky, visibility 10 statute miles. The temperature was 21 degrees C, dew point was 17 degrees C. The wind was from 100 degrees at 6 knots. The altimeter setting was 29.83 Hg.
The end of civil twilight occurred at 2023.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a mountain at an elevation of 3,554 ft. The airplane came to rest inverted on a near-vertical slope about 300 feet below the top of the ridgeline; the airplane came to rest about 50 ft below the impact point. The airframe examination revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Oil was observed on the airplane's undercarriage from the nose to the tail cone. A visual examination of the engine revealed a hole in the top of the engine case near the No. 6 cylinder. The engine was shipped to the manufacturer for further examination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Santa Barbara County Sheriff-Coroner, Coroner's Bureau, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was reported as "multiple traumatic injuries."

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The testing detected 0.0431 and 0.002 (ug/ml, ug/g) tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid, the inactive metabolite of marijuana in the liver and cavity blood respectively; no tetrahydrocannabinol (marijuana) was detected in the cavity blood.

No ethanol was detected in the urine or vitreous; 67 (mg/dL, mg/hg) ethanol was detected in cavity blood.

TEST AND RESEARCH

An engine teardown examination was performed, and it revealed that the No. 5 connecting rod had fractured and separated from the crankshaft, which caused internal damage to the engine. The engine's internal components exhibited signs of oil starvation. Residual oil was found in the top and front of the engine crankcase.


The pilot of a small plane that crashed earlier this month in Santa Barbara County, killing him and his passenger, had a long history of discipline by the Federal Aviation Administration and lacked the medical clearances required to fly.

Government records show that David K. Martz, 58, of San Diego lost his pilot's license three times over the years — the latest revocation occurring in 2009 after he had oral sex with an adult film actress while flying a helicopter.

Before the crash Aug. 6, Martz was facing a fourth revocation proceeding on allegations that he falsified his Federal Aviation Administration medical certificate related to two drunken driving convictions in 2013 and 2014. He surrendered the document in June during the agency's investigation.

The Federal Aviation Administration issues medical certifications to pilots after doctors determine they are healthy enough to operate aircraft.

"A person needs a pilot certificate and a current medical certificate to fly legally," said Ian Gregor, an Federal Aviation Administration spokesman in Los Angeles. "Mr. Martz did not have a valid medical certificate when last week's crash occurred."

Martz was at the controls of a Cessna 182F Skylane when it crashed into a steep hillside in a remote area of Los Padres National Forest north of Ojai. He reported engine trouble about 9:45 p.m., authorities said.

The plane was headed from Lompoc to McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad in north San Diego County. Also killed in the crash was Greg Bacino, 56, of San Diego.

Though Martz had a lengthy disciplinary record, it can be difficult for the Federal Aviation Administration to keep reckless, incompetent or rogue pilots out of the cockpit permanently. Under federal regulations, pilots can lose their licenses for a year and get them back by successfully re-testing after the revocation period expires.

There are exceptions, however. Air transport, commercial and private pilot licenses as well as medical certificates can be revoked permanently because of drug or alcohol dependencies, serious health issues, psychological problems, lack of good moral character, criminal convictions for narcotics trafficking or knowingly installing parts in aircraft that are not Federal Aviation Administration-certified.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, Martz first lost his commercial pilot's license for a year in 1986 for flying an aircraft without a valid registration and possessing a false medical certificate — the same charge he was facing before the Santa Barbara crash.

His flight privileges were revoked again in 2004 for operating an aircraft while his pilot's license was suspended and flying within 50 feet of people and property at the Miramar Marine Corps Air Station in San Diego.

The third revocation occurred in 2009 for recklessly operating a four-passenger Bell helicopter Martz had lent to an adult film company. While at the controls and hovering over San Diego, he was captured on videotape receiving oral sex from a Swedish porn star.

The Federal Aviation Administration also has suspended Martz's license several times starting in 2002, when he lost his flight privileges for 30 days for performing aerobatics below an altitude of 1,500 feet over a populated area. A 230-day suspension followed in 2005 after he flew passengers in a helicopter he knew was damaged.

The Federal Aviation Administration also investigated Martz in 2006 for landing a helicopter on Wattles Drive in the Hollywood Hills to pick up Motley Crue drummer Tommy Lee, who wanted to go to a Nine Inch Nails concert.

No disciplinary action resulted, but the Los Angeles city attorney's office charged Martz with reckless operation of an aircraft, landing an aircraft on a public road and landing an aircraft without a permit, all misdemeanors. Frank Mateljan, a city attorney spokesman, said Martz was placed on 36 months' probation and fined $1,000 after pleading guilty to a lesser charge.

Three years later while transporting Lee again, Martz was forced to land his helicopter at Van Nuys Airport after he reportedly flew very close to a Los Angeles police chopper. Authorities said Martz took a Breathalyzer test to determine if he was intoxicated, but it was inconclusive.

Original article can be found here: http://www.latimes.com

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 06, 2015 in Montecito, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182F, registration: N5738F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 6, 2015, about 2210 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182F, N5738F, impacted mountainous terrain about 15 miles northeast of Montecito, California. The pilot operated the rental airplane from Pacific Coast Flyers, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a business cross-country flight. The pilot and one passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight had departed from the San Luis County Regional Airport (SBP), San Luis Obispo, California, at an undetermined time. The flight was destined for Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport (CRQ), Carlsbad, California. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight, and no flight plan had been filed. 

The pilot radioed a mayday call to an air traffic controller at Point Magu Naval Air Station, and indicated that he had oil on his windscreen and smoke in the cockpit. Subsequently radio and radar contact was lost. An Alert Notification (ALNOT) was issued at 2212. The airplane was located the following morning at 0430 in mountainous terrain by the Ventura County Sheriff's Department.

Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department and a Search and Rescue crew accessed the site, and reported that the airplane came to rest inverted about 300 feet from the top of the ridgeline. 

The National Transportation Safety Board, Federal Aviation Administration, and Cessna Aircraft responded to the site. The airplane had impacted the mountain about 50 feet above its final resting spot. Oil was observed from the nose of the airplane to the tail cone.

A further inspection of the airplane will take place following its recovery.

Federal Aviation Administration reviewing whether Allegiant Air filed safety reports on time

The Federal Aviation Administration said Friday it is reviewing whether Allegiant Air failed to timely file safety reports detailing mechanical difficulties causing two emergency landings at St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport this summer.

The airline filed the "Service Difficulty Reports" about the June 17 and July 3 emergency landings Tuesday. That came after the Tampa Bay Times repeatedly asked the FAA and Allegiant to either provide the reports or explain why they were missing.

Federal regulations require the filing of such reports with the FAA generally within four days. Allegiant declined to discuss the reports for those two flights.

An SDR for a June 8 emergency landing at the airport was filed in a timely manner.

The FAA requires airlines to quickly file safety reports on serious mechanical problems on their planes so the agency can identify potentially dangerous flaws in aircraft systems.

"The FAA is looking into the timeliness of Service Difficulty Reports that Allegiant Air filed in connection with emergency landings on June 17 and July 3," FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said. "The FAA is working with the carrier to improve its SDR reporting process."

Allegiant has declined to provide much detail on the three emergency landings, so the reports provide the first glimpse of the mechanical issues that may have contributed to them.

On the afternoon of June 8, Allegiant Flight 864 departed St. Pete-Clearwater for Maryland with 141 passengers aboard. Shortly after takeoff, a flight attendant reported "smoke/fumes" like burning rubber, according to the SDR.

The plane made an emergency landing, deploying evacuation slides. Four passengers and a flight attendant suffered minor injuries.

Mechanics combed the aircraft to identify a malfunction. But the FAA report filed by the airline said they were unable to find any problem.

The June 8 incident was similar to the flight of a different Allegiant aircraft a week earlier that never made the news, according to reports reviewed by the Times.

That aircraft was descending into St. Pete-Clearwater when three out of four flight attendants "claim they felt dizzy & became nauseous" due to "smells like gunpowder & a mechanic shop" in the sixth row of passenger seats, an SDR filed for the flight said. Passengers, it noted, smelled nothing.

The pilot landed safely without declaring an emergency. Allegiant mechanics, the report said, could find nothing amiss with the aircraft.

In a statement, Allegiant declined to discuss that flight in detail. "We cannot speculate on the source of an odor for which we found no evidence of the source," the airline said.

On June 17, Allegiant Flight 866 departed the Pinellas airport with 154 passengers, headed to Pittsburgh, before returning for an emergency landing. Allegiant told the FAA that air-conditioning equipment failed, resulting in the aircraft being unable to maintain pressurization. The report said the pilot was forced to descend at the "maximum rate" of 3,000 feet per minute.

An inoperative control valve was later found by mechanics.

On July 3, Allegiant Flight 977 left Asheville, N.C., bound for Punta Gorda, but was forced to divert to St. Pete-Clearwater.

An Allegiant spokesperson had previously said an indicator light in the cockpit pointed to a potential problem with the alignment of the aircraft's spoilers, which rise from the wings to reduce lift during descent.

An SDR filed on the flight confirmed that and noted the problem was simply a broken sensor, which first malfunctioned at 2,000 feet.

Original article can be found here: http://www.tampabay.com

D.C., New York flight delays caused by air traffic glitch, Federal Aviation Administration says



A computer problem at a Virginia air traffic control center led to significant flight delays Saturday at airports in the Washington and New York City areas, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Airports with delays included Baltimore-Washington International Airport, where departures were stalled up to two hours as of 1:15 p.m. ET, the FAA said.

An unspecified problem emerged in a computer system that processes flight plans at the Washington Air Route Traffic Control Center in Leesburg, Virginia, forcing the FAA to temporarily halt departures for all planes at the D.C.-area's three major airports, the FAA said.

Flights from at least two Washington-area airports resumed in the early afternoon, said Kimberly Gibbs, spokeswoman for the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority.

But the stoppage had a domino effect, pushing back numerous flights.

The problem also affected planes that were in the sky at the time of the computer problem, with "high-altitude traffic" diverted around the center's airspace, FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said.

A map on flight-tracking website FlightRadar24.com seemed to illustrate the effect: Very few fights were shown over large parts of North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware early Saturday afternoon.

More planes were in the airspace by 1:30 p.m., with planes finally departing Washington-area airports. But planes taking off from the Washington airspace were being kept at an elevation of 10,000 feet or lower, images from FlightRadar24.com showed.

Major airlines acknowledged the East Coast delays.

"We have to make last-minute adjustments to flight plans," Delta Air Lines spokesman Morgan Durrant said. "Flights in and out of the three major D.C.-area airports may be delayed."

"There is an issue with air traffic control impacting all airlines' east coast flights. Please plan accordingly," American Airlines said on Twitter.

The FAA said general delays as of 1:15 p.m. ET included:

• Up to two hours at Baltimore-Washington International Airport

• Up to one hour at Washington Dulles International Airport

• 15 minutes or less at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport

• Up to one hour at New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport

• Up to 75 minutes at New York's LaGuardia Airport

• Up to 29 minutes at Newark Liberty International Airport

Source:  http://www.cnn.com

Friday, August 14, 2015

Piper PA-46-310P Malibu, N717BL: Men planned flights, car rentals in young girl's kidnapping




C L FAMILY LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N717BL


VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) -  A 5-year-old child has been reunited with her mother after officials said she was kidnapped from an elementary school playground.

It happened at Westside Elementary School around 2:15 p.m. Friday.

According to a report, two men walked onto the school property and snatched the 5-year-old.

A teacher saw what was happening and rushed to intervene, but was pushed away as the two men took the child away.

The teacher immediately told the school's resource officer, who notified the Lowndes County Sheriff's Office.

The two men left with the child in a car, and officials began searching for it with a description given by the teacher.

Deputies found the vehicle about 10 minutes later near the Valdosta Airport, where they were able to pull it over and recover the child.

The two men, identified as 33-year-old Michael Ray McCormick and 36-year-old David Scott Stapp, both of Biloxi, MS, were arrested without incident.

McCormick was charged with kidnapping, simple battery on a school official, and disruption of a school.

Stapp was charged with kidnapping (party to the crime), simple battery on a school official (party to the crime), and disruption of a school (party to the crime).

The child was then taken by officials and reunited with her mother, who is an airman at Moody Air Force Base in Valdosta.

The kidnapping plans

Investigators later learned that McCormick is the non-custodial parent of the child, and had traveled from Ocean Springs, Mississippi to Valdosta in a private plane. He had then rented a car to travel to the school.

Officials did not immediately confirm that the two men planned to take off the same day with the child, although they were caught close to the Valdosta Airport.

The Lowndes County Sheriff's Office said they found the plane that the two men arrived in at the airport and locked it in a hangar to collect evidence.

The plane the two men flew in was a Piper PA-46 with tail number N717BL, investigators reported.

Recorded flight tracking data revealed the plane departed from Trent Lott International Airport in Pascagoula, MS at 6:13 p.m. CDT Thursday and arrived at Valdosta Regional Airport at 8:47 p.m. EDT.

McCormick and Stapp were taken to the Lowndes County Jail. Booking photos of the two were expected to be released Friday night.

A bond hearing was set for the two, but a specific date was not immediately available.

Source: http://www.walb.com


Flight data revealed the plane departed from Trent Lott International Airport and arrived at Valdosta Regional Airport the day before the kidnapping. (Source: FlightAware.com)

Elk Grove Village Mayor Brings Truckload Of Comments To Last Federal Aviation Administration Hearing: Nearly 3,700 Comments Collected At 4 Meetings Attended By 2,230 People

FAA Great Lakes Regional Administrator Barry Cooper (center) talks with Elk Grove Village Mayor Craig Johnson and Itasca Mayor Jeff Pruyn in front of nearly 2,000 comment cards and printed emails delivered by the two mayors, Elk Grove Village trustees, Elk Grove officials and residents to the last of four FAA hearings at Belvedere Banquets in Elk Grove Thursday.



Elk Grove Village Mayor and Suburban O’Hare Commission (SOC) Chairman Craig Johnson, Itasca Mayor Jeff Pruyn, local officials and residents arrived at Thursday’s hearing on O’Hare Airport armed with 16 boxes filled with nearly 2,000 comment cards addressing airport noise.

From there, the comments were marched into a Federal Aviation Administration hearing at an Elk Grove Village banquet hall and presented directly to FAA Great Lakes Regional Administrator Barry Cooper.

As FAA staffers sorted the comment cards and emails, Johnson and Pruyn walked with Cooper through a series of exhibits meant to inform the public on progress of the O’Hare Modernization Plan (OMP), showing both current and projected noise impacts and flight paths around O’Hare. Johnson said he took the time to explain his and other SOC community residents’ concerns and explained what was being presented from his perspective.

Johnson said both Cooper and new Chicago Aviation Commissioner Ginger Evans have been open and receptive to hearing suggestions, something that has not always been the case through the years especially with Chicago officials who oversee O’Hare.

A contract between the airlines and FAA to use O’Hare is up for renewal in 2018. Johnson said he wants to see a more robust “Fly Quiet” regulations in place with consequences for violating, and would like the FAA to consider other recommendations expected in a report by aviation experts hired by SOC.

Among those expected recommendations is a steeper glide slope for aircraft landing at O’Hare. SOC consultant Bill DeBlazo said a steeper glide slope would mean less noise for those below. Cooper told the Journal & Topics the existing three-degree glide slope is the safest.

FAA officials recently changed flight patterns for aircraft on approach to O’Hare from using a series of stepped drops in altitude to a straight three-degree glide.

Johnson said the difference in stepped down glide slopes and the direct three-degree slope would not change much for communities closer to the airport. He said he understands O’Hare expansion is happening and said he wants to work with Chicago and the FAA to ensure the airport is a good neighbor.

One issue both SOC and local coalition Fair Allocation in Runways (FAiR) have pushed for is keeping two diagonal northwest-to-southeast runways, long the primary workhorses of O’Hare, open. Cooper said, “Our focus is on parallel (east-west) runways. Many (FAA) rules make use of the diagonals more complex.”

Addressing cross traffic, FAA Public Affairs Officer Tony Molinaro said new taxiways at O’Hare come in behind runways and no longer cross runways. Although aircraft taxi a greater distance, Molinaro said the “freeflow” configuration keeps planes moving, making the ride to the gate or runway further but faster for passengers.

Thursday’s hearing was the fourth and final FAA hearing on noise impacts from new runway construction in the OMP.

From Monday, Aug. 10 through Thursday, Aug, 13, the FAA collected 3,690 comments and saw 2.230 people attend four hearings in Niles, Chicago, Bensenville and Elk Grove Village.

Of the 2,230 attending, FAA officials said 600 attended Monday’s hearing at White Eagle Banquets in Niles, 400 attended the hearing in Chicago, 800 in Bensenville and 411 in Elk Grove Village.

Molinaro said a planned runway, which would see arrivals-only from the west, in line with Irving Park Road, would most affect Bensenville and was in part responsible for the higher turnout there.

The FAA also collected 3,690 comments on airport noise from members of the public, including 1,800 printed postcard-style comment cards collected by Elk Grove Village not including printed emails also collected by the village, Molinaro said.

Source:  http://www.journal-topics.com

A map models flight tracks of aircraft coming in and out of O'Hare Airport at Thursday's FAA hearing. The green dot represents Belvedere Banquets in Elk Grove Village where the hearing was held. 

Stafford Regional (KRMN), Virginia: Stafford airport authority hosts town hall meeting

Stafford Regional Airport Authority Chairman Hank Scharpenberg fields questions and comments from a crowd of some 70 people at the open house and town hall meeting Aug. 11. 



The Stafford Regional Airport Authority and several county supervisors faced a largely hostile crowd during an open house and town hall meeting Tuesday evening at the airport.

The authority hosted the meeting to present residents with a timeline of the airport’s history, an overview of current operations and plans for expansion.

Authority members also explained their Compatible Land Use guidelines clarifying the types of construction suitable near the airport and the effects of airport operations on neighbors.

Authority Chairman Hank Scharpenberg explained that the airport is planning a runway extension that is expected to bring larger corporate jets and boost the local economy. He added that the flight path to the runway would be altered to its original plan, slightly affecting some residences in the August Forge neighborhood.

While the authority got several compliments for operations and the expansion of the airport from a trailer to a terminal, other residents were not pleased.

New home-owners complained about aircraft noise into the evening hours and the accompanying vibration. Several residents questioned the three Stafford supervisors promoting the airport expansion, Meg Bohmke, Paul Milde and Robert Thomas, who were seated on the dais. The residents wanted to know why they were not informed of airport plans before they bought houses.

Supervisor Paul Milde, Aquia District, said the authority’s Compatible Land Use plan would clarify future expansion and possible effects. He noted that he would like to incorporate the plan into the county’s Capital Improvement Plan.

Scharpenberg pointed out that any expansion of the airport would require public hearings and that the process would be transparent.

Supervisors chairman Gary Snellings, who represents the airport area and sat in the audience as did Supervisors Jack Calavier and Laura Sellers, said he voted against the airport plan in June because it’s too complicated. He added that he was reflecting the sentiments of his constituents.

Cavalier noted that the authority’s plan will have to be tweaked to make it better for residents.

He also added that it was too bad the town hall meeting did not happen before the supervisors voted down the land-use plan.

Source:  http://www.insidenova.com


Visitors at the open house and town hall meeting view a map of the Stafford Regional Airport.

Concord Regional (KJQF), North Carolina: Concord moves ahead with airport expansion

Concord Regional Airport Director Rick Cloutier speaks to Concord City Council members at a work session on Tuesday.



CONCORD, N.C. -- Concord officials made concrete steps Tuesday toward the construction of a new terminal and parking deck at the Concord Regional Airport.

Council members passed one motion allowing airport staff to negotiate a financing agreement for the parking deck and related work not to exceed $6 million and another motion approving a $450,000 contract with The Wilson Group for parking deck design work. That amount is included with the $6 million.

The FAA and the state are paying for 95 percent of the new commercial terminal. The city’s 5 percent portion is estimated at about $1.06 million. About half of that will be part of the financing agreement, and the city will contribute another $500,000 directly.

Airport Director Rick Cloutier said terminal and parking deck construction will follow completion of the south ramp expansion authorized last year.

Increasing traffic from Allegiant Airlines and the potential for more low-cost carriers has created Concord’s need for a separate terminal and parking for commercial flights, city officials say.

The terminal will not be elaborate, but will provide space for at least two commercial carriers, rental car companies, limited concessions and office space to support those functions. Total square footage has not been determined.

The parking deck will have 700 spaces, 350 on each of its two levels, along with two elevators. The site grade will allow cars to drive directly into each level with no internal ramping.

City staff will make an application to the Local Government Commission and set a public hearing for the debt on Sept. 10.

Source:  http://www.independenttribune.com

Stinson SR-9B Reliant, N17154: Accident occurred August 14, 2015 near Brown Field Municipal Airport (KSDM), San Diego, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:  
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N17154

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA240
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 14, 2015 in Chula Vista, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/06/2017
Aircraft: STINSON SR 9B, registration: N17154
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot stated that, after about 30 minutes airborne on the local flight, the engine experienced a partial loss of power and the airplane began to lose altitude. The pilot switched the fuel selector to the other fuel tank and made a forced landing onto a highway. After touching down on the highway, the engine regained power and the pilot departed again; but shortly thereafter, the engine experienced a total loss of power. During the subsequent off-airport landing in a field, the airplane nosed over and came to rest inverted.

The pilot initially reported that he departed with about 20 gallons of fuel on board but was unsure of the exact quantity. He later stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airplane, and that the loss of power was likely the result of fuel starvation or exhaustion. During postaccident examination, there was no odor of fuel present around the wreckage and no evidence of fuel in the wing tanks or the fuel lines.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion as a result of the pilot’s failure to verify the fuel quantity before the flight.

On August 14, 2015, about 0700 Pacific daylight time, a Stinson SR-9B, N17154, experienced a total loss of engine power and landed in a dirt field in Chula Vista, California. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injury; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal local flight departed from Brown Field Municipal Airport, San Diego, California, about 0620. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The pilot stated that he departed for a short practice flight with about 20 gallons of fuel on board, but was not sure of the precise quantity. After about 30 minutes airborne, as he began his return flight back to the airport, the engine power reduced and the airplane began to lose altitude. He switched the fuel selector to the other fuel tank and made a forced landing onto the 125 highway. After touching down on the highway, the engine regained power and became airborne before he had time to react. He attempted to return back to Brown Field but shortly thereafter, the airplane experienced a total loss of power. He again prepared for an off-airport landing and during the landing roll in a dirt field adjacent to Eastlake Parkway and Hunt Parkway, the airplane flipped over and came to rest inverted.

The pilot, who had recently purchased the airplane, noted that the last annual inspection occurred about one month prior to the accident and had flown one hour since that maintenance. The pilot later stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures and the loss of power was likely the result of a fuel starvation or exhaustion.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors responded to the accident site. They stated that there was no smell of fuel present upon arrival. They further stated that removal of the wings and corresponding fuel lines revealed no evidence of fuel present in the tanks at the time of the accident; the fuel tanks did not appear breached. They opined that the loss of engine power was a result of fuel exhaustion.








CHULA VISTA — A small vintage plane made a touch-and-go landing on a Chula Vista freeway Friday, then flipped upside down onto a hillside more than three miles away, authorities said. 

The pilot, 65, suffered a tiny injury to one hand and caused no highway crashes. He was flying alone.

The pilot had taken off from Brown Field in Otay Mesa about 6:20 a.m. in a Stinson SR-9B Reliant and developed engine problems, Chula Vista fire Battalion Chief Chris Manroe said.

Police said the pilot, whose name was not released, was planning to fly to Point Loma and back.

He headed to state Route 125 for a landing strip. Motorists reported to the California Highway Patrol that a small plane had landed in southbound lanes near H Street about 6:45 a.m.

The aircraft briefly touched down, then regained power and took to the air again, police and fire officials said. The pilot tried to make it back to Brown Field, but the engine began failing again.

Minutes later, Chula Vista police got calls reporting that the plane had landed on a hill near Hunt and Eastlake parkways, three miles to the south past homes and schools. The pilot then aimed for a wide open space of dirt and low brush about half a mile east of the freeway, where the two roads deadend.

“He would have made it, but his wheels clipped a hill,” police Capt. Lon Turner said.

The plane landed hard and overturned. The jolt ripped off the front landing gear and caused serious damage to the aircraft.

The pilot was able to crawl out on his own. Paramedics evaluated him and put a small bandage on his hand injury.

He told authorities he had spent considerable time and money restoring the plane.

Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane is registered to John D. Nance of San Diego. The record said the Stinson SR-98 was manufactured in 1941. Authorities did not say whether Nance, 68, was the pilot.

A pilot escaped serious injury when his small plane went down in Chula Vista Friday morning while en route to Brown Field Municipal Airport, ending up down on a hillside. 

The Stinson SR-9B Reliant plane was first reported as touching down on state Route 125 south of East H Street after its engine failed around 6:45 a.m., according to a Chula Vista police statement. However, it was gone before authorities arrived.

It went down again shortly afterward on a hillside near the intersection of Eastlake and Hunte parkways, east of state Route 125, and came to a rest upside down, police said.

The plane was substantially damaged in the emergency landing, according to Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

The pilot was seen walking around after setting the aircraft down, police said. No one else was aboard.

The pilot was evaluated at the scene for complaints of pain, but was not taken to a hospital, according to police and fire officials.

FAA records showed the single-engine aircraft was registered to John D. Nance of San Diego, but it was not immediately confirmed if he was at the controls.

Gregor said the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board were investigating the emergency landing.