Monday, August 10, 2015

Incident occurred August 10, 2015 at Waukesha County Airport (KUES) Wisconsin

A pilot escaped injury Monday evening when a plane slid off a runway at Crites Field in Waukesha, according to the Waukesha County sheriff's office.

The aircraft had taken off from the airport but returned shortly before 7 p.m. after the pilot noticed mechanical problems, according to a news release from the sheriff's office.

The plane landed and struck a landing light at the end of the runway before it came to a stop on grass adjacent to the runway, according to the release.

The 57-year-old pilot was not injured, the plane sustained minor damage and the accident remained under investigation late Monday, according to the sheriff's office.

Source:  http://www.jsonline.com

Grumman American AA-5A Cheetah, N9684U: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, Illinois

Docket And Docket Items: http://dms.ntsb.gov 

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA347
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, IL
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5A, registration: N9684U
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 9, 2015, about 2050 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-5A airplane, N9684U, impacted terrain in the Shawnee National Forest near Harrisburg, Illinois. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the route of flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport (5M9), Marion, Kentucky, about 2030, and was en route to the Williamson County Regional Airport (KMWA), Marion, Illinois.

The pilot was not on a flight plan and was not in radio contact with any air traffic control center. An unconfirmed message from the pilot to his spouse about 2045 reported that the pilot was going to return to the airport; presumably 5M9. The airplane was located on August 10 in a heavily wooded area of the Shawnee National Forest.

A search of radar facilities did not find any primary or secondary radar targets consistent with the accident airplane. The airplane's exact route of flight could not be determined.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 36, held a combined student pilot and second class medical certificate issued on May 21, 2015. At the time of his application for the medical certificate, the pilot reported logging 30 hours of total time with 20 hours accumulated in the preceding six months.

The pilot's log book was not recovered during the course of the investigation, and the pilot's total experience could not be determined. It could not be determined if the pilot had received recent flight instruction and if he possessed a current solo endorsement. The amount of experience he had flying at night could not be determined.

The passenger was not pilot rated and the student pilot was not authorized to fly with passengers.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a Grumman AA-5A, serial number AA5A-0050, manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a 150-horsepower, normally aspirated, Lycoming O-320-E2G engine which drove a metal, 2-bladed, fixed-pitch, McCauley 1C172/BTM7359 propeller. The airplane's logbooks were not recovered and the airplane's maintenance history was not established. A September 7, 2013 auction listing for the airplane on an internet page, reported the engine hours at 7,578 hours, which also appeared in an included interior photo of the airplane's instrument panel.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A review of weather information revealed that at 1900 a low pressure system was over western Illinois with an associated frontal wave. A warm stationary front was in the immediate vicinity of the accident site which had the potential to form a partially cloudy sky. The closest weather reporting facility was the Harrisburg-Raleigh Airport (HSB), Harrisburg, Illinois, located about 15 nautical miles north of the accident site at an elevation of 398 feet mean sea level (msl). At 2035 the weather reporting facility at HSB reported wind from 070° at 3 knots, visibility 5 miles in mist, a clear sky, temperature 77° F, dew point 77° F, and a barometric pressure of 29.91 inches of mercury.

Data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 13 system found that at 2035, the accident site was located in an area ahead of a large mesoscale convective system (MCS). The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Severe Storms Laboratory defines a MCS as "a collection of thunderstorms that act as a system. An MCS can spread across an entire state and last more than 12 hours." Astronomical Conditions for the accident site found that the moon had set at 1648 and was below the horizon at the time of the accident.

There is no evidence of the pilot receiving a weather briefing prior to the flight.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

At the beginning of the debris path, several broken and downed trees tops were found with airplane wing parts suspended in the trees and on the ground. About 55 yards from the start of the tree strikes, generally aligned along a 320° magnetic heading, was an impact point that was about 2.5 feet deep. The main wreckage had come to rest partially outside of the impact point. The debris field continued another 25 yards through the trees. Impact signatures were consistent with the airplane impacting the ground at least 25° nose low.

Portions of the right wing were found near the tree strikes with left wing components found next when walking towards the impact crater. The engine and propeller were found at the bottom of the impact crater with the fuselage and empennage resting on top of the engine. Both wings were fragmented in multiple locations. When reconstructed, all flight controls were accounted for without any evidence of preimpact damage. The engine was removed from the fuselage and examined down to its crankshaft. No preimpact anomalies were detected with the engine. The propeller remained attached the engine at the propeller flange. One blade was curled rearward and displayed chordwise scratches, gouges, and leading edge polishing. The other blade remained straight with light leading edge polishing. No preimpact anomalies were detected with the airframe or engine.

A majority of the cockpit instrumentation was destroyed by impact force. The ignition switch was in the both position. The turn and slip indicator displayed a 45° right bank. The altimeter's Kollmans window displayed 29.92. The emergency location transmitter (ELT) was found separated from the airplane and the switch was found in the OFF position. Soil was deposited in the area surrounding the switch and its preimpact position could not be determined.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Although requested, the Pope County Coroner's Office did not perform an autopsy on the pilot, as the office deemed it not necessary due to the high velocity nature of the airplane crash.

A few milliliters of blood were recovered by the Country Coroner's Office. The entire sample was sent to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) for toxicology. The sample was marked putrefied. Testing detected 29 mg/dL of ethanol.

ERICH J. SNYDER: http://registry.faa.gov/N9684U

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA347
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harrisburg, IL
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5A, registration: N9684U
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2015, about 2050 central daylight time, a Grumman AA-5A airplane, N9684U, impacted terrain in the Shawnee National Forest near Harrisburg, Illinois. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the route of flight, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport (5M9), Marion, Kentucky, about 2030, and was en route to the Williamson County Regional Airport (KMWA), Marion, Illinois.

The airplane was located on August 10 in a heavily wooded area of the Shawnee National Forest. At the beginning of the debris path, several broken and downed trees tops were found with airplane wing parts suspended in the trees and on the ground. About 55 yards from the start of the tree strikes was an impact point that was about 2.5 feet deep. Near the impact point was the main wreckage. The debris field was aligned with a 320° magnetic heading and continued another 25 yards.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

At 2055, an automated weather reporting facility located at KMWA, about 20 nautical miles northwest of the accident site reported a wind from 210° at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, a broken ceiling at 8,000 feet, temperature 81° F, dew point 77° F, and barometric pressure of 29.92 inches of mercury. It listed a remark for lightning to the distant west and northwest of the station.

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Springfield FSDO-19

Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

POPE COUNTY, IL (KFVS) - Pope County Sheriff Jerry Suits has released the name of the victims of the small plane crash. 

He said the two victims, father and son, were Tommy Snyder, 59, of Zeigler, Ill., and Erich Snyder, 36, of Carterville, Ill.

Sheriff Suits say it took a while to identify the bodies and the Pope County Coroner had been waiting to notify the family members.

He said he was told it was a leisure trip for the two men. They spent the day in Marion, Ky.

NTSB and FAA are still investigating the crash. They are still on scene with the wreckage.

The Pope County sheriff said the investigation into a plane crash is just getting started.

Investigators say hikers found debris from the plane just after 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Aug. 10 and called for help.

Members of the search crew identified the plane. They say it was in a ditch off of one of the main cliffs in Burden Falls in the Shawnee National Forest. We're told both people on board the plane were killed, their names have not been released.

"The works not done," said Sheriff Jerry Suits. "We've got a big part of this completed, but the works not done here. We've got an incident, a scene here that we're going to have to clean up and we have the proper people here that's going to make that happen for us. We've still got to identify the bodies that was there."

The sheriff said he was happy to have found the plane, but he was hoping for better results.

"I'm very pleased about that," he said. "I think I said earlier that I wasn't pleased with my results, I'm now pleased with the results. As for the family, I'm sadden by it. I'm Pope County sheriff. It's not supposed to happen in my county, it can happen somewhere else, but don't happen here. So, that bothers me, but it got some closure now for the families and we're hoping to get there real quick for them."

The NTSB and FAA have taken over the investigation and will be releasing information at it becomes available.

Sheriff Suits said the plane was headed to Illinois with two people on board.

He said contact with the plane was lost some time during a storm. He said the pilot sent his wife a text message around 8:55 p.m. on Sunday saying he was flying in rough weather and having trouble. The plane wasn't heard from again.

Earlier on Monday afternoon, while still looking for the plane, he said they were doing their best, but having no luck.

The dense forest and rugged terrain slowed down the search for debris.

"It makes it very difficult of us," Sheriff Suits said. "We've had planes in the air today, looking down. We're looking for anything and right now we're not finding it."

Crews were focusing the search in the Shawnee National Forest. Deputies with multiple sheriff's departments and volunteers searched for more than 16 hours before hikers found the plane in a ravine.

"I'm gonna tell you I'm not Superman, but I'm going to stay out here until we find that aircraft," Sheriff Suits said.

Officials say they received reports of a possible plane crash early on Monday morning involving a single engine Cheetah Tiger, blue/white in color.

Officials were searching for evidence of a crash by ground and air, reportedly near the One Horse Gap area.

The search had been going on since approximately 2:30 a.m. by planes, horses and ATVs. Police say the forest canopy was making it extremely hard for searchers to find debris.

Illinois State Police, Emergency Management personnel, and Forest Service personnel were aiding in the search.

The Saline County Sheriff's Office, who was also aiding in the investigation, said the aircraft left from Marion, Ky. and was en route to Marion, Ill. when officials lost track of it.

Story, video and photo gallery:  http://www.kfvs12.com



POPE COUNTY, IL (KFVS) - The Pope County Sheriff's Department said they have found the wreckage of a plane in Pope County, Ill. on Monday, Aug. 10. 

According to Illinois State Police, there were no survivors from the crash in the Shawnee National Forest. Names of the victims are not being released pending family notification.

Pope County Sheriff Jerry Suits said the plane was found in western Pope County at about 6:40 p.m. by a U.S. Forest Service worker.

According to Peter Knudson with NTSB, they are investigating the crash of a Grumman AA-5B.

Knudson said on Monday night that an investigator was on his way to the area.

Sheriff Suits said a plane was headed to Illinois with two people on board.

He said contact with the plane was lost some time during a storm. He said the pilot sent his wife a text message around 8:55 p.m. on Sunday saying he was flying in rough weather and having trouble. The plane wasn't heard from again.

Earlier on Monday, while still looking for the plane, he said they were doing their best, but having no luck.

"It makes it very difficult of us," Sheriff Suits said. "We've had planes in the air today, looking down. We're looking for anything and right now we're not finding it."

Crews were focusing the search in the Shawnee National Forest.

"I'm gonna tell you I'm not Superman, but I'm going to stay out here until we find that aircraft," Sheriff Suits said.

Officials say they received reports of a possible plane crash early on Monday morning involving a single engine Cheetah Tiger, blue/white in color.

Officials were searching for evidence of a crash by ground and air, reportedly near the One Horse Gap area.

The search had been going on since approximately 2:30 a.m. by planes, horses and ATVs. Police say the forest canopy was making it extremely hard for searchers to find debris.

Illinois State Police, Emergency Management personnel, and Forest Service personnel were aiding in the search.

The Saline County Sheriff's Office, who was also aiding in the investigation, said the aircraft left from Marion, Ky. and was en route to Marion, Ill. when officials lost track of it.

Source:  http://www.kfvs12.com

Illinois State Police confirm that a hiker found a crashed plane roughly five miles northwest of Eddyville, Illinois Monday evening. 

The crash site is near Burden Falls in the Shawnee National Forest.  ISP Troopers confirm to Local 6's Holden Kurwicki  that the hiker discovered two deceased people inside the plane.  The identities of the deceased are not being released at this time.

ORIGINAL STORY:  The Pope County Sheriff's Office says they are looking for a plane that went missing Sunday night.

Pope County Sheriff Jerry Suits says they have set up a command center at Union Social Brethren Camp north of Eddyville, IL.

"They've been able to get an area here that we're getting more comfortable with searching and that's what we're going to do,” said Suits.

According to Suits, the plane took off from the Marion-Crittenden County Airport in Marion, Kentucky, Sunday afternoon with two people on board. The sheriff's office got a call around 2:30 a.m. that the plane may have gone missing.

They have already cleared a rural area of One Horse Gap Lake near Herod where they believed the downed plane might have been.

The entire search area is between Marion, Illinois and Marion, Kentucky and rough terrain has made coordinating search efforts a virtual nightmare.

"We don't have any cell service out here,” said Suits. “We have all of this technology, and I've got two of them and I can't get either one to work, but that's Pope County we're used to that."

To bridge the gaps in this rural area crews have relied on volunteers familiar with the terrain, but to this point no debris has been found.

"I've got some volunteers here on horseback and four wheelers that are helping us out,” said Suits. “It's a group effort for us and we appreciate their help."

However to this point, searchers have yet to find any evidence that the plane, and its two passengers, are nearby.

"I'm not Superman, but I'm going to stay out here until we find that aircraft,” said Suits.

Source:  http://www.wpsdlocal6.com

 











Aventura II, N6356Z, Stall Out Multiple Sclerosis LLC: Incident occurred August 10, 2015 in Lake Tyler, Smith County, Texas

Date: 10-AUG-15 
 Time: 09:00:00Z
Regis#: N6356Z
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Personal
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TYLER
State: Texas

AIRCRAFT CRASHED ON LAKE WHILE PRACTICING TOUCH AND GO'S. TYLER, TEXAS.

STALL OUT MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6356Z


 

Daniel Gonzalez was working on a fence at a home on Lake Tyler when he saw a plane crash less than 100 yards from him Monday morning.

Whitehouse firefighters, Tyler police, Tyler fire personnel, EMS and other agencies responded to the plane crash just before 9 a.m. Monday.

Tyler police at the scene said pilot Sam Wells, 67, of Tyler, was doing "touch-and-gos" on Lake Tyler's surface for about an hour when he lost control of the Aero Adventure ultralight amphibious two-seater aircraft.

Wells, the owner of Coyote Sams in Tyler, was taken to a local hospital with a head injury, but was talking with officials at the scene after the crash. 

"I saw the airplane coming and he was too close to the (boathouse) and I think he thought he was going to hit the building, so he pulled up and then the plane came straight down," Gonzalez said.

Gonzalez said he and another worker ran to the water to check on Wells and find out if he was alone in the plane. 

"He said he was the only person, and we asked if he could make it. We saw his head was bloody, and he told us he couldn't make it," he said.

Gonzalez said the other worker jumped into the lake and swam to Wells, but then a boat came to both men's rescue and got them back to shore. 

"They were having a hard time, so the guy on the boat really helped a lot," Gonzalez said.

Lynn Lundsford with the Federal Aviation Administration said his agency is continuing their investigation into the cause of the crash and crews would be tasked in recovering the aircraft, which crashed in about waters about 10-feet of water and was almost fully submerged. 

It was not clear if Wells is the owner of the plane, and information concerning its registration was not available as of presstime. 

Story, photo gallery and video:  http://www.tylerpaper.com

Evans Volksplane VP-1, N9288: Accident occurred August 10, 2015 at Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport (KBKV), Hernando County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Tampa, Florida 

http://registry.faa.gov/N9288

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA306
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 10, 2015 in Brooksville, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: WRIGHT DANIEL J Volksplane VP-1, registration: N9288
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The sport pilot, who was also the builder of the single-seat, experimental, amateur-built airplane, stated that he had "some issues" during assembly of the experimental engine kit, but was finally able to achieve the desired engine rpm during static tests. Subsequently, during the airplane's takeoff roll on its first flight with the new engine, the pilot noted that the airplane was able to gain airspeed, but struggled to become airborne. The pilot stated that he should have aborted the takeoff at that point. The airplane reached a maximum altitude about 100 ft, the engine lost power, and the airplane descended into trees and was destroyed by a postimpact fire. The extent of the fire precluded detailed documentation of the engine and its associated systems; therefore, the reason for the loss of power could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to abort the takeoff after determining that the engine was not producing adequate power. Contributing to the accident was the engine's inability to produce adequate power for reasons that could not be determined due to extensive postimpact fire damage.

On August 10, 2015, at 1033 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Volksplane VP-1, N9288, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain during the initial climb after takeoff from Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport (BKV), Brooksville, Florida. The sport pilot, who was also the builder of the airplane, was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local test flight which was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to information obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the airplane departed from runway 9 and appeared to climb no higher than 100 feet. It made a left turn beyond the departure end of the runway and eventually descended into a wooded area about 1/2 mile north of the approach end of runway 27.

According to the pilot, he purchased the preowned fuselage and wings in late 2012, and after assembling those, purchased landing gear, some instrumentation and a Sonex Aerovee 2180 engine kit. He also noted that he had "no experience building an aircraft engine or any engine for that matter." The pilot further stated that there were initially "some issues" with the engine's performance, but that it finally achieved [desired] static rpm on the ground.

The accident flight was the pilot's first in the single-seat airplane. During the takeoff roll, the airplane "gained speed but struggled to get off the ground at which time I should have aborted the takeoff. Trying to overcome the first flight anxiety and not knowing how this aircraft should behave," the pilot continued the takeoff. After being cleared for a left turn, the pilot continued the climb, but realized that the engine, "did not develop enough power to climb sufficiently." As the airplane began to turn downwind, the engine lost more power, and the airplane descended into trees. Hitting the trees, the airplane burst into flames, and the pilot passed out. When he awoke, the pilot was in the fuselage and his legs were on fire. After unbuckling the four-point safety harness, he climbed out of the fuselage and crawled away from the fire.

Photographs of the scene showed the airplane in multiple parts and mostly consumed by the fire. The responding FAA inspector noted that the extent of the fire precluded detailed examination of the engine and systems.

NTSB Identification: ERA15LA306 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, August 10, 2015 in Brooksville, FL
Aircraft: WRIGHT DANIEL J VP-1, registration: N9288
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 10, 2015, at 1033 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Wright Volksplane VP-1, N9288, was destroyed in a postcrash fire following a descent into trees and terrain shortly after taking off from Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport (BKV), Brooksville, Florida. The sport pilot was seriously injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local post-maintenance test flight which was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to preliminary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) information, the airplane was on its first flight following the installation of a new engine. The airplane departed runway 9 and appeared to climb no higher than 100 feet. It made a left turn beyond the departure end of the runway and eventually descended into a wooded area about 1/2 mile north of the approach end of runway 27.





BROOKSVILLE, FL (WFLA) – A Hernando County man is in serious condition after he was airlifted to Tampa General Hospital Monday morning after a plane he was flying crashed. Hernando County First Assistant Chief Kevin Carroll tells News Channel 8 the call came in after 10:30 Monday. Pictures show the single engine plane on pieces and flames.

“Part of the wing the part of an engine for which thank goodness …all the rain we’ve received this year did not spread any further to the woods,” said Chief Carroll.

Hernando officials said, 68-year-old pilot was found standing next to the wreckage. He was airlifted to TGH and said to be in serious condition.

“Definitely had some serious injuries, I can’t get specific to what actually was wrong with him but the patient definitely needed care at a trauma facility locally which we did in turn send by helicopter to Tampa General. As you can imagine probably falling somewhere between 100-150 feet from the air down into the woods you can imagine someone would probably be stunned or shocked at that point,” Chief Carroll said about the pilot’s condition.

Witnesses who rushed to the scene after the crash said, they could see smoke coming from the wooded area where the plane hit the ground at the Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport. Those witnesses tell News Channel 8 that the pilot was covered in burns. Fire crews were concerned about internal injuries.

Hernando County Fire Rescue tells us that the pilot was flying and experimental aircraft. Those who know the pilot tell us the single engine plane was from a kit and was homebuilt. The wings were solid but the cabin was open according to HCFR.

Witnesses tell News Channel 8 that the plane crashed right as it was taking off. We are told it barely made it above the tree line before turning towards the ground.

Source:  http://wfla.com




BROOKSVILLE --   A pilot was seriously injured in an experimental plane crash at Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport Monday morning.

Falk Nicolaus, 63, was injured when the plane crashed at 10:37 a.m. in a wooded area near the Brooksville-Tampa Bay Regional Airport.

Officials said that when Hernando County Fire Rescue responded to the scene, they found Nicolaus standing near the burning wreckage. He was taken by air to Tampa General Hospital with serious injuries.

Crews quickly extinguished the plane and wooded area without further incident.

The Federal Aviation Authority has been contacted for further investigation.

Source: http://www.baynews9.com





Federal Aviation Administration study shows air traffic controllers show chronic fatigue



WASHINGTON (AP) - Air traffic controllers' work schedules often lead to chronic fatigue, making them less alert and endangering the safety of the country's air traffic system, according to a study the U.S. government kept secret for years.


Federal Aviation Administration officials posted the study online Monday, hours after The Associated Press reported the findings — and noted that agency officials had declined to furnish a copy despite repeated requests over the past three months, including a Freedom of Information Act filing.

The AP was able to obtain a draft of the final report dated Dec. 1, 2011. The report FAA posted online was dated December 2012, although the findings appear to be nearly identical to the draft.

The impetus for the study was a recommendation by the National Transportation Safety Board to the FAA and the National Air Traffic Controllers Association to revise controller schedules to provide rest periods that are long enough "to obtain sufficient restorative sleep."

The study found that nearly 2 in 10 controllers had committed significant errors in the previous year — such as bringing planes too close together — and over half attributed the errors to fatigue. A third of controllers said they perceived fatigue to be a "high" or "extreme" safety risk. Greater than 6 in 10 controllers indicated that in the previous year they had fallen asleep or experienced a lapse of attention while driving to or from midnight shifts, which typically begin about 10 p.m. and end around 6 a.m.

Overall, controllers whose activity was closely monitored by scientists averaged 5.8 hours of sleep per day over the course of a work week. They averaged only 3.1 hours before midnight shifts and 5.4 hours before early morning shifts.

The most tiring schedules required controllers to work five straight midnight shifts, or to work six days a week several weeks in a row, often with at least one midnight shift per week. The human body's circadian rhythms make sleeping during daylight hours before a midnight shift especially difficult.

The study is composed of a survey of 3,268 controllers about their work schedules and sleep habits, and a field study that monitored the sleep and the mental alertness of more than 200 controllers at 30 air traffic facilities.

NASA produced the study at the FAA's request.

J.D. Harrington, a NASA spokesman, also declined to release the study, saying in an email that since the FAA requested it, "they own the rights to decide its release." NASA gave the scientists who conducted the study an award for the project's excellence in 2013.

In the field study, researchers concentrated on controllers who worked a schedule known as the "rattler" in which controllers squeeze five eight-hour shifts into four 24-hour periods by cutting the turnaround time between shifts to as little as eight hours. Some controllers like the schedule because it gives them a 3-day weekend.

Controllers participating in the study wore a wrist device that recorded when they were asleep. They also kept logs of their sleep, and were administered alertness tests several times per work shift.

The 270-page study makes 17 recommendations to the FAA, including that the agency discontinue mandatory six-day schedules "as soon as possible." At the time, about 4 percent of controllers were being assigned "a six-day constant schedule," the study said, but the share of controllers who had actually worked a six-day schedule in their previous work week was 15 percent.

FAA spokeswoman Laura Brown, who didn't provide answers to AP questions about controller fatigue for more than a month, said in an email late Monday the agency now requires there be at least two controllers on duty after midnight and that controllers be provided at least nine hours between certain shifts to rest. Controllers are also permitted more time for "recuperative breaks" during shifts, workload permitting.

"Although fatigue is an issue in any 24/7 operation, the FAA has taken many positive steps to minimize fatigue," Brown said. "The fatigue modeling we've done shows that there is greater alertness using these updated scheduling practices."

Story and video:  http://www.wxyz.com

It’s cloudy skies for air charter firms • High cost of operations and lack of adequate infrastructure make the general aviation sector a tough market to crack

Mumbai: TAJ Air Ltd, the air charter company owned by the Tata Group, wants to expand its operations and add one more aircraft to its fleet of three, but has been forced to do a rethink.

“The present aviation scenario is restricting growth of our charter business,” says Atiesh Mishra, director of operations at TAJ Air.

“In fact, we want to ramp up our operations in business aviation. But thanks to infrastructure constraints and high taxation, many corporate houses are limiting their operations. There is no space to expand aircraft fleet in Mumbai airport. Airports at Ahmedabad and Delhi have similar stories,” says Atiesh Mishra.

True, air traffic may be growing, but business aviation is not.

At least 15-20 planes owned by business houses, charter services and individuals are up for sale, as the high cost of operations and lack of adequate infrastructure make the general aviation sector a tough market to crack.

General aviation includes services of airplanes and helicopters operated by private individuals, companies or charter operators.

D.K. Mishra, chief executive officer (CEO) with charter company Freedom Charter Services Pvt. Ltd, said his two planes are flying less these days.

“There is no parking place in Mumbai. We have to park our planes at airports of Ahmedabad, Goa or Pune. Parking charges at other airports are high, in addition to the high taxation,” says D.K. Mishra.

A senior official at the Business Aircraft Operators Association (BAOA), a lobby group, confirmed that at least 15-20 planes are up for sale. This person didn’t want to be named.

At present, India has a fleet of 550 helicopters, planes with propellers and jets under the general aviation category.

While the industry was growing in single digits till 2012-13, there was a contraction of about 2% in the previous fiscal, says an official with the BAOA, requesting anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to media.

The BAOA expects a fall of 3-4% this year, according to this official, given that more planes are being sold than bought in the general aviation segment.

“2001 to 2007 was the golden period for general aviation that registered double-digit growth in terms of fleet addition. Post 2007, growth has slowed owing to imposition of an unexplained tax regime and the economic slowdown,” the official says.

Aircraft that fall in the private category, including charter operators, have to pay import duties adding up to 19.6%, including a 2.5% basic customs duty.

In comparison, airline operators only pay a customs duty of 2.5% and are exempted from duty components like a countervailing duty and a special additional duty imposed on private airplane operators.

The lack of infrastructure is another impediment.

For instance, charter firms are finding it difficult to get hangar space and parking lots with privately operated airports, such as the ones in Mumbai and Delhi that give preference to scheduled airline operators that pay more.

Unlike in other nations, India does not have dedicated landing space and repair units for small aircraft operators. Countries like Singapore and Indonesia, the US, UK and France have satellite airports catering to small aircraft operators.

“There is no dedicated facility of heliports for helicopters. Therefore, all are operating out of Delhi airport. Business jets have to wait till civil airplanes land or take off. Helicopters have to wait on the ground for at least 30 to 40 minutes against 10 minutes in the case of a dedicated airport facility,” Sanjay Julka, vice-president of BAOA, said.

A senior executive from Mumbai International Airport Ltd confirmed on condition of anonymity that the airport has space constraints, and there are no parking slots left for private operators.

Apart from charter operators, some companies that own private jets are also choosing to give them up for a variety of reasons.

At present, India’s aviation regulator Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) does not permit charter companies to import aircraft that are purchased or financed by a third-party Indian company. So, any organization that wants to operate one for in-house requirements, but also wants to charter it for financial viability, is forced to set up a full-fledged charter company, or an NSOP, which is short for non-scheduled operating permit. Under an NSOP, operators cannot publish the flying schedule, unlike scheduled commercial airlines such as IndiGo or Jet Airways.

Consequently, the number of NSOPs have tripled since 2007, courtesy lower taxation, leading to a highly fragmented market.

“I know that several companies are selling their planes. These companies are keeping the sale process confidential as it is embarrassing for them,” said Bharat Malkani, chairman of Max Aerospace and Aviation Ltd, an aircraft repairing firm.

Original article can be found here: http://www.livemint.com

Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance, N43829: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2015 near Harbor Springs Airport (KMGN), Emmet County, Michigan

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

FAA  Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Grand Rapids FSDO-09

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA342 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harbor Springs, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/23/2016
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R-300, registration: N43829
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was completing a long cross-country flight during dark, night visual meteorological conditions. While on a visual approach to the runway, the airplane impacted trees and terrain less than a mile from the end of the runway. The pilot had not logged night flight experience in several years and had not logged any night flight experience in the make and model of the accident airplane. Additionally, he had not logged a flight into the airport in his logbook.

The airport's tree obstructions and nonstandard precision approach path indicator with a 4.0-degree glidepath were noted in the airport facility directory. However, it was the pilot's first flight into the airport; thus, it is likely that his unfamiliarity with the airport environment, including the trees close proximity to the airport and nonstandard glidepath, and the dark, night conditions led to his failure to maintain clearance from the trees. The witness marks on the trees and the damage to the airplane were consistent with the airplane being in a relatively wings level descent when it impacted the tops of the trees. The condition of the landing gear and flaps were consistent with the airplane being configured to land. There were no mechanical anomalies with the airplane, engine, or related systems that would have precluded normal operation at the time of the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from the trees during the approach in dark, night conditions, which resulted in controlled flight into trees and terrain.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 9, 2015, about 2325 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA 32R-300 airplane, N43829, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain east of the Harbor Springs Airport (MGN), Harbor Springs, Michigan. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the Tuskegee Airman National Historical Museum and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from the Coleman A Young Municipal Airport (DET), Detroit, Michigan, about 2000.

According to the Emmet County Sheriff's Department and colleagues of the pilot, he was flying to MGN for a conference. He communicated with a colleague via text message and indicated he would arrive at MGN around 2325. The wreckage of the airplane was located at 0730 on August 10th by employees of Emmet Brick & Block after they arrived for work. The initial impact point was located at the top of a tree several hundred feet east of the main wreckage.

There were no known witnesses to the impact. Several witnesses reported seeing or hearing a low flying airplane around the time of the accident. The pilot was not receiving services, nor was he required to be, from air traffic control.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 58, held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating reissued on January 28, 2015. The certificate was first issued on July 17, 2009. He was issued a special issuance third class airman medical certificate on August 5, 2014. The certificate contained the limitations "Not valid for any class after 08/31/2015. Must wear corrective lenses for near and distant vision."

On the pilot's medical certificate application, dated July 28, 2014, he reported 380 hours total time, 14 hours in the past 6 months. The pilot's personal flight logbook was located in the wreckage. It contained entries from November 10, 2006, through July 22, 2015. A review of the logbook indicated that the pilot had logged no less than 406.9 hours total time in single engine airplanes; 78.4 hours of which were in the accident airplane and 95.5 hours in high performance/complex airplanes. He received his complex airplane endorsement on November 16, 2011, and his high performance airplane endorsement on July 17, 2012. He had logged 19.5 hours at night and his last logged night flight was on November 8, 2013. He had not logged any night experience in the accident airplane nor did his logbook reflect that he had ever flown to MGN.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, a Piper PA32R-300 (serial number 32R-7780527), was manufactured in 1977. It was registered with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) on a standard airworthiness certificate for normal operations. An Avco Lycoming Aircraft Engine, IO-540-K1G5D, rated at 300 horsepower at 2,700 rpm powered the airplane. The engine was equipped with a Hartzell 3-blade, variable-pitch propeller.

The airplane was registered to the Tuskegee Airman National Historical Museum, Detroit, Michigan, owned by the United States government, and operated by the pilot. The airplane was maintained under an annual inspection program. A review of the maintenance records indicated that an annual inspection had been completed on July 8, 2015, at an airframe total time of 4,825.7 hours (tachometer time 3,648.5). On August 6, 2015, the vacuum pump was removed and replaced. The airplane had flown approximately 16.8 hours between the last inspection and the accident and had a total airframe time of 4,842.5 hours.

The Tuskegee Airman National Historical Museum received the airplane from the Michigan State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP) for the use of training juveniles in piloting and maintenance. The terms of the five year property transfer contract prohibited the airplane from being rented or used for personal purposes. During this restriction period the airplane was the property of the United States Government.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The closest official weather observation station was MGN, located 1 nautical mile (nm) west of the accident site. The elevation of the weather observation station was 677 feet mean sea level (msl). The routine aviation weather report (METAR) for MGN, issued at 2335, reported wind calm, visibility 10 miles, sky conditions were scattered clouds at 4,100 feet, broken clouds at 5,000 feet, broken clouds at 6,000 feet, temperature 20 degrees Celsius (C), dew point temperature 19 degrees C, and altimeter 29.94 inches.

According to the United States Naval Observatory, Astronomical Applications Department Sun and Moon Data, the sunset was recorded at 2057 EDT and the end of civil twilight was 2130 EDT. The moon rose at 0207 EDT, and set at 1711 EDT on the day of the accident. The phase of the moon was waning crescent with 23 percent of the moon's visible disk illuminated.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

MGN is a public, uncontrolled airport located three miles east of Harbor Springs, Michigan, at a surveyed elevation of 685.8 feet. The airport had one open runway - runway 10/28 (4,149 feet by 75 feet, asphalt). Runway 10 was equipped with a 4-light precision approach path indicator (PAPI) on the right side which provided a 3.5 degree glide path. Runway 28 was equipped with a 4-light PAPI on the left which provided a 4.0 degree glide path. The PAPI for runway 28 was classified as nonstandard and unusable beyond 2 degrees left of the centerline of the runway.

Additional remarks for the airport included lighted obstacles for both runway 10 and runway 28. Runway 28 had 80-foot trees in side slope which were lighted, 201 feet from the runway and 170 feet from the runway on both sides of the centerline. The departure procedures for runway 28 also described trees, 100 feet above ground level, abeam the end of the runway and 350 feet south of the runway.

According to the airport manager, after the accident, one of the bulbs (one of eight) in the PAPI system was found inoperative and was immediately replaced. The PAPI system remained operational despite this bulb outage.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site was located in forested terrain just east of the airport. The accident site was at an elevation of 704 feet msl and the airplane impacted on a magnetic heading of 280 degrees.

The initial impact point was characterized by deciduous and coniferous trees. The left wing tip was located in the top of one tree and debris extended from this point west to the main wreckage.
The airplane came to rest oriented on a heading of east. The terrain sloped 45 degrees up and to the south. The main wreckage included the engine and propeller assembly, fuselage, and empennage. The right wing separated from the airframe and came to rest adjacent to and north of the main wreckage. The right side of the fuselage was crushed and twisted towards the left. The front windscreen and side windows separated and were fragmented. The bottom of the fuselage was crushed up and twisted to the left.

The engine, instrument panel, and nose landing gear were twisted and the engine came to rest on its left side. The nose landing gear appeared to be extended. All three propeller blades remained attached and exhibited chordwise scratching and leading edge polishing. Two of the three propeller blades exhibited twists and bends.

The followings settings and positions were documented in the cabin:

Kollsman window - 29.93
Fuel selector valve - right tank select
Gear handle - up
Flap control handle – First notch – 10 degrees
Tachometer -3665.3
Hobbs - 1204.2
Mixture Control – full forward
Propeller Control – full forward
Throttle Control – full forward
Alternate Air Door - closed

The right wing included the right aileron. The right flap separated from the wing assembly and was located 5 feet north of the right wing. The flap was buckled at midspan. Buckled and torn metal was observed along the entire leading edge of the right wing. The flight control was continuous from the aileron inboard to the separation point. When the right wing was moved about 1 gallon of fuel was observed and additional fuel poured out. The right main landing gear separated from the wing and was located 10 feet to the north of the right wing. The assembly was otherwise unremarkable.

The left wing separated from the fuselage and was located to the south and uphill from the main wreckage. The outboard leading edge piece separated. Buckled and torn metal was observed along the entire leading edge of the left wing. The landing gear assembly remained attached and was down and locked. The left flap separated partially and remained attached at the flap track. The flap was buckled at midspan. The flight controls were continuous from the left aileron inboard to the separation point.

The empennage included the left and right stabilators, vertical stabilizer, and rudder. The outboard 22 inches of the leading edge of the left stabilator were crushed inboard and aft. Tree bark was imbedded within this crush zone. The trim tab was "down." The right stabilator was not visibly damaged. The upper leading edge of the vertical stabilizer was crushed aft and twisted to the left. The entire horizontal stabilator was twisted towards the front of the airplane on the right side and the back of the airplane on the left side. Flight controls were continuous from the forward column aft to the stabilator and rudder. About 7 threads were visible on the stabilator trim – this correlated to a slight nose up trim setting. Impact damage limited the ability to move the controls at the control yoke or the control surfaces through their full range of motion.

A 55-inch portion of the left wing was located 30 feet east of the main wreckage. This piece was torn at midspan and exhibited leading edge crushing. Bark was embedded along the crush zone. The right wing tip (24-inch piece) was located to the north of the left wing piece and east of the main wreckage.

The rotating beacon, plexiglas, bent and torn metal, broken tree limbs/branches, and personal effects were located in debris field scattered around the main wreckage. Several of the branches exhibited 45 degree cuts.

The airplane was moved from the side of the hill to the level ground below to facilitate further examination.

The upper bank of spark plugs was removed. The number 5 spark plug exhibited signatures consistent with a lean mixture. The number 6 spark plug exhibited signatures consistent with a rich mixture. The valve covers and propeller were removed from the engine and the engine was rotated at the propeller flange. Tactile compression and accessory gears and valve train continuity were observed on all cylinders.

The fuel manifold contained fuel and was unremarkable. The fuel injector servo was unremarkable and the screen was free of visible debris or contamination. The number 5 fuel injector nozzle was partially occluded. All remaining fuel injector nozzles were unremarkable.

The ignition harness was impact damaged on the left side. The single drive dual magneto was removed from the engine and produced spark when rotated by hand. The vacuum pump rotated when actuated by hand and air movement was observed. Further internal examination revealed no anomalies. The fuel pump contained small amounts of fuel and functioned as designed when actuated by hand.

No preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures were found that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The autopsy was performed by Sparrow Forensic Pathology on August 11, 2015, as authorized by the Emmett County Medical Examiner's office. The autopsy concluded that the cause of death was "multiple injuries" and the report listed the specific injuries.

The FAA's Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological tests on specimens that were collected during the autopsy (CAMI Reference #20150016001). Results were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Testing of cavity blood and urine revealed amlodipine.

The FAA Aerospace Medical Research website listed amlodipine as a "calcium channel blocker heart medication used in the treatment of hypertension." It provided the warning "adverse reactions include edema, dizziness, and palpitation."

On the pilot's medical certificate application dated July 28, 2014, he reported using medication to control his hypertension with no side effects.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the FAA Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM) – Chapter 2. Aeronautical Lighting and Other Airport Visual Aids 2-1-2. Visual Glideslope Indicators b. Precision Approach Path Indicator (PAPI). "The precision approach path indicator (PAPI) uses light units similar to the VASI but are installed in a single row of either two or four light units. These lights are visible from about 5 miles during the day and up to 20 miles at night. The row of light units is normally installed on the left side of the runway…"

Four white lights indicated the glide path was high. Three white lights and one red light indicated the glide path was slightly high. Two white lights and two red lights indicated the glide path was on. One white light and three red lights indicated the glide path was slightly low. Four red lights indicated the glide path was low.

TUSKEGEE AIRMEN NATIONAL HISTORICAL MUSEUM: http://registry.faa.gov/N43829

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA342
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 09, 2015 in Harbor Springs, MI
Aircraft: PIPER PA 32R-300, registration: N43829
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 9, 2015, about 2325 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA 32R-300, N43829, was substantially damaged when it impacted trees and terrain east of the Harbor Springs Airport (KMGM), Harbor Springs, Michigan. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the Tuskegee Airman National Historical Museum and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Dark night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from the Detroit, Michigan, area at an unknown time.


According to the Emmet County Sheriff's Department and colleagues of the pilot, he was flying to KMGM for a conference. He communicated with a colleague via text message and indicated he would arrive at KMGM around 2325. The wreckage of the airplane was located at 0730 on August 10, by employees of Emmet Brick & Block. The initial impact point was located at the top of a tree several hundred feet east of the main wreckage.


The main wreckage of the airplane was located on the edge of the Emmet Brick & Block property, in sloping and forested terrain. The nose of the airplane was oriented to the east and the main wreckage of the airplane included the fuselage, empennage, and engine and propeller assembly. The right wing separated and came to rest immediately adjacent and to the north of the main wreckage. The left wing separated and came to rest uphill and to the south of the main wreckage.


Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

Gov. Rick Snyder Tuesday, October 20th ordered U.S. flags within the State Capitol Complex and on all state buildings to be lowered to half-staff on Thursday, Oct. 22, in honor of Department of Natural Resources conservation officer First Lt. Arthur Green III.

Green died in a  Piper PA-32R-300 Cherokee Lance plane crash Aug. 9 while en route to a DNR meeting in northern Michigan. The flag honoring date was selected in consultation with the Green family.

“First Lieutenant Green dedicated an entire life of service to the state of Michigan, protecting its residents and natural resources,” Snyder said. “He truly exemplified public service and his death is a tragic loss for the entire state of Michigan. His family, friends and colleagues remain in my prayers.”

Green, 58, was a nearly 20-year veteran officer of the DNR, serving as supervisor of the southeast district covering Wayne, Oakland, Monroe, Genesee, Lapeer, Macomb and St. Clair counties. Most recently, Green helped to secure a smooth transition of Belle Isle Park to DNR management.

Prior to joining the DNR, Green was a Detroit police officer and had also served in the U.S. Air Force and the Michigan Air National Guard, including two tours in Kuwait, before retiring in 2004. He resided in Farmington Hills and is survived by his wife, two sons and three grandchildren.


This flag order is in accordance with Executive Order 2013-10. Michigan residents, businesses, schools, local governments and other organizations also are encouraged to display the flag at half-staff. Flags should be returned to full-staff on Friday, Oct. 23.

A top Department of Natural Resources law enforcement officer from Farmington Hills was texting while flying shortly before his plane crashed, according to preliminary federal findings.


An initial report by the National Transportation Safety Board said Lt. Arthur Green “communicated with a colleague via text message” indicating he would arrive at Harbor Springs airport at 11:25 p.m. Aug. 9.

Federal spokesmen declined further comment, but Emmet County Sheriff Peter Wallin said Green’s text was sent at 11:10 p.m. — 15 minutes before local police estimate as the time of the crash.

The text asked Conservation Officer Damon Owens to meet him at the airport and Green said he was about 25 minutes away, Wallin said.

An earlier text by Green was sent at 9:03 p.m. saying he would arrive between 10:45 p.m. and 11 p.m., Wallin said.

Federal Aviation Administration and NTSB spokespersons declined further comment as the investigation continues.

Department of Natural Resources spokesman Ed Golder said the agency is withholding comment until the investigation is complete.

Texting while flying is generally against Federal Aviation Administration regulations under a new policy in place since May. Under rules for general aviation, including small aircraft, “no person may operate, nor may any operator or pilot in command of an aircraft allow the operation of, any portable electronic device.”

One exception, however, is if the pilot has determined the device “will not interfere with the safe operation of the navigation or communication system of the aircraft.”

The airport’s final approach instructions warn pilots to “overfly open field, brick yard and gravel pit as long as is practical before aligning with runway centerline.” It also instructs pilots to “avoid low, dragged-in approaches.”

Eighty-foot trees are located 201 feet from the runway’s asphalt approach, according to airport information.

Wreckage from the Piper plane was located at 7:30 a.m. Aug. 10, by employees of Emmet Brick & Block, which is located across the street from the end of the airport’s runway. The initial impact point was at the top of a tree several hundred feet east of the main wreckage.

Green, 58, was an experienced pilot. He had served in the U.S. Air Force and the Michigan Air National Guard before retiring in 2004. He served two tours in Kuwait.

The single-engine plane was owned by the Tuskegee Airmen National Historical Museum in Detroit and built in 1977, according to FAA registry records.

Green was one of 13 DNR law enforcement first lieutenants in Michigan. He supervised a seven-county district made up Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Genesee, Lapeer, Monroe, and St Clair. There are 218 conservation officers in the state.

Green was en route from Detroit City Airport to the Harbor Springs airfield, three miles east of the popular tourism resort.

http://www.detroitnews.com



A Farmington Hills man is killed in a plane crash in northern Michigan.

Arthur Green III was piloting a Piper Cherokee plane from Detroit to northern Michigan when it crashed for some reason, killing him.

Green was the only person aboard the plane, which went down sometime Sunday night but he was discovered 7:30 a.m. Monday.

While loved ones wait to learn why, they are making sure his accomplishments in life are not forgotten.

"I consider him by brother, he wasn't just a friend - he was my brother," said his friend Larry Sargent.

A former Detroit police officer who served two tours in Iraq, he was also the president of the Detroit chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen, and lieutenant with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Larry Sargent has been by his side since the beginning.

"He called me one day, I will never forget, he said 'I got an airplane,' I said 'No you don't have an airplane.'"

A love of flying started in 2008 taking up hundreds of kids as part of the Tuskegee Airmen's program to get kids interested in a career in aviation.

He also flew planes for his job with the DNR. In fact he was flying out for training when the plane went down in little Traverse Township early Monday morning.

Sargent spoke with the night before the crash.

"I told him to not be in a hurry to get up there," he said. "Check the weather, because I see a few storms popping up on the northwest part of Michigan. I said just make sure everything is clear. He said 'I'll take care.'  That's why I trusted him because he had done it before."

But even before he received the news of his death, Sargent didn't feel right about the trip.

"I had a gut feeling when I got up," he said. "Normally when we fly on any trip, the guys in our organization will always text somebody and let them know what was going on. I didn't hear anything. Then around 10:30 his wife called and I got the news."

It is unknown what caused the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration is currently investigating.

"He died with the passion that he loved," Sargent said. "He loved flying."

Story, video and photo gallery: http://www.fox2detroit.com





First Lt. Arthur Green III
~


LANSING – A Michigan Department of Natural Resources law enforcement officer died Sunday after the plane he was piloting crashed in northern Michigan, the DNR said in a news release.

First Lt. Arthur Green III, 58, of Farmington Hills, was supervisor of the DNR district covering Wayne, Oakland, Monroe, Genesee, Lapeer, Macomb and St. Clair counties, the release said. He was flying a private Piper Cherokee to a meeting of the DNR Law Enforcement Division at about 11 p.m. Sunday when the plane crashed during its approach to the Harbor Springs Airport in Emmett County, the DNR said.

Green was alone in the plane. The accident remains under investigation.

“F/LT. Green’s death is a profound loss for the DNR and for the citizens of the state,” DNR Law Enforcement Division Chief Gary Hagler said in a statement. “He was a dedicated professional who was deeply committed to protecting our nation, its citizens and Michigan’s natural resources. Most recently, F/LT. Green was instrumental in the smooth transition of Belle Isle Park in Detroit to DNR management. He will be greatly missed.”

Green joined the DNR in 1996, the release said.









Story was updated to include information from Sheriff Pete Wallin.

EMMET COUNTY, MI – The Sheriff's Department identified Arthur A. Green III, 58, of Farmington Hills, as the pilot who was killed in a plane crash.

Green served as a first lieutenant for the state Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division, Sheriff Pete Wallin said Monday, Aug. 10.

The crash happened as Green's Piper Cherokee approached Harbor Springs Airport sometime after 11 p.m. Sunday.

A worker at Emmet Brick & Block Co., spotted the downed plane behind the business on M-119 when he showed up for work at 7:30 a.m. Monday.

Green was the only one on the plane. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate the crash, police said.

Story and photo gallery:  http://www.mlive.com





PETOSKEY, MI – The pilot of a small plane was found dead on Monday, Aug. 10, after the plane crashed behind Emmet Brick & Block Co.

A worker spotted the plane just after 7 a.m., salesman Jeff Dufek said.

When he showed up for work, the worker noticed a large tree limb in the road where there are no nearby trees. He went out back and saw the plane. He looked inside the plane and saw that the man was dead.

The business is in the flight path of Harbor Springs Municipal Airport in Emmet County.

Emmet County Sheriff Pete Wallin said the Piper Cherokee crashed during its approach sometime after 11 p.m. Sunday.

Police withheld the victim's name pending notification of family. He was the only one on the plane.The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate, Wallin said.

The plane was partially hidden from view, Dufek said.

He said investigators have cordoned off the area with police tape. 

Source:  http://www.mlive.com



Authorities have confirmed the male pilot of a small private plane is dead after the aircraft crashed near the Harbor Springs airport overnight.

The plane, a Piper Cherokee, was discovered by an employee at Emmet Brick and Block around 7:30 a.m. Monday, Emmet County Sheriff Pete Wallin said. 

Authorities believe the plane crashed on approach to the Harbor Springs airport Sunday around 11 p.m.

The male pilot, Authur A. Green III, 58, of Farmington Hills, was the only person on board the plane, according to Wallin.

Green served as a First Lieutenant with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Law Enforcement Division.

Wallin said officials from the Federal Aviation Administration have been notified, and the investigation will be turned over to them upon their arrival.

Harbor Springs Fire Department and Emmet County EMS also responded to the scene.

Story, comments and photo gallery:  http://www.petoskeynews.com