Friday, January 31, 2020

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 180A, N9729B; accident occurred January 27, 2020 at Eloy Municipal Airport (E60), Pinal County, Arizona

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N9729B 


Location: Eloy, AZ
Accident Number: WPR20CA085
Date & Time: 01/27/2020, 1640 MST
Registration: N9729B
Aircraft: Cessna 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that while practicing landings in the tail-wheel equipped airplane, he completed one go-around and two landings without incident. On his next landing attempt, the airplane encountered a left crosswind during the landing flare. Despite his attempts to maintain directional control, the airplane ground looped and veered off the left side of the runway.

The right wing was substantially damaged.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  315 hours (Total, all aircraft), 127 hours (Total, this make and model), 183 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 22 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9729B
Model/Series: 180 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1957
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 50027
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/02/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 51 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2367 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-470-7-K
Registered Owner: Serenity Aero LLC
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KP08, 1574 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1640 MST
Direction from Accident Site: 46°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 15 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 300°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Coolidge, AZ (P08)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Eloy, AZ (E60)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1540 MST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Eloy Muni (E60)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1511 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 02
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3901 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.803889, -111.588889

Cessna 650 Citation III, N131PG: Incident occurred January 30, 2020 at Eagle County Regional Airport (KEGE), Gypsum, Colorado

Contributed Photograph
Cessna 650 Citation III, N131PG 

Contributed Photograph
Cessna 650 Citation III, N131PG 


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aircraft veered off the runway and ground looped.

TRN Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N131PG

Date: 30-JAN-20
Time: 21:12:00Z
Regis#: N131PG
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 650
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: EAGLE
State: COLORADO

Piper PA-28-180 Cherokee, N7047W: Accident occurred January 30, 2020 at Naples Municipal Airport (KAPF) and Incident occurred December 28, 2017 at Everglades Airpark (X01) - Collier County, Florida

View of right wing damage. 
Federal Aviation Administration 


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N7047W


Location: Naples, FL 
Accident Number: ERA20CA099
Date & Time: 01/30/2020, 1415 EST
Registration: N7047W
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, while landing, the airplane had a "slight bounce", became airborne again, and drifted left of centerline. He overcorrected to the right with the rudder, and when the plane touched down a second time, the nose wheel was angled to the right and the airplane exited the runway onto the adjacent grass where the right wing impacted a taxiway sign.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 74, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/06/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/21/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 188 hours (Total, all aircraft), 122 hours (Total, this make and model), 133 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N7047W
Model/Series: PA28 180
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-793
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/03/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2525 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A2A
Registered Owner: Apflight Llc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Apflight Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAPF, 9 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1920 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 11°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR): 
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Arcadia, FL (X06)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Naples, FL (APF)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1330 EST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Naples Muni (APF)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 8 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6600 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 26.152500, -81.775556 (est)  










Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida

December 28, 2017:   Aircraft veered off runway into the dirt.

Date: 28-DEC-17
Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N7047W
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: EVERGLADES
State: FLORIDA

Hard Landing: Cessna 150E, N31ER; accident occurred January 25, 2020 at Prescott Regional Airport (KPRC), Yavapai County, Arizona

Engine Mount 


Engine Mount 


Engine Mount 


Engine Mount 


Accident Airplane 


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N31ER

Location: Prescott, AZ
Accident Number: WPR20CA084
Date & Time: 01/25/2020, 1235 MST
Registration: N31ER
Aircraft: Cessna 150
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that during the descent for a touch-and-go landing, the airplane was not descending and he noticed that he was high on the approach. The pilot trimmed the airplane for a more nose down attitude and extended the flaps to 40o. Throughout the descent, the pilot had a difficult time controlling the airplane as he experienced updrafts and a tailwind. After passing the touchdown point on the runway, the airplane stalled and landed hard on the runway, bouncing several times.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mount assembly.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age:20, Male 
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/14/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  139 hours (Total, all aircraft), 52 hours (Total, this make and model), 93 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 49 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N31ER
Model/Series: 150 E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1964
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 15061072
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/12/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1601 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 9841 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-200 SERIES
Registered Owner: Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ Inc
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: Embry Riddle Aeronautical Univ Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPRC, 5052 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1153 MST
Direction from Accident Site: 173°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / -3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Prescott, AZ (PRC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Prescott, AZ (PRC)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:  MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Prescott Rgnl - Ernest A Love (PRC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5045 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 21R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4846 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.652778, -112.421111 (est)

ASK-21, N202GG: Incident occurred January 29, 2020 in Hollister, San Benito County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Glider crashed on a road.

Soaring Nevada LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N202GG

Date: 29-JAN-20
Time: 21:30:00Z
Regis#: N202GG
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: ASK21
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: HOLLISTER
State: CALIFORNIA

Long-EZ, N277DE: Incidents occurred January 29, 2020 and March 10, 2019 at Ormond Beach Municipal Airport (KOMN), Volusia County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

January 29, 2020: Aircraft landed and gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N277DE

Date: 29-JAN-20
Time: 16:20:00Z
Regis#: N277DE
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: LONG EZ
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ORMOND BEACH
State: FLORIDA

March 10, 2019:  Gear collapsed.

Date: 10-MAR-19
Time: 18:17:00Z
Regis#: N277DE
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: LONG EZ
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ORMOND BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N23868: Incident occurred January 29, 2020 at Pompano Beach Airpark (KPMP), Broward County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft landed long and went off the end of runway.

Christiansen Aviation Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N23868

Date: 29-JAN-20
Time: 14:53:00Z
Regis#: N23868
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172R
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: POMPANO BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Diamond DA20-C1, N233ND: Incident occurred January 29, 2020 at Newnan Coweta County Airport (KCCO), Georgia



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft returned and landed after the nose wheel separated during takeoff.

Johnny's Air Service LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N233ND

Date: 29-JAN-20
Time: 18:15:00Z
Regis#: N233ND
Aircraft Make: DIAMOND
Aircraft Model: DA20
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA






A student pilot averted a potential disaster Wednesday, cleanly landing a plane that was missing part of its landing gear.

Just after 12:30 p.m., Coweta County Fire Rescue responded to the Coweta County Airport after receiving a report that a plane was having issues with its landing gear, according to Commander Bryan Fuller with CCFR.

A student pilot and his flight instructor realized a front wheel had fallen off the plane while conducting their pre-landing inspection, Fuller said.

Authorities cleared incoming and outgoing air traffic while the student pilot and instructor burned off their airplane’s fuel before making the approach to the runway.

The pilot was able to land the plane successfully on the back two wheels of the aircraft, and both occupants of the plane were unhurt, Fuller said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://times-herald.com

Beechcraft B60 Duke, N50JR: Accident occurred January 29, 2020 near Big Spring McMahon-Wrinkle Airport (KBPG), Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N50JR

Location: Big Spring, TX
Accident Number: CEN20TA071
Date & Time: 01/29/2020, 1710 CST
Registration: N50JR
Aircraft: Beech 60
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On January 29 2020, about 1710 central standard time, a Beechcraft BE60 airplane, N50JR, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing about ½ mile southwest of Edwards Lucian Wells Ranch Airport (TX31), Big Spring, Texas. The commercial pilot and sole occupant received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to American Woodcraft LLC and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight had departed Abilene Regional Airport (KABI), Abilene, Texas, at 1622 and was destined for Odessa Airport (KODO), Odessa, Texas, about 140 nautical miles southwest.

According to the pilot, he asked the fixed base operator (FBO) to add 20 gallons of 100LL to both fuel tanks. Fuel receipts and statements from the FBO personnel confirm that the fuel requested was added to the airplane.

After departing, he climbed to a cruise altitude of 8,000 ft. After the left engine quit, the pilot advised air traffic control and attempted to divert to Big Spring, Texas (KBPG). When it became evident the airplane would not reach KBPG, the pilot elected to divert to TX31. While overflying the runway at TX31, the right engine quit and the airplane landed about ½ mile southwest of the field.

When the Federal Aviation Administration aviation safety inspector arrived on scene, they attempted to drain fuel from the fuel tanks. They were able to drain what they described as "a couple tablespoons" of fuel from the left tank, but were unable to drain the right tank due to the terrain and the position of the airplane. There was no blue discoloration present on either of the wings or engine nacelles and neither fuel tank was breached. The battery remained connected, and they applied power to the electrical system. Both fuel gauges indicated empty.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N50JR
Model/Series: 60 B60
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:


GLASSCOCK COUNTY, Texas (KOSA) - Thursday 2:50 p.m. 

Update: Authorities have identified the pilot involved in Wednesday’s plane crash.

According to the Glasscock County Sheriff Keith Burnett, James Nyerges of Odessa was hurt in the crash and taken to Midland Memorial Hospital.

As of Thursday afternoon Nyerges was listed in stable condition.

The Glasscock County Sheriff's Office is investigating a plane crash Wednesday evening in Northwestern Glasscock County.

Glasscock County Sheriff Keith Burnett tells CBS7 that it happened about 5:15 p.m., two miles west of 461.

Burnett tells CBS7 that the pilot was flying from Abilene to Odessa when he crashed.

He was alert and talking when he was transported to Midland Memorial Hospital.

Authorities have not released the name of the pilot.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be arriving Thursday to investigate what caused the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.cbs7.com



Glasscock County Sheriff's Department 
January 29, 2020 

Approximately 5:15 pm a plane crashed in northwest Glasscock county.

Glasscock County Emt’s took the only person on board which was a 76 year old pilot to Midland Hospital. His condition is unknown at this time.

The pilot is from Odessa and he was coming from Abilene back to Odessa.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Piper PA-60-601P Aerostar 700 Superstar, N6071R: Fatal accident occurred January 28, 2020 near Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport (KSPI), Springfield, Sangamon County, Illinois

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois
Lycoming; Phoenix, Arizona 
Hartzell Propeller; Piqua, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N6071R

Location: Springfield, IL
Accident Number: CEN20FA070
Date & Time: 01/28/2020, 1503 CST
Registration: N6071R
Aircraft: Piper PA60
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 28, 2020, about 1503 central standard time, a Piper PA-60-601P airplane, N6071R, collided with terrain while on an instrument approach to Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport (SPI), Springfield, Illinois. The airline transport pilot, 2 passengers, and a dog were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed during a postimpact fire. The airplane was owned by LKJ Properties, LLC, and operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 on an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan. Day instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the accident site. The personal cross-country flight departed Huntsville International Airport (HSV), Huntsville, Alabama, at 1301.

According to automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) data that was transmitted by the airplane to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control (ATC), the flight departed runway 18L at HSV and turned north-northwest toward SPI. The airplane subsequently climbed to 10,000 ft mean sea level (msl) and continued direct toward SPI. At 1440:34, the pilot established radio contact with Springfield approach and reported being level at 10,000 ft msl. The approach controller replied that the pilot should expect radar vectors to join the localizer for the instrument landing system (ILS) runway 31 at SPI. At 1441:20, the approach controller told the pilot that there were a couple of pilot reports (PIREPS) for light to moderate mixed icing in the clouds at 3,000 ft msl. The approach controller also cleared the pilot to descend to maintain 3,000 ft msl. At 1441:32, the pilot reported leaving 10,000 ft msl for 3,000 ft msl. At 1441:43, the approach controller told the pilot to fly a 350° heading for vectors to the localizer. The pilot confirmed the heading change and ADS-B data showed the airplane turned to a 350° course while still in a descent.

At 1448:54, the pilot reported that the cloud tops were at 3,000 ft msl. At 1449:00, the approach controller told the pilot, "seven one romeo, roger, thank you, seven miles from CALDE, turn left heading three four zero, maintain three thousand until established on the localizer (unintelligible) I-L-S runway three one approach." The pilot replied, "three four zero on the turn, here we go."

At 1449:29, the pilot transmitted, "and seventy one romeo, we're not picking these navs on thirty one (unintelligible) or thirty one." According to ADS-B data, at that point the airplane was still flying the assigned 340° heading to intercept the localizer, and the airplane was about 0.72 miles left of the localizer centerline. At 1449:36, the approach controller asked the pilot to repeat his previous transmission and the pilot replied, "Yup, we still got neg nav lights on thirty one." At 1449:53, the approach controller transmitted "Aerostar seven one romeo, ah, we're getting green indications here (unintelligible) just to verify that you are on one one zero point one five on the localizer?" At 1450:01, the pilot replied, "One one zero, three." At 1450:04, the approach controller transmitted, "And its one one zero point one five, would you like revectored for the approach?" At 1450:10, the pilot asked the controller, "Is it one one zero, five?" The approach controller replied, "It is one one, ah, zero point one five. one one zero point one five. ten point one five."

According to ADS-B data, at 1449:59, the airplane flew through the localizer centerline while still on the assigned 340° heading. After crossing through the localizer centerline, the airplane made a left turn to 295° intercept the localizer. At 1450:27, the approach controller asked the pilot if the airplane was established on the localizer. The pilot replied, "We are on the localizer, seven one, ah, romeo." At 1450:40, the approach controller asked the pilot if the airplane was also receiving the glideslope. The pilot replied, "Yes we are." At that point, the airplane was flying through the localizer centerline at 3,000 ft msl while still on the 295° course and was about 4.3 miles southeast of the locator outer marker (CALDE). At 1450:45, the approach controller told the pilot to contact the tower controller. At 1450:52, the airplane made a right turn to about 306° to rejoin the localizer.

At 1450:58, the pilot established contact with the tower controller. The tower controller asked the pilot if he was established on the localizer. At 1451:08, the pilot replied, "We're established, seventy one romeo." At 1451:10, the tower controller cleared the pilot to land on runway 31. At this point the airplane was at 3,000 ft msl and was heading toward CALDE; however, the airplane's course was about 0.1 miles left of the localizer centerline.

At 1451:25, the tower controller told the pilot that the airplane appeared to be "slightly left of course." The pilot replied "correcting." At 1451:43, the tower controller told the pilot that the airplane appeared to be on course. At 1451:46, the pilot replied, "... it looks like we went through the course." At that point, the airplane had descended to 2,400 ft msl as it crossed through the localizer centerline on a 338° course.

At 1451:56, the tower controller transmitted, "seven one romeo, ah, cancel any clearance, climb and maintain three thousand, turn right heading three six zero." At 1452:02, the pilot replied, "Okay (unintelligible) thousand, here we go, seventy one romeo." At 1452:11, the tower controller transmitted, "seven romeo lima, again, cancel any clearance, climb and maintain three thousand, turn right heading three six zero." At 1452:16, the pilot replied, "three six zero on the turn, here we go, seventy one romeo." At 1452:37, the tower controller told the pilot, "seven one romeo, contact departure, they'll vector you around for another, ah, approach here, you were, ah, right left of course we, ah, it just didn't look safe from here so contact departure one two six point one five."

At 1453:10, the pilot reestablished contact with Springfield approach control and reported flying a 360° heading. The approach controller asked the pilot if he wanted to be vectored back to the ILS 31 instrument approach or change to the ILS 22 instrument approach. At 1453:45, the pilot replied, "How about we go back to three one?" The approach controller told the pilot to turn right to 090° for vectors to the ILS 31 approach at SPI.

At 1454:11, the approach controller asked the pilot, "are you having some issues with your nav head?" The pilot replied with a single word, "Yup." At 1454:17, the approach controller asked the pilot if he would prefer to fly an approach surveillance radar (ASR) approach instead of the ILS instrument approach. The pilot's response was unintelligible. At 1454:27, the approach controller told the pilot that his transmissions were intermittent and asked him if the airplane was having electrical issues. At 1454:33, the pilot replied, "Ah, that's negative." At 1454:39, the pilot transmitted, "Yeah, we will just do three one over again and, ah, we're picking up a little ice." At 1454:35, the approach controller asked the pilot again if he would prefer the ASR approach instead of the ILS approach. At 1454:52, the pilot replied, "Okay, no we will try it again, it just, ah, took off when we, ah (unintelligible) when we were ah about twenty three hundred."

At 1455:22, the approach controller told the pilot to turn right to a 130° heading and asked if the airplane was still in icing conditions. The pilot replied that the airplane was above the icing conditions at 3,000 ft msl. At 1456:10, the approach controller asked the pilot if the airplane's landing gear was still extended. The pilot replied that the landing gear was still extended. At 1457:46, the approach controller told the pilot to turn right to a 220° heading. At 1458:09, the approach controller asked the pilot to verify if the airplane was receiving the localizer signal. At 1458:12, the pilot replied, "Oh yeah, we're picking up the localizer, seventy one romeo."

At 1500:09, the approach controller transmitted, "November seven one romeo, six miles from CALDE, turn right heading two eight zero, maintain three thousand until established on the localizer, cleared I-L-S runway 31 approach." The pilot replied, "Okay, here we go, two eight oh on the turn, and three thousand until established, seventy one romeo." According to ADS-B data, between 1400:30 and 1401:00, the airplane's course was about 270° as it approached the localizer from the east. At 1401:00, the airplane turned right to a 290° and flew through the localizer at 1401:29. At that point the airplane had descended to 2,600 ft msl and was about 5 miles from CALDE. The airplane continued toward CALDE slightly left of the centerline. At 1502:03, the approach controller transmitted, "Aerostar seven one romeo, is everything looking good now, we are showing you on course." At 1502:07, the pilot replied, "Yup, looking good." At 1502:11, the approach controller told the pilot to contact Springfield tower. At 1502:14, the pilot replied, "Contact tower, seventy one romeo." At that point, the airplane was at about 3.5 miles from CALDE, and the airplane's course was still paralleling the localizer slightly left of the localizer centerline.

About 5 seconds after the pilot had been cleared to contact the tower controller, the airplane entered a left descending turn away from the localizer to a south-southwest course. The left turn began at 2,400 ft msl and descended to 700 ft msl before ADS-B track data was lost at 1503:11. The final ADS-B datapoint was recorded at 700 ft msl (about 125 ft above ground level) and the airplane's ground track and ground speed were 267° and 87 knots, respectively. The final ADS-B datapoint was located about 362 ft east-northeast of the airplane's initial impact with terrain.

At 1502:37, the tower controller attempted to contact the pilot on the tower radio frequency without any reply. At 1502:45, the tower controller again attempted to establish radio contact with the pilot. At 1502:47, the pilot replied, "We've got a prob (unintelligible)." At 1502:49, the tower controller asked the pilot if he was able to climb. There was no recorded response from the pilot. At 1502:56, the tower controller told the pilot to climb and maintain 3,000 ft msl. There was no recorded response from the pilot. At 1503:15, the tower controller told the pilot to climb and maintain 3,000 ft msl and to turn left to a heading of 180°. There was no recorded response from the pilot.

The airplane impacted a harvested cornfield about 7.3 miles southeast of the runway 31 threshold. The wreckage debris path measured about 200 ft and was oriented on a 248° compass heading. The airplane's left wingtip impacted the ground first, followed by the left and right propellers, respectively. The nose landing gear wheel was found separated from the fork assembly about 40 ft from the initial point of impact. The outboard 2.5 ft of the left aileron was found separated from the left wing along the wreckage debris path. The main wreckage came to rest at the western edge of the cornfield amongst several trees and a wire fence. The main wreckage consisted of the entire fuselage, both wings, and the empennage. The fuselage cabin and cockpit exhibited extensive damage from the postaccident fire. Both wings spars had fractured at the respective wing roots and each wing remained partially attached to the fuselage by engine control cables. Flight control continuity was not established because the control push/pull tubes for the ailerons, elevators, and rudder exhibited extensive fire and impact damage. Both ailerons and flaps exhibited impact and fire damage. Both hydraulic flap actuators were extended about 1.5" and were consistent with about 20° of flap extension. The flap control handle was found in an intermediate position. Both elevators remained attached to the horizontal stabilizer and exhibited fire damage. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer, but most of the rudder had been destroyed by fire. The landing gear was found extended. The landing gear selector handle was not located during the investigation. The throttle quadrant was destroyed by impact and fire damage. The airspeed indicator and altimeter were destroyed by fire. The attitude indicator and horizontal situation indicator were extensively damaged by fire. The internal gyros of the attitude indicator and horizontal situation indicator did not exhibit any evidence of rotational scoring. The turn indicator gyro was found separated from its instrument case that was not located during the investigation. The turn indicator gyro did not exhibit any evidence of rotational scoring. The electronic engine trend monitor was destroyed by fire. The electronic engine tachometer indicated 1,200 rpm for both engines. The manifold pressure gauge indicated 28 and 30 inches of mercury for the left and right engines, respectively.

Both engines remained attached to their respective engine mounts and nacelles. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed for each engine while their respective engine crankshaft was rotated through a rear accessory gear. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. Both magnetos on each engine were damaged by fire and could not be tested. The spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. A lighted borescope inspection of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies with the cylinders, pistons, valves, or valve seats. Both oil pumps discharged oil when their respective engine crankshaft was rotated. The pressure pump installed on each engine could not be rotated because of fire damage to their respective drive gears; however, a partial disassembly of both pressure pumps revealed no evidence of internal failure that would have precluded normal function during flight. The turbocharger system components remained secured at their respective mounts. The turbocharger compressors and turbine impellers remained intact and undamaged. The turbine impellers rotated freely by hand. The exhaust bypass valves remained secured at each turbocharger exhaust pipe and their butterfly valves remained intact and undamaged. The postaccident examination of both engines did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation during the flight.

The left propeller remained attached to the engine propeller shaft flange. One propeller blade appeared to be in the feathered position, and the remaining two blades appeared to be in the normal range of operation. Two propeller blades were visibly bent in the aft direction, and the remaining blade appeared to be slightly bent aft. Two propeller blades had indications of heat exposure such as charring, sooting, and paint blistering. One propeller blade could be partially rotated by hand force. The spinner dome was dented with one counterweight mark on the internal surface in the normal blade angle range of operation. The hydraulic unit remained intact and undamaged and the piston/pitch change mechanism appeared to be on the start locks. Propeller blade no. 1 was bent aft, bent opposite rotation and twisted towards low pitch. Propeller blade no. 2 was bent slightly aft with no remarkable twisting. Propeller blade no. 3 was bent aft, opposite rotation and twisted towards low pitch. All three propeller blades exhibited chordwise/rotational scoring isolated to the leading edges on both the camber and face side. The low pitch stop had an impact mark consistent with the propeller operating on or near the low pitch stop angle. The preload plate for propeller blade no. 3 had knob impact marks in the range of 26°-31°, which was consistent with blade angles between 17°-22°.

The right propeller remained attached to the engine propeller shaft flange. All three propeller blades appeared to be in the normal blade angle range. The spinner dome was dented with counterweight impressions that were consistent with normal blade angle range of operation. All three propeller blades were bent aft, opposite rotation in varying degrees and twisted towards low pitch. One propeller blade had indications of heat exposure such as charring, sooting and paint blistering. All three propeller blades could be partially rotated by hand force. The hydraulic unit remained intact and undamaged and the piston/pitch change mechanism appeared to be in the feathered position. All three propeller blades exhibited chordwise/rotational scoring isolated to the leading edges on both the camber and face side. The pitch change knob on all three blades were fractured. The low pitch stop had an impact mark suggesting the propeller was operating on or near the low pitch stop angle. The preload plate for propeller blade no. 2 had a knob impact mark in the slot at about 45°, which was consistent with a blade angle of about 3°. The preload plate for propeller blade no. 3 had a knob impact mark in the slot at about 21°, which was consistent with a blade angle of about 27°.

The airplane was a 1979 Piper PA-60-601P (Aerostar), serial number 61P-0686-7963324. On June 19, 1992, the two Lycoming IO-540-AA1A5 reciprocating engines were modified by supplemental type certificate (STC) Nos. SA4156NM and SE4157NM to include twin-turbochargers and intercoolers. The modified engines were rated at 350 horsepower when operated at 42 inches-of-mercury and 2,500 rpm. The engines provided thrust through constant-speed, full-feathering, three-blade, Hartzell HC-C3YR-2UF/FC8468B-8R propellers. The mid-wing airplane was of conventional aluminum construction with a retractable tricycle landing gear and wing flaps. The airplane had a pressurized cabin configured to seat six people. The airplane was equipped for operations in IMC and icing conditions. The airplane had a total fuel capacity of 173.5 gallons (165.5 gallons usable) distributed between two wing fuel tanks and a fuselage tank. According to fueling documentation, the airplane's fuel system was topped-off before the accident flight.

The airplane's hour meter was destroyed by the postimpact fire, which precluded a determination of the airplane's total service time at the time of the accident. According to available maintenance documentation, the last annual inspection of the airplane was completed on August 1, 2019, at 3,542.7 total airframe hours. As of the last annual inspection, the left engine, s/n L-32219-48E, had accumulated 1,691 hours since new, and the right engine, s/n L-32893-48E, had accumulated 1,571.5 hours since new. The static system, altimeter system, automatic pressure altitude reporting system, and transponder were last tested on May 10, 2016.

On November 26, 2019, the airplane's left propeller collided with bird(s) while on approach to Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport (SRQ), Sarasota, Florida. The left propeller was removed and sent to an overhaul facility to be inspected and possibly repaired. The damaged propeller exceeded repair limits and another overhauled propeller was installed on the airplane on January 27, 2020. Additional maintenance actions completed on January 27, 2020, included servicing the turbocharger waste gates on both engines, replacement of the pressure pump and its outlet hose on the left engine, replacement of the cabin heater thermostat, and adjustment of the pilot seat track guides and locks. The airplane had accumulated 3,584.7 total airframe hours when the last maintenance actions were completed on January 27, 2020.

According to FAA records, the 69-year-old pilot held an airline pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. The airplane single-engine land rating was limited to commercial privileges. The pilot also held an expired flight instructor certificate for single and multiengine airplanes and instrument airplane. The pilot's most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 6, 2018, with a limitation for corrective lenses. On the application for his current medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 5,500 total hours of flight experience and 60 hours within the previous 6 months. A review of available logbook documentation revealed that the pilot's last recorded flight was a flight review completed on October 29, 2017. It is unknown if the pilot had another, more current, logbook onboard the airplane at the time of the accident. The pilot's recent instrument flight experience could not be determined with the available documentation.

During August 21-23, 2019, the pilot received initial training in the Piper PA-60-601P airplane from Advanced Flight Training International, Sarasota, Florida. The flight instructor who provided the training stated that the pilot had received a certificate of completion that was limited to visual flight rules (VFR) operations. The reason the certificate of completion was limited to VFR operations was because the airplane had a malfunctioning horizontal situation indicator during training, which prevented an evaluation of the pilot's ability to fly solely by reference to instruments under IFR. The flight instructor stated the pilot had demonstrated, "very good piloting skills operating the aircraft in a safe manner and keeping it within its limitations."

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. At 1452, about 11 minutes before the accident, the SPI automated surface observing system reported a calm wind, 5 miles surface visibility with mist, 700 ft above ground level (agl) overcast ceiling, temperature -1°C, dew point -3°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.10 inches of mercury. There was an active weather advisory (AIRMET) for moderate icing while operating in clouds between the freezing level and 8,000 ft msl. The pilot reported to the approach controller that the cloud tops were about 3,000 ft msl.

Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport, a public airport located about 3 miles northwest of Springfield, Illinois, was owned and operated by the Springfield Airport Authority. The airport field elevation was 598 ft msl. The airport was served by three runways, runway 4/22 (8,001 ft by 150 ft), runway 13/31 (7,400 ft by 120 ft), and runway 18/36 (5,300 ft by 150 ft). The airport was equipped with an air traffic control tower and approach control that was operational at the time of the accident.

During an ILS approach, the localizer provides lateral guidance for the final approach course, and the glideslope provides vertical guidance as the aircraft descends toward the runway. For a precision approach, such as an ILS approach, the missed approach point is where the aircraft reaches the decision altitude while on the glideslope. The published inbound course for the ILS runway 31 approach at SPI was 308° magnetic, the crossing altitude for the final approach fix (CALDE) was 2,014 ft msl, and the distance between CALDE and the runway 31 threshold was 4.3 nm. The published localizer frequency was 110.15 MHz. The touchdown zone elevation was 590 ft msl. The decision altitude was 790 ft msl (200 ft agl) and required ½ mile visibility to land. The missed approach procedure was to climb on runway heading to 1,700 ft msl, then make a climbing left turn to hold at the locator outer marker (CALDE) at 3,100 ft msl. According to FAA documentation, the ILS runway 31 approach at SPI was fully functional at the time of the accident.

The database cards for the airplane's Garmin 430 and 530 panel-mounted GPS navigation/communication devices were recovered at the accident site and placed in a test device to determine their expiration dates. The obstacle database cards and IFR database cards had expired on September 13, 2018. Further review of the IFR database cards established that the stored localizer frequency for the ILS runway 31 approach at SPI was the same frequency that was listed on the current approach plate (110.15 MHz).

A doorbell security camera located about 300 ft north of the accident site captured video and audio of the final seconds of the flight. A review of the camera footage revealed that the airplane descended toward the ground in a left wing down, slightly nose-down attitude. All three landing gear were observed to be extended before impact. There was no evidence of an inflight fire before impact. The initial impact with the ground was obscured by a door post and trees; however, when the airplane reemerged it was observed sliding on its lower fuselage. Smoke from a postimpact fire was observed a couple seconds after the accident.

A second doorbell security camera, located about 0.6 miles south of the accident site, captured audio of the final seconds of the flight. The sound spectrums of both doorbell cameras were analyzed to identify any propeller sound signatures that were consistent with the propellers rotating under engine power. Both sound spectrums exhibited a relatively constant propeller noise signature until about two seconds before impact. The results of an acoustic analysis were consistent with the airplane's propellers rotating at 2,500 rpm before a sudden reduction in propeller speed to about 1,200 rpm about two seconds before impact.

Both propellers left three distinct slash marks in the soil. The average distance between the left propeller strike marks was 2.5 ft. The average distance between the right propeller strike marks was 2.64 ft. An estimation of the airplane's ground speed at impact was calculated using the average distance between the propeller strike marks and a propeller rotation speed of 1,200 rpm (as determined by the electronic tachometer and the sound spectrum analysis from the video footage). The propeller strike mark calculations estimated the airplane's ground speed was between 88 and 94 knots at impact.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N6071R
Model/Series: PA60 601P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: LKJ Properties LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SPI, 598 ft msl
Observation Time: 1452 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 700 ft agl
Visibility:  5 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Huntsville, AL (HSV)
Destination: Springfield, IL (SPI)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.762500, -89.572222

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 







SPRINGFIELD, Illinois (WICS/WRSP) — 10:30 A.M. WEDNESDAY UPDATE:

The Sangamon County Coroner's Office has identified three victims in Tuesday's deadly plane crash.

The victims were identified as 69-year-old John Evans of Glenarm, 69-year-old Frank Edwards of Springfield, and 63-year-old Cinda Edwards of Springfield.

6:46 P.M. UPDATE:

Sangamon County Coroner Cinda Edwards and her husband, former Springfield Mayor Frank Edwards were killed in Tuesday afternoon’s plane crash in Sangamon County. The identity of the third passenger is not known.

NewsChannel 20/Fox Illinois has confirmed through multiple sources, who wished to remain anonymous, their identities.

State Senator Andy Manar (D-Bunker Hill) issued the following statement regarding the passing of those aboard a twin-engine Piper Aerostar that crashed outside of Springfield Tuesday afternoon, including Sangamon County Coroner Cinda Edwards and former Springfield Alderman and former Springfield Mayor Frank Edwards:

“My heart breaks for the families of those involved in this tragedy. Cinda and Frank Edwards were devoted public servants to the communities of Springfield and Sangamon County. I ask everyone to join me in sending heartfelt condolences to the Edwards family.”

5:49 P.M. UPDATE:

Video from a nearby home's Nest camera was released. In the video, the plane can be seen crashing.

5:40 P.M. UPDATE:

Three people and a dog died in Tuesday's plane crash, according to the Sangamon County Sheriff.

The Sangamon County Sheriff says the airport tower and pilot recorded that the plane was having trouble due to the weather and the plane's instruments prior to impact.

Sheriff Jack Campbell says no one was able to approach the plane at first due to the flames.

The FAA currently has control of the scene.

As soon as the FAA releases the scene, the Sangamon County Coroner's Office will then be allowed to make a positive identification of the plane crash victims.

Rochester Police Department was the first on the scene.

If you saw or heard anything about the plane before or after the crash, you're encouraged to contact the Sangamon County Sheriff's office at 217-753-6666.

At this time, officials are not able to make an identification from the bodies.

4:48 P.M. UPDATE:

The plane originally took off from Florida's Sarasota/Bradenton International Airport.

The plane stopped in Huntsville, Alabama around 12:20 p.m. Tuesday to get fuel before heading to Springfield's Abraham Lincoln Capital Airport.

It crashed when it was attempting to land at the Springfield airport and missed two houses before impact.

4:25 P.M. UPDATE:

The Federal Aviation Administration sent the following message in regards to the crash:

A Piper PA-60-601P Aerostar 700 Superstar went down in a field while on approach to the Springfield, IL, airport this afternoon. The plane departed from Huntsville, Alabama.

Please contact local officials for information about the condition of the occupants.

The FAA and NTSB will investigate. We will release a tail number after investigators verify it at the crash site.

Story and video ➤ https://newschannel20.com