Friday, October 19, 2018

Cessna 182P Skylane, N9326G: Fatal accident occurred October 16, 2018 near Double Eagle II Airport (KAEG), Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

Dr. Michael Vavrek and Dr. Judy Vavrek (Berrong)


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration - ABQ FSDO; Albuquerque, New Mexico
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Hartzell Propeller Inc.; Piqua, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N9326G

Location: Canoncito, NM
Accident Number: CEN19FA008
Date & Time: 10/16/2018, 1622 MDT
Registration: N9326G
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 16, 2018, about 1622 mountain daylight time (all times referenced as mountain daylight time), a Cessna 182P airplane, N9326G, collided with terrain during a forced landing near Canoncito, New Mexico. The commercial pilot and his pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by the pilot and operated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 while on an instrument flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The personal cross-country flight departed Lake Havasu City Airport (HII), near Lake Havasu City, Arizona, about 1234 with the intended destination of Double Eagle II Airport (AEG), near Albuquerque, New Mexico.

The cross-country flight originally departed from Fullerton Municipal Airport (FUL), Fullerton, California, during which the pilot made a planned fuel stop at HII before continuing toward AEG. According to recovered GPS track data, the flight from FUL to HII was about 2 hours. The manager of the fixed-base operator at HII reported that the airplane was filled with 30.9 gallons of 100 low-lead aviation fuel before it departed on the accident flight.

According to a preliminary review of available air traffic control (ATC) data, after departing HII the airplane climbed to an assigned cruise altitude of 19,000 ft mean sea level (msl) while it continued toward Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

At 1608:25, the pilot established contact with Albuquerque Approach and reported descending through 14,600 ft msl to 10,000 ft msl. The controller issued the current weather conditions at AEG and told the pilot to fly direct to the Albuquerque Very High Frequency Omni-Directional Range (ABQ VOR) and to expect the visual approach to runway 14 at AEG. At 1612:19, the controller told the pilot that the airplane was on a southerly track and to turn to heading 80° magnetic to resume a direct course to the ABQ VOR.

At 16:13:35, the controller asked the pilot to verify his heading. The pilot replied, "about seventy-two right now sir, we're going back to eighty in a minute." 

At 16:13:43, the controller told the pilot to descend to maintain 9,000 ft msl. The pilot replied, "down to nine thousand, two six golf, yeah, we're just taking it real slow sir." 

At 1613:53, the controller told the pilot to advise if he was going to deviate from assigned headings. The pilot replied, "ah, you bet, thanks, we are just going around some clouds here." The controller then approved the pilot to make heading deviations to avoid clouds and to resume a direct course to the airport when able.

At 1614:16, the pilot replied, "direct to the airport after deviations for two six golf, yeah, in fact, we are just getting into some a little bit of precipitation here." The controller cleared the pilot to deviate as necessary to avoid the precipitation and to start the descent to maintain 9,000 ft msl.

At 1616:05, as the airplane was descending through 10,000 ft msl, the pilot transmitted, "two six golf has got engine problems at this point." 

At 1616:14, the controller confirmed with the pilot that he was having engine issues. The pilot replied, "yes sir, um, can't really tell what's going on here." The controller replied, "ah, might be some icing, use caution there is high terrain below you, um, I-40, ah, Interstate 40 is located off your right wing and about nine, nine to ten miles." 

At 1616:38, the pilot replied, "yeah, we've broken out, we are under the clouds now, but, ah, yeah, I'm trying to get it to run here." The controller then told the pilot to make a right turn to 120° to intercept Interstate 40. According to GPS track data, the airplane made a right turn to the east-southeast toward Interstate 40. At that point the airplane was at 9,000 ft msl, about 9.5 nautical miles (nm) west-northwest of Interstate 40, and about 16 nm west-southwest of AEG.

At 1617:33, the pilot transmitted, "and I've got my power back with the carb heat sir." At 1617:38, the controller told the pilot to maintain 8,200 ft msl because of high terrain below the airplane. 

At 1617:50, the pilot replied, "yeah, we will stay above eighty-two hundred, two six golf, thank you." 

At 1617:54, the pilot asked the controller, "can I be direct to alpha, ah, alpha echo golf right now?" The controlled asked the pilot how his engine was running. The pilot replied, "right now I've got some power." The controller told the pilot that a direct course to AEG would be away from the interstate and asked if he was okay with that. 

At 1618:14, the pilot replied, "yeah, I think we will be okay." 

At 1618:20, the controller cleared the pilot direct to AEG. At that point the airplane was descending through 8,200 ft msl on an east-southeast course and was about 14.5 nm west-southwest of AEG. According to available GPS track data, the airplane continued to the east-southeast and did not turn toward AEG.

At 1618:23, the controller told the pilot that there was an east/west road about 5.8 nm south of the airplane's current position. 

At 1618:52, the controller asked the pilot to ensure that the carburetor heat was turned on. 

At 1618:59, the pilot replied, "you bet, we do." 

At 1619:44, the controller asked if the pilot could maintain his own terrain and obstacle clearance at his current altitude. 

At 1619:48, the pilot replied, "yeah, I'm back to having my problems with the engine." At that point the airplane was descending through 7,600 ft msl on an east-southeast course.

At 1620:09, the controller asked the pilot of an air ambulance helicopter that was northeast of the airplane's position for assistance and issued a course change to intercept the airplane's position. 

At 1620:45, the controller informed the accident pilot that the airplane was about to descend below available radar coverage, told the pilot to climb, and issued the current altimeter setting of 30.25 inches of mercury. 

At 1620:58, the accident pilot replied, "yeah, 26G, we can't climb, I don't know what's going on, I'm gonna pick a dirt road down here somewhere [unintelligible] wind." 

At 1621:05, the controller replied, "Cessna two six golf, winds at the airport are out of the east at one six knots, gusting two five knots, ah, suggest you, ah, find a flat spot out there, I don't know of any flat spots there, out there, use caution, there is a lot of ravines."

At 1621:27, the controller told the pilot that the airplane was 200-300 ft above the ground. 

At 1621:34, the pilot stated, "yeah [unintelligible] the engine just came back on." 

At 1621:37, the controller told the pilot that the interstate was about 3.5 nm directly ahead of the airplane's position. There was no response received from the pilot. According to recovered GPS track data, the airplane briefly climbed to about 550 ft above the ground before it resumed a descent on an easterly course. 

At 1622:05, the airplane entered a right turn toward the south. 

At 1622:05, the final GPS track point was recorded at 5,922 ft msl (about 300 ft above terrain) and about 671 ft from the initial point-of-impact with terrain.

The controller continued to issue radar vectors to the pilot of the air ambulance helicopter until the wreckage was discovered at 1628:22. The helicopter landed at the accident site about 1630. The helicopter pilot reported that upon landing at the accident site the cloud ceiling was about 1,800 ft above ground level (agl), the surface visibility was about 8 miles with light rain, and the outside air temperature was about 5° C. The medical crew proceeded to the wreckage and confirmed that there were no survivors. The helicopter pilot observed several pieces of mixed-ice on the ground below the leading edge of the left wing. He described the ice pieces as being rectangular, 12-18 inches long, 4-5 inches high, and 1/4 to 3/8 inch thick. He did not observe any ice on the airplane during his brief walk around the main wreckage. The helicopter pilot noted that weather was quickly deteriorating and that he quickly returned to the helicopter to prepare for departure.

The accident site was in a sparsely populated area consisting of rolling desert terrain. The initial point-of-impact was where the right wingtip collided with the terrain. The right wingtip navigation lens cover was found near the initial impact. A shallow crater was located about 30 ft south of the initial impact point. The main wreckage was located about 110 ft south of the initial point-of-impact. The main wreckage consisted on the entire fuselage, both wings, empennage, engine, and propeller. The airplane came to rest on a north heading. There was no evidence of an inflight or postimpact fire. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage and the outboard half of the wing exhibited an upward bend with leading-edge damage. The left wing support strut remained attached to the wing and fuselage. The left aileron and flap remained attached to the wing. The left flap moved freely due to impact related damage. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage and the outboard half of the wing exhibited impact related damage. The right flap remained attached to the wing and was in the fully retracted position. The inboard half of the right aileron remained attached to the wing, and the remaining portion of the aileron was found along the wreckage debris field. The aft fuselage was fractured and twisted. The empennage components remained attached to the aft fuselage. Flight control cable continuity was established from each flight control surface to its respective cockpit control. The nose landing gear and right main landing gear separated from the fuselage during impact. The left main landing gear remained attached to the fuselage.

The electronic recording tachometer indicated 201.23 hours when battery power was applied to the device. The throttle was found full forward, the mixture control was extended about 2 inches, the carburetor heat control was extended about 2 inches, and the primer control was stowed and locked. The cowl flap handle was in an intermediate position. The flap handle was found at 15°; however, a measurement of the flap actuator indicated the wing flaps were fully retracted at impact. The ignition key switch was positioned on the left magneto. The altimeter's Kollsman setting indicated 29.97 inches-of-mercury. The autopilot controller was turned off. The transponder was set to altitude-encoding and the squawk code was 1525. The cabin heat control was extended about 1/2 inch. The pitot tube heat switch was ON. The alternate static source control was extended about 1/2 inch.

The fuel selector valve handle was observed between the BOTH and the LEFT position; however, a functional test determined that the selector valve was in the BOTH position at impact. Additional testing did not reveal any anomalies with the fuel selector valve. About 10 gallons of fuel was drained from the right wing fuel tank. No fuel was recovered from the left wing fuel tank; however, the left fuel line from the forward tank outlet to the selector valve had fractured during impact. The left fuel line from the rear tank outlet to the fuel selector valve remained intact. The airplane came to rest with the left wing high. About 4 ounces of fuel was drained from the fuel strainer, and no contamination was observed when the fuel strainer was disassembled. About 2 ounces of fuel was drained from the supply line to the carburetor. About 4 ounces of fuel was drained from the carburetor bowl. An unmeasured amount of fuel was observed to drain from the left fuel supply line to fuel selector valve. All fuel samples were blue in color and had an odor consistent with 100 low-lead aviation fuel. No water or particulate contamination was observed in the fuel samples. The vented fuel tank caps were installed and secured on both fuel tanks. The left wing exhibited fluid streaking on the top wing surface aft of the fuel tank cap and on the lower wing surface behind the left wing strut attachment and fuel system vent. The observed fluid streaks were a light tan color, consistent with the color of the sandy soil at the accident site. There were no fluid streaks observed on the right wing.

The airplane was equipped with portable oxygen system. The oxygen bottle was observed with the regulator valve in the ON position and the tank gauge indicated between the green arc and empty. The oxygen bottle remained connected to a distribution controller which had two outputs. Both of the controller outputs had a flexible clear plastic line attached. One oxygen line still had a canular attached, the second oxygen line was torn and its canular was not located. The sound of air flow was heard when the feed line to the distribution controller was cut. The distribution controller was battery powered, and the removal and reinstallation of the batteries resulted in a brief self-test cycle.

An examination of the bracket induction air filter dirt revealed sandy dirt impacted into the filter element. The carburetor heat box was deformed during impact and the carburetor heat valve was observed between the ON and OFF positions. The carburetor heat valve shaft was found fractured. The deformed carburetor heat box and fractured heat valve shaft were retained for additional examination.

The exhaust muffler remained attached to the engine exhaust. The muffler was removed from the exhaust and examined for evidence of leaks. A visual examination of the exhaust muffler revealed no evidence of leaks. The muffler flame tube exhibited signs of erosion; however, no loose material was observed in the muffler.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall. Engine control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit controls to their respective engine component. The propeller remained attached to the propeller flange. All three propeller blades remained attached to the propeller hub. The first propeller blade exhibited a spanwise S-shape bend, the second propeller blade was relatively straight, and the third propeller blade was bent aft. Minor erosion was observed on the leading edges of the propeller blades near the blade tips; however, there was no evidence of leading edge gouges. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. Both magnetos remained attached to their respective installation points and provided spark on all posts while the crankshaft was rotated. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. A borescope inspection of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies with the cylinders, pistons, valves, valve seats, or lower spark plugs. The carburetor exhibited minor impact damage to the lower bowl assembly. About 4 ounces of uncontaminated fuel was drained from the carburetor bowl. Functional testing of the carburetor accelerator pump produced a normal fuel discharge. A visual examination of the carburetor fuel inlet screen revealed no evidence of debris. A partial disassembly of the oil pump revealed oil in the housing and on the gears. There was no evidence of hard particle passage to the gears or oil pump cavity. Examination of the propeller governor gasket screen revealed no evidence of debris. The propeller governor drive turned freely by hand and discharged oil as designed. The postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation during the flight. The engine was retained for additional examination and a possible operational test run at the manufacturer.

According to FAA records, the 68-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with single-engine land airplane, single-engine sea airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on October 30, 2017, with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not recovered during the on-scene investigation.

According to FAA records, the 67-year-old pilot-rated passenger held a private pilot certificate with single-engine land airplane rating. Her most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on July 8, 1991, with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not recovered during the on-scene investigation.

The 1971-model-year airplane, serial number 18260866, was a high-wing monoplane of aluminum construction. The airplane was powered by a 285-horsepower, 6-cylinder, Continental O-550-F/TS reciprocating engine, serial number 284691-R. The original fuel-injection system had been replaced with a carburetor when modified by Texas Skyways Supplemental Type Certificate No. SE09131SC. The engine provided thrust through a constant speed, three-blade, Hartzell PHC-G3YF-1RF propeller, serial number HP657B. The four-seat airplane was equipped with a fixed conventional landing gear. The airplane had a maximum allowable takeoff weight of 2,950 pounds. According to maintenance documentation, the last annual inspection was completed on October 4, 2018, at 11,179 total airframe hours. The airplane had accumulated 21.23 hours since the last annual inspection. The airframe had accumulated a total service time of 11,200.23 hours when the accident occurred. The engine had accumulated 201.23 hours since being installed on August 2, 2017.

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at Double Eagle II Airport (AEG) about 12.5 miles north-northeast of the accident site. At 1618, about 4 minutes before the accident, the AEG automated surface observing system reported: wind 140° at 17 knots with 23 knot gusts, 10 miles surface visibility, light rain, an overcast ceiling at 4,700 ft agl, temperature 7°C, dew point -3°C, and an altimeter setting 30.25 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9326G
Model/Series: 182 P
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AEG, 5837 ft msl
Observation Time: 1618 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / -3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots / 23 knots, 140°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 4700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Lake Havasu, AZ (HII)
Destination: Albuquerque, NM (AEG) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.071111, -107.035278

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Dr. Michael Vavrek, age 68 and Dr. Judy Vavrek (Berrong), age 67, beloved husband and wife of forty-six years, residents of Albuquerque, passed away together on Tuesday, October 16, 2018.  They are lovingly remembered by their three children, Holly Kay Vavrek, Noelle Kay Kempton (Tyson), Starr Mikael Vavrek (Kristina) and their five grandchildren, John, Brayden, Lily, Sky, and Katerina, by Mike's brother, Jack (Elsie), and Judy's siblings, Tom (Lydia), Dave (Midge), and Carol (Lynn).

Dr. Michael Vavrek came to New Mexico with his wife Dr. Judy Vavrek over 40 years ago when he joined the Air Force and was stationed at Holloman AFB. They fell in love with Albuquerque and decided to stay in NM. Judy had retired from her passion, teaching. Michael worked with cars and airplanes. Michael had been flying since he was 16 and Judy was a pilot as well - the couple loved to travel!  They were just returning home from one of their favorite destinations, Disneyland.  We love them and we miss them.

A Celebration of Life will be held on Sunday, 11-Nov-2018, from 3-6pm at the Marriott Pyramid in Albuquerque, NM.  We will gather as friends and family to celebrate the lives of Dr. Michael and Dr. Judy Vavrek and enjoy food, music and all the fun stories together.  Dress Code: Please feel free to dress colorful as this this is a celebration of life!

Albuquerque Marriott Pyramid North

5151 San Francisco Rd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87109

**We have a block of rooms setup for our event, just mention it when you reserve your room!**

Link to directly book rooms under our event.

http://www.marriott.com

In lieu of flowers please consider contributing to the following charity in honor of Dr. Michael and Dr. Judy Vavrek, who were both pilots and aviation enthusiasts:

AOPA Foundation to fund general aviation “You Can Fly”, the Air Safety Institute and Flight Training Scholarships 

https://www.aopa.org

As an additional option, please consider contributing to the following charity in honor of Dr. Judy Vavrek:

La Mesa Arts Academy to fund a wide variety of after school art programs for students at La Mesa Elementary School in ABQ, NM (where Dr. Judy Vavrek taught 3rd Grade). 

https://dm2.gofund.me


https://www.gabaldonmortuaryinc.com



ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The two people killed in Tuesday's plane crash have been identified as Michael Vavrek, 68, and Judy Vavrek, 67.

Michael was flying the plane when in crashed near Route 66 Casino.

Just after 4 p.m., Vavrek called into dispatch reporting he was trying to land at Double Eagle Airport but didn't think they'd make it.

Air Traffic Control tried to him options, but he still had trouble.

"We're under the clouds now, but yeah, I'm trying to get it to run here," Vavrek said at one point to Air Traffic Control.

Just minutes later, the Cessna plane dropped off the radar.

Dispatchers scrambled to find where the plane was but had little luck. They tried to locate the plane based on what Vavrek said before contact was lost.

"We're trying to call Double Eagle Airport now. They said he was going to try and make the airport but that he wasn't going to be able to and that he was going to try and land somewhere on I-40. We're calling Double Eagle airport right now to try and get some better information for you guys," a dispatch operator stated.

More time passed, and they still couldn't find the plane.

Eventually, another aircraft spotted the plane. It had crashed near Tojahilee.

The Cessna aircraft is in pieces, the tail split in half and the right wing broken. Both Michael and Judy Vavrek had died.

The couple's son, Starr Vavrek, tells KOAT his parents were returning home from Disneyland at the time of the crash.

Starr said his parents met over 40 years ago when Michael Vavrek joined the Air Force and was stationed at Holloman Air Force Base. They fell in love in Albuquerque where they decided to make their home.

Judy was a teacher and Michael loved working with cars and airplanes. Michael had been flying since he was 16-years-old.

The cause of the crash is still under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.koat.com



ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. - Michael Vavrek, 68, and Judy Vavrek, 67, have been identified as the two people who were killed in a small plane crash west of Albuquerque. 

The single-engine Cessna 182 went down just after 4 p.m. Tuesday, approximately five miles southwest of Double Eagle II Airport. 

According to Albuquerque Fire Rescue officials, initial reports indicated that the pilot was going to attempt to land along I-40, expressing that they were not going to make it to the airport. Soon after that report, information from Double Eagle was relayed to crews that the aircraft was no longer visible on radar.

Preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration shows the pilot reported encountering icing and loss of engine power shortly before the crash.

Tom Pentecost, the chief flight instructor at Del Sol Aviation, believes the plane was at risk from the moment it took off.

"That aircraft, in my mind, in my view, had no business being up there," he said. "They were coming into Double Eagle and they were close. And what happens in your mind when you're doing that is that you say, 'Only have 15 or 20 miles to go. I can make it.'"

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kob.com

Piper PA-28-161, N8125Y: Incident occurred October 19, 2018 near Gillespie Field Airport (KSEE), El Cajon, San Diego County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Landed on a highway.

So Cal Leasing LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N8125Y 


Date: 19-OCT-18
Time: 18:20:00Z
Regis#: N8125Y
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 161
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: EL CAJON
State: CALIFORNIA



EL CAJON, Calif. (KGTV) - A plane made an emergency landing Friday on westbound Interstate 8, according to the California Highway Patrol.



A 36-year-old student pilot and 25-year-old instructor from California Flight Academy were above El Cajon and had engine trouble about 11:15 a.m., the CHP reported.


According to SDSUBaseball's twitter page, the instructor is Ryan Muno, a former Aztec baseball star.

Both men were trying to land at Gillespie Field but were forced to touch down on the freeway. The instructor took over the controls and landed safely in lanes near Second Ave.

"The instructor took over the controls of the plane. He stated he knew they weren’t going to make it to the airport, so his next course of action was to take it down the interstate," Officer Travis Gallows with CHP El Cajon said.

Muno able to land the plane on the fast lane on I-8 Westbound, miraculously missing power lines and overhead freeway sign.

10News spoke to Jim Andersen, who was driving a few cars behind the plane when it landed. When he passed by, he saw that the two aviators looked shaken up.

"The two gentlemen were talking to each other. They looked like they were catching their breath because they had just come to a stop," Andersen said.

Thankfully it wasn't a crash course, but a valuable lesson on emergency landings. 

“For them to make that landing, and have nobody else involved in it, it’s pretty much a miracle,” Officer Gallows said. 

No cars were hit and no one was injured. The plane, a Piper aircraft based in El Cajon, remained intact.

The pilot and instructor pushed the plane to the right shoulder.

Officers shut down the Mollison Ave. off-ramp of westbound I-8 due to the plane emergency. 

CHP Officer Jim Bettencourt said the CHP would be in contact with the National Transportation Safety Board to determine the best way to remove the plane.

"Try not to stop and slow down," Bettencourt recommended to drivers in the area.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.10news.com







A single-engine airplane made an emergency landing onto a busy Southern California highway Friday avoided crashing into any vehicles.

"For them to make that landing and have nobody else involved in it, I'd say that's a miracle," said California Highway Patrol Officer Travis Garrow.


A 25-year-old flight instructor and his 36-year-old student were traveling in the Piper aircraft when they experienced engine loss. 


The flight instructor took over the control to make the emergency landing, Garrow said.


He put the plane down in the middle of westbound Interstate 8 just before 11:30 a.m., flying under power lines. 


A couple who captured the plane landing on a mobile phone yelled out loud when they saw it.


“That ----- just landed on the freeway,” Zach Decker said in the video. “And he’s got it under control.” 


When Zach's wife Keri noticed the plane flying precariously low, she quickly pulled out her phone to record the whole thing.


"It was like magical, like the fact that he was able to maneuver around the cars and that the cars were smart enough to get away," she said.


When emergency personnel arrived, the plane had been pushed over to the right shoulder blocking the Mollison Avenue off-ramp lane. Mollison Avenue remains closed while crews remove the wings from the plane to get it off the freeway, Garrow said.


The plane was headed to Gillespie Field when the trouble started and the teacher decided he should take over and land the plane.


Once the plane touched down, it traveled about a half a mile on the freeway before coming to a stop.


"This is pretty cool actually because you could tell he had it under control." Zach Decker said. "He was obviously a good pilot."


Officials said no one was injured although the pilot and the student were a little shaken up.


"They were like, he was just rubbing his head, and just like, he, he was scared," Keri Decker said.


No vehicles were hit. No traffic lanes on the freeway were blocked by the plane.


A SigAlert was issued as CHP officers worked to clear the aircraft from the highway.


Both the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board have been dispatched to the scene to handle the investigation, Garrow said.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbclosangeles.com


 



A flight instructor landed a small plane with a student on board on Interstate 8 in El Cajon on Friday, avoiding motorists on the busy highway and escaping injuries, authorities said.


A California Highway Patrol officer radioed about 11:30 a.m. that an aircraft appeared to be in trouble. The pilot told authorities that the single-engine plane started to lose power as the student was flying toward Gillespie Field, so he took over and landed the aircraft in the westbound lanes near Second Street, roughly three miles from the airport.


“They were on course to land at the airport … knew they weren’t going to make that path so he diverted the plane off to the south a little bit and was able to successfully make that emergency landing on Interstate 8,” CHP Officer Travis Garrow told reporters at the scene.


The pilot managed to avoid road signs, power lines and cars as he landed the plane, a feat that Garrow said was “pretty much a miracle.”


“The fact that he was successful in landing it out here was a pretty good achievement,” he said.


The Piper PA-28-161, built in 1979, is registered to So Cal Leasing at Gillespie Field in El Cajon, according to Federal Aviation Administration records. The California Flight Academy at Gillespie Field confirmed it operates the aircraft.


Two freeway lanes were blocked for a time as the plane was steered off the freeway to the Mollison Avenue off-ramp. Traffic on the interstate backed up as motorists slowed to check out the unusual sight.


The plane will remain on the off-ramp until it can be towed away. A mechanic might have to take the wings off before authorities can move the aircraft, Garrow said.


The Federal Aviation Administration could not immediately be reached for comment.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.latimes.com







EL CAJON (CNS) - A light plane occupied by a flight instructor and a student pilot made a safe emergency landing Friday amid late-morning traffic on Interstate 8 in El Cajon.


The two San Diego men were performing a descent in preparation for landing at Gillespie Field when the engine of the Piper PA-28-161 Cherokee lost power shortly before 11:30 a.m., according to the California Highway Patrol.


Realizing that he and his 36-year-old student would not be able to reach the airport, the flying teacher, 25, took the controls, diverted to the south and set the plane down on the north side of the freeway, near Second Street, CHP public-affairs Officer Travis Garrow said. "There was no damage to the aircraft, motor vehicles or property and no injuries sustained as a result of the emergency landing," Garrow said.


After rolling to a stop, the errant single-engine plane blocked several lanes on the freeway. Caltrans personnel rushed to the scene and pushed it onto the nearby Mollison Avenue offramp, allowing traffic to get through the area with minimal disruption.


The 39-year-old airplane is registered to Gillespie Field-based So Cal Leasing, according to Federal Aviation Administration records.


The aircraft was expected to remain on the freeway exit at least into the late afternoon as workers remove its wings so it can be loaded onto a truck and hauled off for repairs.


The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were called in to investigate the aviation mishap.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.cbs8.com

Bowers Fly Baby, N107KW: Fatal accident occurred October 19, 2018 in Milton, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N107KW

Location: Milton, FL

Accident Number: ERA19FA020
Date & Time: 10/19/2018, 1130 CDT
Registration: N107KW
Aircraft: Bowers FLYBABY
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 19, 2018, at 1130 central daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Bowers Flybaby, N107KW, was substantially damaged after impacting trees and terrain near Milton, Florida. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed George T. McCutchan Airport (8FL6), Harold, Florida, around 1100.


The owner/operator of the airplane reported that pilot was his friend and a highly experienced military and airline pilot. The pilot routinely flew the airplane to either Yellow River Airstrip (FD93), Holt, Florida, or Baker Sky Ranch, a private airport, but the owner was unsure where the pilot was flying to on the day of the accident. He also stated that there were no known issues with the airplane.


Several witnesses observed the flight and stated that the airplane was flying west-southwest and paralleling the highway 500 ft above ground level (agl) about 2 miles northwest of FD93. They stated that the airplane's engine sounded like it was modulating back and forth from normal power to no power on a regular interval. One witness said the engine sounded smooth when it had power, however, it then went quiet for about 10 seconds before starting back up again; "it did this several times." The airplane descended to about 100 ft agl, just above the tree tops when the wings started to rock back and forth. The airplane then made a left turn to the south, immediately rolled left and descended steeply until impact. Another witness stated he heard a "backfire" as the airplane was descending.


The airplane collided with trees and terrain on a heading of about 120° in a heavily wooded area next to a farm. The wreckage path was compact; all primary structural components and flight control surfaces were accounted for in the debris field. There were several broken branches about 20 ft agl in nearby trees and the airplane struck the ground in a nose down angle. The propeller remained attached to the flange and one blade was broken backwards but remained attached to the hub. The engine remained attached to the firewall, which was separated from the fuselage. The left wing separated from the fuselage and was broken in several locations. The airplane had numerous breaks and tears in the fuselage. The tail section, including the rudder and elevators remained attached and showed little sign of damage. The 12-gallon fuel tank mounted on the firewall was compromised during the accident sequence and contained about 2 gallons of 100 low lead aviation gasoline. There was no post-accident fire.


The wreckage was retained for further examination.


According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airmen records, the pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single engine land and flight engineer. He held a basic medical certificate. The pilot reported 7,859 total hours of flight experience as of his most recent medical examination, which was dated June 13, 2016 and according to the owner of the airplane, he had accumulated about 37 hours in the accident airplane.


According to FAA airworthiness and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was issued a special airworthiness certificate in the experimental category on September 20, 2008. It was a single place, open cockpit, low wing, tail-wheel equipped airplane that was constructed of wood and fabric. It was powered by a Continental A-80, 80-horsepower engine that drove a Sensenich wooden two-blade fixed pitch propeller. The engine tachometer recovered from the accident site showed 142.2 hours. According to the airplane logbooks, the last condition inspection was completed on April 26, 2018 and the recorded tachometer at that time was 119.1 hours.


Bob Sikes Airport (CEW) Crestview, Florida was located about 15 miles east of the accident site. The 1153 weather observation at CEW, included wind from 100° at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 27° C, dew point 21° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.23 inches of mercury. 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Bowers

Registration: N107KW
Model/Series: FLYBABY
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCEW, 213 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 100°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Harold, FL (8FL6)
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 30.708611, -86.771111

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


John L. Boudreaux, Jr.
Birth Date: February 26, 1950
Death Date: October 19, 2018
~

Maj. John Landry “Boodie” Boudreaux, Jr. (USAF, Ret.)

February 26, 1950 – October 19, 2018

Maj. John Landry “Boodie” Boudreaux, Jr. (USAF, Ret.), who served his country as a fighter pilot and entertained jazz lovers as a big band trumpeter, died on October 19, in Holt, FL, in a single-engine aircraft accident. He was 68.

A native of Baton Rouge, LA, John graduated from Baton Rouge High School in 1968. He earned the rank of Eagle Scout. He received a Bachelor of Science degree with a minor in American history from Louisiana State University in 1972. Upon graduation, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the United States Air Force through ROTC.

As an Air Force command fighter pilot, John served at bases in the United States, Germany and South Korea. He logged more than 4,000 hours in six fighter and trainer aircraft from 1973 to 1993 (F-15, F-106, F-100, T-37, T-38 & T-33). After retirement from active duty, he was employed by FedEx as a flight engineer in Memphis. He retired in 2014 as an Airbus Captain with 20 years of service and more than 8,000 flight hours.

John’s lifelong passion for music was cultivated during four years as a member of the LSU Golden Band from Tigerland. Upon relocating to Memphis in 1995, he revived his love for jazz as a trumpet player with the Memphis Knights Big Band, VA Band, and the Memphis Shrine Band, and as the leader of the Memphis Doctors Band. He volunteered his time to play “Taps” for local military funerals in association with Bugles Across America.

John was an aviator in every sense of the word. He participated in numerous events to promote aviation and preserve aviation history. He piloted his own planes in retirement and was a traveling member of the “Black Ducks” flying club near Milton, FL. He will be deeply missed as an exceptional man, full of life and joy in every moment.

Visitation will be held Thursday, November 1, from 5-7 p.m. at Memorial Park Funeral Home, 5668 Poplar Ave., Memphis. Funeral services are scheduled for 11:45 a.m., Friday, November 2 at Grace Hill Church, 10576 Collierville Road, Collierville. Friends will be received from 10:30-11:45 a.m. The service will be officiated by Pastor Jason Stockdale. Burial with full military honors will follow at West Tennessee Veterans Cemetery, 4000 Forest Hill Irene, Memphis.

John is survived by his wife of 45 years, Jan Will Boudreaux, his high school sweetheart and fellow high school band member; a daughter Allison Boudreaux Walden, CFRE, IOM (Christopher James Walden); son Maj. Jeremy John Boudreaux, USAF (Jessie Seahorn Boudreaux); grandchildren Luke Walden and Lillian Walden; mother Ruth Bowman Suthon Boudreaux; and brothers Richard Lee Boudreaux (Candice Hughes), Ronald Charles Boudreaux and Jeffrey Lynn Boudreaux (Isabelle Begue); niece Josephine Boudreaux (Evan Weinberg) and great-niece Eleanora Weinberg. He is preceded in death by his father, John Landry “Buddy” Boudreaux.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The National Aviation Hall of Fame, P.O. Box 31096, Dayton, Ohio 45437 or the National Museum of the United States Air Force by way of the Air Force Museum Foundation, P.O. Box 1903, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433.

Arrangements have been entrusted to Memorial Park Funeral Home and Cemetery, 5668 Poplar Ave., Memphis, TN 38119 (901) 767-8930. “Celebrating Life… Behind the Stone Wall”. 

https://www.memorialparkfuneralandcemetery.com



HOLT — One man died Friday as the result of a small plane crash near Holt.

John Boudreaux, of Memphis Tenn., has tentatively been identified as the deceased pilot of the single engine Fly Baby aircraft that went down around 10 a.m. in the Log Lake area, close to U.S. Highway 90.

Boudreaux had taken off from George T. McCutchan airfield in Santa Rosa County about 30 minutes before the crash occurred.

The plane he was flying belonged to Maj. Gen. Clay T. McCutchan, who served in the Air Force Special Operations Command at Hurlburt Field. FAA records show McCutchan lives in Escambia County close to the Santa Rosa County line.

Records indicate McCutchan owns several aircraft and Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Michele Nicholson confirmed he maintains a small airfield on his property.

McCutchan was unavailable Friday for comment.

Witnesses said they saw the plane flying low and heard its engine shut off and come back on, the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

One person said he saw the aircraft go down somewhere north of U.S. 90.

As first responders conducted a search of the area, a resident of Joseph Cook Road said that he had located the plane in trees south of his property, the release said.

The FAA will investigate the cause of the crash., a man, was the only person aboard, Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Michele Nicholson said.

The FAA has been notified about the crash and will investigate, the news release said.

Records show the plane involved in the accident was manufactured in 2008. A certificate to operate the aircraft had been issued in 2014 and was not due to expire until 2020.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nwfdailynews.com

Updated Story 3:20 pm Friday

Investigators say the victim in this morning's plane crash has been tentatively identified as John Boudreaux of Memphis, Tennessee. According to the Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office, Boudreaux had reportedly taken off from George T. McCutchan airfield in Santa Rosa County around 9:30 am Friday. Witnesses told investigators they heard the plane's engine shut off and come back on. One witness told officials he saw the small aircraft go down north of Highway 90. A man living on Joseph Cook Road told first responders he found the aircraft in trees south of his property. ​

Original Story 11:30 am Friday

HOLT, Fla. (WKRG) - A pilot was killed this morning when a single-engine plane crashed near Holt. The Okaloosa County Sheriff's Office says the plane crashed east of Highway 90 near Cooper Lane. Investigators say a witness called 911 around 10 am Friday and reported seeing a small plane flying over his property. The caller told officials the plane's engine was sputtering.

First responders found a crash scene. The pilot was the only person on-board the plane. The FAA will investigate.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wkrg.com

Van's RV-4, N511TG: Incident occurred October 18, 2018 at Buchanan Field Airport (KCCR), Concord, Contra Costa County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Prop strike on landing.

https://registry.faa.gov/N511TG

Date: 18-OCT-18
Time: 00:31:00Z
Regis#: N511TG
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: VANS RV 4
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CONCORD
State: CALIFORNIA