Sunday, October 13, 2019

Cessna 182, N20855: Incident occurred October 12, 2019 in Bozeman, Gallatin County, Montana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena

Aircraft made an emergency landing in a field.

Mission Aviation LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N20855

Date: 12-OCT-19
Time: 16:20:00Z
Regis#: N20855
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: BOZEMAN
State: MONTANA


GALLATIN GATEWAY, Montana - A small airplane made an unscheduled landing in a Gallatin County alfalfa field around 10:30 AM on Saturday, a Gallatin County Sheriff's Office official says.

According to Gallatin County Sheriff's Office Captain Jason Jarrett, a 26-year-old woman was flying a Cessna 182, a four-seat, single-engine plane, above Gallatin Gateway when her engine failed, forcing her to land in a field off of Dead Cow Run.

The woman, from Park City, Montana, was the plane's only occupant and was not injured during the incident. It's unknown where she was heading.

Jarrett says there didn't appear to be any damage to the alfalfa field, and the pilot was able to fly out of the plot without any issues.

"You gotta be doing everything right when it all goes wrong," said Jarrett on Sunday about the close call.

The Gallatin Gateway Fire Department and the Gallatin County Sheriff's Office both responded to the scene on Saturday.

An investigation into the origin of the mechanical issues has been referred to the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board.

Original article ➤ https://www.abcfoxmontana.com

A small airplane experiencing mechanical trouble landed in an alfalfa field near Gallatin Gateway on Saturday, according to the Gallatin County Sheriff's Office.

The sheriff's office said a 24-year-old woman from Park City, Montana reported mechanical problems around 10 a.m. Saturday.

The woman was able to land the airplane safely in an alfalfa field off Dead Cow Run, near the Axtell Anceny fishing access site.

"No injuries, no damage to the plane, good job putting it down," said Captain Jason Jarrett, Gallatin County Sheriff's Office. "It's one of those where they say, 'Any landing that you walk away from is a good landing,' and that was the case on this one."

The woman was uninjured and was the only occupant of the airplane.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kpax.com

JetBlue Airways, Airbus A320-200, N559JB: Incident occurred October 13, 2019 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York

JetBlue Airways Corporation

https://registry.faa.gov/N559JB 

Officials say a JetBlue Airways flight bound for Orlando has safely landed at John F. Kennedy International Airport after the crew reported smoke in the cockpit and declared an emergency.

The Federal Aviation Administration says JetBlue flight 227, an Airbus A320, had departed Newark Liberty International Airport en route to Orlando international Airport when it diverted. It landed at John F. Kennedy International Airport shortly after 7:30 p.m. Sunday.


A JetBlue spokeswoman had no immediate information about how many passengers were aboard.


The Federal Aviation Administration said it will investigate.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.miamiherald.com

Piedmont Airlines, Embraer ERJ-145, N628AE: Incident occurred October 13, 2019 at Raleigh-Durham International Airport (KRDU), North Carolina

Piedmont Airlines Inc on behalf of American Airlines Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N628AE 

RALEIGH, North Carolina - A Piedmont Air flight out of Charlotte Douglas International Airport made an emergency landing at the Raleigh-Durham International Airport because smoke odor in the cockpit was reported, Federal Aviation Administration officials confirmed with Channel 9.

The flight destined for the Newport News/ Williamsburg International Airport landed safely at 6:49 p.m. Sunday.

The  Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the incident.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wsoctv.com




MORRISVILLE, North Carolina — Smoke in the cockpit prompted an American Eagle airplane en route from Charlotte to Virginia to make an emergency landing Sunday evening at Raleigh-Durham International Airport, authorities said.

A spokeswoman for the airport said Flight 4911 was carrying 45 people on the plane when it was diverted to RDU.

The flight departed Charlotte shortly after 4 p.m. and had been due to arrive in Hampton/Newport News/Williamsburg shortly thereafter, according to the plane's itinerary on the American Airlines website.

The pilots landed the plane at RDU after they smelled smoke.

No injuries were reported and the plane landed safely at RDU, authorities said.

One passenger requested an evaluation from medical authorities, however.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wral.com

Aerodynamic Stall/Spin: Taylorcraft BC12-D, N96709; accident occurred October 13, 2019 near Eck Field Airport (SN64), Sedgwick County, Kansas

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N96709

Location: Goddard, KS
Accident Number: GAA20CA015
Date & Time: 10/13/2019, 1430 CDT
Registration:N96709 
Aircraft: Taylorcraft BC12
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during takeoff, the airplane lifted off and he felt "a strange push" and the airplane drifted left towards some hangars. He made corrections toward the runway centerline and the airplane felt "mushy." The airspeed decreased, so he lowered the nose to increase the airspeed. The airplane "continued to [aerodynamically] stall." The airplane landed in a soft field and came to a sudden stop.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation station, located 6 miles to the east, reported that, about 37 minutes before the accident, the wind was variable at 3 knots. The same automated station reported that, about 23 minutes after the accident, the wind was calm. The pilot reported that the wind was 7 to 10 mph from the south-southeast and shifted to 7 to 10 mph from the north-northeast. The pilot departed on runway 18. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/19/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 810 hours (Total, all aircraft), 55 hours (Total, this make and model), 783 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Taylorcraft
Registration: N96709
Model/Series:BC12 D 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1946 
Amateur Built:No 
Airworthiness Certificate:Normal 
Serial Number:9009 
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:2 
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91 installed
Engine Model/Series: A65-8
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 65 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KICT, 1340 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 116°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Goddard, KS (SN64)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1430 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: ECK FIELD (SN64)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 1413 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2499 ft / 70 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 37.692500, -97.543611 (est)

SEDGWICK COUNTY, Kansas (KWCH) A small plane crashed Sunday near Goddard.

Sedgwick County deputies were called around 2:30 p.m. for a report of a Taylorcraft BC12-D plane crash at North 167th St and west Central.

Sgt. Tim Hallacy says the pilot took off but then realized the plane was having mechanical issues.

The pilot landed with only minor damage to the plane. He was taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

The crash is still under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kwch.com


A Taylorcraft BC12-D plane crashed at 167th St West and Central around 2:30 Sunday afternoon.

Sgt. Tim Hallacy said the pilot took off and realized the plane was having mechanical issues.

After landing the plane with minimal damage.  

The pilot was taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

The crash is still under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kfdi.com

Medical Event: Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N5522S; accident occurred October 12, 2019 at Key West International Airport (KEYW), Monroe County, Florida

View of the airplane.
Federal Aviation Administration 


Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N5522S

Location: Key West, FL
Accident Number: GAA20CA025
Date & Time: 10/12/2019, 2105 EDT
Registration: N5522S
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: None
Defining Event: Medical event
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that he performed the preflight inspection at night and started the airplane, but the airplane would not move forward as he attempted to taxi from parking to the runway.

The pilot looked out the airplane's left window in search of wheel chocks, and his passenger exited the airplane's right door and checked the right main landing gear wheel for chocks. The passenger subsequently moved to the front of the airplane and attempted to remove the chocks from the nose wheel. The passenger's right hand was struck by the propeller.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/20/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/22/2019
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 164.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 152.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 98 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 29.3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7.9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5522S
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S11430
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: Paragon Flight Training Co
Rated Power:
Operator: Paragon Flight Training Co
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEYW, 21 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0253 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 99°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 40°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 23°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fort Myers, FL (FMY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Fort Myers, FL (FMY)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1600 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Key West Intl (EYW)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 3 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: None
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 None

Latitude, Longitude: 24.556111, -81.760000 (est)


A Florida woman lost her right hand and two toes on her right foot when a propeller blade hit her Saturday as she was helping to prepare a private plane for takeoff at Key West International Airport.

A report from the Miami office of the Florida Highway Patrol listed Rebecca Lynn Gray, 45, as a passenger in a Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP plane being piloted by her husband, Walter V. Gray, 46. The couple rented the plane in Fort Myers, where they reside.

The Federal Aviation Administration is conducting an investigation of the accident, her father-in-law W.V. Gray Sr., told the Fort Myers News-Press, part of the USA TODAY Network.

"My daughter-in-law, Rebecca, will recover," he said. "Obviously, it could have been much worse, for which we are very thankful."

At approximately 9:30 p.m. EDT, Gray was outside of the aircraft removing the chock blocks that were keeping the plane's wheels in place, in preparation for takeoff, the FHP report said. The engine was on and the single, front-mounted propeller was spinning.

As she removed the chock blocks from the plane's front wheel, the right side of the spinning propeller struck the right side of her body.

Gray was initially taken to Lower Keys Medical Center and later flown out to Ryder Trauma in Miami.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.usatoday.com




A Fort Myers woman trying to help prepare a private plane for takeoff at Key West International Airport lost her right hand and two toes on her right foot when the plane's propeller hit her Saturday.

A report from the Miami office of the Florida Highway Patrol said Rebecca Lynn Gray, 45, was a passenger in a Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP plane being piloted by her husband, Walter V. Gray, 46.

The Grays are Fort Myers residents and the plane had been rented by the couple out of Fort Myers, the Florida Highway Patrol said.

The Federal Aviation Administration is conducting an investigation of the accident, her father-in-law W.V. Gray Sr., said.

"My daughter-in-law, Rebecca, will recover," he said. "Obviously, it could have been much worse, for which we are very thankful."

The Florida Highway Patrol Report said the plane, with a single propeller attached to its front, was parked around 9:30 p.m. at the Key West Airport in an airplane parking zone and the aircraft’s engine was turned on and the propeller was spinning.

Rebecca Gray was outside of the aircraft removing the chock blocks that were keeping the plane's wheels in place, in preparation for take-off, the Florida Highway Patrol 
 report said.

While she was removing the chocks from the plane's front wheel, the right side of the spinning airplane propeller struck the right side of her body.

She was taken to Lower Keys Medical Center and flown out to Ryder Trauma in Miami.

A report from the Associated Press said she lost her arm and foot when she was struck by the propeller.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.usatoday.com

A passenger on a private flight headed out of Key West stepped in front of the plane Saturday night and was struck by the propeller, which severed one of her arms, police said.

Rebecca Lynn Gray, 45, of Fort Myers, was taken to Lower Keys Medical Center and then airlifted to a Miami-area hospital in stable condition, according to the Florida Highway Patrol, which is handling the case.

The incident happened at about 8:45 p.m. Saturday at the Key West International Airport.

Her husband, Walter Gray, 46, witnessed the incident and was the pilot of the Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP. The plane was a rental out of Fort Myers.

A Monroe County Sheriff’s Office spokesman said the woman’s foot was also severed but Florida Highway Patrol said they could only confirm the woman lost an arm.

The incident began when Walter Gray tried to taxi on the runway but the plane wouldn’t move.

He got out, while the plane was still running, to check to see if the plane’s tires were still in the wheel chocks, the wedges of sturdy material put against a plane’s wheels to prevent accidental movement.

He told his wife to stay in the plane but she got out.

Gray then told his wife not to go to the front of the plane but she did. She went to remove chocks from the plane’s tires and she came in contact with the propeller.

Key West Fire Rescue took the woman to Lower Keys Medical Center.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.miamiherald.com

A propeller on a private plane severed a Florida woman's arm and foot, according to authorities.

The woman, a resident of Naples, was struck by the propeller at the Key West International Airport Saturday around 8:45 p.m., according to a news release by the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office.

The pilot and female passenger were preparing to taxi in the private plane when it "would not move or was having some other unknown mechanical issue," authorities said.

The pilot then exited the plane while it was still running to see if the chocks placed by the airplane tires when stationary on the tarmac were still in place. The passenger was struck by the propeller after she exited and walked to the front of the aircraft.

The victim was first taken to the Lower Keys Medical Center on Stock Island and later flown in stable condition to the Jackson Memorial Ryder Trauma Center in Miami, authorities said, adding that her condition on Sunday was not known.

It is also not clear what caused the plane to not move.

Additional information was not immediately available. The victim's identity was not released.

Florida Highway Patrol is conducting the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://abcnews.go.com

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna 441 Conquest II, N771XW; fatal accident occurred February 22, 2018 in Rossville, Clinton County, Indiana



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Honeywell; Phoenix, Arizona

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N771XW


Location: Rossville, IN
Accident Number: CEN18FA107
Date & Time: 02/22/2018, 1939 EST
Registration: N771XW
Aircraft: CESSNA 441
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

Analysis 

The airline transport pilot and two passengers departed in the twin-engine, pressurized airplane on a business flight in night instrument meteorological conditions. Shortly after takeoff, the airplane began to deviate from its assigned altitude and course. The controller queried the pilot, who responded that the airplane was "… a little out of control." After regaining control of the airplane, the pilot reported that he had experienced a "trim issue." The airplane continued on course and, about 13 minutes later, the pilot again reported a trim malfunction and said that he was having difficulty controlling the airplane. The flight's heading and altitude began to deviate from the course for the last 8 minutes of radar data and became more erratic for the last 2 minutes of radar data; radar and radio communication were subsequently lost at an altitude of about 18,300 ft in the vicinity of the accident site. Several witnesses reported hearing the airplane flying overhead. They all described the airplane as being very loud and that the engine sound was continuous up until they heard the impact.

The airplane impacted a field in a relatively level attitude at high speed. The wreckage was significantly fragmented and the wreckage path extended about 1/4 mile over several fields. Examination of the available airframe and engine components revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the airplane. The accident airplane was equipped with elevator, rudder, and aileron trim systems; however, not all components of the trim system and avionics were located or in a condition allowing examination. Although the airplane was equipped with an electric elevator trim and autopilot that could both be turned off in an emergency, the investigation could not determine which trim system the pilot was reportedly experiencing difficulties with. It is likely that the pilot was unable to maintain control of the airplane as he attempted to address the trim issues that he reported to air traffic control.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
An in-flight loss of control for reasons that could not be determined based on the available evidence. 

Findings

Aircraft
Aircraft systems - Malfunction

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Enroute-climb to cruise
Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Uncontrolled descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On February 22, 2018, at 1939 eastern standard time, A Cessna 441 Conquest II airplane, N771XW, impacted terrain following a loss of control in Rossville, Indiana. The airline transport rated pilot and two passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Ponderosa Aviation LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was operating on an instrument flight plan. The flight originated from the Eagle Creek Airpark (EYE), Indianapolis, Indiana, about 1920, with an intended destination of the Green Bay Austin Straubel International Airport (GRB), Green Bay, Wisconsin.

After takeoff the pilot contacted Indianapolis departure control and was cleared direct to the Boiler (BVT) VHF Omni-directional Range & Tactical Air Navigation (VORTAC) system. About a minute after the pilot checked in on the frequency, the airplane deviated from its assigned altitude and course, and the controller received a Standard Terminal Automation Replacement System (STARS) Minimum Safe Altitude Warning (MSAW) for the airplane. The controller queried the pilot regarding his heading and altitude. The pilot stated the airplane was "… a little out of control." The controller asked the pilot if he needed assistance and there was no reply. The controller then asked the pilot what his altitude was, and the pilot replied that he was at 5,500 ft and he asked for a block altitude and a heading of 090°. The controller instructed the pilot to maintain at or above 5,000 ft, and to fly any heading that he needed. The pilot then requested a block altitude of 4,500 ft to 5,000 ft. The controller instructed the pilot to remain at or above 4,000 ft on a heading of 090°.

The pilot then turned the airplane to a heading of 090° and explained to the controller that he had a trim problem and difficulty controlling the airplane, but that he had the airplane back to straight and level. The pilot was issued a turn to a heading of 310° direct to BVT, followed by a clearance to climb and maintain 13,000 ft. The pilot was then instructed to contact the Chicago Air Route Traffic Control Center (ZAU). The pilot checked in with ZAU57 sector stating that he was climbing from 10,600 ft to 13,000 ft. The pilot was cleared to climb to FL200 (20,000 ft) followed by a climb to FL230 (23,000 ft) direct to GRB. The pilot was instructed to change frequencies to ZAU46 sector. The pilot then transmitted that he needed to get control of the airplane and "… my trim kind of going out on me." Communications and radar contact were then lost. The last radar data was in the vicinity of the accident site and the last altitude data recorded was 18,300 ft.

Several witnesses reported hearing the airplane flying overhead. They all described the airplane as being very loud and that the engine sound was continuous up until they heard the impact.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 35, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/30/2017
Occupational Pilot:Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 2248.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 454.6 hours (Total, this make and model), 1732.8 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 22.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a multi-engine and Eclipse 500 ratings. The certificate listed commercial privileges for single-engine land airplanes. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine, airplane multi-engine, and instrument airplane ratings. The instructor certificate was issued May 23, 2017.

The pilot's logbook contained entries between September 13, 2004, and January 20, 2018. The pilot had logged a total flight time of 2,248.3 hours of which 454.6 hours were in Cessna 441 airplanes. The pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate issued March 30, 2017. The medical certificate contained the limitation, "Must wear corrective lenses." The pilot's last flight review was on February 2, 2017, in a Cessna 441 airplane.

The pilot was hired by Ponderosa Aviation LLC to fly the airplane for the company. The first flight logged in the accident airplane was on December 20, 2017, with 24.2 hours logged before the accident.

The pilot had received unusual attitude and upset training in February 2016.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N771XW
Model/Series: 441 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 441-0065
Landing Gear Type:
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/01/2017, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 65 Hours
Engines:  Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 6907.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Honeywell
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TPE331-10N-53
Registered Owner: PONDEROSA AVIATION LLC
Rated Power: 715 hp
Operator: PONDEROSA AVIATION LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The Cessna 441 Conquest II is an eight to ten-place, twin-engine airplane, with a pressurized cabin and retractable tricycle landing gear. The airplane is certificated as a normal category airplane, with a maximum operating altitude of 35,000 ft. The main cabin entry door is located on the left side of the airplane, aft of the wing and common to the aft portion of the cabin.

The airplane is equipped with an icing protection system including: pneumatic deice devices (boots) for the wings and stabilizers, and electrical deice elements for the propeller, windshield, pitot tubes, and stall warning sensor. Flight into known icing conditions is approved, except for severe icing conditions.

The airplane is powered by two Honeywell TPE331-10N turboprop engine that can produce 715 shaft horsepower at 2,000 rpm. The engine design featured an integral gearbox, two stage centrifugal compressor, reverse flow annular combustor, and a three-stage axial flow. The propellers were Hartzell propeller assemblies with four-blade, hydraulically actuated, constant speed design configuration, with feathering and reverse pitch capability.

Ponderosa Aviation LLC purchased the airplane on October 13, 2017. Phase 2, 3, & D inspections were accomplished on the airframe and engines on November 1, 2017, at a total aircraft time of 6,907.5 hours. At the time of this inspection, the time since overhaul of both engines was 2,095.6 hours.

The last entry in the airframe logbook was dated February 19, 2018, which documented the removal and replacement of the left horizontal situation indicator (HSI) at an aircraft total time of 6,972.7 hours. The maintenance records show that both elevator trim tab actuators were disassembled, cleaned, inspected, primed and reinstalled on October 23, 2017.

The person who coordinated the maintenance of the airplane stated the only open discrepancy he was aware of was an issue with a fluctuating oil pressure indication. He stated that the oil pressure had been checked and it was ok, but they were still trying to determine why there was a fluctuating indication.

The airplane was fueled with 230 gallons of Jet A fuel before the flight. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: LAF, 606 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1954 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 263°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 120°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.38 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 7°C / 5°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Indianapolis, IN (EYE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Green Bay, WI (GRB)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1920 EST
Type of Airspace: Class A 

Two Airmen's Meteorological Information notices (AIRMET) that covered the route of flight were in effect at the time of the accident. AIRMET SIERA called for instrument meteorological conditions with ceilings below 1,000 ft and 3 statute miles of visibility with precipitation, mist, and fog. AIRMET TANGO called for moderate turbulence between 18,000 ft and 35,000 ft.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 40.464722, -86.612778 

The accident site was located about 0.34 miles north of the town of Rossville, Indiana.

The airplane impacted terrain in a plowed field (upper field) which was soft and muddy. A shallow linear disruption of the dirt was present which was about 250 ft in length. The impact mark was present up to the crest of a slight incline where the main pieces of wreckage began. Trees bordered the east end of the field and just beyond the tree line was a tree-covered hill which descended about 50 ft at a slope of about 50°. The trees on the hillside were about 80 to 100 ft tall. At the bottom of the hill was an 8 - 10 ft wide creek. The east bank of the creek was treelined and beyond the trees were two open fields (lower fields) which were divided by a row of small trees and brush. The wreckage was scattered in the upper field, down the hillside, and into the lower fields. The entire wreckage path was about ¼ mile in length.

The wreckage path in the upper field was scattered after the initial terrain impact point and along a magnetic heading of about 110°. The first pieces of wreckage along the path were the nose baggage doors. The upper left engine cowling and the rudder were the next major pieces of wreckage along the path followed by the outboard section of the left wing, the elevators, and the outboard section of the right wing. Both outboard flaps and the right-wing inboard flap were found in the upper field along with pieces of the left inboard flap.

The vertical stabilizer, the cockpit wiring bundle, and the cockpit flight controls including the throttle quadrant were the major pieces of wreckage found on the hillside.

The wreckage located in the lower field consisted of the fragmented pressure vessel, the aft pressure bulkhead, the left and right engines, both propellers, avionics, pieces of the instrument panel, all three-landing gear, and a section of the left wing between the aileron and the engine. The left engine was the main piece of wreckage that was located furthest from the initial impact in the upper field.

A postaccident examination was conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, and FAA inspectors, with the assistance of a representative of the engine and airplane manufacturers. The examination did not reveal any anomalies consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction. A detailed summary of the examination is included in the docket associated with the investigation. 

Medical And Pathological Information

An autopsy on the pilot was conducted on February 25, 2018, by the Indiana Forensic & Surgical Pathology at the request of the Carroll County, Indiana Coroner's Office. The pilot's cause of death was attributed to injuries sustained in the aircraft accident.

Toxicology testing performed by the FAA Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, was negative for carbon monoxide, cyanide, and ethanol. The testing was negative for drugs in the testing profile. 

Tests And Research

The Honeywell enhanced ground proximity warning system (EGPWS) was examined and downloaded at the Honeywell facility in Redmond, Washington, on March 20, 2018. The EGPWS does not record continuous flight history; it is an event driven recording. The version of the terrain database on the unit was not the most current version. No terrain warnings were recorded at the end of the flight and some of the recorded data was invalid.

The radar data ground track showed the airplane made a turn to the west followed by a turn to the north shortly after takeoff. The airplane then made a 270 ° left turn before heading east. The airplane then turned to the northwest as it continued to climb. The airplane then entered a sweeping right turn before entering a 450° turn and rolling out on a northerly heading. The ground track then turned northeasterly before ending.

Ayres S2R-T34 Turbo Thrush, N3090C: Accident occurred October 11, 2019 in Willacoochee, Atkinson County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta

Souther Crop Spraying Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N3090C


NTSB Identification: GAA20CA020
14 CFR Part 137: Agricultural
Accident occurred Friday, October 11, 2019 in Willacoochee, GA
Aircraft: Ayres S2R, registration: N3090C

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed in a field under unknown circumstances.

Date: 11-OCT-19
Time: 13:21:00Z
Regis#: N3090C
Aircraft Make: AYRES THRUSH
Aircraft Model: S2R
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: WILLACOOCHEE
State: GEORGIA



A pilot in Atkinson County is alive but suffered a head injury and has a few cuts and scrapes after a plane crash Friday morning.

The Atkinson County Sheriff's Office and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating after the accident on Talmadge McKinnon Road in Willacoochee.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirms that a Ayres S2R-T34 Turbo Thrush aircraft crashed in a field near Willacoochee at 9:21 a.m.

Atkinson County Sheriff David Moore says that the plane was dusting a cotton field and circled around when it clipped the power lines and crashed into a wooded area next to the field.

Lineman anticipate that the power will be restored by Friday evening.

The pilot’s name has not been released as of publication.

Story and video ➤ https://wfxl.com

Piper PA-34-200T Seneca, N15789: Incident occurred October 11, 2019 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft landed and gear collapsed.

https://registry.faa.gov/N15789

Date: 11-OCT-19
Time: 14:08:00Z
Regis#: N15789
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA34
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

J A Megna Aircraft LLC
~

October 11th at 9:51 a.m., Miami-Dade Fire Rescue responded to reports of a small aircraft that made an emergency landing at Miami Executive Airport in SW Miami-Dade.

When Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Foam24 truck arrived, they found that the small aircraft had already landed on the runway. Crews assessed the scene and ensured there were no injuries onboard.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue foam trucks are units utilized at our airports with specialized capabilities to fight aircraft fires and all types of hazards. 

-Miami-Dade Fire Rescue




SOUTHWEST MIAMI-DADE, Florida (WSVN) - A small airplane made an emergency landing at Miami Executive Airport in Southwest Miami-Dade.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue crews responded to the scene just before 10 a.m., Friday.

The small plane was able to land on the runway.

No injuries were reported.

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue foam trucks were dispatched to the scene in case of an aircraft fire or other potential hazards.

Story and video ➤ https://wsvn.com