Friday, October 18, 2019

Piper PA-23-250 Aztec F, N778PA: Fatal accident occurred October 16, 2019 in Gonzale, Louisiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge;

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances into the Gulf of Mexico

https://registry.faa.gov/N778PA

Date: 16-OCT-19
Time: 00:05:00Z
Regis#: N778PA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA23
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: Yes
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: GONZALES
State: LOUISIANA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

 
Dr. Steven Stone Schumacher was a trauma specialist for Saint Francis Healthcare in Cape Girardeau, Missouri. He studied at LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans in 1990.


The U.S. Coast Guard ended its search in the Gulf of Mexico for a small aircraft piloted by an LSU medical school graduate who officials believe crashed last week en route from Missouri, where he worked as a trauma surgeon, to Gonzales.

Steven Stone Schumacher, 63, was traveling alone in a Piper PA-23-250 Aztec F plane. His family reported him missing hours after he was scheduled to arrive Wednesday night, officials said.

Crews spent roughly 21 hours searching for the plane, covering more than 62,500 square-nautical miles before calling it off Sunday, the Coast Guard said.

"After the utmost consideration and review of all factors involved in this search and rescue case, the Coast Guard has made the difficult decision to suspend its active search efforts,” said Cmdr. Drew Casey, search and rescue mission coordinator from the Eighth Coast Guard District, in a statement. “We extend our sincere condolences to the family and friends of Mr. Steven Schumacher.”

The plane's last position over the Gulf was 440 miles off Louisiana's coast, and federal air controllers weren't able to contact Schumacher. He was expected to arrive in Gonzales about 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, officials said.

The Coast Guard and Mexican Navy had been searching for the plane but found no signs of it. 

Schumacher, a trauma surgeon in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, graduated from the LSU School of Medicine. He was a resident at the New Orleans Charity Hospital's department of surgery, according to the Missouri health care system

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.theadvocate.com

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A U.S. Coast Guard plane and a Mexican Navy vessel searched the Gulf of Mexico for a small plane Thursday after a trauma surgeon flew the aircraft hundreds of miles (kilometers) beyond its intended destination.

Steven Schumacher's family reported him overdue at 10:30 p.m. Wednesday, two hours after he was scheduled to end a trip from Cape Girardeau, Missouri, to Gonzales, near Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the Coast Guard said.

An online flight tracker showed the Piper Aztec's last known position over the Gulf about 11:40 p.m. Wednesday, about 440 miles (700 kilometers) past Louisiana's coast, said Petty Officer Sydney Phoenix, a Coast Guard spokeswoman.

The Houston air traffic control center was unable to reach the pilot, Federal Aviation Agency spokesman Lynn Lunsford said in an email.

"If a pilot is not on a controller's frequency, there is no way for the controller to contact them other than to try and reach them on an emergency frequency that pilots are supposed to monitor. In this case, the pilot was not in contact with controllers and did not respond to attempts to contact him," Lunsford wrote.

Schumacher is a trauma surgeon with Cape Trauma Specialists, a partner organization with St. Francis Healthcare System of Cape Girardeau, St. Francis president and CEO Maryann Reese said in an emailed statement. "The Saint Francis Family is keeping the Schumacher family in our thoughts and prayers as the search continues for him and his private aircraft," she wrote.

Schumacher has connections in several other states.

A hangar lease with the Cape Girardeau airport for the 1977 Piper PA-23-250 Aztec F with tail number N778PA shows he signed it for Critical Care Response of St. Petersburg, Florida.

According to his LinkedIn profile, he has worked with St. Francis since July 2017, while also working for much of that time with University Hospitals Cleveland in Ohio. He has worked for hospitals in New York City, Kettering, Ohio, and St. Petersburg, not to mention four months teaching surgery for the University of Virginia School of Medicine in Butare, Rwanda, the profile showed.

He graduated from Louisiana State University with a bachelor of science degree, received his medical degree in 1990 from LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans, was an LSU resident in general surgery from 1990 to 1995, and did postgraduate work in 2007 and 2008 at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, according to his profile.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.abcactionnews.com

Maule M-7: Incident occurred October 17, 2019 in Raleigh, North Carolina

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro

Aircraft landed and veered off runway and hit runway light.

Date: 17-OCT-19
Time: 15:48:00Z
Aircraft Make: MAULE
Aircraft Model: M7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: RALEIGH
State: NORTH CAROLINA

Piper PA-18-150, N2894P: Accident occurred October 17, 2019 in Gerlach, Washoe County, Nevada

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno

https://registry.faa.gov/N2894P 


NTSB Identification: GAA20CA030

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, October 16, 2019 in Gerlach, NV
Aircraft: Piper PA18, registration: N2894P

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances and was abandoned.


Date: 17-OCT-19

Time: 17:07:00Z
Regis#: N2894P 
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: GERLACH
State: NEVADA

Piper PA-28-140, N15888: Incident occurred October 17, 2019 -and- Accident occurred October 26, 2018 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

October 17, 2019:  Aircraft landed and nose gear collapsed.


https://registry.faa.gov/N15888


Date: 17-OCT-19

Time: 15:54:00Z
Regis#: N15888
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Miami, FL

Accident Number: GAA19CA040
Date & Time: 10/26/2018, 1100 EDT
Registration: N15888
Aircraft: Piper PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

 Analysis 

The student pilot reported that, during a solo cross-country flight, while landing with a crosswind, the airplane bounced and landed hard. He added that the propeller struck the ground, the airplane "tilted” left, and the left wing then struck the ground. The airplane came to rest in the grass off the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mount.

The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The airport’s automated weather observation system reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 240° at 8 knots. The airplane landed on runway 27R, which resulted in a 4-knot crosswind.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 
The student pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Abnormal runway contact (Defining event)
Hard landing
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Runway excursion

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 29, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 115.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 114.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 8 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7.5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N15888
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1972
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7325189
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/03/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  6025.2 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E3D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTMB, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1453 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 251°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Okeechobee, FL (OBE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Miami, FL (TMB)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0943 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: MIAMI EXECUTIVE (TMB)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 10 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5003 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 25.649167, -80.429167 (est)

Douglas DC-3C, N437GB: Accident occurred October 18, 2019 near Lynden Pindling International Airport, Nassau, Bahamas

Atlantic Air Cargo Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N437GB 


NTSB Identification: ERA20WA015
14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Friday, October 18, 2019 in Nassau, Bahamas
Aircraft: Douglas DC3C S1C3G, registration: N437GB
Injuries: 2 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Bahamas has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Douglas DC3C S1C3G airplane that occurred on October 18, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Bahama investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Bahamas.

NEAR NASSAU, Bahamas (WSVN) – Two people are expected to be OK after a cargo plane crashed on approach to an airport several miles north of Nassau, Bahamas.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the Douglas DC-3 took off from Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport, Friday afternoon.

Julio Castrillo, a pilot, has been identified by family members as one of the people on board the aircraft.

Nancy Johns, Castrillo’s sister, said she was terrified when she heard about the crash.

“When I heard that a DC-3 was crashed, I got hysterical,” she said.

The Federal Aviation Administration released a statement on the crash that read in part:

“A Douglas DC-3 on approach to the Lynden Pindling International Airport, Nassau, Bahamas crashed short of Runway 14 into the water today at 4:45 p.m. The flight departed the Miami-Opa Locka Executive Airport enroute to Lynden Pindling International Airport. The FAA will investigate and the NTSB will determine the probable cause of the accident.”

Atlantic Air Cargo in Doral operate the aircraft with daily charter flights from Miami to the Bahamas and the Florida Keys.

The Coast Guard said the Royal Bahamian Defense Force picked up the two people on board the downed aircraft.

“They were rescued. They were doing good, and that’s it. It was wonderful to hear,” Johns said.

It remains unclear what caused the plane to go down.

Story and video ➤ https://wsvn.com

Cessna 172M, N12679 and Cessna 172M, N9567H: Incident occurred October 17, 2019 at Miami Executive Airport (KTMB), Miami-Dade County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft ready for takeoff and struck N9567H.

Garuda Aviation Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N12679

Date: 17-OCT-19
Time: 12:52:00Z
Regis#: N12679
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Aircraft on departure was struck by N12679.

https://registry.faa.gov/N9567H

Date: 17-OCT-19
Time: 12:52:00Z
Regis#: N9567H
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 172 Skyhawk, N7233A: Incident occurred October 18, 2019 near Melbourne International Airport (KMLB), Brevard County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando

Aircraft made a forced landing on a road.

Victoria's Wings LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N7233A

Date: 18-OCT-19
Time: 01:50:00Z
Regis#: N7233A
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: MELBOURNE
State: FLORIDA





Investigators were attempting to find out how and why a small plane landed on an old stretch of roadway in an industrial part of Melbourne late Thursday.

No one was injured after the unidentified single-engine aircraft touched down about 9:02 p.m. on Old Nasa Boulevard, just south of Nasa Boulevard, not far from the Orlando Melbourne International Airport. 

"We don't know the cause, but the airplane came in for a landing and touched down on Old Nasa. It came to a stop at the dead-end of the road. It stopped in the grass," said Sgt. Mike Casey of the Melbourne Police Department. "Everyone is fine, the only person on board was the pilot," he said. 

The pilot has not been identified.

The incident was being investigated by airport police. 

Neither airport police nor the airport's public information officer responded to inquiries Friday.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.floridatoday.com

Ercoupe 415-C, N2585H: Accident occurred October 17, 2019 near Pearland Regional Airport (KLVJ), Brazoria County, Texas


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston

https://registry.faa.gov/N2585H

NTSB Identification: GAA20CA031
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 17, 2019 in Alvin, TX
Aircraft: Ercoupe 415, registration: N2585H

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft crashed in a field under unknown circumstances.

Date: 17-OCT-19
Time: 17:35:00Z
Regis#: N2585H
Aircraft Make: ERCOUPE
Aircraft Model: 415
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: ALVIN
State: TEXAS




MANVEL, Texas — A pilot was not injured after crash landing his small plane in a subdivision in the Manvel area Thursday morning.

This happened in the Martha’s Vineyard subdivision just east of County Road 99 and Highway 6.

Troopers with the Texas Department of Public Safety say the pilot was flying in from Senora and headed to the Pearland Airport when the plane ran out of fuel.

Witness video of the landing shows that the plane rolled once before coming to a stop.

Fortunately, the plane did hit any structures when it landed.

Story and video ➤ https://www.khou.com

Cessna 206H Stationair, N11379: Incident occurred October 17, 2019 near Stockton Metropolitan Airport (KSCK), San Joaquin County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland

Aircraft lost power and made an emergency landing off airport.

County of San Joaquin

San Joaquin County Sheriff's Office

https://registry.faa.gov/N11379

Date: 17-OCT-19
Time: 22:10:00Z
Regis#: N11379
Aircraft Make: Cessna 206H Stationair
Aircraft Model: 206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PUBLIC USE
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: STOCKTON
State: CALIFORNIA







STOCKTON — A plane carrying two San Joaquin County sheriff’s deputies was forced to make an emergency landing shortly after takeoff Thursday evening near Stockton Metropolitan Airport after experiencing engine trouble, the Sheriff’s Office reported.

The Cessna 206H Stationair plane crashed into a cyclone fence and diesel trailer.

“Miraculously they appear to be uninjured at this time,” the Sheriff’s Office said in a statement.

According to Andrea Lopez, a spokeswoman for the Sheriff’s Office, the deputies had been training just before the incident occurred.

“About 6:15 p.m. our dispatch received a call that an airplane had crashed in this area,” she said Thursday night during a press briefing at the scene. “We later learned that it was two of our deputy officers in the plane.

“They took off today for a routine training and shortly after, they experienced engine trouble,” Lopez said. “They felt a loss of power and we were very grateful that they were able to conduct this emergency landing.”

The plane belonged to the Sheriff’s Office, she said, and is expected to remain at the scene of the crash landing until Friday as the investigation continues.

An investigation will be conducted by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, the Sheriff’s Office said.

Medics were brought to the scene, but the deputies who had been aboard did not go to the hospital, she said.

“We only have property damage at this point,” she said. “We are grateful that our deputies are OK. The fence, the plane, the tractor trailer, are all replaceable. Our deputies are not.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.recordnet.com

Flight Design CTLS, N771TX: Accident occurred October 17, 2019 at Monument Valley Airport (UT25), San Juan County, Utah

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City

https://registry.faa.gov/N771TX

NTSB Identification: GAA20CA032
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, October 17, 2019 in Monument Valley, UT
Aircraft: Flight Design CTLS, registration: N771TX

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft lost control on takeoff and crashed.

Date: 17-OCT-19
Time: 16:45:00Z
Regis#: N771TX
Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN
Aircraft Model: CTLS
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: MONUMENT VALLEY
State: UTAH

Ikarus C 42E, N475CR: Incident occurred October 17, 2019 near Shell Lake Municipal Airport (KSSQ), Washburn County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis

Aircraft after takeoff lost engine power and crashed near the shoreline.

https://registry.faa.gov/N475CR

Date: 17-OCT-19
Time: 19:37:00Z
Regis#: N475CR
Aircraft Make: COMCO IKARUS
Aircraft Model: IKARUS C42
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: SHELL LAKE
State: WISCONSIN

Bell 206B JetRanger II, N167AG: Fatal accident occurred October 17, 2019 in New Salem, Union County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charlotte, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N167AG

Location: New Salem, NC
Accident Number: ERA20FA012
Date & Time: 10/17/2019, 1538 EDT
Registration: N167AG
Aircraft: Bell 206
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

On October 17, 2019, about 1538 eastern daylight time, a Bell 206B, N167AG, was substantially damaged when it impacted powerlines and terrain near New Salem, North Carolina. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The helicopter was owned and operated by Vertical Flight Technologies under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local aerial application flight, which originated about 1534.

A team of ground personnel consisting of two employees who operated a mobile ground truck, and according to the lead person, the pilot performed a preflight inspection of the helicopter about 0745 for a day of aerial application, with no anomalies noted. The pilot had previously conducted numerous applications in the local area, then relocated the helicopter to the accident field for the first time. The ground personnel relocated the mobile truck to a location northwest of the field to be sprayed and waited for the helicopter to approach and land.

After refilling the chemical reservoir, and through the use of hand signals, the lead dispatched the helicopter for about the 22nd aerial application of the day. The pilot departed to the north and made a left turn to a southerly heading, then tracked to the south while flying along the west side of the field. The pilot then turned north near the service road to the field. After the helicopter had been flying for about two minutes, the lead heard a "pop" and when he turned around to look at the helicopter, he saw it travel about 30 yards before impacting terrain. He then ran toward the accident site and attempted to render assistance to the pilot.

Examination of the accident site revealed that a powerline with two wires was strung on along a magnetic heading of 353° across the road servicing the property at the southern edge of the field. At the point where the helicopter impacted the ground, the two wires would have been transitioning across the road at a height approximately 35 to 45 feet above the ground. The helicopter came to rest on its right-side, in nose low attitude, and on a magnetic heading of 351°. All major components of the helicopter were accounted for at the scene. The main rotor mast fractured about 2 inches below the bottom of the hub and the hub was located to the left of the cockpit with both fragmented rotor blades. A section of powerline wire laid across the nose of the helicopter, over the top of the cockpit and around the main rotor mast and was entangled in the spray system. Additionally, about five rotations of wire were wrapped around the tail rotor hub and blade assembly.

Flight control system continuity was established from the pilot side cyclic and collective through the push-pull control tubes to the three hydraulic servo actuators. Continuity was confirmed from the servos through fractures of the control tubes exhibiting features consistent with overload separation, to the swashplate assembly on the main rotor mast. The blade pitch change links remained attached at both ends and were fractured consistent with overload. Control continuity was established from the anti-torque pedals continuously to the tail rotor hub and blade assembly. The tail rotor blade pitch change links remained intact and attached. An examination of the twist grip throttle linkage confirmed throttle continuity to the fuel controller on the engine. The copilot (left side) cyclic and collective controls were not installed.

The engine remained attached to the engine mounts. The compressor air inlet revealed damage to the 1st-stage compressor blades in the direction opposite of rotation, and the compressor could not be rotated by hand. Rotational scoring was also observed on the top of the air inlet housing.

The main gearbox was found rotated aft about 45° with the engine to transmission drive shaft pulled from the main gearbox attachment fitting. The mast rotated freely by hand.

The tail rotor shaft was fractured just forward of the horizontal stabilizer. The shaft remained attached to the engine reduction gear box and showed rotational scoring just forward of the fracture. When the tail rotor shaft was rotated the freewheeling unit engaged, when the shaft was rotated in the opposite direction it turned freely. The shaft aft of the fractures was continuous to the tail rotor gear box and turned freely when rotated by hand.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the helicopter was manufactured in 1974. It was equipped with a Rolls-Royce 250C20 series, 370-horsepower turboshaft engine.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for rotorcraft-helicopter and instrument helicopter. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for rotorcraft-helicopter. At the time of the accident, the pilot held a second-class medical certificate issued on February 19, 2019. Review of the pilot's logbook revealed a total of 5,670 hours of flight experience in helicopters.

The weather conditions reported about 1953 at Charlotte-Monroe Executive Airport (EQY), Monroe, North Carolina about 17 miles southwest of the accident site, included visibility of 10 miles, clear sky, wind from 310° at 10 knots, temperature 19°C, dew point 01°C, and a barometric altimeter setting of 29.88 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N167AG
Model/Series:206 B 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Vertical Flight Technologies
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137); Commercial Space Transp. Experimental Permit

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.88 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Albemarle, NC
Destination: New Salem, NC

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.149167, -80.362222

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Andrew Alan STEPHEN was born on March 3, 1965 and passed away on October 17, 2019. 


In care of McEwen Funeral Home of Monroe Monroe, NC 704-289-3173

The crop-dusting pilot who died Thursday when his aircraft got tangled in power lines over a North Carolina field has been identified as Andrew Alan Stephen by the Union County Sheriff’s Office.

Stephen, 54, of Florida, was the lone occupant of the helicopter when it went down west of the 6900 block of N.C. 205, north of New Salem, according to a sheriff’s office Facebook post. The area is about 30 miles east of Charlotte.

“The helicopter (was) spraying herbicide in the field when the aircraft became entangled in a power line before crashing,” Union County officials said.

The helicopter was “very heavily damaged,” reported the Observer’s news partner WBTV.

Investigators told WCNC the pilot was “working under contract with Vertical Flight Technologies” at the time of the incident. A witness in the field at the time of the crash was identified by the station as the pilot’s partner.

The crash occurred around 5 p.m. Thursday and state and county first responders rushed to the site, along with the Union County Fire Marshal’s Office.

“Deputies remain on scene pending arrival of FAA investigators today,” the department said Friday morning.


https://www.newsobserver.com



UNION COUNTY, North Carolina - A pilot was killed when a helicopter crashed Thursday afternoon near New Salem in Union County at the Stanly County line, officials said.

the accident happened near N.C. Highway 205, which is near Swift Road.

The Bell 206B JetRanger II helicopter was spraying crops at 3:50 p.m. when it struck a power line and crashed into a heavily wooded area, FAA officials said in a statement.

No one else was aboard.

It was an unusual sight for residents and investigators in the Union County farming community.

"They're getting ready for the next crop, so yeah they're crop dusting and spraying the field. It's normal this kind of year," said resident Julia York.

In the quiet farming community of New Salem, residents expect to see land being prepared for next year's crops.

"He was actually spraying a herbicide in the timber," said Tony Underwood, with the Union County Sheriff's Office.

Investigators believe the pilot was flying about 30 to 35 feet above the ground.

"Apparently he got too low and became entangled in a power line and unfortunately the helicopter went straight to the ground," said Underwood.

The view from Chopper 9's Skyzoom showed the wreckage and a downed power line, which took down the pilot and helicopter in a wooded area.

"The cabin area where the pilot was sitting is still somewhat intact but (the rest) is broken into pieces," said Underwood.

York has lived in the area her whole life and can't recall an incident like what happened Thursday. She said neighbors said everyone started calling each other.

"Which is scary. I grew up on a farm. I'm from a farm. That's scary, because I know people from around here. It worries you, because you don't know who it might be," said York.

Investigators said the pilot was from Florida and had a partner, who witnessed the crash, working in the field below.

"They were a contract company out of Florida and apparently they go all along to the East Coast doing contract jobs such as the one behind me," said Underwood.

Dozens of agencies responded to the crash but couldn't save the pilot.

"It's very sad, very tragic, especially if he was just doing a job, to only gotten tangled in the power lines," said Underwood.

Investigators said the pilot's family in Florida has been notified and his name will be released soon.

Deputies secured the crash site Thursday as they wait for national investigators to arrive Friday morning from Washington, D.C.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wsoctv.com






MARSHVILLE, North Carolina — One person died after a helicopter crash in Union County late Thursday afternoon, an official confirmed to WCNC NBC Charlotte.

The crash happened around 4 p.m. near North Carolina 205 in the Marshville area of Union County. This was north of the New Salem community.

Investigators believed the crash occurred in a heavily wooded area after the Bell 206B JetRanger II helicopter became entangled in a power line. The helicopter had been spraying a field.

NBC Charlotte's Hunter Sáenz learned from the sheriff's office that the pilot who died was from Florida and was working under contract with Vertical Flight Technologies. 

The pilot's partner was at the field but not with him in the helicopter, the sheriff's office said.

The FAA will investigate, and the NTSB will determine the probable cause of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wcnc.com

Saab 2000, N686PA: Fatal accident occurred October 17, 2019 at Unalaska-Tom Madsen Airport (PADU), Unalaska, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N686PA


Location: Unalaska, AK
Accident Number: DCA20MA002
Date & Time: 10/17/2019, 1740 AKD
Registration: N686PA
Aircraft: Saab 2000
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 37 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 121: Air Carrier - Scheduled 

On October 17, 2019, about 1740 Alaska daylight time, PenAir flight 3296, a Saab 2000, N686PA, overran the runway while landing at the Thomas Madsen Airport (PADU), Unalaska, Alaska. The airplane passed through the airport perimeter fence, crossed a road, and came to rest on shoreline rocks. Of the 42 passengers and crewmembers on board, 1 passenger was fatally injured, and several other passengers sustained serious or minor injuries. The airplane received substantial damage. The regularly scheduled domestic passenger flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 from Ted Stevens International Airport (KANC), Anchorage, Alaska, to PADU.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Saab
Registration: N686PA
Model/Series: 2000 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Peninsula Aviation Services Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Flag carrier (121); Supplemental
Operator Does Business As: PenAir
Operator Designator Code: PNSA 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / 2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3900 ft agl
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 29.52 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Anchorage, AK (ANC)
Destination: Unalaska, AK (PADU)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 34 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious, 3 Minor, 37 None
Latitude, Longitude:

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



David Allan Oltman

David Allan Oltman died unexpectedly in Dutch Harbor, Alaska on Oct. 17 at the age of 38.


David is survived by his parents, Leo and Diana Oltman of Ellensburg, WA; wife, Erin, and their children, Reece and Evan of Wenatchee, WA; siblings, Scott Oltman of Ellensburg, WA and Leanne Semprimoznik of Spokane, WA.


David was born July 14, 1981 in Yakima, WA. He graduated from Ellensburg High School in 2000, and later received a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology and Retail Management at Central Washington University.


David first met his wife Erin in 2000 and began dating in 2003. In 2010, David and Erin were married and settled in Wenatchee, WA. The Oltman's children are Reece (age 6) and Evan (age 3).


Called "David of all trades," David was known for his wide repertoire of skills. His work history included construction, orthopedic implant representative, technology plant manager at Jeld Wen, Mission Ridge Ski Patrol, Chelan County fire recruit, commercial fisherman, and most recently the owner of BKR Construction Services.


His family and friends recognized him as a "master of play." He worked hard to play hard. He enjoyed fishing, biking, skiing, camping, paddle boarding, water skiing, dirt biking, and hunting.


David was the backbone of his family whom he loved and adored. He strove to be the absolute best for his family, for which he was always the driving force. David had a knack for conversation. He was able to make a connection with anyone. This contributed to his success professionally and why so many have fond memories of and with David. David was loved by so many from all walks of life. His ability to fit into any environment is why he impacted so many people.


A Celebration of Life is scheduled for Sunday, Oct, 27, 2019 at the Mission Ridge Lodge from 1 to 4 p.m. Friends and family members are welcome to attend and celebrate David's life. Please wear your Xtratufs, Sorels, or Bogs as there is snow on the ground. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Mission Ridge Avalanche Control at https://www.missionridge.com.


Condolences can be sent to https://www.jonesjonesbetts.com.


The family would like to specifically thank the Mission Ridge family, the Paton Family, the Roberts Family, the Garlini Family, and Saddlerock Brewery.


This picture shows the area where a propeller on the Saab 2000 punctured the Peninsula Airways aircraft, killing David Oltman of Wenatchee, Washington.



Regular flights to and from Unalaska, a place that relies on air travel, are suspended in the aftermath of a fatal commercial plane crash on Thursday that killed a Washington state man.

The cessation of regular service left travelers stranded or scrambling for charter flights even as demand for seats spiked with Bering Sea crabbers headed out for the season opener.

Alaska Airlines markets two or three flights a day from Anchorage to Dutch Harbor, an airport notorious for temperamental Aleutian weather at a runway hemmed in by water.

Alaska Airlines and PenAir, a Ravn Air Group carrier, are temporarily stopping operations to and from Dutch Harbor in “the interest of safety” and “are working together to determine a timeline for resuming service,” according to an Alaska Airlines statement. Alaska markets the flight as PenAir, but that company was purchased by a Ravn affiliate in bankruptcy proceedings last year.

Alaska is offering a full refund to people who bought tickets on the route through Oct. 28. An Alaska Airlines spokesman said that doesn’t mean service will be suspended through that date.

A Ravn spokeswoman referred all questions to Alaska Airlines.

The crash occurred Thursday afternoon when a plane landing with 39 passengers and three crew from Anchorage ran off the end of the runway on the pilot’s second attempt to touch down. The Saab 2000 twin-engine turboprop came to a stop with its nose hanging over the edge of a rocky embankment at the water’s edge. Parts of a propeller blade ended up in the cabin.

Traumatic injuries killed Wenatchee resident 38-year-old David Allan Oltman. People in Unalaska say Oltman’s construction job brought him there fairly regularly.

Another critically injured passenger was flown to Anchorage. Nine more people got hurt, including at least one member of Cordova’s high school swim team who needed a trip to Anchorage for metal embedded in his leg. The rest of the team returned home Friday.

An 8-member National Transportation Safety Board team is in Unalaska investigating the crash, according to the agency’s Alaska chief, Clint Johnson. A barge brought the plane to another site at the airport for inspection. The cockpit recorders yielded good recordings, Johnson said.

It wasn’t the NTSB’s decision to suspend air service, which falls outside that agency’s authority, he said.

The disruption to air service stranded some either in Unalaska or on their way back.

Don Goodfellow’s quality control manager at Alyeska Seafoods Inc. was stuck in Portland as of Tuesday. Another of his employees couldn’t rotate out for vacation and was helping with maintenance between pollock and crab processing seasons.

The next pulse in demand for air travel could come within a few days, Goodfellow said, when crab fishermen get a break between seasons and will want to go home.

“I’m expecting my dock will be very full of very frustrated fishermen if we don’t get service restored pretty soon,” he said.

Several companies provide charter service to the area: flights booked by a single entity, like a seafood processor, instead of seat by seat.

Alaska Central Express on Tuesday was sending two charters to Unalaska and two to Akun Island, the closest place to get a boat or smaller plane over to Dutch Harbor, according to Steven Deaton, senior vice president.

But getting one of 16 seats on the company’s Beechcraft 1900 isn’t as easy as booking a ticket online.

“Thing is, they’re trying to buy one seat,” customer service representative Alicia Tufaga said Tuesday. “We don’t do that, we don’t sell individual seats. People are trying to get on the charter but they have to contact the people who chartered the plane.”

Grant Aviation doesn’t provide scheduled service between Anchorage and Unalaska. But some travelers booked flights from Unalaska to Saint Paul Island where they could catch a Ravn flight to Anchorage, according to Grant’s station manager in Unalaska.

Flying challenges are familiar in the Aleutians, longtime Unalaska resident Suzi Golodoff said Tuesday, reporting “crappy visibility” and a nasty cross-wind near the airport.

The current situation is causing residents to cancel medical appointments and planned trips but at the same time, it’s not unusual to go for days without getting out, Golodoff said.

“The bigger thing is people are badly shaken and really feeling tender about what happened,” she said. “It was really a horrible thing to see that plane over the embankment like that.”

https://www.adn.com


The Alaska State Troopers identified the victim as David Allan Oltman, 38, of Washington state, according to Associated Press reports.  Oltman died Thursday night, PenAir announced in a Friday, Oct. 18 statement.

The accident took place when a plane attempting to land slid partway off a runway at Unalaska’s Tom Madsen Airport, also known as Dutch Harbor Airport.  Alaska Airlines flight 3296, operated by PenAir from Anchorage to Dutch Harbor, was also carrying the Cordova Jr./Sr. High School swim team.

“On behalf of PenAir, Ravn Air Group and all our employees throughout the company, we would like to extend our deepest sympathies and condolences to the family and loved ones of our passenger who passed away,” said Ravn Air Group President Dave Pflieger in a statement.

The accident took place at 5:40 p.m., according to a report from Alaska Airlines.  In photos of the accident, the Saab 2000 twin engine turboprop plane is seen with its nose hanging off a shallow embankment over water about 500 feet from the airport. The aircraft carried 39 passengers and three crew members, according to the report.

The aircraft was apparently forced beyond its planned landing area by high winds, said an eyewitness quoted in an Associated Press reports.  However, the conditions leading to the accident remain undetermined, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson Allen Kenitzer, the Associated Press reports.

Initial reports from Cordova School District seemingly indicated that none of the 10 students on board, or their coaches or chaperones, had been harmed. However, student Charlie Carroll, 16, had a piece of metal embedded in his left leg during the crash, said Charlie’s mother Lisa Carroll. Charlie Carroll also told his mother that the passenger sitting next to him had broken his leg, she said. Charlie Carroll is planned to be flown to Anchorage for treatment, his mother said.

Two passengers had been critically injured in the incident, and another 10 were receiving medical care in Unalaska, announced Debbie Reinwand, a spokesperson for Ravn Air Group, which owns PenAir, in a statement Thursday evening.

PenAir is cooperating with the National Transportation Safety Board, which will be investigating this accident, Reinwand said.  The NTSB had dispatched a team of nine investigators to the site, the agency announced via Twitter on Friday.

PenAir and Ravn Air Group have established a family assistance line for anyone with loved ones aboard the flight, at 1-800-757-4784.

Reported earlier:

A PenAir plane carrying the Cordova Jr./Sr. High School swim team slid partway off a runway at an Unalaska airport on the evening of Thursday, Oct. 17. The approximately 10 students on board, as well as their chaperones and coaches, were unharmed in the accident, said Cordova School District Superintendent Alex Russin.

The incident occurred around 6:11 p.m. at Tom Madsen Airport, also known as Dutch Harbor Airport. In photos of the accident, the aircraft is seen with its nose hanging off a shallow ledge over water.

Within an hour of the accident, the members of the swim team had been reassembled and were eating pizza, wrote Russin in an email announcement. Unalaska School District Superintendent John P. Conwell confirmed that the students were all accounted for and seemed fine, Russin wrote.

Eyewitnesses said that the other passengers also appeared largely unharmed, although some passengers were transported from the airport in an ambulance, according to an Associated Press report.

“The Unalaska School District is taking care of our students to the best of their ability,” Russin said. “They are safe and secure and our thoughts and prayers go out to everybody involved… The students and chaperones are accounted for — a bit shaken, but safe.”

Original article ➤ https://www.thecordovatimes.com



A 38-year-old man from Washington state died when a PenAir plane went off the end of the runway Thursday afternoon at Unalaska’s airport, officials say.

David Allan Oltman died of “traumatic injuries suffered in the crash,” according to updates Friday morning from Unalaska officials and Alaska State Troopers. Another critically injured passenger was flown to Anchorage. Nine others were also hurt, according to the city’s Department of Public Safety. Responders had to extricate one patient and evacuated the others.

The Alaska Airlines flight carrying 42 people was operated by Peninsula Airways, or PenAir. Cordova’s high school swim team was on the plane, which left Anchorage at 3:15 p.m.

Oltman died Thursday night, according to a statement from RavnAir Group, which owns PenAir. RavnAir president Dave Pflieger extended “deepest sympathies and condolences” to his family and loved ones.

“Our entire team is devastated by this tragic incident,” Pflieger said.

Authorities say it’s not yet clear what happened to cause the  Saab 2000 plane to go off the end of the runway, coming to a stop just short of the water with its nose hanging over an embankment. The airport is notoriously challenging due to topography and winds.

The plane crashed at around 5:45 p.m. after a missed approach on the first attempt to land, according to preliminary information from Clint Johnson, Alaska chief for the National Transportation Safety Board.

“The accident happened on the second landing attempt," Johnson said.

Local officials said the swim team members were all unhurt, but the mother of one said a piece of metal was embedded in his leg and the person next to him suffered a broken leg, according to a report in The Cordova Times.

Her 16-year-old son is staying in Unalaska until Sunday, when he’s supposed to fly to Anchorage, Lisa Carroll said. She and his father will meet him at the airport and he’ll get the piece of metal removed from the soft tissue of his leg Monday.

“He’s fine but shaken,” Carroll wrote in an email Friday. “I’m just thankful for all the emergency responders and citizens of Unalaska who responded to the scene ... As a parent I am shaken, but again God is good and I’m glad there were boots on the ground taking care of all the injured. My thoughts and prayers go out to all involved.”

The Unalaska Fire Department arrived about five minutes after the crash and transported seven patients to the Iliuliuk Clinic and four others were brought to the clinic by personal vehicle, according to the public safety update. Injuries ranged from minor to critical.

A major investigations team of eight or nine people from the NTSB was expected to leave Washington, D.C., for Anchorage on Friday morning. Some members will continue to Dutch Harbor on Saturday. The investigation is being run from the agency’s headquarters because it involves a commuter air carrier and someone died in the crash, Johnson said. An Anchorage-based investigator is on the team, which also includes experts in airworthiness and operations as well as John Lovell, the the investigator in charge.

The runway is shut down until further notice, local officials say. Law enforcement has secured the scene pending the arrival of the federal investigators. The plane may still pose safety risks so officials are asking the public is asked to stay away from the area.

PenAir and Ravn are fully cooperating with the NTSB, according to a statement sent through a public-relations firm representing the airline. PenAir and Ravn have established a family assistance line at 1-800-757-4784.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com






ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - UPDATE, 10/18/19 5:35 a.m.:

The National Transportation Safety Board says it is sending a team of nine to Unalaska to investigate the crash.

According to the Associated Press, the plane was carrying 42 people.

UPDATE, 11:05 p.m.: Two people were critically injured when a commercial plane went off the runway at the Unalaska Airport on Thursday evening, with the aircraft left teetering over a bank toward a nearby body of water.

In a news release late Thursday night, a representative for the public relations firm representing PenAir wrote that the company had "been informed that two passengers were critically injured and ten others are receiving medical care in Unalaska. All other passengers are being cared for."

The release went on to include a message from company CEO Dave Pflieger.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to all of our passengers and crew, and the family members of everyone with loved ones on this flight,” he said.

Clint Johnson of the National Transportation Safety Board said early Thursday evening that details of the incident were still being worked out.

"We've got a major investigation going here," he said, "and there's all sorts of rumors going around. We're trying to get an investigator down, and the rest of the team will be coming from Washington, D.C."

PenAir, which is owned by Ravn Air Group, is in close contact and fully cooperating with the NTSB, according to the release from the company.

Per usual, the NTSB will lead the investigation into the incident.

The Alaska Department of Transportation posted on its Facebook page only that at approximately 6 o'clock on Thursday evening, it was "notified that a commercial aircraft was off the runway at the Unalaska/Dutch Harbor Airport. DOT&PF Airport Rescue and Fire are responding. The airport is currently closed. At this time we have no additional information."

Numerous pictures posted on social media and sent to KTUU showed the plane off the runway and nose-down, sitting on what looked like a sloped, rocky edge and pointing toward the water.

Alaska Airlines added in a news release Thursday night that PenAir Flight 3296 had 39 passengers and three crew members on board. PenAir operates the Anchorage-Dutch Harbor service for Alaska with a Saab 2000 aircraft.

Alex Russin, superintendent of schools in Cordova, wrote in a social media post that the district's high school swim team and chaperones were on the plane.

Unalaska resident Randy Batten told KTUU he and his wife were walking their dog along the road that runs near the runway when they "saw an approaching plane. It was a little windy but I didn't think it was that bad, for some reason he aborted his first attempt to land and flew over us to come around again to make another attempt."

Batten said he and his wife then drove the short distance to their home, which overlooks at the airport. They arrived home just as the crash happened.

"We heard a screech of rubber and a bunch of scrapping of metal and we knew right away it was probably that plane that we had seen do the flyover on the first attempt."

The representative for PenAir said the airline has established a family assistance line for everyone who has loved ones on the flight. That can be accessed by dialing 1-800-757-4784.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ktuu.com






Updated 10/18/19 at 3:40 a.m.

Two passengers were critically injured — and 10 others received some level of medical attention — after a PenAir airplane arriving from Anchorage went off the runway at Unalaska's airport on Thursday evening, according to PenAir officials.

"PenAir Flight 3286 (marketed by Alaska Airlines) departed Anchorage for Dutch Harbor and upon landing at approximately 5:40 p.m. went off the end of the runway," said a PenAir statement released around 11 p.m. "We have been informed that two passengers were critically injured and ten others are receiving medical care in Unalaska. All others passengers are being cared for."

There were 39 passengers and three crew members on the flight, according to PenAir.

"Our thoughts and prayers go out to all of our passengers and crew, and the family members of everyone with loved ones on this flight," said PenAir CEO Dave Pflieger in the statement. 

PenAir officials said the airline, which is owned by Ravn Air Group, "is in close contact and fully cooperating with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), which will be investigating this accident."

NTSB spokesperson Keith Holloway confirmed the inquiry in an email, sharing a Twitter post by the agency: "NTSB sending team of 9 to Unalaska, AK to investigate Oct. 17, 2019, accident involving Peninsula Air #3296, Saab SB20, that overran runway on landing."

"The team's exact arrival [date] is unknown at this time," added Holloway.

Airline officials also said: "PenAir and Ravn have established a family assistance line for everyone who has loved ones on this flight. Please call 1-800-757-4784 if you need any additional information."

Earlier story, updated at 10/17/19 at 10:50 p.m.

Multiple passenger injuries were reported after a PenAir airplane arriving from Anchorage went off the runway at Unalaska's airport on Thursday evening.

The extent of those injuries was unclear, as was the reason the Saab 2000 did not stop at the end of the runway.

As police officers, fire personnel, and emergency medical service providers responded to the scene, Interim Police Chief John Lucking declined to answer questions while the response was underway. But when Mayor Frank Kelty asked him if there were any casualties, Lucking said "no" shortly after 6 p.m.

An ambulance was seen leaving the airport for the clinic with its lights flashing at 6 p.m. Then, between 6 and 6:40 p.m., three more people were taken out of the airport on stretchers and away in ambulances. All three of those people were conscious and sitting upright, with at least one holding an ice pack.

City Manager Erin Reinders was at the airport when the Thursday evening flight arrived, carrying 39 passengers and three crew members. She said the plane came from the west side of Mount Ballyhoo, which stands above the runway with water on either side.

"We watched one [landing] attempt, and it was going with the wind, [approaching] from the Hog Island side," said Reinders. "Then it went back up [for] a second attempt. It went with the wind again. It did land, so all the wheels were on the ground. And then it wasn't stopping. It was slowing down, and it was apparent that it was slowing down, but it wasn't stopping."

While the plane appeared to slow down as it traveled the length of the runway, it didn't come to a stop until its nose tipped over the edge of a rocky embankment just above the waters of Iliuliuk Bay, near the intersection of Airport Beach and Ballyhoo Roads. 

"I don't know if it was coming [too] fast or if it wasn't able to break or if there was a gust," said Reinders. "That stuff — it wasn't readily apparent."

Reinders said all passengers and airline crew on the flight manifest were accounted for, according to a report by first responders.

As a coach for Unalaska's school swim team and leader at the United Methodist Church, Reinders was at the airport to welcome the flight, which brought Cordova's swim team for a meet, as well as speaker Heath Day, who's scheduled to lead a teen workshop at the church on Saturday.

She said responders had confirmed that Day and all of the visiting students and chaperones were physically safe, though shaken. 

A spokesperson for PenAir and Ravn Air Group, which bought PenAir in 2018, declined to comment when reached by phone on Thursday around 9:10 p.m.

"We don't have anything to release at this time," said spokesperson Debbie Reinwand. "I'm working with the Ravn emergency operations center right now."

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is investigating what happened.

"We are currently gathering information about the accident and should have more information [in the] morning," said NTSB spokesperson Keith Holloway in an email around 10:30 p.m.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration did not immediately respond to KUCB's request for comment on Thursday night.

Meanwhile, three passengers on the flight told KUCB that there was intense turbulence as they approached Unalaska and that the plane seemed to be moving very fast. Asked if the pilots made any announcements at that time, one passenger said they did not.

Kelty said he saw the pilots apparently unharmed and outside of the airport after the landing. He said they went to the police station to give interviews to the authorities.

The extent of damage to the PenAir plane is also unclear. Some photographs circulating on social media showed an apparent dent and broken window on the Saab 2000's left side.

Unalaska's Department of Public Safety announced the closure of roads near the plane in an announcement released at 6:09 p.m. The notice asked the community to avoid the area along Airport Beach Road between Delta Way and Tundra Drive. 

The department also asked the community to avoid using cell phones while the response was underway.

"Public Safety is currently responding to an emergent incident and phone lines need to be cleared during such," said another announcement released at 5:24 p.m. "We ask for your cooperation during this time."

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.kucb.org



Jay Hebert is a Bering Sea skipper trying to get a group of king crab fishermen out of Unalaska’s flight-dependent port of Dutch Harbor, where a fatal plane crash suspended regular air service this month.

They’ve agreed to pay $15,000 for eight seats on a flight he chartered, Hebert says. “That’s how desperate it is.”

City officials in Unalaska on Tuesday declared a local emergency and asked for permission to organize three round-trip charters a week given the lack of a “fixed, known date” that regular air service will return and the likelihood the community will be without it until at least Nov. 8.

Regular air service between Unalaska and Anchorage was suspended after the October 17th crash of a Saab 2000 twin-engine turboprop operated by Ravn Air Group at Unalaska’s airport two weeks ago. The plane overran the runway, killing a Washington state man. Ten others required medical attention.

The community of more than 4,000 residents sits on an island battered by Aleutian weather about 800 miles southwest of Anchorage. With thousands of fishing industry employees trying to get out of Unalaska and processing companies filling charter seats with workers, locals say, it’s becoming increasingly difficult for the average Unalaskan to leave.

Residents describe separated families and increasingly urgent medical needs. A few who could afford the up-front payment have started chartering flights and selling seats via social media to provide the community with travel options.

Hebert and his wife paid just under $14,000 to charter a Security Aviation plane for the fishermen Friday. If they can get takers for the Anchorage-Unalaska leg of the run, the per-seat cost will drop. But right now, it pencils out at $1,875 a person though the fishermen will get refunded as people book seats on the Anchorage leg.

The group was "willing to pay any cost to get out of town,” Hebert said Wednesday. “The average person in this community, they can’t afford a thousand-dollar ... a fourteen-hundred dollar ticket.”

Alaska Airlines, which marketed up to three scheduled daily flights, is canceling trips through Nov. 20, a spokesman said Wednesday.

Ravn is continuing to prepare to start new scheduled flights with a de Havilland Dash 8 sometime next week, a Ravn spokeswoman said. “As soon as we are ready to start flights, and we have received (Federal Aviation Administration) approval to add this airport to our operations specifications, we will make an announcement regarding the date service will begin,” the company said in an emailed statement.

The city of Unalaska wants to start organizing its own charters, in part because “the high cost of chartering a flight puts (private charter service) out of reach of persons without the means to charter an entire plane,” according to a resolution approved by the city council Tuesday night.

In order to start, the city needs a waiver to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s public charter operator requirements.

The city wants to sell seats on city-organized charters without markup beyond the basic cost to the city. The council approved spending municipal funds for up to three weeks or until regular air service resumes.

The city manager wasn’t available Wednesday to provide more information about the city’s plans.

There are maybe a half-dozen charters making trips between Anchorage and Unalaska every day, including the 29-seat Dash 8 Ravn is flying. Big seafood processing companies are tying up entire flights, locals say.

There are still charters available outside of that, operators say.

ACE Air Cargo has 16-seat Beech 1900 twin-engine turboprops for anyone who wants to book one — not just big commercial operations like seafood plants, executive vice president Steve Deaton said Wednesday.

“We’ve done two or three already in the past three days of just a guy calling up and saying, ‘I need a plane, I want to get home, and I’m willing to find 10 people,’" Deaton said. “We’re moving, in the last four weeks, hundreds of people in and out of Dutch.”


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.adn.com