Tuesday, December 28, 2021

Runway Incursion - Vehicle: Stinson 108-3 Voyager, N6548M; accident occurred June 27, 2021 near Key Way Airport (19WA), Stevenson, Skamania County, Washington






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Stevenson, Washington 
Accident Number: WPR21LA251
Date and Time: June 27, 2021, 08:28 Local 
Registration: N6548M
Aircraft: Stinson 108-3
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Runway incursion veh/AC/person 
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported that, he planned to fly one circuit in the traffic pattern, and then land from the south. The landing approach was uneventful, and having reached midfield, he began to initiate the flare. A van then crossed the runway directly in front of the airplane, and the pilot decided to perform a go-around. Although the airplane began to slowly climb, it was not climbing at a rate sufficient to clear the approaching rising terrain, and within a few seconds they reached the end of the runway. The pilot attempted to perform a forced landing into a clearing about 1,000 ft beyond the end of the runway, and shortly after impacting the ground,
the airplane caught fire and was destroyed.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation. He stated that standard procedures called for retracting the flaps once a positive rate of climb had been established, however he did not do so because the climb performance was not sufficient.

The airport owner reported that, due to rising terrain to the north of the 2,300 ft-long private turf airstrip, landing approaches from the south were recommended. The airstrip was 100 ft wide and bound by trees immediately to the left and right.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
A runway incursion, which resulted in a go-around, and subsequent forced landing when the airplane was not able to climb at a rate sufficient to clear approaching rising terrain. 

Findings
Environmental issues Ground vehicle - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Mountainous/hilly terrain - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown Runway incursion veh/AC/person (Defining event)
Approach-VFR go-around Collision during takeoff/land

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 52, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: BasicMed Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 27, 2021
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 988 hours (Total, all aircraft), 214 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Stinson 
Registration: N6548M
Model/Series: 108-3
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1948 
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 108-4548
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: October 18, 2020 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 30 Hrs
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3100 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Franklin
ELT: C91A installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: 6A-4165-B3
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 105 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTTD,29 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 24 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 08:53 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 245°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.83 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Stevenson, WA (19WA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Stevenson, WA 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 08:15 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: KEY WAY 19WA 
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 972 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15/33
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2300 ft / 100 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing: Go around

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 45.724543,-121.88893


Loss of Control in Flight: Best Off Skyranger B, N7714E; accident occurred June 27, 2021 in Ellicott, El Paso County, Colorado







Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Ellicott, Colorado
Accident Number: CEN21LA292
Date and Time: June 27, 2021, 10:20 Local
Registration: N7714E
Aircraft: CURNUTT ELTON E SKY RANGER B 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported the flight’s purpose was to fly “low and slow” over the riverbed for a ceremony. During a left turn initiated about 250 ft above ground level, the pilot noticed a sink rate develop. The pilot applied full power, but the sink rate continued, and the airplane struck a tree that resulted in substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s loss of control while maneuvering at low altitude.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Airspeed - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-low-alt flying Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Uncontrolled descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: None 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: July 16, 2020
Flight Time: 662 hours (Total, all aircraft), 662 hours (Total, this make and model), 11 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CURNUTT ELTON E 
Registration: N7714E
Model/Series: SKY RANGER B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2005 
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental light sport (Special)
Serial Number: SKR 0503 573
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: June 28, 2020 Condition 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 19 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 682 Hrs at time of accident 
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C126 installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 912ULS
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 100 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KABH,6030 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 09:58 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 146°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 10000 ft AGL 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 340° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.28 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Peyton, CO (KFLY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Peyton, CO (KFLY) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 10:00 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.914,-104.443 (est)

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna A185F Skywagon 185, N8216J; accident occurred June 27, 2021 at Nushagak Airport (AK21), Dillingham, Alaska






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
Location: Dillingham, Alaska
Accident Number: ANC21LA050
Date & Time: June 27, 2021, 17:00 Local
Registration: N8216J
Aircraft: Cessna A185F 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Business

Analysis

The pilot reported that, just after takeoff from the narrow brush lined airstrip, he encountered a wind gust which pushed the airplane to the left. The left wing struck the brush and the airplane spun around and impacted terrain sustaining substantial damage to the fuselage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during takeoff in gusting wind conditions which resulted in a loss of control and impact with terrain.

Findings

Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Environmental issues Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 59, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: June 8, 2021
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: September 7, 2019
Flight Time: 1907 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1267 hours (Total, this make and model), 1826 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 56 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 39 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N8216J
Model/Series: A185F 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976 
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 18502864
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: May 15, 2021 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C126 installed, activated
Engine Model/Series: IO 520 D
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 300 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAJZ, 270 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 16:56 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 121°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Visibility: 6 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 3700 ft AGL 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - None - Haze
Departure Point: Dillingham, AK 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Portage Creek , AK
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: NUSHAGAK AK21 
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 40 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Rough
Runway Used: 16/34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1000 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 59.88313,-157.76075

Aerodynamic Stall / Spin: Piper PA-32-260 Cherokee Six, N55455; fatal accident occurred January 25, 2020 near Cannon Creek Airpark (15FL), Lake City, Columbia County, Florida

Salena Short
~












Salena Gail Short
1959 - 2020
~


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Lycoming; Williamsburg, Pennsylvania
Piper; Vero Beach, Florida

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Lake City, Florida
Accident Number: ERA20FA085
Date and Time: January 25, 2020, 09:30 Local
Registration: N55455
Aircraft: Piper PA32
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin 
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

A witness described that, when the pilot arrived at the airport several days before the accident, the airplane’s engine “cut out” while on final approach to the runway. After landing uneventfully, the pilot had a mechanic service the airplane, and the engine performed normally. On the day of the accident, as the airplane departed, the witness reported that he watched the airplane turn “hard left” after it cleared trees near the runway. He later heard a loud bang, then saw smoke. He drove over to the smoke and saw that the airplane was completely engulfed in flames. The airplane came to rest in the yard of a residence about 1,000 feet left of the runway’s midpoint.

Postaccident examination of the airplane was limited due to impact and postcrash fire damage; however, no defects consistent with a preimpact failure or malfunction of either the airframe or engine were observed. Additionally, a sound spectrum analysis of the audio from a video recording showed that the engine was likely running slightly below full throttle before the accident. Given this information, there was no evidence that a loss of engine power preceded the accident.

The witness’s description that the airplane was in a “hard left” turn, the location of the accident site relatively close to the runway, the lack of a discernable horizontal wreckage path, and little fragmentation of the wreckage to suggest a high-energy impact, were consistent with the airplane impacting the ground in a near-vertical descent at a relatively low speed. Thus, it is likely that the pilot exceeded the airplane’s critical angle of attack during the steep, low-altitude turn shortly after takeoff, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and loss of airplane control at an altitude too low for recovery.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall and subsequent loss of control at low altitude.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 25, 2020, about 0930 eastern standard time, a Piper PA32-260, N55455, was destroyed when was involved in an accident near Lake City, Florida. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

A witness stated that the pilot flew to Cannon Creek Airpark (15FL), Lake City, Florida, the weekend before the accident. At that time, the pilot said the engine “cut out” on short final approach to the runway; however, after landing, the pilot performed an engine run-up, and the engine performed normally. The pilot and the witness subsequently opened the engine cowling and observed an oil leak. The pilot contacted a local mechanic to fix the oil leak. A couple of days later, the pilot ran the engine, and no oil leaks were noted. The night before the accident flight, the pilot and the witness taxied the airplane to the fuel tank and topped off the wing tanks and left-wing tip tank, but they did not put fuel in the right-wing tip tank because it had a fuel leak.

On the morning of the accident, the witness and pilot performed a preflight inspection of the airplane and noted no anomalies. The witness watched the airplane take off from runway 36 and noticed that the pilot “turned hard left” after the airplane cleared the trees, which was earlier than normal. The witness returned to his vehicle when he heard a loud bang and saw smoke. He drove over to the smoke and saw that the airplane was engulfed in flames.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest on the side of a house in a subdivision about 1,000 ft to the west side of the midpoint of the runway. The wreckage was oriented on a heading of 215° and there was no discernable horizontal wreckage path. A postaccident fire consumed the airplane, and only the tail section remained intact and undamaged by fire. The cockpit, instrument panel, firewall, fuselage, and wings were all destroyed by the fire, and the engine accessory case was consumed by fire; the magnetos, fuel pump, carburetor, vacuum pump, and oil filter were destroyed. All major components of the airplane were accounted for at the scene. Control cable continuity was confirmed to the respective controls.

Postaccident examination of the engine revealed the engine crankcase and cylinders were intact. The top spark plugs were removed, and a borescope examination of the cylinder walls, exhaust, intake valves and piston heads revealed no anomalies. The engine’s crankshaft was rotated by hand and thumb compression was established on all cylinders. Valve train continuity was established throughout the engine by observing movement of the rocker arms and rear accessory case gears.

Both propeller blades remained attached to the hub. One blade was bent aft about midblade, and both blades were twisted near the tip. 

A witness near the airport captured the airplane engine noise on a video camera. The airplane was not captured by the video, and its position, ground track, speed, and therefore at what point during the accident sequence the captured audio occurred could not be determined. A sound spectrum analysis of the audio by the National Transportation Safety Board Vehicle Recorders Laboratory revealed that during the time audio from the accident airplane’s engine was recorded, the engine rpm was approximately 2,584 rpm, which was slightly below the maximum rated 2,700 rpm.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy performed on the pilot by the Office of the Office of the Medical Examiner, Jacksonville, Florida, reported the cause of death as blunt force trauma.

Toxicology testing performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory found no tested-for drugs or alcohol.

History of Flight

Initial climb Aerodynamic stall/spin (Defining event)
Uncontrolled descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61,Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: July 15, 2016
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 172.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 172.5 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N55455
Model/Series: PA32 260 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1973
Amateur Built:
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 32-7300038
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: August 1, 2019 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3554.3 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-540-E4B5
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 250 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGNV,123 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 35 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 14:53 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 144°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 330°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Lake City, FL (15FL) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Tyler, TX (38XA) 
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 09:30 Local 
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Cannon Creek Airpark 15FL
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 125 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3500 ft / 25 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 30.156944,-82.669166







Aviat Husky A-1A, N111XJ: Accident occurred December 09, 2021 in Saint Jo, Montague County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas

Aerial Photographers LLC


Location: St. Jo, Texas
Accident Number: CEN22LA076
Date and Time: December 9, 2021, 16:52 Local
Registration: N111XJ
Aircraft: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC A-1A 
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 9, 2021, about 1652 central daylight time, an Aviat Aircraft A-1A, N111XJ, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near St. Jo, Texas. The pilot received minor injuries and the passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part91 personal flight.

According to the pilot, while in cruise flight the engine lost power. He executed a forced landing to a field and the airplane nosed over.

Subsequent to the accident it was noted that the bottom of the fuselage was covered with oil.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AVIAT AIRCRAFT INC 
Registration: N111XJ
Model/Series: A-1A 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KNFW, 608 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:52 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C /12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 20000 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 25000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.76 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 32.694828,-97.522525 (est)


MONTAGUE COUNTY, Texas — The Texas Department of Public Safety has identified two hospitalized occupants of a small plane that crashed near Saint Jo Thursday afternoon.

John Irving, the pilot of the plane, and Donald White, a passenger, both of Denton, Texas, were hospitalized following the crash.

Around 5 p.m. Thursday, December 9, a single-engine plane crashed north of Saint Jo, off of Cobb Hollow Road.

According to DPS Sgt. Dan Buesing, both Irving and White were transported with non-life-threatening injuries.

The cause of the crash is believed to be possible engine failure.

An Federal Aviation Administration crash investigation team is expected to be on the scene Friday, December 10.

Learjet 35A, N880Z: Fatal accident occurred December 27, 2021 in El Cajon, San Diego County, California

Learjet crash victims Tina Ward, Julian Bugaj, Laurie Gentz and Douglas Grande (clockwise from bottom). 



This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

Investigator In Charge (IIC): Cawthra, Joshua
The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Jonathan Burgess; Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Med Jet LLC



Location: El Cajon, California 
Accident Number: WPR22FA068
Date and Time: December 27, 2021, 19:14 Local 
Registration: N880Z
Aircraft: GATES LEARJET CORPORATION 35A
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Positioning

On December 27, 2021, about 1914 Pacific standard time, a Gates Learjet Corporation 35A, N880Z, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near El Cajon, California. The 2 pilots, and 2 flight nurses were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 repositioning flight.

Earlier in the day, the flight crew had flown from Lake Havasu City Airport (HII), Lake Havasu, Arizona, to John Wayne / Orange County Airport (SNA), Santa Ana, California, for a patient transfer. They departed SNA about 1856 to reposition to their home base at Gillespie Field (SEE), El Cajon, California.

Review of preliminary communication recordings revealed that at 1908:23, the pilot contacted the SEE Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) and reported to the controller they were on the GPS approach to runway 17. The controller issued the current wind and cleared the pilot to land on runway 17. At 1912:03, the pilot reported the airport in sight and requested to squawk VFR. The controller did not acknowledge the request to squawk VFR, however, he reissued the landing clearance for runway 17.

At 1912:13, the pilot requested to land on runway 27. The controller asked the pilot if they wanted to cancel their IFR flight plan, to which the pilot replied, “yes sir.” The controller acknowledged that the IFR cancelation was received and instructed the pilot to overfly the field and enter left traffic for runway 27R and cleared them to land runway 27R. At 1912:30, the pilot requested that the runway lights for runway 27R be increased, however, the controller informed them that the lights were already at 100 percent.

Preliminary Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data showed that after departure from SNA, the flight made a left turn out over the waters of the Pacific Ocean and flew generally south – southeast along the coast and ascended to a cruise barometric altitude of about 11,000 ft sea level (MSL). After the flight passed Carlsbad, California, the airplane turned left and began to descend toward SEE. As shown in figure 1, ADS-B data showed that the airplane overflew SEE at a barometric altitude of about 775 ft MSL (407 ft above ground level) and entered a left downwind for runway 27R. While on the downwind leg, the airplane descended to a barometric altitude of 700 ft MSL, then ascended to a barometric altitude of 950 ft MSL while on the base leg. The last recorded ADS-B target was at 1914:09, at a barometric altitude of 875 ft MSL. 

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane struck a set of power lines and subsequently impacted the yard of a residential home about 1.43 nautical miles east of the approach end of runway 27R. The airplane came to rest upright on a heading of about 118°, at an elevation of about 595 ft msl. The wreckage debris path was oriented on a heading of about 310° and was about 186 ft long and 90 ft wide. All major structural components of the airplane were located throughout the wreckage debris path. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

At 1855, recorded weather data at SEE showed weather conditions were variable wind at 5 knots, visibility of 3 statute miles, mist, broken cloud layer at 2,000 ft, overcast cloud layer at 2,600 ft, temperature of 10° C, dew point temperature of 8° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. No precipitation was indicated.

At 1955, SEE reported a variable wind of 5 knots, visibility 3 statute miles, mist, broken cloud layer at 1,100 ft, overcast cloud layer at 2,600 ft, temperature of 10°C, dew point temperature of 8°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.96 inches of mercury. No precipitation was indicated.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: GATES LEARJET CORPORATION
Registration: N880Z
Model/Series: 35A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSEE, 387 ft msl 
Observation Time: 18:55 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1.4 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C /8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2000 ft AGL 
Visibility: 3 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Santa Ana, CA (SNA)
Destination: El Cajon, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 32.821182,-116.93942 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.





SANTEE (KUSI) – Three months after a plane slammed into a Santee neighborhood, the victim saved from her burning home is speaking out.

The crash killed the pilot and a UPS driver, and left residents Phil and Maria Morris seriously injured.

After months of battling for her health, Maria is ready to share her story.

KUSI’s Hunter Sowards was live from Santee with more details.



Tina Ward Memorial Scholarship Fund

Tina Ward was an exemplary wife, mother, and nurse. She gave so much of her light and love to others through her service of 30+ years as a paramedic and a critical care nurse. She lost her life doing what she loved following a devastating plane crash on the night of December 27th, 2021 in El Cajon, California. She and her crew were flying back after transporting a patient that day and sadly she never made it back home to us.
 
To all that loved her Tina was known as “Mama Tee” and she touched the hearts of everyone she met through her acts of love, compassion, and kindness. Her daughters and loving husband would like to memorialize her legacy and her unparalleled selflessness and mentorship through the Tina Ward Memorial Scholarship Fund. This scholarship will be dedicated to the next generation of first responders to ensure her legacy will shine on for years to come within the EMS community.
 
We ask in lieu of flowers or funeral donations please donate to this fund in her memory. All funds donated will go directly toward scholarships for underrepresented students working on furthering their careers in EMS.
 
Thank you all so much for your prayers of love and support. Our hearts share in the grief with the families and friends of the other crew members from Flight Crew N88OZ. We appreciate those who have shared our Mother's story and who will continue on her legacy of always smiling, always showing love, and always putting others first.
 
Thank you again,
Joe, Hannah, Lauryn, & Megan Ward




Blanca Olmsted is organizing this fundraiser - 

On December 27th, we tragically lost my father-in-law, Jorge Bugaj. A hard working and dedicated father, son, husband, grandfather, and a strong follower of the Lord.
 
Jorge has been an aviation enthusiast for decades. Starting from gliders, working his way into becoming a CFI (Certified Flight Instructor) and as of the last few years he’s been flying Learjets for Aeromedevac. Transporting everything from organs to patients all over the country for life saving procedures. He is truly a hero in what he did and loved every second of it. On December 27th while on approach to Gillespie airport in El Cajon, his Learjet tragically crashed 1.4 miles from landing.
 
Aside from being an actual life saver, he was an amazing provider for his family. I want to try and help my mother-in-law, Alexis, so she has just a little less to worry about during this time, and the near future. She’s an amazing woman and has done so much for my own family and others, I want to do all I can to give back and help with expenses, memorials, and some future stability.
 
Any little amount is helpful, or even sharing this. We appreciate anything and everything!
 
We find peace in knowing he’s with the Lord now, but he is missed dearly.






The names of the two crew members and two nurses on board the aircraft that came down in unincorporated El Cajon on Monday night are now known.

Wednesday afternoon, the San Diego County Medical Examiner's office said that Douglas James Grande, 45, and Julian Jorge Bugaj, 55, were killed when the Learjet 35 they were onboard crashed in the 1200 block of Pepper Drive at 7:14 on Monday.

Also killed in the crash of the Aeromedevac air ambulance were flight nurses Laurie Gentz and Tina Ward, who have been identified by grieving friends and colleagues.

Mariana Aliano, the vice president and treasurer of International Association of EMTs and Paramedics, Local 162, worked closely with both of the nurses and said they were highly-experienced.

“Not just regular nurses, they both had really high standards, they both took it very seriously,” Aliano told NBC 7.

Gentz, who served as union president for several years, leaves behind her husband, a retired pilot and her three dogs.

Ward is survived by three grown daughters and her husband of many years, a retired Oceanside deputy fire chief.

"It is with heavy hearts that the Oceanside Fire Department and their fire family would like to extend our deepest condolences to our recently retired Chief Ward, his family, and all family and friends of the Aeromedevac flight crew N880Z," the department said, sharing a photo of Ward with her husband.

“Always a working mom but did everything for those three girls," Aliano said. "They were involved in sports, full-time mom, full-time nurse. They were both just full-time kind, good people.”

On Wednesday, Aeromedevac posted the following statement on its website:

"It is with great sadness that we must share the devastating loss of our colleagues at Aeromedevac Air Ambulance on December 27, 2021. The loss of our friends has left us an indescribable void. To both us and their families they are unsung heroes, dedicating their lives to caring for others in need throughout our community. Our priority now is to support the well-being of the families of all our crew members. We are a close-knit air ambulance program that is united by our missions to care for our patients. Our team’s commitment to helping others has always been inspiring. We are honored and blessed to have worked with the crew members that we have lost, and we extend our heartfelt condolences to their families.”

The medical examiner is not expected to officially identify the remaining two victims for some time, an official told NBC 7.

There were no survivors of Monday's crash. Miraculously, nobody was injured on the ground in the residential neighborhood where the incident occurred.




EL CAJON, California — Three of the four victims who died in an El Cajon plane crash Monday have been identified.

According to the Oceanside Fire Department, Tina Ward was on board and died in the December 27 plane crash. Ward was the wife of recently retired Deputy Chief Joe Ward, the department said.

“As you can imagine, this is the most difficult of times for his family. His immediate family is together with Joe, and they are being supported by friends, the department, the Oceanside Fire Management Association, and the Oceanside Firefighters Association,” the department said in part.

The San Diego County Medical Examiner also identified 45-year-old Douglas James Grande and 67-year-old Julian Jorge Bugaj as victims of the deadly crash.

The Oceanside Fire Department said in a statement that Ward was well-known in the department, adding that "words can't convey the hurt and loss the family and many of us feel."

The greater Oceanside Fire Department family has experienced a terrible loss. Tina Ward, wife of recently retired Deputy Chief Joe Ward, was on board and a victim of the fixed wing air medical transport that crashed in Lakeside on Sunday evening December 26, 2021. Joe is known and respected by many in the regional fire service. As you can imagine, this is the most difficult of times for his family. His immediate family is together with Joe, and they are being supported by friends, the department, the Oceanside Fire Management Association, and the Oceanside Firefighters Association.

At the moment, the Ward family is requesting privacy so that they have the opportunity to grieve and process. There have been many offers of assistance, and we will communicate to individuals or organizations if there is a need from the family or OFD. The department hasn’t issued a press release and the official investigation by responsible agencies is ongoing. Much of the information about this incident is on social media and we ask that you please keep this in mind when reading about details.

Tina was well known within the department and words can’t convey the hurt and loss the family and many of us feel. You may take comfort in the fact that the Ward family is surrounded by close family and friends in their time of need, and that they have the wider OFD and fire service family ready to assist them. It is in these moments when we experience the true friendship and support that comes with being in our profession. We thank you, truly.

The Oceanside Firefighters Association 3736 Union also released a statement following the crash:

It is with heavy hearts that the Oceanside Fire Department and their fire family would like to extend our deepest condolences to our recently retired Chief Ward, his family, and all family and friends of the Aeromedevac flight crew N88OZ. Chief Ward’s wife Tina, was a flight nurse on board of the aircraft that crashed last night in El Cajon. We are shocked and saddened by this devastating news and are keeping you all in our thoughts and prayers during this difficult time. 

Aeromedevac Air Ambulance, the company that owns the plane, shared their condolences after the deadly crash. The company said in part, "the loss of our friends has left us an indescribable void. To both us and their families they are unsung heroes, dedicating their lives to caring for others in need throughout our community."

It is with great sadness that we must share the devastating loss of our colleagues at Aeromedevac Air Ambulance on December 27, 2021. The loss of our friends has left us an indescribable void. To both us and their families they are unsung heroes, dedicating their lives to caring for others in need throughout our community. Our priority now is to support the well-being of the families of all our crew members. We are a close-knit air ambulance program that is united by our missions to care for our patients. Our team’s commitment to helping others has always been inspiring. We are honored and blessed to have worked with the crew members that we have lost, and we extend our heartfelt condolences to their families.

The investigation into what caused the deadly crash won't be completed for up to two years, as the NTSB works through evidence from the scene to determine what happened.

The crash occurred just after 7 p.m. in the 1200 block of Pepper Dr. in El Cajon, according to the San Diego County Sheriff's Department (SDSO). Four people in total were aboard the flight.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Learjet 35A business jet departed John Wayne Airport in Orange County and was on its way to Gillespie Field. According to the National Transportation Safety Board, the Learjet was on an instrument approach to Runway 17 at Gillespie Field, when the pilot requested a change to a visual approach to Runway 27R.

Shortly after air traffic control cleared the plane to land, the aircraft crashed about 1.4 miles from the approach end of the runway, according to NTSB.

One home and one vehicle were reportedly damaged by debris from the crash, and hundreds of nearby SDG&E customers lost power to their homes.

NTSB investigators plan to have a preliminary report in the next several weeks, with a final report expected in 1 to 2 years. Authorities are asking anyone with photos or video of the crash to email witness@ntsb.gov.




EL CAJON, California — A second victim has been identified in the Learjet 35A crash in East County San Diego in a Facebook post.

The post by International Association of EMTs and Paramedics identified Laurie Gentz as one of the passengers on the flight that had crashed near Gillespie Field Monday evening with 4 on board.

In the post, the organization offered "sincere condolences for the devastating and sudden loss of Local 162 President Laurie Gentz, her fellow passengers and the Learjet flight crew" and featured a photo of Laurie with 3 other people.

The first victim was identified as a nurse and the wife of a recently retired local fire chief in an Instagram post on Tuesday by The Oceanside Firefighters Association. The post identified Tina Ward as one of the people on board when the aircraft went down. The post offered condolences to Tina's husband - recently retired Oceanside Fire Chief Joe Ward - and featured a photo of the couple.

"It is with heavy hearts that the Oceanside Fire Department and their fire family would like to extend our deepest condolences to our recently retired Chief Ward, his family, and all family and friends of the Aeromedevac flight crew N880Z," the post read in part.

An investigation into the crash that took off from John Wayne Airport in Santa Ana and slammed into a neighborhood near El Cajon is ongoing. 

The crash was reported at about 7:15 p.m. Monday near the 1200 block of Pepper Drive and North Mollison Avenue in the unincorporated Bostonia neighborhood.

The area is a few miles east of Gillespie Field airport, where the plane was scheduled to land.

Deputies from the San Diego County Sheriff's Department's Santee and Lakeside stations immediately responded to the scene along with the Lakeside Fire Protection District, the California Highway Patrol and the El Cajon Police Department.

One home was damaged, but no injuries were reported on the ground, officials said.

There was no immediate word on what led to the crash. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will be handling the investigation. According to the NTSB, the plane was a Learjet 35A business jet, which seats eight people.

The FAA released the following statement Tuesday morning:

"A Learjet 35A business jet crashed in a residential San Diego neighborhood around 7:15 p.m. local time Monday. Four people were aboard. The flight departed John Wayne Airport in Santa Ana, Calif., and was headed to Gillespie Field Airport in San Diego. The FAA and NTSB will investigate. The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation and will provide all updates. Neither agency identifies people involved in aircraft accidents."

Pepper Drive was expected to remain closed between Topper Lane and North Second Street through Wednesday, officials said.

The crash took down an unknown amount of power lines. San Diego Gas & Electric reported outages affecting as many as 2,500 customers in the El Cajon area following the crash. By midday Tuesday, SDG&E crews were still on standby, waiting for clearance to access the area.

The American Red Cross was providing assistance to residents who remain affected by the power outage, according to sheriff's officials.

Anyone who witnessed the crash or has photos or videos from the scene was asked to email witness@ntsb.gov.

The crash comes less than three months after a small aircraft crashed into homes in another East County San Diego neighborhood killing two people and destroying two homes. The Oct. 11 plane crash in Santee claimed the lives of the pilot Dr. Sugata Das and a UPS driver who was struck on the ground Steve Krueger.






More information became available Tuesday about the owner of a Learjet that crashed in a fireball near El Cajon the night before, as well as the aircraft operation that night and who might have been onboard.

The crash occurred on the roadway of Pepper Drive near North Mollison, a couple of miles east of Gillespie Field, said Lakeside Fire Protection District Chief, Don Butz.

An address linked to the registration number of the crashed plane belongs to an office and hangar at Gillespie Field for High Performance Aircraft. On Tuesday, workers at the site in El Cajon told NBC 7 they work with a company called Aeromedevac and that the company is "still handling what happened" and "talking to all the families."

Also on Tuesday, the San Diego County Medical Examiner's office said it will take several days before they release the victim names but, based on Aeromedevac's website, there's reason to suspect all four may have been local residents.

The Oceanside Fire Association posted on their public Facebook page that one of the victims, Tina Ward, was a nurse, and the wife of their retired fire chief.

It appeared that another medical transport jet was visible at the High Performance Aircraft hangar at Gillespie Field, with the door open and, next to it, was a parked medical transport truck.

The Aeromedevac company is based in El Cajon and offers air ambulance and air-transport services for critical care patients. Its website, which has since been taken down, said that every aircraft is equipped with two pilots and two medical team workers, the same number of people onboard who died when the plane crashed.

NBC 7 found a social media post from 2019 that shows pictures of the plane — based on the tail number tail number N880Z — that crashed on Monday. Inside, a a patient bed is visible, as well as two seats in the cockpit.

According to Aeromedevac's website, both people in the cockpit had a lot of flight training. On similar aircraft, captains must hold an airline transport pilot license, and first officers must have at least a commercial pilot license.

Also on Tuesday, the FAA confirmed in a preliminary report that there were two crew members and two passengers killed in the crash.

In a separate report, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said the Learjet 35A was on an instrument approach to Runway 17 at Gillespie just before crashing at 7:14 p.m. However, as the aircraft drew near the airport, the pilot asked to switch to a visual approach to Runway 27R, and was quickly granted approval.

The plane, however, came down 1.4 miles from the beginning of the runway, according to the NTSB, which said three of its investigators had been assigned to investigate the crash.

The NTSB's final report on the crash, "including the probable cause and any contributing factors, is expected to be completed in 12 to 24 months," officials said.


Tina Ward, Flight Nurse
~


EL CAJON, California – One of the four victims in Monday’s deadly plane crash in unincorporated El Cajon has been identified as the wife of a recently retired local fire official, according to the union representing Oceanside firefighters.

The victim, Tina Ward, was working as a flight nurse aboard the Learjet 35A aircraft that crashed about 7:15 p.m. Monday near the 1200 block of Pepper Drive and North Mollison Avenue in the Bostonia neighborhood, an Instagram post by the Oceanside Firefighters Association 3736 shows.

Her identity was confirmed late Tuesday by a battalion chief in the Oceanside Fire Department.

“We are shocked and saddened by this devastating news and are keeping you all in our thoughts and prayers during this difficult time,” the union said in its post.

She was married to retired Oceanside Fire Deputy Chief Joe Ward and is the first person from the crash to be publicly identified. The San Diego County Medical Examiner has not named her or the other three victims because the office was “working on (identifying) the deceased” before notifying families, the office’s website shows.

It is not immediately clear when the other victims of the crash will be identified by local authorities.

Investigators say there were no survivors from the plane that took off Monday evening from John Wayne Airport in Orange County with Gillespie Field being its intended destination. Nobody on the ground was hurt in the crash, though one home was damaged and debris initially knocked out power to more than 2,500 San Diego Gas & Electric customers.

The plane crashed approximately 1.4 miles from the approach end of the runway at Gillespie, the National Transportation Safety Board said in an initial report released Tuesday.

Crews from the NTSB expect to be in the El Cajon area for three days to document the site with one area of focus being to recover the cockpit voice recorder from the aircraft. If there is usable audio with it, officials will create a transcript of the recording to learn more about the plane’s final moments.

Those who witnessed the crash or have relevant information to the investigation were asked Tuesday to contact investigators by email at witness@ntsb.gov.








A Learjet 35A crashed in a residential neighborhood near El Cajon on Monday, and authorities reported no survivors.

The aircraft, flying out of John Wayne Airport in Orange County, downed several power lines on Pepper Drive near Bevin Lane and disintegrated on impact — seconds after the pilot is heard to scream in air-traffic control audio “Oh shit! Oh shit! Oh shit!”

“There is very little left of the aircraft,” said Fire Chief Don Butz of the Lakeside Fire Protection District, briefing reporters under rainy skies. “We weren’t able to find any survivors.”

It missed nearby homes, but debris struck at least one car, he said. (Later, the Sheriff’s Department said one home was damaged.)

On Facebook, James Wall posted live video of the aftermath.

A spokeswoman for John Wayne Airport confirmed the private jet left at 6:56 p.m. but had no details on the number of passengers or crew. She said the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board would provide further details.

The crash was reported about 7:15 p.m. in the 1200 block of Pepper Drive in the unincorporated Bostonia Neighborhood. Butz said there were some initial evacuations, but residents were soon allowed back in their homes.

The area is a few miles east of Gillespie Field, where the plane was headed.

A radio-controlled aircraft buff posted Nest Camera video showing the plane going down and exploding in an intense flash of light. He wrote: “My wife and I heard a loud thunderous noise, and I knew something was wrong.”

Nearby, Nanci Watt was alone at the computer in her Pepperwood Mobile Home Park unit, “Googling and Amazon shopping.”

Living under the flight path to Gillespie Field, she knows the difference between a small plane engine and a jet engine, so when she heard the noise she knew a crash was coming.

“I just hit the floor and everything’s black,” she said of power going out to the neighborhood. 

She called her husband, Ed, at work in Rancho Bernardo, and then her son nearby. Ed said his wife was “most panicked.”

Nanci said: “I didn’t know if there was going to be a big fire and we’d have to evacuate. We have two dogs. What do we take?”

She said she was outside looking at “the glow” before even fire crews arrived.  

“We were shaking,” she said

Deputies from the Santee Sheriff’s Station and Lakeside Sheriff’s Substation immediately responded along with the Lakeside Fire Protection District, California Highway Patrol and El Cajon Police Department.

Other fire units arrived from San Miguel, Santee. Lemon Grove, La Mesa and Bonita fire agencies, Butz said.

Besides an SDG&E crew, a hazardous materials unit was on scene to clean up jet fuel on the road.

“With this weather condition we have, the vapors are going to hang around for a while because there’s no air movement and the cold, moist air keeps all the vapors to the ground,” Butz said.

Video from the scene showed the burning remains of what appeared to be a small executive jet on a street outside homes.

According to FlightAware.com, the Learjet 35A is registered to Med Jet LLC of El Cajon. On LiveATC.net, commenters posted flight information as well, noting the plane arrived at John Wayne earlier Monday from Lake Havasu City, Arizona.

The crash took down a number of power lines, and San Diego Gas & Electric reported at midnight that about 350 customers in the El Cajon area were still without power. Power was expected to be restored by early Tuesday morning, according to the utility.

The San Diego County Sheriff’s Department tweeted at 8:57 p.m. that the fire was out, and added that the FAA and NTSB were notified and will be handling the investigation.

An FAA investigation team was on its way from Seattle, Butz said, along with a local representative of the agency.

Pepper Drive will remain closed between Topper Lane and North Second Street through Wednesday, said the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department, citing the time needed for investigators to process the scene.

Anyone who witnessed the crash or has photos or videos from the scene was asked to email witness@ntsb.gov.