Sunday, August 01, 2021

Bombardier CRJ-701ER (CL-600-2C10) Regional Jet, N514MJ: Incident occurred August 01, 2021 at Greater Rochester International Airport (KROC), New York

United Express 
GoJet Airlines 

https://registry.faa.gov/N514MJ

 


ROCHESTER, New York (WHEC) — A plane enroute to Buffalo from Newark, New Jersey, with a significant fuel leak made an emergency landing at the Frederick Douglass Greater Rochester International Airport early Sunday evening.

Airport Director Andy Moore tells News10NBC the United Express flight was carrying 55 passengers.  Moore says the pilot noticed a fuel leak on the aircraft's wing. That's when the flight was diverted to Rochester. 

Video shared by Justin Abbott shows fuel pouring from the plane as it approaches the runway before landing safely on Runway 4/22. 

The plane then parked on the runway, and the airport shuttled passengers to the main terminal building on Brooks Avenue, according to Moore.

As a precautionary measure, ambulances were called to the scene but Moore said that there were no injuries reported. 

Several emergency responders including Rochester Airport Professional Fire Fighters, IAFF Local 1636 were on scene.

Incident occurred August 01, 2021 at South Haven Area Regional Airport (KLWA), Michigan





South Haven Area Emergency Services

SHAES responders were on standby at the South Haven Area Regional Airport on Sunday as an airplane made an emergency landing without incident. 

The Piper Archer was enroute from Wisconsin to Ohio when it experienced electrical issues shortly before noon. 

The Federal Aviation Administration in South Bend via Van Buren County dispatch directed the plane to the South Haven airport.

The two occupants were not injured.

The $27.85 Beer: High-Flying Prices at Airports Spur Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Audit Order

Some of the most expensive beer in the city is at the airports. But according to Port Authority rules, retailers at Kennedy, LaGuardia and Newark should only be charging 10% more than “street prices.”

‘It’s just Sam Adams Summer Ale — that’s insane!’


The company that operates food and beverage concessions at the region’s three major airports has been ordered to conduct a full audit of how much it makes customers pay after being called out online for sky-high prices on beer and French fries.

The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey recently asked for the audit after OTG — which runs restaurants and stores at LaGuardia, Kennedy and Newark airports — was flagged on Twitter by travelers outraged over a $27.85 Sam Adams Summer Ale and a $10.90 order of fries.

“It’s just Sam Adams Summer Ale — that’s insane!” said Cooper Lund, 32, of Brooklyn, who encountered the pricey 23-ounce brew at an airport Biergarten restaurant while flying from LaGuardia earlier this month to visit family in Minnesota.

An OTG spokesperson told THE CITY the prices on the beer at LaGuardia and fries at Newark were “incorrectly posted” and “quickly corrected” — to $18.15 and $8.45. One of OTG’s senior executives is Larry Schwartz, a longtime lieutenant to Governor Andrew Cuomo.

“Because of these posted-pricing hiccups, our in-house menu teams have been diligently working to ensure pricing across all restaurants are, in fact, rendering correctly,” said the spokesperson, Michael Marchese.

Even the updated prices at many airport businesses appear to test the limits on 2020 pricing guidelines that allow airport businesses to charge up to 10% more than “street pricing.”

The Port Authority board last year approved airport price increases of up to 10% after voting in 2018 to increase the minimum wage for tens of thousands of airport workers to $19 an hour by 2023.

“Oh my goodness, I thought it was going to be $2.50,” said Emily Fishman, 75, after paying $4 for a 12-ounce bottle of Minute Maid orange juice at a JFK food court during a layover on a flight to Israel. “They’ve got you, they know you don’t have a choice.”

Comparison Shopping

Terminal operators and concession management companies set the prices at airports, based upon comparison to locations within the New York and New Jersey metropolitan area, according to the Port Authority.

“The Port Authority is committed to enforcing that all terminal operators and concessionaires adhere to cost parity policies throughout our airports,” a Port Authority spokesperson said in a statement to THE CITY. “We know this market is expensive enough already, so we’re committed to everything we can do to ensure reasonable prices for our customers.”

The bi-state agency said it uses “mystery shoppers” and social media posts to flag overpriced items.

A search by THE CITY of several stores and eateries at LaGuardia and JFK turned up several items that could be had for much less than what the airport businesses charge.

At a NYC Aglow by Hudson newsstand/convenience store inside Terminal B at LaGuardia, a five and a half-ounce tin of Pringles potato chips sells for $5.99, while an 11.5 ounce bottle of Simply Lemonade goes for $4.69 and a five-ounce bag of Kettle Corn Popcorners can be had for $5.49.

At the Pronto Lotto and Vape convenience store in Flushing, the Pringles are priced at $2.50, with the Simply Lemonade bottle at $2.75. The Kettle Corn Popcorners, meanwhile, are $2.99 at the Saanvi Food Mart in Flushing.

At the Long Island Express Deli across from the AirTrain station in Jamaica, a 20-ounce bottle of soda sells for $1.75 — compared with $3.89 at a Hudson News in Terminal 1 at JFK. While a bottle of Dasani water is $3.69 at that same airport newsstand, it goes for $1.75 in Jamaica.

“We sometimes get people who stop by on the way to JFK and get stuff here,” said Jose Guanam, 61, a clerk at the deli. “They say it’s too expensive.”

As part of an approval process for airport concessionaires, the Port Authority said retailers are required to provide four product comparisons to businesses in the New York City region. They also are required to offer a “value item,” such as a combo meal.

Several travelers who spoke to THE CITY at Kennedy and LaGuardia said good deals are hard to come by at the airports.

“I paid $8 for two Fantas, that’s a ripoff,” said Felipe Rodriguez, 61, who flew into JFK from Puerto Rico. “It’s not like this is freshly squeezed juice — it’s Fanta!”

“I just figured airports are this expensive, no matter what,” said Kay Bolles, 37, who had a 10-hour JFK layover on her way from Ohio to Italy. “I have a long day in the airport, so I brought cash for that.”

Economic Turbulence

Airport concessionaires have struggled to stay open during the pandemic, according to Port Authority figures. At JFK, just 53% were open in June, compared to 64% at LaGuardia and 77% at Newark.

Hudson Group, the parent company of Hudson News with more than 1,000 stores and newsstands in airports and commuter terminals across the country and in Canada, did not respond to questions from THE CITY.

But Lund’s tweet about getting soaked on suds at LaGuardia caught the attention of OTG, whose Twitter account offered beers “on us” next time he travels through the airport.

Lund said he would welcome prices that are more in line with those outside of the airports.

“It strikes me as an enforced monopoly,” he told THE CITY.

And after passing on the high-priced Sam Adams Summer Ale, Lund said he settled for paying $11 for a 12-ounce beer.

“It was underwhelming,” he said. “It was a Heineken.”

Cities press lawmakers to intervene in Aurora State Airport (KUAO) row

Airport interests implore board to appeal decision to state Supreme Court; city asks Wyden and Merkley to intervene in new planning effort



Marion County, Oregon -   As is typical for the topic of the Aurora State Airport, a dizzying array of planning and legal components are progressing simultaneously.

First there's the ongoing saga regarding the validity of the 2012 airport master plan update, which called for a runway extension that Wilsonville government officials and some residents have argued would cause noise and traffic issues in the area.

A case brought forward by the cities of Wilsonville and Aurora, among other entities, was dismissed in December 2020 by the Land Use Board of Appeals, only to be sent to the Oregon Court of Appeals and, in June, remanded back to LUBA.

And then there's the new master plan process, which will begin soon and, according to the city, appears unsatisfactory.

During a meeting Thursday, July 15, the Oregon Aviation Board heard from a variety of aviation industry representatives as well as Sen. Betsy Johnson, D-Scappoose, and a representative of the Eugene Airport advocating for the board to appeal the OCOA ruling to the Oregon Supreme Court. Airport business interests also recently asked the OCOA to reconsider its decision, citing purported factual errors in its ruling.

Meanwhile, the board agreed to move forward with hiring a consultant for the new master planning process and outlined next steps at the meeting.

If all that weren't enough, the city of Wilsonville is seeking help from federal representatives and the Federal Aviation Administration to force the ODA to address concerns about the master planning process.

Legal fight continues

In its June 16 ruling, the OCOA not only remanded LUBA's 2020 decision on the case but also documented deficiencies in the 2012 airport master plan update. The court determined that the master plan was changed following its purported adoption in 2011 and that, contrary to LUBA's ruling, projects added to the plan would unlawfully encroach on agricultural land.

Airport business interests asked the OCOA to reconsider this decision based on what they believe are factual inaccuracies in the court's opinion. The city of Wilsonville and other entities then filed an objection to the reconsideration motion. The court has yet to decide whether it will agree to reconsider the case.

Airport business interests argue that the OCOA's ruling sets a dangerous precedent that would hinder projects not only in Aurora but throughout the state.

Based on Land Conservation and Development rules, LUBA decided that because the plan doesn't call for projects that would usher in a larger class of airplanes based on tail height and wingspan, it doesn't have to comply with certain statewide planning goals. The OCOA, however, interpreted the LCDC law to also consider plane weight, which led it to object to LUBA's ruling.

Airport proponents note that projects like a long-contested 1,000-foot runway extension were approved in an airport master plan in 1976, and they believe opening up airport projects and plans to litigation based on the OCOA's interpretation to this rule could prove damaging.

"This decision, if not overturned, will make it virtually impossible to modernize public airports without going through lengthy, uncertain and extremely expensive land-use processes," said attorney Wendie Kellington, who represents the Aurora Airport Improvement Association, at the aviation board meeting.

Of course, the cities of Wilsonville and Aurora, 1,000 Friends of Oregon and Aurora Planning Commissioner Joseph Shaefer were much more favorable to the OCOA ruling.

"This scenario is analogous to weight limits on a bridge. Larger trucks may lawfully cross the bridge with special permits, or without being fully loaded. If that bridge were strengthened to eliminate the weight restrictions, one would say the bridge now permits use by a larger class of trucks," their response reads.

During the meeting, aviation board Chair Martha Meeker described the arcane debate over classes of airplanes as "off the rails."

Those asking for the aviation board to take further legal action against the OCOA ruling included representatives from the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Oregon Pilots Association and the National Business Aviation Association.

"The stated mission of the Department of Aviation is to promote growth and economic development of airports and their communities. The board must ask for review of this decision because the decision is antithetical to that mission and it's wrong on the facts and the law," said Joe Smith, a previous aviation board member who represents the board of Oregon Aviation Industries.

The board plans to hold an executive session on the topic in the coming weeks and to subsequently make a decision about whether to ask the state Supreme Court to consider the case.

Cities press lawmakers to intervene

The cities of Wilsonville and Aurora, meanwhile, sent a letter to Rep. Kurt Schrader and U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley asking them to intervene with the Federal Aviation Administration to require that federal grant funding for master plan work be allocated only if certain conditions are met. It does not spell out suggested conditions, however.

"We support and agree with the FAA's requirement that a new master plan for the Airport is past due and necessary, but the Scope of Work proposed by ODA is inadequate and does not comply with key elements of federal and state law and public processes," the city's letter reads.

It continues, later: "Furthermore, ODA has already publicly announced an intent to complete the new plan in as short a time frame as possible and with as little environmental due diligence and traffic analysis (air and ground) as possible. This is all being done at the urging of private airport businesses with significant speculative financial stakes in a major Airport expansion."

The cities later contend that the scope of work for the plan doesn't consider the legal battle over the previous master plan update, and the letter raises concerns about the representation on an advisory committee that includes ample business interest but not groups like the Charbonneau Country Club and Deer Creek Estates.

"A momentary pause in funding the master plan update may help provide ODA the incentive necessary to ensure an adequate Scope of Work and to provide all stakeholders a seat at the table," the letter reads.

Planning process moves forward

During the July 15 board meeting, the OAB agreed to move forward with hiring a consultant for the completion of the master plan update. Planning and Project Manager Heather Peck said this process would take about two years, will include at least seven PAC meetings as well as open houses for the public to attend, and won't include an environmental component as that is needed for the advancement of specific projects following the completion of the plan update.

The Wilsonville government said the previous process did not include appropriate public involvement. Peck also said more groups could be added to the advisory committee.



Emergency repairs proposed for Nebraska City Municipal Airport (KAFK)



NEBRASKA CITY, Nebraska - The Nebraska City Airport Authority is scheduled to meet at city hall at 4:30 p.m. on Monday, August 2.

The meeting agenda says an emergency expenditure is proposed to repair the runway, which buckled due to excessive heat.

The authority is seeking a Nebraska Department of Transportation grant to assist with the emergency runway repair.

Smokejumpers temporarily stationed in Medford, Oregon, to help with firefighting efforts





MEDFORD, Oregon — Wildfires are raging across the West, and here in southern Oregon, recent lightning storms and red flag conditions are not helping efforts.

Today I got up close with some of the brave people who quite literally, face fire head-on.

Have you ever heard of smokejumpers?

They are specially trained firefighters who jump out of planes to fight fires in hard-to-reach areas.

Ty Vankeuren is a U.S. Forest Service smokejumper from Boise, Idaho. He’s temporarily stationed in Medford right now until he’s called out to fight a fire.

He says rookie school for smokejumpers lasts up to 6 or 7 weeks.

He says he parachutes into fires, most of which are caused by lightning.

“The most unique thing about smokejumping is going into a very remote place in the western United States, all of our gear with us, being dropped from an airplane and packing our gear out,” he said.

Vankeuren says he’s required to do proficiency jumps every 2 weeks to qualify to do smoke jumping.

Airplane wreckage that prompted Coast Guard response was yard decoration: Piper PA-30-160 Twin Comanche, N7155Y


Piper PA-30-160 Twin Comanche, N7155Y: Fatal accident occurred March 18, 2020 near Eagle Nest Ranch Airport (OR65), Estacada, Clackamas County, Oregon.



One man's junk may be another man's treasure—but it's not often that treasure sparks a response from the Coast Guard.

Gary Welter's property in Warren, Oregon, features an eclectic collection of what some might consider "junk" turned into yard art, each piece with its own story to tell. 

"This truck right here is eventually going to be a picnic table," said Welter, walking walking toward an old pickup truck. Nearby, half of a 1985 Corvette has been turned into a gate. A 1956 Chevy sits in the front yard. Welter said was either going to the trash or his front yard, and he chose the yard. 

"I see something and it just kind of strikes me and we do it," Welter said.

What Gary didn't know was that one particular piece of yard art would cause quite a stir. Along his private beachfront, Welter has the tail end of a Piper Comanche twin engine airplane sticking out of the tree line. 

"It's come apart right at the fuselage, the tail," he said, pointing at the tail of the plane. The wrecked plane's tail was placed on the shoreline at the end of June. Welter's friend Chuck Hamm was the plane's co-owner and was going to scrap it.

"Gary said, what are you going to do with the tail section? What are you going to do with that wing? It's all going to scrap, it's not salvageable," Hamm said.

Welter told Hamm about his plans to turn it into yard art. Hamm told him to come and get it.

Like all of Welter's pieces, the airplane wreckage has its own story to tell. The story of how it came to rest 55 miles away from where it crashed begins on March 18, 2020.

Chuck Hamm co-owned the plane with his cousin, George Sheasley. Sheasley had taken off from the Eagle Nest Ranch airport near Estacada in the afternoon of March 18, 2020.

Shortly after takeoff, something went wrong and Sheasley crashed. Neighbors pulled him from the wreckage, he was life flighted to a hospital with serious burns. The NTSB says the crash is still being investigated.

"If there wasn't neighbors there at the time of the accident, he would've burnt to death in the airplane." Hamm said, "They were able to get him out of the airplane and the airplane burnt down to a hulk. You couldn't even recognize it as an airplane anymore, other than the wing and tail section."

Sheasley passed away months later. The plane was moved to Welter's property 56 miles away, off Highway 30 near Rainier. 

Nobody paid much attention to it, until a boater passing by called the Coast Guard to report an airplane crash Monday. 

The Coast Guard responded, launching a helicopter to look for survivors. A rescue swimmer took a closer look and determined the wreckage was from the March 2020 crash. The search for survivors was called off.

Gary Welter's property in Warren, Oregon, features an eclectic collection of what some might consider "junk" turned into yard art, each piece with its own story to tell. 

"This truck right here is eventually going to be a picnic table," said Welter, walking walking toward an old pickup truck. Nearby, half of a 1985 Corvette has been turned into a gate. A 1956 Chevy sits in the front yard. Welter said was either going to the trash or his front yard, and he chose the yard. 

"I see something and it just kind of strikes me and we do it," Welter said.

What Gary didn't know was that one particular piece of yard art would cause quite a stir. Along his private beachfront, Welter has the tail end of a Piper Comanche twin engine airplane sticking out of the tree line. 

"It's come apart right at the fuselage, the tail," he said, pointing at the tail of the plane. The wrecked plane's tail was placed on the shoreline at the end of June. Welter's friend Chuck Hamm was the plane's co-owner and was going to scrap it.

"Gary said, what are you going to do with the tail section? What are you going to do with that wing? It's all going to scrap, it's not salvageable," Hamm said.

Welter told Hamm about his plans to turn it into yard art. Hamm told him to come and get it.

Like all of Welter's pieces, the airplane wreckage has its own story to tell. The story of how it came to rest 55 miles away from where it crashed begins on March 18, 2020.

Chuck Hamm co-owned the plane with his cousin, George Sheasley. Sheasley had taken off from the Eagle Nest Ranch airport near Estacada in the afternoon of March 18, 2020.

Shortly after takeoff, something went wrong and Sheasley crashed. Neighbors pulled him from the wreckage, he was life flighted to a hospital with serious burns. The NTSB says the crash is still being investigated.

"If there wasn't neighbors there at the time of the accident, he would've burnt to death in the airplane." Hamm said, "They were able to get him out of the airplane and the airplane burnt down to a hulk. You couldn't even recognize it as an airplane anymore, other than the wing and tail section."

Sheasley passed away months later. The plane was moved to Welter's property 56 miles away, off Highway 30 near Rainier. 

Nobody paid much attention to it, until a boater passing by called the Coast Guard to report an airplane crash Monday. 

The Coast Guard responded, launching a helicopter to look for survivors. A rescue swimmer took a closer look and determined the wreckage was from the March 2020 crash. The search for survivors was called off.

"I never thought anything would like this would happen, kind of blown up. Hopefully it puts a little laughter in everybody's day. We weren't trying to create a stir," said Welter.

Hamm says his cousin would've gotten a kick out of the whole situation.

"His sense of humor and everything, I know he is looking down and he is laughing about this and he's going 'Chuckie, what the heck did you do now?'"  


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

https://registry.faa.gov/N7155Y

Location: Eagle Creek, OR
Accident Number: WPR20LA111
Date & Time: 03/18/2020, 1700 PDT
Registration: N7155Y
Aircraft: Piper PA 30
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 18, 2020 about 1700 Pacific daylight time, a Piper PA-30 airplane, N7155Y, impacted terrain during takeoff from Eagle Nest Ranch Airport (OR65), Estacada, Oregon. The airline transport pilot was seriously injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

Video of the accident revealed the airplane lifted off the runway surface with a nose high, left-wing low attitude. After liftoff, the airplane immediately banked to a right-wing low attitude and appeared to be in a slow climb. When the airplane reached about 15-20 feet above the ground it made a left turn towards adjacent trees. The airplane continued the left turn until the left wing struck a tree. The airplane subsequently struck the ground and trees and burst into flames.

Witnesses reported they heard the airplane takeoff from the grass strip. Some stated that the airplane didn't sound as loud as it normally would. Immediately after the accident occurred, they proceeded to the airplane and pulled the pilot out of the wreckage.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N7155Y
Model/Series: PA 30 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TTD, 39 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 300°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Eagle Creek, OR (OR65)
Destination: Eagle Creek, OR (OR65)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 45.352778, -122.340833 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.







Robinson R66 Turbine, N7000J: Fatal accident occurred August 01, 2021 in Colusa, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California
Robinson Helicopter Company; Torrance, California 
Rolls Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana 

William B. Vann 
Location: Colusa, California 
Accident Number: WPR21FA300
Date & Time: August 1, 2021, 12:51 Local
Registration: N7000J
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R66 
Injuries: 4 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On August 1, 2021, about 1251 Pacific daylight time, a Robinson R66 helicopter, N7000J, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Colusa, California. The pilot and 3 passengers were fatally injured. The helicopter was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

A witness, who was driving south on a highway about 0.5 miles east of the accident site, reported that he noticed a helicopter flying on an easterly heading about 50 to 100 ft above ground level (agl), and initially thought it may have been a crop duster. The witness stated that the helicopter was initially straight and level, however, suddenly made a sharp left turn. The witness briefly lost sight of the helicopter due to trees and when he reestablished visual contact, he observed the helicopter descend into the ground.

Recorded Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) showed that at 1207, the helicopter had departed Willows, California, and flew toward the foothills which bordered the western edge of the valley. The ADS-B data showed that the helicopter turned south while over Elk Creek, California, and overflew Lodoga, and Stonyford, California, before a turn to the east was initiated. The helicopter continued on an easterly heading for about 12 minutes, and then turned to a southeasterly heading. The helicopter remained on a southeasterly heading for about 2 minutes, and then initiated a left turn to an easterly heading, about 0.7 miles west of the accident. The ADS-B data contained no altitude data for the entire flight. 



Examination of the accident site revealed that the helicopter impacted open terrain on a heading of about 090°.



Wreckage debris was scatted within a 360 ft long and 392 ft wide area as depicted in figure 2. All major structural components of the helicopter were located throughout the debris area. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY
Registration: N7000J
Model/Series: R66
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOVE,190 ft msl
Observation Time: 12:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C /14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 240°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Willows, CA (KWLW)
Destination: Williams, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 3 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.296803,-122.03939 (est)

  
Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.


A prominent Colusa County almond farmer and his wife have been identified among the four people killed in Sunday's helicopter crash.

Bill Vann, 67, the owner of Vann Family Orchards, and Susie Vann, 60, died in the crash along with two friends, according to a statement released by the family.

The couple were from Williams, the Colusa County Sheriff's Office said. The office identified the other two people on board the helicopter as Bobbie Lee Keaton, 62, also from Williams, and Charles Thomas Wilson, 71, from Rocklin.

Bill partnered with his brother Garnett Vann in 1973 to farm 40 acres of wheat and the business later expanded to almonds, walnuts and pistachios. The company now farms more than 17,000 acres in the Sacramento Valley, contracts with more than 100 growers and employs more than 200 people around the region, according to the family.

“Bill was a hands-on partner who loved both farming and business. For him, being actively involved in every step of the operation made him the happiest,” Garnett Vann said in a news release. “His loss is a shock to our family, our employees and our fellow growers. Despite this tragic accident, the business will continue to move forward as we have been planning for the future for quite some time.”

Charles Thomas Wilson was known by loved ones as "Chuck." His wife Beverly told KCRA 3 he worked in highway improvement. She says they recently moved to Rocklin from Nevada City to be safer from the wildfires.

Christopher Wilson, the couple's neighbor, said Beverly was home alone on Monday afternoon when she received news of her husband's death, around 24 hours after the crash.

"She did come over right away after she found out," Wilson told KCRA 3. "She said I was the first one she came to because she knew we were home and she just needed to talk to somebody."

Wilson described Chuck as "really nice, really talkative, really polite, and just a really nice guy."

"Hugs and touching your neighbors and shaking hands is something we couldn't do during COVID and today was the first time I actually gave Beverly a hug," Wilson said. "It felt good to hug her, but I wish I didn't have to hug her for this reason."

The helicopter crashed Sunday around 1:15 p.m. in a field near Highway 45 at Reservation Road, right by the Sacramento River. The Federal Aviation Administration said the helicopter was a Robinson R66.

Deputies and Sacramento River Fire personnel found the passengers still inside the helicopter and declared all four dead at the scene, the sheriff's office said.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating.

A flag could be seen flying at half-mast outside Vann Family Orchards in Colusa on Monday.

Richard Waycott, president and chief executive officer of the Almond Board of California, called the Vann family "a leader in the California almond business" and said the family has grown the industry's stature.

"We extend our heartfelt condolences to all Vann family members,” he said in a statement.

Bill and Susie Vann are survived by four children and seven grandchildren.

The family is planning funeral services.


Zodiac CH 601 XL, N409WM: Incident occurred August 01, 2021 on Fernandina Beach, Nassau County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aircraft experienced engine issues and landed on the beach.  


Date: 01-AUG-21
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N409WM
Aircraft Make: ZENITH
Aircraft Model: ZODIAC 601XL
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: FERNANDINA BEACH
State: FLORIDA



A small plane landed Sunday on Fernandina Beach after having engine trouble, according to Fernandina Beach Police Chief Mark Foxworth.

Foxworth said there were two people on the plane and no injuries were reported.

He said the Federal Aviation Administration was notified.

Storm damages airplanes, hangar at Slatington Airport (69N), Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

This plane spun 180 degrees from where it was tied, and another plane was unmoored and tipped over July 29, 2021, at Slatington Airport in Lehigh County following tornado warnings and damaging winds that moved through the area.


   
A plane is tipped over July 29, 2021, at Slatington Airport in Lehigh County following tornado warnings and damaging winds that moved through the area.

A hangar door is blown out July 29, 2021, at Slatington Airport in Lehigh County following tornado warnings and damaging winds that moved through the area.




SLATINGTON, Pennsylvania - No tornadoes have been confirmed in Lehigh County, but the severe storms Thursday night were wicked enough to cause damage.

At the Slatington Airport, two planes were damaged, as well as a hangar.

Slatington Airport owner Roger Sell was sitting at home when the skies opened up.

"We were at home listening to 69 News," Sell said.

Soon his phone was ringing. First, his alarm company informed him there was movement at the airport, despite him not being there.

Then he found out a transformer blew across the street. He and his son decided to investigate. When they got there, emergency crews were everywhere, and a tree was down on the road.

"I climbed through the tree and came over here and saw this," Sell said.

Airplanes were tossed about.

"That airplane over there got ripped right out of it's tying... it must have really thrown it around," Sell said. "This other plane behind me here was ripped loose and spun 180 degrees with no damage."

Sell says two planes were badly damaged.

"That airplane there is probably worth about $100,000 and you might not get anything out of that, it's hard to say," Sell said.

A hangar was also badly damaged.

"I was amazed, one of the hangers really took a beating, but the airplane inside is unscathed," Sell said.

Sell expects to find more damage after he takes a closer look at everything. In terms of the price tag of all this, Sell says he's going to let the insurance adjuster figure that out.

As to what caused this damage, for now Sell is just calling it an act of God.

Van's RV-6, N443JB: Accident occurred August 01, 2021 near Grimes Field Airport (I74), Urbana, Champaign County, Ohio

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Columbus, Ohio


Location: Urbana, OH 
Accident Number: CEN21LA365
Date & Time: August 1, 2021, 08:22 Local 
Registration: N443JB
Aircraft: Vans RV6 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N443JB
Model/Series: RV6 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEDJ,1123 ft msl 
Observation Time: 08:15 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C /15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 6 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Urbana, OH 
Destination: Urbana, OH

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.108061,-83.752465 (est)

URBANA, Ohio (WDTN) – The Ohio State Highway Patrol is investigating a small plane crash that happened in Urbana Sunday.

The Springfield Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol said the crash happened just outside the Grimes Field Airport before 8:22 a.m.

A 1989 Van’s RV-6 experimental aircraft was approaching the runway and lost power during approach. The pilot, Michael Baldwin, 61 of Pickerington, Ohio, made a controlled landing in a field, according to a release. 2 NEWS crews on scene could see the plane landed at the edge of a cornfield at the northern edge of the airport.

Baldwin was not injured in the crash. OSHP said no fuel spill occurred.

The crash is under investigation.




A small plane crashed at Grimes Field Airport Sunday morning. No one was injured in the crash, the Ohio State Highway Patrol said in a release.

Initial reports show that a 1989 Van’s RV-6 experimental plane was approaching a runway and lost power. The pilot, Michael Baldwin, 61, of Pickerington made a controlled landing in a field. He was not injured, the OSHP reported.

The incident was reported just before 8:30 a.m. The OSHP, Urbana Fire and EMS, Urbana Police Department, Grimes Field Airport officials and Maine’s Towing all responded to the scene, along with the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were contacted and also responded to the scene.

The crash is still under investigation, the OSHP said.



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY — The Springfield Post of the Ohio State High Patrol is investigating a small plane crash in Urbana Sunday morning.

OSHP dispatch confirmed the plane crash happened near Grimes Field Airport and crews were called to respond just before 8:30 a.m.

The plane appeared to have crashed into a nearby field.

Dispatch says there are no injuries currently being reported.

The the cause of the crash is under investigation at this time.

Nantucket Memorial Airport (KACK) runs out of jet fuel

Nantucket Memorial Airport has run out of jet fuel at the peak of summer, impacting private flights at one of New England’s busiest transportation hubs.

On Saturday, the airport suspended jet fuel sales, and informed commercial carriers that they needed to fly into the island fully loaded with fuel due to the shortage.

Airport officials said Saturday night that they were facing overwhelming demand for jet fuel, along with a logistical nightmare in getting fuel tanker trucks to the island due to record competition for reservations this summer on the Steamship Authority ferries. They also cited a national truck driver shortage as playing a role in the unprecedented situation. 

On Saturday, the airport reserved jet fuel for its scheduled air carriers – including JetBlue, Delta, United and American – in order to ensure those flights and thousands of passengers reached their destinations. Around 1 p.m., the airport stopped selling fuel to the hundreds of private aircraft that come and go from the island on any given summer day.

But on Sunday, it will be “no jet fuel for anyone,” Assistant Airport Manager Noah Karberg said. “We’ve been monitoring this event since Wednesday or Thursday. We’ve put all our air carriers on notice that they had to come in full (of fuel) or schedule an appropriate fuel stop.”

More fuel is expected to arrive on Nantucket via tanker truck by early Monday morning with the arrival of the early Steamship Authority ferry.

The airport will be holding roughly 3,000 gallons of jet fuel in reserve for Boston Medflight helicopters should they need it, as well as for search and rescue operations. 

Jet fuel sales are up 60 percent at the airport compared to 2019, and by the end of July it had pumped over 1 million gallons of Jet-A fuel, a record. 

The competition for ferry reservations is another factor, as one cancellation at the beginning of the month threw the airport’s entire fuel delivery schedule into chaos, with ripple effects that were still being felt by the end of July as it tried to play catch-up. 

Nantucket Memorial Airport’s fuel farm holds 100,000 gallons of jet fuel – enough to cover normal traffic for four to five days –  but the demand this summer has drained supplies to the point it was holding essentially a single days worth of fuel on most days in July. 




Loss of Control on Ground: Piper PA-12, N3447M; accident occurred August 01, 2019 at Manassas Regional Airport (KHEF), Prince William County, Virginia

View of damage to the left wing. 



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington D.C. 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Manassas, VA
Accident Number: GAA19CA482
Date & Time: 08/01/2019, 1350 EDT
Registration: N3447M
Aircraft: Piper PA 12
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot reported that, during the landing roll, the airplane veered right. The pilot attempted to correct the right veer with left rudder pedal, but his foot slipped. Subsequently, the airplane ground looped. The left main landing gear collapsed, and the left wing struck the ground. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a ground loop.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 77, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/15/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/21/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3600 hours (Total, all aircraft), 71 hours (Total, this make and model), 3500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N3447M
Model/Series: PA 12 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1947 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 12-2065
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/09/2018, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1935 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A1A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHEF, 192 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2156 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 5500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 130°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Washington, DC (HEF)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Washington, DC (HEF)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1345 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: MANASSAS RGNL/HARRY P DAVIS FI (HEF)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 192 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 16R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3715 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.721111, -77.515000 (est)

Low Altitude Operation / Event: Robinson R66 Turbine, N1767L; accident occurred August 02, 2019 in Vandalia, Fayette County, Illinois

View of damaged main rotor blade. 




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

HeliCrops LLC


Location: Vandalia, IL
Accident Number: GAA19CA481
Date & Time: 08/02/2019, 1535 CDT
Registration: N1767L
Aircraft: Robinson R66
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

Analysis

The helicopter pilot reported that, during high reconnaissance of a field intended for agricultural application, he saw power lines surrounding the field. He started the application southbound from the northwest section, and after travelling about 300 yards and while about 15 ft above ground level, the helicopter struck a power line, after which the pilot was able to land the helicopter on an adjacent field without further incident.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor blade.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from power lines during an agricultural application flight. 

Findings

Personnel issues Monitoring environment - Pilot
Aircraft Altitude - Not attained/maintained
Environmental issues Wire - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Maneuvering-low-alt flying Low altitude operation/event (Defining event)
Maneuvering-low-alt flying Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 41, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/10/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/05/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 6696 hours (Total, all aircraft), 94 hours (Total, this make and model), 6636 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 217 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 145 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5.7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N1767L
Model/Series: R66 No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2011
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0044
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: 250-R300
Registered Owner: Helicrops Llc
Rated Power:
Operator: Helicrops Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K3LF, 690 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 27 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2035 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 295°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 4200 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 50°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Vandalia, IL (VLA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Vandalia, IL (VLA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1530 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.975278, -89.142500 (est)