Thursday, July 28, 2016

Cessna 172M, N1506V: Incident occurred July 28, 2016 at Bellingham International Airport (KBLI), Whatcom County, Washington

http://registry.faa.gov/N1506V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Seattle FSDO-01

Date: 28-JUL-16
Time: 19:09:00Z
Regis#: N1506V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BELLINGHAM
State: Washington

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE SIDE OF THE RUNWAY INTO A DITCH, BELLINGHAM, WASHINGTON.



Commercial flights were on standby for a short time after a small plane went off the runway and into a ditch at Bellingham International Airport Thursday afternoon, July 28.

The pilot was not injured.

Emergency crews towed the single-engine Cessna from the runway. Airport officials suspended all flights for about 30 minutes shortly after the incident.

Story and video: http://www.bellinghamherald.com

BELLINGHAM --  A small plane went off the runway at Bellingham International Airport Thursday afternoon, July 28, briefly pausing all commercial flights.

The small, single-engine Cessna went into a ditch near the runway just after noon. The pilot was not injured in the crash and was the only person on board, said Mike Hogan, a Port of Bellingham spokesman.

Commercial flights were put on standby while crews worked to remove the plane, Hogan said. But an Alaska Airlines flight landed on a nearby runway while crews worked. Hogan added that officials likely had deemed the area safe enough to land the plane.

A tug vehicle pulled the plane from the ditch at about 1:20 p.m.

No further information, including whether the pilot was trying to take off or land or why the plane ended up in the ditch, was immediately available, Hogan said.

Source: http://www.bellinghamherald.com

Cirrus SR-22-G3 Turbo GTS, Harkey Aero LLC, N341CP: Accident occurred July 28, 2016 at Henderson Executive Airport (KHND), Las Vegas, Clark County, Nevada

HARKEY AERO LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N341CP

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA402
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 28, 2016 in Henderson, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR, registration: N341CP
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the landing in gusty crosswind conditions, the airplane touched down "firm" with the landing gear side loaded. The pilot further reported that the airplane immediately veered off the runway to the left. During the runway excursion, the airplane encountered a steep ravine located about 300 feet from the runway centerline; subsequently the landing gear collapsed. 

The right elevator and right wing sustained substantial damage. 

The pilot did not report any mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

The automated weather observation station (AWOS) at the airport four minutes before the accident recorded the wind at 250 degrees true at 10 knots. The AWOS about 56 minutes after the accident recorded the wind at 260 degrees true at 7 knots, gusting to 14 knots. The pilot reported that the landing was on a runway aligned with 170 degrees magnetic.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in gusty crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion and a landing gear collapse.





No one was injured when a small airplane missed the runway and crash-landed at the Henderson Executive Airport this afternoon, according to an airport spokeswoman.

Firefighters responded to the airport, 1600 Jet Stream Drive, about 3:30 p.m., Clark County Department of Aviation spokeswoman Christine Crews said.

The Cirrus SR-22 missed the runway and landed on dirt, Crews said. There was no fire, but the airplane was damaged and leaked fuel.

Runway 17 Left was shut down while the plane was moved and the fuel spill cleaned, Crews said.

There were three people onboard and no injuries were reported, Crews said. The main runway at the airport remains open and operational.

No disturbance to regular airport operations was expected, she said.

Source:  https://lasvegassun.com


HENDERSON (KTNV) - Christine Crews, spokesperson for the Clark County Department of Aviation tells 13 Action News that a Cirrus SR-22 single-propeller airplane landed short of runway 17 on Thursday.

It was reported around 3:25 p.m. at Henderson Executive Airport.

There were no injuries or damage to the runway. The runway is closed, due to the plane's damage. The plane is reportedly leaking fuel.

The airport's main runway is open. There are no other closures.

Story and video:   http://www.ktnv.com




HENDERSON (KSNV News3LV) — A small aircraft came down short of the runway at the Henderson Executive Airport Thursday afternoon.

The Cirrus SR22 came down at 3:33 p.m. in the dirt path, short of the runway.

Three people were on board at the time of the landing. No injuries were reported.

The runway will be closed until plane can be removed.

Source:  http://news3lv.com

Piper PA-24-250 Comanche, PO Vent Air Transport LLC, N6423P: Incident occurred July 28, 2016 at Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport (KLBB), Lubbock County, Texas

PO VENT AIR TRANSPORT LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6423P

Date: 28-JUL-16
Time: 16:28:00Z
Regis#: N6423P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LUBBOCK
State: Texas


AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP. LUBBOCK, TEXAS.





A main Lubbock Preston Smith International Airport runway was re-opened Thursday afternoon after a private plane landed “wheels up," prompting a brief closure and flight delays.

Airport Safety and Operations Deputy Director Steve Nicholson said operations were in full swing just after 2 p.m., after a single-engine plane met a rough landing damaging the runway in the process.

At 11:30 a.m., the aircraft traveling from El Paso to Lubbock contacted air traffic control to report landing gear problems.

When the plan landed, the landing gear reportedly collapsed upon touchdown.

The two occupants on board were uninjured, Nicholson said, and the repairs were made by airport maintenance.

Nicholson said it was a safe ending considering the landing situation.

Source:   http://lubbockonline.com

Caden Urschel: 13-year-old from Arizona pilots Cessna Citation M2



LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- If you're gonna tell 13-year-old Caden Urschel that flying is just for adults, you're a little late.

About four years too late.

Urschel is barely into the age of pimples and proms, but he already has roughly 200 hours of flight time in the cockpits of various airplanes and helicopters, thanks to his father, Scott Urschel, who is both a flight instructor and a commercial pilot.

And a new video of Caden behind the wheel of a Cessna Citation M2 jet -- his father at his side -- has gained the attention of the nation, going viral with over 18,000 views on YouTube alone.

In the video, the Chandler, Arizona, teen can be seen in the cockpit, wearing a headset and communicating with air traffic control as the jet races down the runway and he pulls the control wheel back, taking the jet into the sky. Later in the video, we see Caden guide the aircraft into a perfect landing, afterward giving his dad a high five. His father sits in the co-pilot seat and provides instruction.

"It’s a lot of fun," Caden told WDRB News by phone from an airshow in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, Thursday afternoon. "I'm just happy that I’m able to fly and have that experience – to fly with my dad."

For his part, Scott Urschel, Caden's father, says he's grateful for the time with his son as well.

"It’s pretty awesome to be able to talk your son down flying a $4 million jet down onto the runway for the first time," Scott said. "He made that landing all by himself, I just helped him with some of the speeds and the procedures."

"It's really amazing," Scott added. "Young people today -- a lot of them don’t have the opportunities that Caden do. I think that, pretty much any young person, they have such great, fine motor skills at that age. And if we expose them to aviation and aircraft…I think Caden is not any more exceptional than another 12-year-old that would have had four or five years of exposure to aviation like he has."

"Yes," Caden laughed. "Yeah, I was very surprised, because I’ve never had anything like that happen before."

Scott said he has posted a few videos of his son flying various aircraft -- but none got the attention that the video of Caden flying the Citation M2 jet did.

"For some reason, I think that the jet really had an impact in the aviation industry, and I think it just seemed so far reached for some folks that they were amazed that a 13-year-old boy could fly the airplane," Scott said.

Federal law means that Caden can't fly solo until he is 16 -- and Caden says that's just fine for now.

"I don't really feel like I'm ready yet, but I feel like I will be by the time I'm 16," he said. "I can't wait until I turn 16 to fly my solo."

"My favorite part is, when you're flying, and looking down above everything else," he added. "It just, like, gives me the feeling that I have more…there's more to see in the world. I have more freedom."

Story and video:  http://www.wdrb.com

Federal Aviation Administration safety inspectors unable to make surprise inspections

A government watchdog says U.S. safety inspectors are generally unable to conduct unannounced inspections of foreign repair stations where most airlines send their planes for major repair work


WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. safety inspectors are generally unable to conduct unannounced inspections of foreign repair stations where most airlines send their planes for major repair work, and sometimes must cancel inspections for lack of funds, according to a government watchdog.

Federal Aviation Administration inspectors are required to give countries where the repairs stations are located advance notice of their plans, and often notice to the repair stations and the country's aviation safety agency as well, according to a report released Thursday by the Government Accountability Office.

While FAA inspectors complained that they've had to cancel inspections because of the agency's tight travel budget, the GAO said it couldn't confirm the assertions because the FAA said doesn't keep separate data on travel expenditures for oversight of foreign repair stations.

Airlines typically perform routine maintenance on planes themselves, but planes are generally sent to outside repair stations for major aircraft or engine overhauls.

The report also criticized the FAA for not collecting data from airlines on the amount of work that's performed at both foreign and domestic repair stations, saying the information could significantly enhance the agency's oversight. The FAA responded that the volume of repairs to U.S. registered planes at particular repair stations doesn't reflect whether there is a safety risk.

The GAO also recommended the FAA take steps to better measure the effectiveness of its repair station oversight, which the agency agreed to do.

"Yet again, the GAO confirms that there are weaknesses and gaps in the FAA's oversight of foreign repair stations," said Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore., who requested the report. "How many watchdog reports do we need before the federal government will act to ensure that work done at low-cost foreign repair stations is up to our standards?"

The FAA oversees safety at 4,030 domestic and 716 foreign U.S.-certificated aircraft repair stations. Europe has the greatest number of foreign repair stations, 423, followed by Asia, 112; Africa, 60; Mexico and Central America, 38; South America, 34; the Middle East, 32; Australia, 12; and New Zealand, 5.

FAA regulations don't require foreign repair stations to conduct drug and alcohol testing on mechanics and other employees who work on planes at foreign repair stations, although such testing is required of employees at repair stations in the U.S.

Under an aviation law passed by Congress in 2012, the FAA must issue regulations requiring drug and alcohol testing of employees at foreign repair stations. The agency has indicated its intention to do that, but its timetable doesn't call for proposing the regulations until May 2017. It will take months, and perhaps years, before they become final. Several countries have opposed the testing requirements.

Under another aviation law passed by Congress earlier this month, the FAA is also supposed to issue regulations requiring security background checks of employees working at foreign repair stations.

Source:  http://www.usnews.com

Mooney M20J 201, N54PM, registered to and operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2016 near La Crosse Regional Airport (LSE), Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.govN54PM

Location: Holmen, WI
Accident Number: CEN16FA295
Date & Time: 07/28/2016, 1138 CDT
Registration: N54PM
Aircraft: MOONEY M20J
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 28, 2016, about 1138 central daylight time, a Mooney M20J, N54PM, impacted terrain near Holmen, Wisconsin, while being vectored for an instrument approach to runway 18 at La Crosse Regional Airport (LSE), La Crosse, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight that was operating on an instrument flight rules flight plan. Day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from Willmar Municipal Airport-John L Rice Field (BDH), Willmar, Minnesota, at 1024 and was destined for LSE.

A friend of the pilot stated that the pilot planned the flight a "few weeks" earlier. The friend reported that the pilot was going to pick him up at LSE and that they were going to fly to Appleton, Wisconsin, to buy tickets for the Oshkosh air show and then fly to Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The friend said that he received a text message from the pilot at 1013 stating that he was ready for takeoff from BDH and would be in the air in about 10 minutes. According to the friend, the flight departed at 1024. He stated that, according to Flightaware, the flight was to land at 1137.

Minneapolis Center provided radar vectors to the pilot for the final approach course for the instrument landing system (ILS) runway 18 approach and then was instructed to contact LSE Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT). The pilot contacted LSE ATCT and reported that the airplane was over Mindi (Mindi was the locator outer marker for the ILS runway 18 approach and was located 6.6 miles north of runway 18.) The pilot then asked for radar vectors for the localizer. LSE ATCT instructed the pilot to maintain 4,000 feet and to contact Minneapolis Center for radar vectors. The pilot acknowledged the instruction. There were no further radio transmissions from the pilot.

A witness near the accident site stated that he heard the airplane going very fast about 1145 or 1150. He added that the weather was "bad," it was "misting." and the clouds were lower than 700 ft above ground level. He stated that he heard the engine running but could not tell where the engine sound was coming from. The engine then "quit." After the airplane's engine quit, 3 to 4 minutes elapsed and then he heard a "boom." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 55, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/01/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/29/2015
Flight Time:  1455.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1019.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 1376.5 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

The pilot's logbook showed that his last instrument proficiency check, as specified in 14 CFR Part 61 section 57(d), which included a 1.0 hour biennial flight review, was dated September 7, 2013, and was conducted in the accident airplane. The last filled-in page of the pilot's logbook had flight entries dated from August 1 to May 31 with no year(s) entered; the previous logbook page had its last entry dated July 31, 2014. There was an endorsement at the back of the pilot's logbook for a biennial flight review that was dated November 29, 2015.

Title 14 CFR 61.57(c)(1) states that a person may act as pilot in command under IFR or weather conditions less than the minimums prescribed for VFR only if:

"Within the 6 calendar months preceding the month of the flight, that person performed and logged at least the following tasks and iterations in an airplane, powered-lift, helicopter, or airship, as appropriate, for the instrument rating privileges to be maintained in actual weather conditions, or under simulated conditions using a view-limiting device that involves having performed the following—

(i) Six instrument approaches.

(ii) Holding procedures and tasks.

(iii) Intercepting and tracking courses through the use of navigational electronic systems."

Title 14 CFR 61.57(d) states that "a person who has failed to meet the instrument experience requirements of paragraph (c) for more than six calendar months may reestablish instrument currency only by completing an instrument proficiency check. The instrument proficiency check must consist of the areas of operation and instrument tasks required in the instrument rating practical test standards."

According to the Federal Aviation Administration publication, "Instrument Proficiency Check (IPC) Guidance," regulations for the biennial flight review require a minimum of 1 hour of ground training and 1 hour of flight training. The publication states that, while Part 61.57(d) does not stipulate a minimum time requirement for the IPC, a good rule of thumb is to plan at least 90 minutes of ground time and at least 2 hours of flight time for a solid evaluation of the pilot's instrument flying knowledge and skills. The publication further states that, depending on the pilot's level of instrument experience and currency, the instructor administering the IPC may want to plan on two or more separate sessions to complete an IPC. For pilots with little or no recent instrument flying experience, it is a good idea to schedule an initial session in an appropriate aircraft training device.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MOONEY
Registration: N54PM
Model/Series: M20J
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1988
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 24-1677
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/04/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2740 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3294 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Textron Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-A3B6D
Registered Owner: Pilot
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LSE, 656 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 20°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 19°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 360°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.94 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Willmar, MN (BDH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: La Crosse, WI (LSE)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1024 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: La Crosse Regional Airport (LSE)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 656 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: ILS
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 43.978889, 91.213611 

The accident site was located about 5.6 miles north/northeast of runway 18 at LSE at an elevation of 805 ft msl. The wreckage path was about 800 ft in length and oriented on a north/south heading in a grass/corn field. The fuselage, wings, empennage, control surfaces, engine, and propeller were present along the wreckage path. At the northern edge of the wreckage path about a 35-ft-long by 6- to 10-ft-wide area of corn stalks were cut at an angle of about 45°, sloping down toward the east. The southern edge of the wreckage path contained the engine, which was separated from the airframe. The fuselage was located about 80 ft south of the cut corn stalks and was upright. The left and right wings were located about 6 ft north and 45 ft east of the fuselage, respectively. There was no evidence of soot or fire on the airframe, engine, or terrain.

Examination of the flight controls confirmed flight control continuity from the wing and empennage control surfaces to the cockpit controls through separations of the control system that were consistent with overload. The wing flaps were in the 0° position.

The base of the propeller hub was attached to the engine crankshaft with all the attachment bolts in place. The upper portion of the propeller hub was broken off, and its pieces were located along the wreckage path. The hub fracture surfaces exhibited 45° granular fracture faces consistent with overstress. Both propeller blades were separated from the hub. One propeller blade was buried near corn stalks near the northern edge of the wreckage path, and the other propeller blade was located about 35 ft from the corn stalks. Both propeller blades exhibited leading edge damage and chordwise scratching consistent with propeller rotation/engine power at impact.

The instrument panel was located about 37 ft south from the fuselage. The flight instruments were separated from the panel and were located along the wreckage path. The attitude indicator, which was vacuum driven, was broken apart exposing the gyro casing and gimbals. The gyro was separated from the casing and was not found during recovery of the airplane wreckage. The gyro casing showed circumferential smearing/scoring and was attached to the pitch and roll gimbals.

The engine-driven vacuum pump was attached to the engine accessory section. Removal of the vacuum pump showed that the vacuum pump's drive teeth were intact, but the drive was separated from its opaque plastic coupling, with separation features consistent with torsional overstress. The coupling exhibited counterclockwise witness marks (the drive rotates counterclockwise during engine operation as viewed from the rear of the engine).

The engine did not exhibit any mechanical anomalies that would have precluded engine operation.

Medical And Pathological Information

An autopsy was not performed, and no toxicology samples were available for testing. During the pilot's most recent aviation medical exam, no concerns were reported by the pilot and no significant issues were identified by the aviation medical examiner.


Loren Larson, who died in a crash July 28, 2016, stands by the Mooney M20J 201 he flew in an undated photograph from his Facebook page.




KERKHOVEN — The propeller was spinning and the plane's engine was running when an experienced pilot from Kerkhoven crashed his single-engine aircraft on July 28, 2016, into a cornfield northeast of the La Crosse, Wisconsin, airport. 

That's based on the analysis of wreckage found at the crash site where pilot Loren Larson, 55, of Kerkhoven, died, according to the final factual report on the accident by the National Transportation Safety Board.

It determined that "loss of control in flight'' was the defining event that caused the crash. The NTSB released its report Jan. 30 after a nearly 1½-year investigation.

Family members have been "watching and waiting'' for the report, Lynn Larson, brother of the victim, told the West Central Tribune. The determination of "loss of control in flight'' left him perplexed. His brother had over 20 years of experience as a pilot, he said.

Loren Larson had departed solo from the Willmar Municipal Airport in a rented Mooney airplane at 10:24 a.m. CDT. He was planning to land in La Crosse to pick up a friend. They were to fly to Appleton, Wisconsin, to buy tickets and then fly to the Oshkosh air show.

Due to cloud cover, Larson was going to make an instrument approach at the La Crosse airport. Instead, his plane impacted a cornfield at 11:38 a.m. CDT, about 5.6 miles northeast of the runway at the La Crosse Airport.

A witness told investigators that the weather was "bad,'' according to the accident report. It was misting at the time and clouds were lower than 700 feet above ground level.

The witness heard the plane's engine running, but could not tell where the sound was coming from. "The engine then quit." After the airplane's engine quit, three to four minutes elapsed and then he heard a boom,'' stated the report.

Larson had made radio contact with the La Crosse Regional Airport and had requested vector coordinates to make an instrument approach.

A transcript of the radio transmissions between the pilot and controllers indicates that an air traffic controller in La Crosse had instructed Larson to maintain his altitude at 4,000 feet. He provided Larson with the radio frequency to the Minneapolis Air Route Traffic Control Center. The Minneapolis Center had the plane on radar and was to provide the vector coordinates to Larson for the approach to Runway 18 at La Crosse.

Larson confirmed the radio frequency for contacting Minneapolis with the La Crosse Airport controller. He did not repeat the controller's order to maintain a 4,000-foot altitude.

Larson's radio transmission confirming the radio frequency was recorded at 16:38:23 Universal Time Coordinated, or moments before the crash is believed to have occurred.

Radio transmissions continued between the La Crosse and Minneapolis controllers, who were not aware of the crash until an emergency locator signal was received.

The Minneapolis Center told La Crosse that it had cleared Larson for the approach, but had not heard back from him. " ... We asked him if he had any issues. He said no. So I was just wondering if he had said anything to you about having any issues,'' stated the Minneapolis controller to La Crosse.

Repeated attempts by the La Crosse controller to contact Larson following this exchange did not produce a response.

The accident report indicated that Larson had previous training for making an instrument approach, but it was dated. The report stated that he should have completed a proficiency check within the previous six months of the flight, but had not.

An 800-foot-long wreckage path, running north and south, was found at the accident site. At the northern edge of the wreckage path, an area of corn stalks — measuring about 35 feet long and 6 to 10 feet wide — was cut an an angle of about 45 degrees, sloping to the east.

There was no evidence of soot or fire on the airframe, engine or terrain. The left and right wings were located away from the plane's body. The wing flaps were in the 0-degree position.

Damage to the propellers was consistent with rotation and engine power at impact, the report stated. The engine did not exhibit any mechanical anomalies that would have precluded engine operation, according to the report.

The plane's instrument panel was located about 37 feet from the fuselage. The attitude indicator was broken apart and its gyro was not found.

An autopsy was not performed and no toxicology samples were available for testing. Larson's most recent aviation medical exam had found no health concerns.

http://www.wctrib.com

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA295
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 28, 2016 in Holmen, WI
Aircraft: MOONEY M20P, registration: N54PM
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2016, about 1138 central daylight time, a Mooney M20P, N54PM, impacted terrain near Holmen, Wisconsin during an instrument landing system approach runway 18 at La Crosse Regional Airport (LSE), La Crosse, Wisconsin. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. The commercial instrument rated pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was on an instrument flight rules flight plan. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed about the time of the accident. The flight originated from Willmar Municipal Airport-John L Rice Field (BDH), Willmar, Minnesota and was destined to LSE.




KERKHOVEN - A flying enthusiast from Kerkhoven known for his good humor and love for friends has died in a plane crash in Lac Crosse County, Wisconsin.

Loren Larson, 56, of Kerkhoven, died Thursday when the Mooney M-20 plane he was flying crashed in a cornfield in the northern portion of the county, according to information released by the Lac Crosse County Sheriff’s Department.

The crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board.

He was the only person aboard the plane at the time of the crash.

The Minneapolis Air Traffic Control alerted authorities in La Crosse of a missing plane at 12:13 p.m. Thursday, according to the La Crosse Tribune. The paper reported the plane’s flight log indicated at 11:37 a.m. the plane was flying 181 mph at 4,700 feet, and then dropped 1,200 feet in 2 minutes.

Larson was planning to land at the airport in La Crosse to pick up a friend.

They were headed for the Appleton International Airport in Appleton, Wisconsin, to attend the Experimental Aircraft Aviation airshow in Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

Larson had more than 20 years of experience as a pilot, according to his brother and sister-in-law, Lynn and Shellie Larson of DeGraf.

Shellie said Larson had a passion for flying.

He kept a hangar at the Willmar Airport, and is well known in the area’s flying community.

A graduate of the Belgrade-Brooten-Elrosa High School, Larson has been a long-time resident of Kerkhoven and well known in the community as well. He worked for the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad for the past 36 or 37 years, in recent years as a foreman, according to the family members.

Larson never married, but enjoyed time with his nieces and nephews and family members, as well as his many friends, said Shellie.

Along with flying, he enjoyed hunting and fishing and just having fun with others. “He was bubbly all the time,’’ she said.

Funeral services are pending with the Zniewski Funeral Home in Benson. Survivors include his mother, Laura Larson of Kerkhoven, and his brother and sister-in-law, Lynn and Shellie Larson.


Source:  http://www.wctrib.com







Federal investigators will lead the probe into a plane crash in La Crosse County that has killed a Minnesota pilot.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will try to figure out why the aircraft 56-year-old Loren Larson of Kerkhoven, Minn., was flying crashed into a field outside of Holmen, Wis., Thursday.

The plane was reported missing around noon Thursday, when it failed to make an intended landing at the La Crosse Regional Airport.

The wreckage was found later that evening and Larson's body was found nearby.

This is the first flying-related death in La Crosse County since 2008, when three men died aboard a medical helicopter that crashed in Medary, Wis.

The NTSB also investigated an accident in Caledonia, Minn., three years ago, when a plane crashed while apparently trying to land at an airport, killing three of the four men aboard.

Around 8 a.m. Thursday, another plane crashed in a field near the Fond du Lac, Wis., airport. The single-engine aircraft bounced a couple times and then cartwheeled according to witnesses. 

Its 78-year-old pilot and 71-year-old passengers were both critically injured.

EARLIER REPORT:

HOLMEN, Wis. -- Searchers in La Crosse County have found the wreckage of a plane near Holmen, and they also report finding the body of the plane's pilot nearby. 

A plane had been reported missing around noon, and the wreck was discovered late in the day, close to County Highway D. 

The sheriff's office says the missing plane had been scheduled to land in La Crosse on the way to Appleton.

Reports had come in about people who saw planes flying low to the ground in the afternoon.

The National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the crash.

About three dozen people searched a 4-square-mile wooded area until it was found.

A signal from the pilot's cell phone was used to help locate the plane.

Source:  http://www.1410wizm.com







STEVENSTOWN — A single-engine airplane bound for the La Crosse Regional Airport crashed today near Stevenstown in northern La Crosse County. The plane's pilot was not found in the wreckage, but authorities found a body nearby.

Emergency authorities are at the scene on Hwy. D, south of Stevenstown.

Minneapolis air traffic controllers alerted La Crosse County authorities at 12:15 p.m. today that a single-engine aircraft, which is registered in Minnesota, had fallen off radar. The pilot, believed to be the only person on board, was planning a scheduled stop in La Crosse, according to La Crosse County Sheriff Chief Deputy Jeff Wolf.

About 1:45 p.m., authorities were able to get information from a cellphone aboard the plane that showed it was located near Stevenstown.

Crews at 4:15 p.m. began a line search from Hwy. V to William Severson Road. They found the plane about 6:15 p.m. The Civil Air Patrol’s La Crosse squadron is assisting with the search.

It’s believed the pilot left a Twin Cities airport, with a planned stop in La Crosse before heading to Appleton, Wis. The pilot did not report any problems before the plane disappeared from radar, according to authorities.

Authorities have set up a command post at Lewis Valley Church in Stevenstown. Assisting with the search were Farmington and Holmen first responders, the La Crosse County Sheriff’s Department, the Wisconsin State Patrol and Tri-State Ambulance Service.

Source:  http://lacrossetribune.com






STEVENSTOWN — Authorities are searching northern La Crosse County for a missing airplane that was bound for the La Crosse Regional Airport.

Minneapolis air traffic controllers alerted La Crosse County authorities at 12:15 p.m. today that a single-engine aircraft, which is registered in Minnesota, had fallen off radar. 

The pilot, who is believed to be the only person on board, was planning a scheduled stop in La Crosse, according to La Crosse County Sheriff Chief Deputy Jeff Wolf.

At about 1:45 p.m., authorities were able to get information from a cellphone aboard the plane that showed it was located near Stevenstown.

Crews at 4:15 p.m. began a line search from Hwy. V to William Severson Road.  The Civil Air Patrol’s La Crosse squadron is assisting with the search.

It’s believed the pilot left a Twin Cities airport, with a planned stop in La Crosse before heading to Appleton, Wisconsin. 

The pilot did not report any problems before the plane disappeared from radar, according to authorities.

Authorities have set up a command post at Lewis Valley Church in Stevenstown. 

Assisting with the search are Farmington and Holmen first responders, the La Crosse County Sheriff’s Department, the Wisconsin State Patrol and Tri-State Ambulance Service.

The most recent aviation crash in La Crosse County was May 10, 2008, when a medical helicopter crashed into a bluff side, killing all three people aboard, according to the National Transportation Safety Board’s accident database. The last crash in the Coulee Region was in August 2014, when a helicopter went down while dusting crops near Tomah, injuring the pilot.

Source:  http://lacrossetribune.com

LA CROSSE CO., Wis. (WKBT) -  Authorities searching for a missing plane in northern La Crosse Co. have located the wreckage.

The plane was found near the area of County Hwy. D and Anderson Rd., northeast of Holmen.

La Crosse Co. Sheriff's Dept. Chief Deputy Jeff Wolf tells News 8 that only the male pilot was believed to be on board the single-engine plane.

Wolf also says a body was found outside of the wreckage, which is believed to be the pilot.

Previous Story:

Officials say they received a cell phone ping from the missing airplane at approximately 1:45 P.M. pinpointing it to the Farmington area.

A ground search is in progress with the Civil Air Patrol surrounding a designated 4 mile radius.

There has been no contact with the pilot or the passenger.

It is believed the airplane was heading to the Appleton airport with a stop in La Crosse.

Previous Story:

La Crosse County Sheriff's Department is searching for an airplane that went missing Thursday afternoon.

Officials are looking for the overdue single engine plane by the Lewis Valley Lutheran Church along County T near Holmen.

There is believed to be one occupant in the plane.

Source:  http://www.news8000.com

Flight Design CTLS, N527TS: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2016 at Fond du Lac County Airport (KFLD), Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/527TS

Location: Fond du Lac, WI
Accident Number: CEN16FA290
Date & Time: 07/28/2016, 0821 CDT
Registration: N527TS
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTLS
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel contamination
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 28, 2016, about 0821 central daylight time, a Flight Design GMBH model CTLS airplane, N527TS, impacted terrain following a loss of engine power after takeoff. The pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Fond du Lac County Airport (FLD), Fond du Lac, Wisconsin at the time of the accident and its destination was not determined.

Witnesses reported seeing the airplane take off to the north and turn left, towards the airport, while still over airport property. They added that the engine sounded abnormal. The airplane did not climb above treetop height before it rolled into a steep left turn and descended into terrain. An additional witness did not see the accident occur, but heard the pilot on the radio state he was making an immediate return to the airport.

Pilot

No pilot logbooks were located during the investigation and the pilot's time in the make and model of the accident airplane could not be determined. The pilot reported 110 total hours on his last application for medical certificate dated April 15, 2002. The pilot did not hold a current FAA medical certificate; however, he was operating the airplane under the Sport Pilot Medical rule.

Pilot-Rated Passenger

No pilot logbooks belonging to the pilot-rated passenger were located during the investigation. The pilot-rated passenger reported 2,136 total hours on his last application for medical certificate dated July 15, 1996.

AIRCRAFT DESCRIPTION

A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed a 200 hr Carburetor Service Requirement per SI-912-021, Inspections of Carburetors, was complied with on December 9, 2014. According to the records the Hobbs meter read 829.5 hrs at the time of the inspection.

WRECKAGE DESCRIPTION

During impact, both wings separated from the fuselage and the engine intruded into the cockpit area. Flight control continuity to the elevator and rudder was verified continuous from the cockpit to each control surface. Flight control continuity was interrupted to both wings, but all observed breaks in continuity were consistent with overload failure during impact. A slight fuel smell was present at the accident scene. Both the left and right fuel tanks were compromised. Several ounces of liquid consistent with aviation fuel were recovered from the right-wing fuel tank, which appeared light blue in color and free of contaminants. The three composite propeller blades were broken and had separated near the propeller hub. The blade sections that were observed were absent chord wise scratches or leading-edge damage. The engine was removed from the wreckage and examined separately at a secure location.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The pilot died on August 9, 2016. An autopsy was authorized and conducted on the pilot by the Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner's Office. The cause of death was attributed to multiple injuries sustained in an airplane accident. Forensic toxicology was not performed.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Engine examination.

The engine was examined on August 17, 2016, in the presence of the NTSB Investigator in Charge. When examined, the engine remained attached to the engine mount.. The exhaust system was damaged and the muffler was not attached to the engine. No anomalies were noted of the ignition system. The fuel pump was removed and hand actuated. Liquid consistent in smell and color to aviation fuel was contained within the pump and squirted out when the pump was actuated. The oil cooler was detached and impact damaged. The engine was equipped with a non-approved aftermarket oil filter. The filter was cut open and inspected for ferrous material; no anomalies were noted. No anomalies were noted with the cylinders and cylinder heads. The engine was hand rotated; continuity was verified and no anomalies were noted. The radiator was impact damaged. The air filtration system was not available for examination.

The engine was equipped with two carburetors; one carburetor fed the number 1 and 3 cylinder, while the second carburetor fed the number 2 and 4 cylinders.

The 1/3-cylinder carburetor float bowl was removed. Flaking was noted on the floats and unidentified contamination, along with corrosion on the bottom of the float bowl. The main jet was clear of obstructions. No fuel was found within the carburetor.

The 2/4-cylinder carburetor float bowl was removed. Flaking was noted on the floats and contamination and corrosion on the bottom of the float bowl. The main jet was clear and no fuel was found within the carburetor. The piston slide was stuck on the carburetor chamber top. The piston was removed from the chamber top. An unknown substance was present that prevented the piston from sliding up and down within its respective bore. The piston slide was stuck in the idle position. Both carburetors were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for further examination.

Carburetor examination.

The NTSB's laboratory removed the float bowls from each of the carburetors. Two black floats were present in each bowl, and all four floats moved freely on their respective posts. The floats were removed from the bowls and labeled by carburetor number and position relative to the side of the carburetor with the control lever. Next, each float was weighed and subsequently submerged for 12 hours in a covered container of automobile gasoline. After soaking, the floats were removed from the gasoline and then weighed again after the soak. Each float had a total weight gain of less than 1%. Additionally, the sum of the weights for the two floats from each carburetor was 5.668 grams and 5.674 grams for the 1/3 carburetor and the 2/4 carburetor, respectively. The maximum allowable combined weight for carburetor floats in each carburetor is 7 grams per the BRP-Powertrain Maintenance Manual for the Rotax 912-series engines.

The interior surfaces of the bowls had black areas along with areas of white film and other accumulations of white and yellow corrosion products. The black areas were mostly circular in shape and located on the lower surfaces of the bowls.

A white film was present in many areas, particularly on the lower surface and side of the bowl for carburetor 1/3. Isolated areas with thicker accumulations of white material was observed in some areas. When disturbed with tweezers, the accumulation had a powdery consistency, and the underlying surface of the bowl was black.

Some areas had an accumulation of yellow material. When disturbed with tweezers, the formation largely maintained its shape, but was easily broken into smaller crystalline chunks when pressure was applied. The surface under the yellow accumulation was also colored black.

Samples of the white and yellow accumulations were removed from the surface and placed onto carbon tape stuck to an aluminum stub to facilitate a compositional analysis using energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Both samples had large peaks of zinc and oxygen consistent with oxides associated with the cast zinc bowl. Both samples also showed smaller peaks of sulfur and lead. The yellow sample and areas of the white sample also showed a peak of aluminum. Additionally, the yellow sample showed peaks of iron and potassium and a higher peak of carbon. Some areas of the yellow sample also showed a peak of silicon.

During the examination, the plunger from the 2/4 carburetor was reinserted into the 2/4 carburetor, and the springs and covers were put into place on their respective carburetors, and subsequently, the plungers were moved up and down. It was noted that the plunger from the 1/3 carburetor moved relatively easily while the plunger from the 2/4 carburetor had a tendency to stick. The plungers were removed from the carburetors with the housings and were manipulated again. The plunger from the 2/4 carburetor tended to stick compared to the plunger in the 1/3 carburetor.

The plungers were removed from the covers again, and accumulations of white material of varying thickness were present within the interior surface.

The surface of the plunger shaft housing on the 1/3 carburetor cover also had white material on the surface, but the material appeared to be more evenly distributed around the housing surface.

A sample of the white material from the plunger shaft housing from the 2/4 carburetor cover was removed and examined using EDS. The resulting spectrum showed high peaks of aluminum and oxygen, consistent with oxidation from the carburetor cover, which was made of an aluminum alloy.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Rotax Aircraft Engines issued Service Instruction (SI)-912-021 on November 9, 2009. The following was extracted from that SI:

1.5) Compliance

- After engine installation/initial operation/return to service of an engine.

- When engine is running rough.

- And/or at the next scheduled maintenance event of carburetor (see Maintenance Manual for engine type 912/914 Series, current issue).

WARNING: Non-compliance with these instructions could result in engine damages, personal injuries or death.

3.1) General

Several carburetors have been found with contamination (dirt, remains of rubber from fuel lines and Loctite, resin-like substance, sediments etc.) in the float chamber.

WARNING: This contamination could possibly cause a partial or complete blockage of the idle or main jet or of other ducts vital for operation, leading to poor performance or stoppage of engine.

3.1.1) Possible shortcomings in the fuel system

- Dirt in the fuel system

- Missing or unsuitable fuel filter

- Clogged fuel filter

- Unsuitable fuel lines

- Dirt in fuel manifold

- Poor float chamber venting

- Insufficient flushing of the fuel system prior to initial engine operation

- Fuel pressure too low or too high

- Unsuitable fuel tanks and tank coatings

- Contaminated float chambers (e.g. corrosion caused by high water content in the fuel)

3.1.2) Fuel

Use only quality fuel as specified.

- EN 228 regular, EN 228 premium, EN 228 Super plus or AVGAS 100LL.

NOTE: The exact defined minimum requirements for fuel are specified in the relevant operators manual (for the relevant engine type) and the Service Instructions SI-912-016/SI-914-019 and SI-2ST-008 „Selection of suitable operating fluids", current issue.

The Rotax 912ULS engine maintenance manual specifies removal/assembly of both carburetors every 200 hours. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 78, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/15/2002
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 110 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/15/1996
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: 2136 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH
Registration: N527TS
Model/Series: CTLS
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2008
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: 08-02-04
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/24/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 135 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 960 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: ROTAX
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 912ULS
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLD, 807 ft msl
Observation Time: 1321 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 188°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1700 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 17°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 60°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: Fond du Lac, WI (FLD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination:
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0820 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: FOND DU LAC COUNTY (FLD)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5941 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  43.780000, -88.488889

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA290
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 28, 2016 in Fond du Lac, WI
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTLS, registration: N527TS
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 28, 2016, about 0821 central daylight time, a Flight Design GMBH model CTLS airplane, N527TS, impacted terrain while returning to land after initial takeoff. The pilot and single passenger were seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to, and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site about the time of the accident, and the flight was operated without a flight plan. The flight originated from Fond du Lac County Airport (FLD), Fond du Lac, Wisconsin at the time of the accident and its destination was not determined.

Witnesses reported seeing the airplane takeoff to the north and start a left turn back to the airport. They stated the engine sounded abnormal and the airplane did not climb above treetop height before it rolled into a steep left turn and descended into terrain. An additional witness did not see the accident occur, but said they heard the pilot on the radio state he was making an immediate return to the airport.

During the impact both wings separated from the fuselage and the engine intruded into the cockpit area. Flight control continuity to the elevator and rudder was verified continuous from the cockpit to each control surface. Flight control continuity was interrupted to both wings, but all observed breaks in continuity were consistent with failure in overload during impact. Some fuel smell was present at the accident scene, but both the left and right fuel tanks were compromised. Several ounces of fuel were recovered from the right wing tank, which appeared light blue in color and free of contaminants. The three composite propeller blades were separated from the propeller hub. The blade sections that were observed were absent chord wise scratches or leading edge damage. The engine and wreckage were recovered to a secure storage location and retained for further examination.




SANTA FE – Two Santa Fe men injured in the crash of their lightweight plane in Wisconsin were still listed in critical condition on Friday.

The men have been identified as David D. Spencer, 78, who owned and piloted the plane that crashed after take-off on Thursday, and his passenger Rafael J. Chavez, 71.

Sgt. Paul Rottscholl of the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office said Friday the plane appeared to lose power soon after taking off from the Fond du Lac County Airport about 8:20 a.m. Thursday. “It appeared as if the pilot was attempting to turn around and land back at the airstrip, but it didn’t make it and crashed into an open field,” he said.

Rottscholl said the crash was witnessed by employees of a nearby medical clinic. “A couple of nurses and doctors and a trauma surgeon ran over to the crash site and stated attending to the passenger, who was sitting outside the plane semiconscious,” he said.

The pilot was still inside the aircraft but pinned under the engine and also semiconscious when Rottscholl arrived a few minutes after the crash. “Myself and the firefighters there made the decision to pick up the plane to get him free, and we were able to do that,” he said.

Spencer and Chavez were separately transported by medical helicopter to ThedaCare Regional Medical Center in Neenah, Wis.

Cameron Humphres, manager of the Santa Fe Municipal Airport, confirmed the plane — a two-seat, fixed wing CTLS model manufactured in 2008 by Flight Design  —was registered there. He said pilots flying under visual flight rules aren’t required to file a flight plan, but it is believed the plane left Santa Fe last Saturday morning.

Spencer and Chavez were likely in Wisconsin to attend AirVenture, a week-long convention of the Experimental Aircraft Association held at Whittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh, Wis. that according to its website attracts about 500,000 people and 10,000 airplanes each year. Sgt. Rottscholl and said many people attending that event use the Fond du Lac airport due to the overflow.

New Mexico Lt. Gov. John Sanchez, staff members with the Department of Transportation’s Aviation Division, and representatives from some of the state’s economic development organizations attended the EAA AirVenture this week. “Our state is in a prime position to benefit from the growing demands of the global market, and this is one of the best venues to showcase all we have to offer the aerospace, aviation, and defense industries,” Sanchez said in a news release earlier this week.




FOND DU LAC COUNTY (WLUK) -- Two men are in critical condition after their plane crashed Thursday morning at The Fond du Lac County Airport.

The plane crashed at an airport that's especially busy this time of year, because of EAA AirVenture up the road in Oshkosh.

Investigators say the plane had taken off, but had to turn back because of mechanical issues.

Investigators combed through the field at the northwest corner of the Fond du Lac County Airport, looking for clues as to why a small white plane crashed early Thursday morning.

"The witnesses said they saw it coming down. And said it made an abrupt turn. They thought it was going to be turning to get to the runway, and then it hit the ground," said Rick Olig, Fond du Lac County Sheriff's Office Captain.

Two people were on board. They've been identified as 78-year-old David Spencer and 71-year-old Rafael Chaves. Both men are from Santa Fe, New Mexico.

"When our medical people got to the scene, we began to treat those people, and they were both injured severely," said Peter O'Leary, Fond du Lac Fire Chief.

Flight for Life and ThedaStar helicopters transported the two men to ThedaCare Regional Medical Center-Neenah.

According to The Federal Aviation Administration, the light sport aircraft took off from the Fond du Lac airport, but the pilot soon asked to return. The plane had clearance to land, but crashed about a half-mile short of the runway.

"We do have quite a few witnesses that actually saw it prior to, and actually saw the crash. The preliminary indications are that the engine was functioning at the time of the crash. They didn't hear anything that appeared to be out of the ordinary," said Olig.

Investigators say The Fond du Lac County Airport is very busy this time of year, handling numerous flights to and from EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh.

"The number of planes that come in and out of here everyday, during EAA is significant. And significant enough the FAA wants to have a staffed tower here," said O'Leary.

The airport was closed for about an hour Thursday morning.

The FAA says its investigation will take about three weeks to complete.

It is unknown whether the men were attending EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh.

Story and video:   http://fox11online.com



FOND DU LAC, Wis.-- - The victims of Thursday morning's plane crash at the Fond du Lac County Airport have been identified. They are 78 year old David Spencer and 71 year old Rafael Chaves, both from Santa Fe, New Mexico. The victims suffered serious injuries and are in ThedaCare Regional Medical Center in Neenah for treatment.

Original Story:

A plane has crashed at the Fond du Lac County Airport. 

The Fond du Lac County Sheriff's office says that two men are critically injured and were flown to a hospital.

Witnesses say the plane was flying low, and it appeared as if it was going to land. That's when the plane banked abruptly and crashed.

Fond du Lac County Fire and Rescue chief Peter O'Leary says crews are responding. 

The FAA is investigating the crash. 

The airport was closed during rescue operations but has since opened up.

Source:   http://www.wtmj.com



FOND DU LAC - A single-engine plane crashed about 8:20 a.m Thursday in the northwest corner of the Fond du Lac County Airport. White smoke burst from the engine as firefighters and an ambulance arrived on scene.

Two men, about the age of 60, were seriously injured and transported separately by Flight for Life and ThedaStar to ThedaCare Regional Medical Center- Neenah, said Rick Olig, captain of operations for the Fond du Lac County Sheriff's Office.

Witnesses of the crash say the plane was flying low and appeared as if it was going to land, Olig said. The plane banked abruptly and crashed.

The crash area was on an open field several hundred yards from the north/south runway.

The two-seat, fixed-wing plane is a model CTLS manufactured by Flight Design, based in Germany, and was last registered in Santa Fe, New Mexico, according to the Aircraft Lookup app.

The Fond du Lac County Airport reopened about 10 a.m., said John Wehner, manager of the Fond du Lac County Airport. This is the first crash at the airport since the 1990s, Wehner said.

Since Sunday, the county airport has been busy as flyers arrive for the EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh. Wehner estimated that the airport would handle 5,000 flights from July 24 to 31, which is 625 flight operations a day. Normally the airport has about 150 daily operation flights, he said.

The sheriff's office is working with federal agencies to determine the cause of the crash.

Story and video: http://www.fdlreporter.com






FOND DU LAC COUNTY, Wis. (WBAY) – Two people were airlifted from the scene of a plane crash at Fond du Lac County Airport, according to Fond du Lac Fire/Rescue.

Officials tell Action 2 News the small, single engine plane crashed west of the runway in a field at about 8:21 Thursday morning.

The Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office says witnesses reported the plane was low and it appeared as if it was going to land.

“The plane banked abruptly and crashed,” according to a Sheriff’s Office statement.

Two men believed to be in their 60s or older suffered critical injuries and were airlifted to a local hospital.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Fond du Lac Fire/Rescue, Town of Fond du Lac Fire, the Sheriff’s Office, Flight for Life, Theda Star, and the FAA responded to the crash scene.

Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office is working with federal agencies to determine what may have caused the crash.  The airport was closed while rescue operations were ongoing, but has since opened up for normal operations.

Source:  http://wbay.com






Two men were injured when a small plane crashed at Fond du Lac County Airport.

The crash happened Thursday morning. The Fond du Lac Action Reporter says white smoke burst from the engine as an ambulance arrived.

Fond du Lac Sheriff's Office captain of operations Rick Olig says the victims were men. He described their injuries as critical. Both were flown to the hospital.

Fond du Lac fire Chief Peter O'Leary says the single engine aircraft crashed on the northwest corner of the airport property, several hundred yards west of a runway.

Olig says witnesses told authorities the plane was flying low and appeared as if it was going to land when it abruptly banked and crashed.