Monday, June 10, 2013

Royal Canadian Mounted Police constable convicted of dangerous operation of an aircraft, fined $2,000 and banned from flying an aircraft for two years


 
RCMP Const. Jean-Michel Sauve’s aircraft came very close to this vehicle as he buzzed people gathered on Fish Lake last January. 
Photo courtesy DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE



An RCMP constable has been convicted of the dangerous operation of an aircraft, fined $2,000 and banned from flying an aircraft for two years.

Jean-Michel Sauve was sentenced this morning in Yukon territorial court.

Sauve was off-duty on Jan. 11, 2013 when he flew his single-engine Tundra aircraft over the Fulda extreme challenge event being held on Fish Lake, “buzzing” the ground and causing the left wing to strike an empty parked vehicle.

Damage to the plane was so severe, investigators for Transport Canada were amazed the wing did not fall off, the court heard.

The 38-year-old has been a licensed private pilot for 14 years and spent 10 years with the RCMP in the North.

He currently works for the Yukon RCMP’s traffic services division, and does not fly for the police.

Sauve’s lawyer, Nic Weigelt, had been seeking a conditional discharge as opposed to a conviction, arguing that would send the appropriate public message but avoid a possible career-ending record.

In her decision this morning, Judge Karen Ruddy said she had ample evidence of Sauve’s good character and long history of work within the community.

Ruddy repeatedly said how difficult of a decision this was for her, pointing to multiple positive letters of reference that have been received by the court.

She acknowledged that there will be consequences to Sauve’s employment, but said it was difficult to know exactly what those consequences would be.

The judge said she was only told the consequences do include the possibility of termination.

While Ruddy recognized a conditional discharge would be in the best interest of Sauve, the same could not be said about the best interest of the public, she said.

It is important to maintain the public’s confidence in the justice system, the judge said.

She ruled in this case the offence was not trifling nor inconsequential.

Ruddy pointed out that Sauve flew the plane close to people three times, including once when the video shows people feeling the need to duck.

During a sentencing hearing in May, Ruddy was presented with footage seized from a camera mounted on the airplane. She also saw a video recorded from the ground.

After leaving the Whitehorse airport at 3:42 p.m. last Jan. 11, Sauve and a friend flew to Fish Lake.

The unnamed friend, who is also a private pilot, took the controls for the first pass over the lake.

Sauve was piloting the aircraft for three more passes.

For Sauve’s first pass, the aircraft was travelling 198 kilometres per hour (123 miles per hour) at 29 feet above the frozen lake, the court heard.

On his second pass, he was travelling 206 km/h (128 mph) at 36 feet above the lake.

On the third pass, Sauve was travelling 200 km/h (124 mph) at 34 feet above the lake.

It was at that point that the wing struck the unoccupied Chevrolet Equinox, causing about $9,000 worth of damage.

The plane was flown back to the Whitehorse airport, where it landed at around 4 p.m.

In court today, Ruddy said the officer was fortunate his actions did not result in the death of a person on the ground, himself, or his passenger.

Ruddy said she had some concerns that Sauve did not appreciate the seriousness of his conduct and had tried to minimize the events to investigating officers.

Last month, the Crown prosecutor told the judge Sauve did not report the accident to the air traffic control tower, to Transport Canada nor the Transportation Safety Board, though he did record the collision in the aircraft log book.

Sauve’s lawyer told the court his client believed the matter had been reported by the Fulda representative.

Sauve also told investigators that the event was “no big deal” involving “only property damage,” Ruddy said today.

Prosecutors had been seeking a $4,000 fine, but Ruddy settled on $2,000.

Ruddy said she was mindful of what Sauve is already paying.

These include $40,000 damage to his aircraft, a potential of $50,000 in fines to Transport Canada, and the $9,800 to Driving Force, the rental company, for repairs to the vehicle, $1,500 of which has already been paid, Weigelt said in May.

Along with the $2,000 fine, Sauve has been ordered to pay a $300 surcharge and $8,039 to Driving Force.

He has been prohibited from operating an aircraft for two years, and given one year to pay the fine.

“I appreciate this is not the news you wanted to hear today,” Ruddy told Sauve after giving her decision, adding that she had taken a lot of time to think about it.

In a statement after court, Sauve said: “I have always accepted full responsibility for my actions, fully co-operated with the investigation  and I feel truly sorry it happened, but now is the time to get on with making it right.”

When the RCMP spoke to the Star last month, Const. Christine Grant said there is an ongoing internal disciplinary review of Sauve’s conduct.

He remains on duty but was assigned to an administration desk after he was charged.

He remains on administrative duties pending the outcome of the review, which will take into consideration the court proceedings and the decision of the court, Grant said. 


Story and Comments/Reaction:   http://www.whitehorsestar.com

AirAsia and All Nippon Airways Clash Over Japan Budget Airline: WSJ

Updated June 10, 2013, 8:39 a.m. ET

By GAURAV RAGHUVANSHI And YOSHIO TAKAHASHI

The Wall Street Journal


KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia—Management tension is threatening to derail a budget-airline venture between AirAsia Bhd. and the parent company of All Nippon Airways, indicating the challenges of operating a carrier in Japan.

The AirAsia Japan venture between AirAsia and ANA Holdings Inc. has been unprofitable since it started flying in August, underscoring the difficulty of getting a low-cost airline off the ground in Japan, where landing and ground-handling fees are among the highest in the world. AirAsia Japan, based at Tokyo's Narita airport, competes with ANA cut-price airline Peach Aviation Co.

"We are looking for the best ways for the future growth of AirAsia Japan, and that includes the possible dissolution" of the venture, an ANA spokesman said.

ANA and AirAsia chief Tony Fernandes said there were no immediate plans to end the partnership, however, responding to a Nikkei newspaper report that they were set to dissolve the venture.

"The problem is not with the model, it's with management," Mr. Fernandes told The Wall Street Journal. AirAsia Japan will do well, he said. "But it's got to be run as a low-cost airline. The difficulties right now…are that we just have different styles of running it." He didn't elaborate on the points of disagreement.

AirAsia holds 33% of AirAsia Japan, and ANA owns the rest. AirAsia said last month that the partners were discussing a turnaround plan. AirAsia Japan Chief Executive Yoshinori Odagiri said keeping costs low had proved to be the company's biggest challenge.

AirAsia Japan flies to only five Japanese destinations plus Seoul and Busan, South Korea, using a fleet of four Airbus A320 jets. It meanwhile has to resolve the challenge of operating at Narita, which is one of the busiest airports in Japan but isn't open 24 hours a day, unlike Kansai International Airport, where Peach is based.


Malaysia's AirAsia remains the biggest budget carrier in Asia, operating a fleet of 124 Airbus A320s. It also has operations in Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines and is seeking regulatory approval for a venture in India.

AirAsia's long-distance affiliate, AirAsia X, held an initial public offering on Monday, seeking to raise up to $426 million. The IPO would be Asia's largest since the listing of Japan Airlines Co. last year, according to Dealogic.


Source:  http://online.wsj.com

Santo Domingo: Crop duster crashes, pilot in serious condition


Monday, June 10, 2013, 11:13 AM

Santo Domingo  - The pilot of a crop-dusting plane that crashed after striking a power line at Hatillo Palma, Montecristi (NW) is in serious condition, local media report.

Arnaldo Rojas, 42, of San Pedro crashed Saturday night while dusting crops aboard the plane registry H 1897, which resulted practically destroyed, and was snared in the power lines, cutting power to many communities.

The pilot, who works for a company in Mao which sprays plantations, has lacerations to his head and body.

Doctors at the clinic where he was taken in Santiago say Rojas is in serious but stable condition.

It’s the second crop duster to crash in the area in as many weeks, after another plane went down in nearby El Copey in late May.


Story and Photo:  http://www.dominicantoday.com

Romance takes flight for students: St. Thomas of Villanova - Ontario, Canada

Villanova student Adam Ventimiglia, 17, took his prom date, Adrianne White, 18, for a short flight in a Cessna 172 Skyhawk Saturday over the city decked out in their formal wear. "It's pretty cool," White said of the experience. The actual prom is this Friday. 
Photograph by: Dax Melmer, The Windsor Star 


Rob Benneian, The Windsor Star | Jun 10, 2013 | Last Updated: Jun 10, 2013 - 7:08 UTC 


Listen up local high school students: The bar has been raised.

In advance of the St. Thomas of Villanova high school prom this Friday, Grade 12 student Adam Ventimiglia took his date Adrianne White, 18, for the ride of her life on Saturday.

While many scrape their dollars together to rent a limousine for the night, this Villanova couple took to the pre-prom skies in a Cessna 172 Skyhawk with Ventimiglia at the controls.

"I couldn't drive a car," said the 17-year-old Ventimiglia, who has no driving license but does have a pilot's license. "So I thought 'I've got to do something.'"

Though the pair have known each other since Grade 9, it wasn't until recently that they began speaking on a regular basis.

"He asked for help in physics class," White said, though she added science isn't one of her strengths.

"I did need some help in physics," Ventimiglia said, but it was "kind of like, kill two birds with one stone."

The couple, who started dating during a recent school trip to Costa Rica, took a short flight over the city decked out in their formal wear. With White at his side, Ventimiglia painstakingly went through a checklist of procedures to ensure the aircraft was safe to operate.

"It's pretty cool," White said of the flight, adding that while some of her friends were jealous of her first-class prom experience, some were too afraid of heights to be green with envy.

Ventimiglia has been flying for nearly two years, starting with gliders, and said he has had an interest in flying since he was born.

He flies about once a month at the Windsor Flying Club at Windsor Airport, where he rents a plane at a rate of $150 per hour. Ventimiglia earned his single-engine light aircraft license last August and hopes to eventually get his commercial license.

"It's kind of like driver's ed," Ventimiglia said of the process of earning his flying license. "I'd be in a classroom studying things like air law and meteorology and then when I would go into the airplane, you apply everything that you learn and there's an instructor there in case you do anything out of protocol."

Ventimiglia will attend RCC Institute of Technology in Toronto in October to pursue a degree in mechatronics, a combination of mechanical, electrical, control and computer engineering. He hopes to study mechanical engineering with a goal of designing airplane parts.

Francesca Ventimiglia said her son's romantic side comes from his father Joe, but Ventimiglia isn't convinced.

"I've never seen my dad as romantic," he said with a laugh.


Story and Photo:  http://www.windsorstar.com

de Havilland DH.53 Humming Bird, G-EBHX: Old Warden Aerodrome, Biggleswade, Bedfordshire - United Kingdom




A pilot from Pitton died after his airplane crashed while he practiced for an air show, an inquest heard.

Trevor Roche, 52, crash-landed the vintage De Havilland DH53 Humming Bird in an airfield just before the Military Pageant Air Show at Old Warden Aerodrome near Biggleswade on July 1 last year, after losing control in strong winds.

Mr Roche was a former test pilot at Boscombe Down, had served in the RAF and worked commercially for British Airways. He had 14,780 hours of flying experience, but the inquest heard in windy conditions the plane would have been “challenging” even for an experienced pilot.

Mr Roche took the plane for a trial flight, which should have lasted around ten minutes, in the morning.

Policeman John Walker told the inquest he had been in the control tower that morning and his attention had been drawn to Mr Roche’s plane.

He said the plane appeared to be making a turn, but the manoeuvre changed from a rounded curve and the aircraft dropped nose first into the ground.

An Air Accident Investigation Bureau report said the most probable cause of the accident was that the pilot lost control in gusty wind conditions.

Mr Roche suffered a severe head injury in the accident and died instantly. A jury recorded a verdict of accidental death.


Story and Photo:  http://www.salisburyjournal.co.uk

On this date in history: One of the craziest emergency landings of all time

 

6:45 a.m. EDT, June 10, 2013 

 On June 10, 1990, British Airways flight 5390 was landed by its co-pilot while the pilot dangled out the window for more than 20 minutes.

 Barely 10 minutes after taking off, an improperly installed window in the cockpit blew out at 17,300 feet. The rushing wind pulled pilot Tim Lancaster out of his seat and out the window, but his knees caught on the cockpit controls and members of the flight crew were able to grab him by the belt and legs. Co-pilot Alastair Atchison took over controls.

Atchison tried to call for an emergency landing, but the wind rushing through the cockpit was so loud he could not hear his instructions. The flight crew believed Lancaster had died, but Atchison instructed them to hold onto him lest his body fly into the engine and cause the plane to crash. The plane made an emergency landing at Southampton.

Amazingly, the crew found that Lancaster had survived. He had frostbite, a few broken bones in his arms and hands, and shock. One member of the flight crew sustained a dislocated shoulder and frostbite from his efforts to hold onto Lancaster.

 Less than five months later, Lancaster was back at work piloting airplanes.


Source:  http://www.dailypress.com

Record turnout for eleventh Hucknall airshow



Published on June 06, 2013 12:05

Record numbers attended the annual Hucknall air show at the weekend, eleven years after the historic event was revived in the town.

Around 2,000 people came along to watch a range of classic aircraft take to the skies, as well as dozens of vintage cars and motorbikes, organizers said.

Organiser Nigel Perkind told the Dispatch: “The whole day went really well – we had sporadic sunshine and our biggest ever turnout, with about 2,000 people attending.

“As well as the classic Spitfires and Hurricanes, there were also teo acrobatic displays and more vintage cars and bikes than ever before.

“We had a selection of vintage Rolls-Royce motorcars and some classic bikes provided by the BSA Owners Club.”

An eye-catching aircraft extravaganza was an integral part of the Hucknall calendar for decades before and after The Second World War..

But it has only been hitting the runway at Hucknall Airfield, off Watnall Road, again for the last eleven years, thanks to the dedication and hard work of the organiser, the Merlin Flying Club, which is based at the site.

The event is known as the Merlin Pageant and has established itself with a hardcore of supporters. It is once again expected to attract thousands of spectators.

Once again it followed the theme of ‘Wings and Wheels’ with vintage aircraft and attractions linked to aviation sharing the billing with a huge display of classic cars and motorbikes.


Story and Photo:  http://www.hucknalldispatch.co.uk

Cosford Air Show organizers today said they would consider refunds to thousands who missed the action because they were stuck in nine mile queues

 


More than 50,000 people enjoyed the spectacular show in beautiful weather, watching displays by the Red Arrows and iconic aircraft such as the Vulcan and Lancaster bombers. 

But many who had paid £25 a time for tickets were caught in queues that at one point stretched all the way from Cosford back to Wolverhampton city centre.

Organizers said they were surprised by the numbers and said there were more cars parked at the site than ever before.

They told ticket holders who could not get in to contact them to ask for a refund.

Some people who set off at 9am didn’t arrive until mid-afternoon for the show – and some gave up and went home.

Andrew Stapleton, from Wellington, set off at 9am for an 11-mile journey that would normally take 20 minutes and didn’t arrive until after midday.

He said: “I came off junction three of the M54 as advised and then was diverted right up the A41 towards Newport before joining the most mind-numbing queue of my life.

“It took two-and-a-half hours just to get back to the roundabout before the crawl towards Cosford.”

Organizers issued a warning at the height of the chaos that anyone without a ticket would not get in with a car.

But despite warnings, they said they had not actually turned anybody away.

Show chairman Wing Commander Mike Wilson said extra parking was made available and changes were made to diversions, adding: “We’re sorry some people were delayed. We work closely with the police and highways to minimize those delays.”

RAF Cosford spokeswoman Amanda Butcher said today: “People seeking a refund are welcome to contact us and we will look at each individual case.”


Story, Photo, Video, Comments/Reaction:  http://www.shropshirestar.com

Cirrus SR22 GTS G3, Southern Aircraft Consultancy Inc Trustee (regd owner, N936CT: Accident occurred June 06, 2013 in Gloucestershire, United Kingdom

The propeller of an airplane which landed in the garden of a Cheltenham house has been turned into a work of art.  
 
The blades from the Cirrus single-engine aircraft have been polished and mounted on a granite base, to form a unique piece, called Crash Bang Wallop, by Stow-on-the-Wold-raised artist, Jack Russell.

His work is on show at the Paragon Gallery, in Montpellier Street, Cheltenham.

The art work is on sale for £2,995.

Although the blades retain the curled ends, bent by the force of the impact in the ground as they spun round in the Up Hatherley garden, it is difficult to equate the smooth, shiny waves of metal with their colourful past.

They have been mirror polished to form a gleaming piece of local aviation history.

Mr Russell, a sculptor for 20 years, who lives in Charlton Kings, said bosses at Gloucestershire Airport asked him if he wanted the propeller blades.

“I have a few pieces on display there,” he said.

“They offered me the materials to have a go.

“This is different because there’s the historical perspective part in there.

“And so many people in Cheltenham know about it, so it’s nice to put it into a historical art piece.

“There are still a few marks on it, from where it was in use as part of a plane.

Mr Russell’s work blends historical metal works with modern additions, as well as up-cyling metal wasted in the industrial process.

Gallery owner, Eleanor Wardle said: “I think they are fantastic and different. The whole ethos of the gallery is to bring in different works.

“We like Jack’s use of different materials.

“But it’s not just about the work, it’s the person who created it.

“People want to know the background of the person they are buying from.

“I always wanted to have an interesting and eclectic mix of works.

“I wanted to broaden people’s boundaries and put pieces ion that are not the norm.”

The light aircraft came to rest in a tree behind a property in Loweswater Close, Up Hatherley, in June, after the 76-year-old pilot landed it safely.

He was making his way from London towards Gloucestershire Airport, in Staverton when the Cirrus single-engine aircraft stopped mid-air during heavy cloud cover.

An Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) report, published on Friday revealed the pilot was not fully trained in how to use the planes automatic levelling system.

http://www.gloucestershireecho.co.uk


http://www.southwestbusiness.co.uk


Jack Russell with his art work
~


The scene of the crash in Loweswater Close, Up Hatherley

 
A close-up of the plane's propeller


Synopsis

The pilot deployed the aircraft ballistic recovery system after he became disorientated on an instrument approach into Gloucester Airport. He was not injured.

History of the flight


The pilot was on a private flight from Denham Aerodrome  to Gloucestershire Airport. As part of his pre-flight preparation, he had contacted Gloucestershire Airport by telephone and was informed that Runway 09 was in use. The first part of the flight was uneventful and conducted in VMC. Initially the pilot was in contact with Farnborough ATC, who subsequently instructed him to contact Brize Norton ATC. Brize ATC instructed the  pilot to climb first to 3,300 ft, then to 4,000 ft. The pilot recalls that he entered cloud shortly before flying over Oxford Airport. When the aircraft was approximately 16 nm from Gloucestershire Airport, Brize ATC instructed the pilot to contact Gloster but refused his request for a descent. When the pilot contacted Gloster he was offered an approach to Runway 27 which he accepted. At this stage, the pilot was approximately 7 nm from the initial approach fix which is located at 10 nm on the extended centreline.

The pilot established the aircraft on the final approach track for an RNAV approach onto Runway 27 with the autopilot engaged in GPS approach and vertical speedmodes. At approximately 1,800 ft amsl the autopilot was disconnected for approximately 5 seconds, during which the aircraft rolled to approximately 30° left bank. When the pilot reinstated the autopilot, it engaged in PITCH HOLD and ROLL HOLD modes, which are the default modes for the system. The pilot did not notice that the autopilot modes had changed and, observing that the aircraft was maintaining a banked turn, attempted to override the autopilot to regain a wings level attitude. After a further 18 seconds, the pilot disconnected the autopilot for a second time but the aircraft had now deviated from the approach centreline. The pilot stated that while trying to correct the situation he “over-controlled” the aircraft in roll and subsequently in pitch. During the following 80 seconds, the aircraft exhibited large variations of pitch, roll, speed and altitude as the pilot attempted to bring the aircraft under control. A series of warnings occurred including an overspeed and terrain proximity warning, and the pilot observed a large red ‘V’ on the primary flight display (PFD). At this point the aircraft was still in cloud and, assessing that he was too close to the ground to recover from what he described as an out-of-control situation, he decided to deploy the ballistic recovery system. The pilot reported that he only became VMC at about the same time as the parachute deployed.


The aircraft came to rest in the garden of a suburban house and was substantially damaged; the pilot was uninjured.

 The pilot stated that the combination of the unexpected runway change and the delay in being allowed to descend to the required height to commence the approach resulted in him experiencing high workload and stress.

http://www.aaib.gov.uk

http://registry.faa.gov/N936CT
    
Photo at Gloucestershire Airport With Thanks To Keith C Wilson. 
Taken on October 30, 2013   http://www.flickr.com/photo 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

NTSB Identification: CEN13WA404 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 06, 2013 in Gloucestershire, United Kingdom
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22 GTS G3, registration: N936CT
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On June 6, 2013, at 0947 coordinated universal time, a Cirrus SR22 GTS G3, N936CT, registered to Southern Aircraft Consultancy, Inc., was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during landing approach to Gloucestershire Airport (EGBJ), Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The flight originated from Denham (EGLD), United Kingdom, and was destined for EGBJ.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the British government. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the British government or the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB). Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch
Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom 


















The plane landed in a back garden belonging to Karen Dean and her husband Mike






















The pilot (circled) is led away from the aircraft after it crashed in the garden
 

Synopsis

The pilot deployed the aircraft ballistic recovery system after he became disorientated on an instrument approach into Gloucester Airport. He was not injured.

History of the flight


The pilot was on a private flight from Denham Aerodrome  to Gloucestershire Airport. As part of his pre-flight preparation, he had contacted Gloucestershire Airport by telephone and was informed that Runway 09 was in use. The first part of the flight was uneventful and conducted in VMC. Initially the pilot was in contact with Farnborough ATC, who subsequently instructed him to contact Brize Norton ATC. Brize ATC instructed the  pilot to climb first to 3,300 ft, then to 4,000 ft. The pilot recalls that he entered cloud shortly before flying over Oxford Airport. When the aircraft was approximately 16 nm from Gloucestershire Airport, Brize ATC instructed the pilot to contact Gloster but refused his request for a descent. When the pilot contacted Gloster he was offered an approach to Runway 27 which he accepted. At this stage, the pilot was approximately 7 nm from the initial approach fix which is located at 10 nm on the extended centreline.

The pilot established the aircraft on the final approach track for an RNAV approach onto Runway 27 with the autopilot engaged in GPS approach and vertical speedmodes. At approximately 1,800 ft amsl the autopilot was disconnected for approximately 5 seconds, during which the aircraft rolled to approximately 30° left bank. When the pilot reinstated the autopilot, it engaged in PITCH HOLD and ROLL HOLD modes, which are the default modes for the system. The pilot did not notice that the autopilot modes had changed and, observing that the aircraft was maintaining a banked turn, attempted to override the autopilot to regain a wings level attitude. After a further 18 seconds, the pilot disconnected the autopilot for a second time but the aircraft had now deviated from the approach centreline. The pilot stated that while trying to correct the situation he “over-controlled” the aircraft in roll and subsequently in pitch. During the following 80 seconds, the aircraft exhibited large variations of pitch, roll, speed and altitude as the pilot attempted to bring the aircraft under control. A series of warnings occurred including an overspeed and terrain proximity warning, and the pilot observed a large red ‘V’ on the primary flight display (PFD). At this point the aircraft was still in cloud and, assessing that he was too close to the ground to recover from what he described as an out-of-control situation, he decided to deploy the ballistic recovery system. The pilot reported that he only became VMC at about the same time as the parachute deployed.


The aircraft came to rest in the garden of a suburban house and was substantially damaged; the pilot was uninjured.

 The pilot stated that the combination of the unexpected runway change and the delay in being allowed to descend to the required height to commence the approach resulted in him experiencing high workload and stress.

http://www.aaib.gov.uk

http://registry.faa.gov/N936CT
    
Photo at Gloucestershire Airport With Thanks To Keith C Wilson. 
Taken on October 30, 2013   http://www.flickr.com/photo 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk

NTSB Identification: CEN13WA404 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 06, 2013 in Gloucestershire, United Kingdom
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22 GTS G3, registration: N936CT
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On June 6, 2013, at 0947 coordinated universal time, a Cirrus SR22 GTS G3, N936CT, registered to Southern Aircraft Consultancy, Inc., was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain during landing approach to Gloucestershire Airport (EGBJ), Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The pilot sustained minor injuries. The flight originated from Denham (EGLD), United Kingdom, and was destined for EGBJ.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the British government. This report is for information purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the British government or the Air Accidents Investigation Branch (AAIB). Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

Air Accidents Investigation Branch
Farnborough House
Berkshire Copse Road
Aldershot, Hampshire
GU11 2HH, United Kingdom 


Fish killed and climbing frame destroyed by plane crash in Hatherley, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire - UK: Cirrus SR22 GTS G3, N936CT
 
Monday, June 10, 2013

By MICHAEL PURTON AND STEVEN IMPEY
Gloucestershire Echo


Relief is the overwhelming emotion for a couple who were unharmed when a plane crashed in their garden.

But as Mike Carter and Karen Dean return their life to normal, they can't help but feel sadness at some of the smaller consequences of the plane plummeting into their lives.

Fuel from the single engine plane leaked into their pond, killing their koi fish, and a climbing frame with sentimental value had to be torn down to remove the plane.

Their home in Loweswater Close, Hatherley, has been the epicentre of a swarm of activity since the single engine plane crash landed in their garden, just 10 metres from their house, on Thursday morning.

Now the plane has been removed from their garden and the crowds have dispersed, they can take stock of their lucky escape from disaster.

"When you look at the garden you realize how lucky everyone has been," said 50-year-old Karen, a project manager for Boots.

"The tree it hit was 57 years old and quite sturdy, but if it had been any other tree it would have toppled into the house, which could have been devastating.

"I was inside the house at the time.

"If it was a couple of minutes later I could have been in the garden at the time, or my son and granddaughter could have been visiting and out there."

Mike, 55, a carpenter, said: "The overwhelming feeling is relief because it could have been a lot worse.

"The plane could not have landed in a better place in regards to injuring people. There are children in all the other gardens around, but our children are grown up and have moved away.

"It's just a relief to have the plane and everyone gone. They'd finished taking it away by 8.30pm on Friday."

Karen said she was sad her two-year-old koi – James, Harry and Whitehead – had been killed.

The climbing frame where her sons Paul, 30, and Matthew, 28, had enjoyed playing as children had to be dismantled to make way for the removal of the mangled wreckage of the plane.

Karen said: "We put the frame up in 1991 and my boys and their friends used to play on it all the time.

"The one question they both asked me after the crash was whether the climbing frame was okay.

"It survived the crash and they were pleased, but they were disappointed it had to be taken down."

Karen had hoped her six-week-old granddaughter Siennawould be able to play on the climbing frame in future years.

"It's disappointing Sienna will not be able to play on it," she said. "But mainly we're just glad nobody was seriously injured and we can start to put the whole ordeal behind us."

The plane, a Cirrus SR22 GTS G3, was flying from London to Gloucestershire Airport in Staverton and was making its descent.

The 76-year-old pilot, from London, miraculously walked away from the wreckage with minor injuries.

The plane came to a rest after the pilot deployed the aircraft's ballistic parachute system, which brought it safely to Earth.

Darren Lewington, head of operations at Gloucestershire Airport, outlined what could have happened if the pilot had not expertly landed the plane in a safe spot.

"In the worst case scenario, it is, of course, possible for a plane to crash into a building," he said. "But that is extremely unlikely and these incidents are exceptionally rare.

"There is a much greater likelihood, as a member of the public, of having your house struck by a car than an airplane."

Story and Photos: http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk
















The plane landed in a back garden belonging to Karen Dean and her husband Mike























The pilot (circled) is led away from the aircraft after it crashed in the garden




Last surviving German bomber lifted off bottom of the Channel

The World War II Dornier is lifted from the English Channel this evening.
 Photo: IAIN DUNCAN


By Sam Marsden

9:20PM BST 10 Jun 2013


The RAF Museum salvage team had previously been hampered by strong winds, but a window of good weather allowed them to winch the only surviving Dornier Do 17 bomber from the sea bed.

Covered in rust and barnacles, with its propellers broken off, the aircraft was pulled to a barge at about 6.30pm.

The team tried to lift the plane on June 2, but bad weather thwarted the attempt within 40 minutes of success when an increase in winds made the sea too choppy to complete the operation.

The plan, which was three years in the making, was adapted so lifting equipment could be attached to what were believed to be the strongest parts of the aircraft’s frame and raise it whole, instead of constructing a cage around it.

The aircraft at Goodwin Sands was discovered by divers in 2008 at a depth of 50ft on a chalk bed with a small debris field around it.

Sonar scans by the RAF Museum, Wessex Archaeology and the Port of London Authority confirmed the identity of the aircraft as the Dornier Do 17Z Werke number 1160.

None of the bombers, which were nicknamed “flying pencils” because of their narrow fuselage, were thought to have survived since the Second World War.

The aircraft is said to be in “remarkable condition”. Other than the effects of the sea, such as barnacles, coral and marine life, it is largely intact.

The main undercarriage tyres remain inflated but the propellers clearly show the damage inflicted during the bomber’s fateful final landing, experts have said.

Peter Dye, the director general of the RAF Museum, said: “The discovery and recovery of the Dornier is of national and international importance. The aircraft is a unique and unprecedented survivor from the Battle of Britain and the Blitz.

“It will provide an evocative and moving exhibit that will allow the museum to present the wider story of the Battle of Britain and highlight the sacrifices made by the young men of both air forces and from many nations.

“It is a project that has reconciliation and remembrance at its heart.”

The Dornier will be conserved and prepared for display. It will be placed in two hydration tunnels and soaked in citric acid for the first stage of its conservation. Once the delicate process is complete, the aircraft will be displayed at the museum’s London site within the context of the Battle of Britain story.

A grant of more than £345,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, has allowed the work to commence.


Story and Photo:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk



Sonar scans of the last surviving Dornier Do 17.


Monday,  June 10, 2013, 10:56

Historians are attempting to try and lift the only surviving German Second World War from the Sea at Ramsgate.

The aircraft was shot down off the Kent coastmore than 70 years ago during the Battle of Britain and the project is believed to be the biggest recovery of its kind in British waters.

So far attempts by the RAF Museum to raise the relic over the last few weeks have been hit by strong winds but the conditions have now improved.

Museum spokesman Ajay Srivastava said: "The forecast now suggests two weather windows this week when we can return to the wreck site and complete the lift.

These are Monday June 10 between 1530 - 1800hrs and early Tuesday morning between 03.30 - 06.30hrs.

"If this proves to be the case, and we know how erratic the weather has been this year, we will raise the Dornier early this week.''

The team last attempted to lift the aircraft on June 2 but again bad weather thwarted the attempt within 40 minutes of success when a sudden increase in winds made the sea too choppy to complete the lift.

The plan - three years in the making - has been adapted and now involves attaching lifting equipment to what are believed to be the strongest parts of the aircraft's frame and raising it whole, in a single lift instead of constructing a cage around it, which was the original plan.

Peter Dye, director general of the museum, said: "We have adapted the lifting frame design to minimize the loads on the airframe during the lift while allowing the recovery to occur within the limited time remaining.

"The RAF Museum has worked extremely closely with SeaTech (the dive company) throughout this process and both organizations remain determined to complete this challenging task and see the Dornier safely recovered as planned and delivered to the museum's conservation centre for preservation and public exhibition.''

The existence of the aircraft at Goodwin Sands became known when it was spotted by divers in 2008 at a depth of some 50ft lying on a chalk bed with a small debris field around it.

Sonar scans by the RAF Museum, Wessex Archaeology and the Port of London Authority then confirmed the identity of the aircraft as the Dornier Do 17Z Werke number 1160.

Nicknamed the Luftwaffe's ''flying pencil'' bombers because of their narrow fuselage, this aircraft is said to be in ''remarkable condition''.

Experts are excited by the find because other than the effects of sea life, such as barnacles, coral and marine life, it is largely intact.

Amazingly the main undercarriage tyres remain inflated but the propellers clearly show the damage inflicted during the bomber's fateful final landing, experts have said.

Mr Dye added: ''The discovery and recovery of the Dornier is of national and international importance.

''The aircraft is a unique and unprecedented survivor from the Battle of Britain and the Blitz.

''It will provide an evocative and moving exhibit that will allow the museum to present the wider story of the Battle of Britain and highlight the sacrifices made by the young men of both air forces and from many nations.

''It is a project that has reconciliation and remembrance at its heart.''

Once it has been lifted, work will start to conserve and prepare the Dornier for display.

It will be placed in two hydration tunnels and soaked in citric acid for the first stage of its conservation. Once the delicate process is complete, the aircraft will be displayed at the museum's London site within the context of the Battle of Britain story.

A grant of more than £345,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF), which was set up to save the country's most precious heritage, has allowed the work to commence.

The Dornier Do 17 will join a range of more than 1,200 objects and places which have been safeguarded by the NHMF at a cost of more than £300 million.

These include HMS Caroline, the last surviving First World War ship, a rare collection of work by Second World War codebreaker Alan Turing and HMS Alliance, the last surviving submarine of the Second World War.


Source:  http://www.heart.co.uk

Zimbabwe losing millions in aviation sector

 Monday, 10 June 2013 12:31

Zimbabwe could be losing close to $100 million annually in earnings to foreign airlines following the collapse of its national carrier and the government's reluctance to license domestic airlines, a local business group has said.

Air Zimbabwe resumed domestic and regional flights a few months ago after it grounded its fleet last year fearing debtors who were threatening to seize planes in order to recover their money.

Three South African airlines — South African Airways, Comair and Airlink — control over 90 percent of the market share on the Harare-Johannesburg, Johannesburg-Victoria Falls and Johannesburg-Bulawayo routes, against AirZim's 10 percent.

A report by the Zimbabwe National Chamber of Commerce (ZNCC) titled Aviation — a Catalyst for Promoting Tourism, Industry and Commerce in Zimbabwe,  reveals that reluctance by the government to allow domestic players on lucrative routes had resulted in foreign airlines dominating these routes, depriving the country of foreign currency.

According to the report, in 2011 one million passengers used these key routes, generating over $800 million.

Air Zimbabwe generated $160 million, or 20 percent of total revenue.

Out of 23 000 tonnes of cargo shipped during the period, Zimbabwean airlines flew 500 tonnes, generating US$870 000 out of a possible US$40 million.

"As a country, Zimbabwe could be losing potential earnings of over US$8 million per month to foreign airlines," reads part of the ZNCC report.

The report said if government registered new domestic players, over 93 000 direct and indirect potential new jobs could have been created.

ZNCC said government must immediately open up the airspace.

"Zimbabwean applicants who have met all required conditions for starting airlines have found themselves unable to do so because the Ministry of Transport and Communications has not been forthcoming in granting the necessary air traffic rights," said the report.

A few domestic airlines have been licensed but they have been denied licences to fly on key domestic routes.

"Allowing other players on profitable routes such as Bulawayo and Victoria Falls (from Harare), will provide the operating airlines with financial resources (cross subsidization) to develop thin routes such as the Harare-Beitbridge daily service, Harare-Mutare three times a week, Harare-Kariba-Hwange-Victoria Falls four times a week, Harare-Chiredzi three times a week and Harare-Masvingo three times a week," the report said.

Read the original article on Theafricareport.com : Zimbabwe losing millions in aviation sector | Southern Africa

New airline gets operating license, urges Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority to increase manpower

Nigeria Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) has been advised to increase its manpower so as to reduce the delay experienced by prospective airline operators from acquiring  Air Operator Certificate (AOC).

The Chief Executive of West Link Airlines, Captain Ibrahim Mshelia gave this advise last Friday when receiving his Air Operators Certificate (AOC) for the West Link Air, a chartered operator that is also licensed for Umra, lesser hajj. He said  the additional manpower in the regulatory authority will  help reduce time spent to acquire Air Operators Certificate (AOC) in the country.

On why the AOC took years to collect, Captain Mshelia explained that there were delays with issues associated with the processes especially with documentation and manpower.

“Sometimes we make errors in our documentation and it takes time to communicate it to the NCAA and time to communicate back so with that time is spent. What I gathered in the system is not new to any of us, manpower. When the system has enough manpower perhaps it may cut down on the time spent to acquire the AOC. The operator too is also a problem if a document is given, to be returned in a day and it takes a week, the operator is also delaying himself.”

Mshelia also said that the airline painstakingly went through  the process of registration so that the airline will  give its clientele and passengers the best of services.

“I wouldn’t say it will be different, we would definitely do thing differently because our purpose is to replicate what we see when we travel out.”

“ Our local carriers over the years have tried their best, we are not saying they are not doing well, we are saying there is room for improvement and we are that airline that will bring improvement and we are putting things in place to make sure that when we start operating you can look at your watch and know that WestLink has flown.”

On manpower training, he revealed that his aviation training school, MishAviation, in Ghana will be graduating students in the next couple of days and this is because of the passion for the industry.

Meanwhile, the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority NCAA has urged the management of Westlink Airlines to have safety as its watchword.

Presenting the AOC to the Chairman of Westlink Airlines, the director of Airworthiness Standards NCAA, Engr. Benedict Adeyelika congratulated the management of the airline for waiting patiently  for the documents which processing started  2010.

Engr Adeyelika advised the airline team to ensure that the standard of safety do not fall below expectation and to maintain good safety records at all times.

According to him, the entrance of Westlink Airlines into the Nigerian aviation market has opened ways for other interested would be airline operators to apply for their AOCs.


Story and Comments/Reaction:  http://www.vanguardngr.com