Monday, July 31, 2017

Golden Circle Air T-Bird II Tierra, N204BC: Accident occurred July 31, 2017 near Washington County Airport (8WC), Potosi, Missouri

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saint Louis, Missouri

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N204BC

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA293
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 31, 2017 in Potosi, MO
Aircraft: CHAPMAN T-BIRD II, registration: N204BC
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 31, 2017, at 0835 central daylight time, an amateur built Chapman T-Bird II, N204BC, collided with the terrain shortly after takeoff from the Washington County Airport (8WC), Potosi, Missouri. The private pilot was seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual flight rules conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and a flight plan had not been filed. The local flight was departing at the time of the accident.

A witness reported the takeoff and initial climb looked normal. The airplane then entered what looked like a right crosswind turn, which was the normal procedure after takeoff on runway 02. He stated the wing "dropped" in the turn and the airplane continued a descending turn until it disappeared behind the terrain. The witness, who had flown the accident airplane, stated that the airplane had a tendency to "drop a wing" in turns and that you had to be quick to recover.



A Missouri State Highway Patrol trooper interviews an eyewitness to the crash of an ultralight aircraft that occurred Monday morning in a field not far from Washington County Airport outside Potosi. The pilot is hospitalized with serious injuries. 






The pilot of an ultralight aircraft was injured Monday morning when the small plane he was flying crashed in a field not far from the end of the Washington County Airport runway outside Potosi.

A Potosi Correctional Center worker reportedly saw the plane impact around 8:30 a.m. Members of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, Washington County Sheriff's Department, Washington County 911 and Potosi Fire Department were on the scene shortly after the crash occurred.

The pilot, whose name has not been released at this time, sustained what was deemed serious injuries and was transported by ambulance to a hospital for treatment, according to Cpl. Juston Wheetley with the Missouri State Highway Patrol. 

According to the FAA, which is overseeing the investigation of the incident, the homemade plane crashed soon after takeoff.

No other details are being released at this time as the cause of the crash is still under investigation.

http://dailyjournalonline.com

Federal Aviation Administration requires update of Hagerstown Regional Airport (KHGR) layout plan



Hagerstown Regional Airport layout plan will be updated for the first time in at least 14 years.

The Federal Aviation Administration is requiring the airport north of Hagerstown to provide a revised layout plan, which has had 16 pen-and-ink updates since at least 2003, Airport Director Phil Ridenour said.

A county document lists the estimated cost of the update at $400,000, but Ridenour said the layout plan and an environmental assessment could probably be done for about $300,000.

The county expects to be reimbursed for 95 percent of the cost. The FAA would reimburse 90 percent, while the state would provide the other 5 percent.

Ridenour said he expects the work, which includes aerial photography, to take nine to 12 months to complete. The county is awaiting an FAA grant.

The FAA has new criteria for airport layouts, including providing a master utility plan and land-use proposals for property the county owns on and surrounding the airport, Ridenour said.

The plan must be done before the county begins any additional projects that are on the horizon that aren't already in progress, he said.

The layout plan will list future projects and land acquisitions being considered for the airport.

The county also will update its obstruction analysis, looking for potential problems such as tree growth along the landing paths for all four runways.

The Washington County Board of Commissioners voted 4-0 on July 25 to approve a budget amendment in the airport's capital-improvement program related to the project, according to an online video of the meeting.

Commissioner Jeff Cline was absent from the meeting, recovering from surgery.

Funds from two other projects — including a terminal expansion for which the county is not expecting FAA funding in the near future — were shifted to help with that and demolition of farm buildings on airport property.

http://www.heraldmailmedia.com

Custom plane would call Pasco home, fly the world for research



Plans are being made to base a new aircraft at Pasco that will fly the world, collecting data on the Earth’s atmosphere.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland is currently responsible for a Gulfstream-1 twin turboprop based in Pasco.

It’s a flying laboratory, packed with scientific equipment and outfitted with external probes for analyzing moisture and particles in the air.

“The ‘G-1’ has been a workhorse,” said Greg Koller, spokesman for PNNL.

But it was built in 1961 and may be on its last wings.

Gulfstream stopped supporting the mechanical structure of the plane in 2006. It has become difficult to get certified repair shops to work on certain systems that will need to be overhauled on specific schedules, Koller said.

Some costly repairs loom, key parts are unavailable and new pilots cannot be certified for the aging plane.

It’s unlikely the plane will fly beyond 2020.

The Department of Energy has agreed that there is a need for a new research aircraft and is evaluating alternatives, Koller said.

A new plane could be purchased at a cost of up to $16 million, or DOE could pursue a lease agreement. Funds would need to be included in the fiscal 2019 federal budget.

PNNL is expecting that a new plane would be bigger than the G-1, which now barely fits inside its Pasco hangar.




The Port of Pasco already is making plans.

The Washington State Community Economic Revitalization Board announced last week that it would provide a $1.7 million loan and a $300,000 grant to the Port of Pasco for a new building at the Tri-Cities Airport Business Center.

The port would invest the remaining money for the $2.6 million project, which is contingent on federal funding for the new airplane being approved.

The port would lease the building to PNNL. A 17,727-square-foot pre-engineered metal building frame with metal sheeting and a metal roof is proposed.

“The Port of Pasco has long been a great partner with PNNL and the ARM Aerial Research Facility, and we appreciate they are anticipating and preparing for our future needs,” Koller said.

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a DOE “user facility” that includes the ARM Aerial Research Facility, which PNNL manages and operates as part of the larger ARM program to support airborne research. The facility solicits research projects from around the world and then supports them.

The new Pasco building is proposed to be large enough to house not only the proposed new aircraft, but also $10 million worth of ARM’s other aerial research equipment.

Equipment includes the $800,000 ArcticShark, a custom-built drone with a 22-foot wingspan that PNNL took delivery of in March. PNNL prefers the term “unmanned aerial vehicle.”



The ArcticShark will be used to gather atmospheric data in the Arctic to aid in global temperature research.

Other equipment that could be based at the new building includes a vast array of instrumentation, which is used to measure aerosol, cloud and trace gas properties in the air, meteorological parameters and infrared energy.

About 15 staff members work on the ARM Aerial Research Facility in Richland, including pilots, and some staff may move to the proposed Pasco building.

PNNL has operated the G-1 since it was acquired for research in the late ’80s.

It can collect measurements at altitudes approaching 25,000 feet and can operate at a wide range of air speeds. It can fly relatively slowly when collecting samples but also can be rapidly flown to sites around the world.

In 2013 it was flown over wildfires in the West to collect soot-like particles that absorb sunlight and release heat. The data is helping researchers understand the effect aerosols have on climate change and what the Earth’s climate may look like in 50 to 100 years.

Other flights in recent years have collected data over the Amazon River in Brazil and the Azores of Portugal. The G-1 spent three months in Alaska, flying at 500 feet over the Alaska tundra.

With space at a premium after equipment is loaded, it has seats for just four researchers aboard to monitor instrument performance and watch the data accumulate in real time.

After the plane returns, data is downloaded and synchronized with location information from a global positioning system and video collected from cameras facing forward and downward.

Scientists around the globe track the research campaigns and access the data.

Story and video ►  http://www.tri-cityherald.com

Fatal accident occurred July 31, 2017 at Hector International Airport (KFAR), Fargo, North Dakota

Airport Exec. Director Shawn Dobberstein points to location where SUV struck worker on runway.



FARGO – A contract worker painting markings on the runway of Hector International Airport was killed in a collision with an SUV early Monday, July 31, 2017, said Shawn Dobberstein, executive director of the Fargo Airport Authority.

The worker was identified by Fargo police as Darry Arveson Jr., 48, of Glen Ullin, N.D.

Dobberstein said Arveson was using a vehicle to paint lines on the runway when it was hit by an SUV driven by an airport employee.

The airport employee was identified as Airport Assistant Director Darren Anderson, who has worked for the airport since 1997. He and his passenger in the SUV were not hurt in the crash.

The collision was reported to emergency dispatchers about 12:40 a.m. Monday. Arveson died at the scene, Deputy Police Chief Joe Anderson said.

The collision happened on the airport’s main runway, according to Dobberstein.

“Our sympathies go out to the (contract) employee and his family and obviously our employee and his family as well,” Dobberstein said.

No one was cited in the incident, but the investigation is ongoing and the case will be referred to the Cass County State’s Attorney’s Office to review whether any charges would be appropriate, Deputy Chief Anderson said.

“We’re going to look at what caused the crash and any charges that could be recommended. At this point, the (airport) employee has been very cooperative with law enforcement,” the deputy chief said.

Story and video ►  http://www.wday.com



FARGO—Fargo's Hector International Airport is investigating the first fatal crash it's ever experienced on the runway.

It involved a SUV and a small, paint striping vehicle. The crash happened on the airport's primary runway early Monday morning.

48-year-old Darry Arveson Jr from Glen Ullin, North Dakota was killed in what airport and Fargo police are calling a tragic accident.

It was at the Hector International Airport around 12:40 a.m. in the morning where officials say Darry Arveson, a contract worker with a private company, was painting stripes in a small utility vehicle, similar to a lawn mower. He was hit by an SUV driven by Airport Assistant Director Darren Anderson, who was coordinating the project.

"[The] tractor was out on the airfield for a couple reasons, primarily to remove some pavement markings and then also to remark, repaint marks out on our primary runway," said Airport Authority Executive Director Dobberstein.

Dobberstein says the crews were working on a routine project.

"A lot of maintenance on your runways especially [is] done at night, we typically don't have operations during the nighttime hours, but certainly, the airport was still open, except primary runway was closed for this operation," Dobberstein said.

It turned into a tragedy when the vehicles collided, while traveling in the same direction, leaving authorities searching for answers.

"It's unfortunate,” Dobberstein said. “Our sympathies go out to the employee and his family and obviously to our employee and his family as well.”

Some of their key questions involve how well lit the project zone was, the state of headlights on both vehicles and how fast they were going. All new questions for an accident Dobberstein has never seen in his nearly 30 years at the airport.

"We've had aircraft incidents and those types of things, but what we would term as a vehicle pedestrian type incident, no we haven't had anything like that," said Dobberstein.

As the investigation continues, so does the construction and flights out of the airport.

Darren Anderson has not been cited, but authorities admit, the case poses unique difficulties. Fargo Police say they cannot issue speeding citations on runways, as the airport owns the facility.

The FAA says it's up to individual airports if they choose to set speed limits. Hector International Airport does not have a posted limit, according to managers. They say tarmac traffic is coordinated through air traffic control.

"Runway presents a certain challenge for law enforcement, we don't' police the runway for speeds," said Fargo Police Deputy Chief Joe Anderson.

Authorities do not know if speeding was a factor or not in last night's collision.

Story and video ►  http://www.wday.com



FARGO (KFGO) -  A contract worker doing striping work was struck and killed by a airport authority SUV on one of the runways at Hector International Airport early Monday.

Police identified the victim as Darry Arveson Jr., 48 year-old male, from Glen Ullin, ND. 


Airport Authority Exec. Director Shawn Dobberstein says Arveson was in a small, specialty vehicle.  He says the striping is part of routine runway maintenance.  Arveson died at the scene.  


Dobberstein says the driver of the airport vehicle was the Airport Assistant Director Darren Anderson.     


The crash scene was about a half-mile north of the main terminal.


Story, photo and comments ► http://kfgo.com 

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N957TA, S & G Sky LLC: Accident occurred July 31, 2017 near Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (KSEA), King County, Washington.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Renton, Washington

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

S & G Sky LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N957TA 

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA176
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 31, 2017 in Seattle, WA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N957TA
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 31, 2017, about 1300 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N957TA, was substantially damaged following a ditching about 5 nautical miles northwest of the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA), Seattle, Washington. The airplane was registered to S & G Sky LLC and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. The certified flight instructor (CFI)and the student receiving instruction were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed the Boeing Field/King County International Airport (BFI), Seattle, Washington, about 1300.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the CFI reported that upon completion of air work with the student and while returning to BFI, he observed a drop in oil pressure, followed by a partial loss of engine power, and eventually a total power failure. With insufficient altitude to make it to BFI, the CFI elected to ditch the airplane in the Puget Sound, about 50 yards from the nearest shoreline. Both the CFI and student egressed the airplane and swam to shore. Except for the top of the rudder and vertical stabilizer, the airplane came to rest upright and submerged in shallow waters.

The airplane was recovered from the accident site to a secured location for further examination.



SEATTLE - A crane and barge removed a small plane that landed in the water off West Seattle on Monday.

The barge quickly took the plane away.

The plane was on an instructional flight at the time of the water landing, investigators said.

Tom Little, senior accident investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board, said the Cessna 172 four-seater was being used for an instructional flight from Boeing Field through the Galvin Flying program. It was en route back to Boeing Field when it crashed.

Both occupants of the plane - the pilot and student - were able to escape without injury. Little said he hadn't yet established which of them was piloting at the time of the crash landing. Their names were not released.

The cause of the crash was a "loss of power," Little said - but he said investigators haven't determined how or why it lost power.

The small plane crashed offshore near the 6000 block of Beach Drive Southwest in West Seattle.

Aerial footage from the scene captured by KOMO's Air 4 showed the plane submerged in shallow water not far from shore with the tip of its tail protruding above the surface of the water. Officials said the aircraft sustained significant damage in the crash.

The Coast Guard, Seattle Fire Department and Seattle police responded to the scene.


Story and photo gallery:  http://komonews.com

SEATTLE - A small plane that made an emergency crash landing Monday in the waters off West Seattle was on an instructional flight at the time, investigators said.

Tom Little, senior accident investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board, said the Cessna 172 four-seater was being used for an instructional flight from Boeing Field through the Galvin Flying program. It was en route back to Boeing Field when it crashed.

Both occupants of the plane - the pilot and student - were able to escape without injury. Little said he hadn't yet established which of them was piloting at the time of the crash landing. Their names were not released.

The cause of the crash was a "loss of power," Little said - but he said investigators have not determined how or why it lost power.

The small plane crashed offshore near the 6000 block of Beach Drive Southwest in West Seattle.

Aerial footage from the scene captured by KOMO's Air 4 showed the plane submerged in shallow water not far from shore with the tip of its tail protruding above the surface of the water. Officials said the aircraft sustained significant damage in the crash.

The Coast Guard, Seattle Fire Department and Seattle police responded to the scene.

Plans call for bringing in a barge with a crane to lift the plane from the water on Tuesday or Wednesday.


http://komonews.com













SEATTLE - A small plane crashed Monday in Puget Sound off West Seattle, and the occupants were able to escape without injury.

Seattle police said the aircraft crashed offshore near the 6000 block of Beach Drive Southwest in West Seattle.

The occupants, two men, were able to make it safely to shore. No other information was immediately available about the two.

Aerial footage from the scene captured by KOMO's Air 4 showed the plane in shallow water not far from shore with the tip of its tail protruding above the surface of the water.

The Coast Guard, Seattle Fire Department and Seattle police responded to the scene. Emergency crews planned to check the aircraft to make certain no one else was aboard at the time of the crash.

The Seattle-Bremerton ferry Kaleetan was briefly called in to assist after the plane landed, but has since returned to its normal route and is running about 30 minutes late.

The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane as a Cessna 172. The aircraft sustained substantial damage. The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

http://komonews.com

Incident occurred July 28, 2017 at Deadhorse Airport (PASC), North Slope Borough, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska 

Aircraft on landing, struck a caribou.

Date: 28-JUL-17
Time: 18:41:00Z
Regis#: CON271
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B737
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation:
Aircraft Operator: CONOCO PHILLIPS
Flight Number: CON271
City: DEADHORSE
State: ALASKA

A straggling caribou was decapitated at the Deadhorse airport on Friday by an aircraft co-operated by ConocoPhillips and British Petroleum, when it came in for a landing on Friday.

According to the Alaska Dispatch News, who first reported on the incident in Alaska, as the aircraft was coming in for a landing at the remote North Slope airport, the flight crew on the aircraft spotted the caribou on the strip and and immediately initiated an abort of the landing. But, that abort came too late for the caribou, and it was hit by the landing gear, killing it instantly.

Following the fatal strike, the aircraft performed a low flyby so that the crew on the ground could observe the landing gear for any damage. While the caribou was decapitated, the landing gear suffered no visible damage, the caribou was cleared from the runway, and the aircraft was able to land successfully without incident.

The caribou on the strip was one of many that have crossed the  airstrip in recent days while migrating. Thousands of caribou were shooed off of the runway last week by airport workers. This lone creature was probably a straggler from that group. 

No one aboard the Boeing 737, or crew on the ground were injured in the incident.

http://alaska-native-news.com

A plane trying to land at Deadhorse Airport on Alaska's North Slope hit and killed a caribou with its landing gear on Friday.

The Shared Services Boeing 737, operated by ConocoPhillips and jointly owned with BP, aborted its landing around 11:05 a.m. at the airport after the flight crew saw a caribou on the runway, ConocoPhillips spokeswoman Natalie Lowman said in an email.

"During the abort procedure, the caribou was struck by the landing gear, and perished," she said. "The pilot saw the caribou prior to landing and initiated a go-around, but not in time to avoid contact with the caribou."

After the plane hit the animal, the flight crew "conducted a subsequent low pass over the airport so maintenance personnel on the ground could make a preliminary damage assessment prior to landing," Lowman said.

The plane then landed at the Deadhorse Airport "without further incident," she said. No damage to the plane was identified and it is back in service.

Deadhorse Airport operations workers removed the caribou carcass and conducted a runway inspection, Lowman said. No passengers, flight crew or ground crew were injured, she said.

Scott Austin, foreman at the Deadhorse Airport, said the caribou ran out onto the runway as the plane was on its final approach and was decapitated by the aircraft. If the airport crew had seen it before, he said, someone would have notified the flight crew.

Last week, a herd of about 4,000 caribou passed through and ended up on parts of the runway, Austin said. It took airport workers nearly half an hour to herd them all off, he said, and this one was likely a straggler.

"You get stragglers all the time," he said. "Once they start coming through, migrating, we'll have them for weeks."

Shared Services flights transport oil field workers to and from the Slope. Lowman said 100 passengers and five crew members were on the plane.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer said in an email that he did not have additional details about the incident.

https://www.adn.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N6009M, Mouki Aviation LLC: Incident occurred July 29, 2017 at Palo Alto Airport (KPAO), Santa Clara County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose

Mouki Aviation LLC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N6009M

Aircraft on landing, went off the side of the runway and struck a taxiway sign.

Date: 29-JUL-17
Time: 20:24:00Z
Regis#: N6009M
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PALTO ALTO
State: CALIFORNIA

Mooney M20C, N2596W: Accident occurred July 29, 2017 at Clearwater Air Park (KCLW), Pinellas County, Florida



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa

http://registry.faa.gov/N2596W

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA481
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 29, 2017 in Clearwater, FL
Aircraft: MOONEY M20C, registration: N2596W

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft landed gear up.




Date: 29-JUL-17
Time: 21:45:00Z
Regis#: N2596W
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CLEARWATER
State: FLORIDA




AIRCRAFT:   1965 Mooney M20C N2596W, s/n 3283

ENGINE - M&M, S/N:  Lycoming 0-360-0AID, s/n L-9040-36A

PROPELLER– M&M, S/N: Hartzell HC-C2YR- BFP/ F7497, s/n N52689B

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   TSMOH 498.2 at the last Annual Inspection on 06/01/2017

PROPELLER:    Installed new on 01/22/16 at Tach 1898.66

AIRFRAME:   TT 4,159.2 at Tach Time 1,996.6 on 06/01/2017.  Current Tach  2016.55, and Hobbs 742.6

OTHER EQUIPMENT:     
1) Audio    1 KMA 245-TSO
2) NAV/COM  1 KX 155 TSO
3) DME  1 KN 62
4) GPS 1 Bendix King KLN 90 B TSO
5) Transponder  1 Stratus ESG Apparo
6) COM   1 Bendix King KY 97 A TSO
7) ADF  1 King KR 86

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Gear up landing

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:    Bender Aviation Services, Inc, (CLW) Clearwater, Florida

REMARKS:  Salvage is sold as is/where is.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N2596W.htm

















Piper PA-24 Comanche, N5088P: Incident occurred July 28, 2017 in Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta

Billy Howell dba Howell Crop Dusting: http://registry.faa.gov/N5088P

Aircraft landed gear up and the propeller struck the runway.

Date: 28-JUL-17
Time: 23:59:00Z
Regis#: N5088P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BAINBRIDGE
State: GEORGIA

Vans RV-4, N63WF: Incident occurred July 29, 2017 at McCarley Field Airport (U02), Blackfoot, Bingham County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City

http://registry.faa.gov/N63WF

Aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

Date: 29-JUL-17
Time: 19:10:00Z
Regis#: N63WF
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV4
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BLACKFOOT
State: IDAHO

Piper PA-28-236, N2204B: Accident occurred July 29, 2017 at Routh Airport (9IL2), St. Joseph Township, Champaign County, Illinois

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA452 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 29, 2017 in St. Joseph, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/31/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N2204B
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, while landing at night, the threshold and right side runway lights were out of service at the airport. He added that he “must have been closer [to the ground] than [he] estimated” on approach because the airplane landed flat. Subsequently, the nose landing gear collapsed, the airplane veered left, and he attempted to correct with right rudder. The airplane came to rest left of the runway in an adjacent cornfield.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s improper landing flare, which resulted in the nose landing gear collapsing and subsequent loss of directional control.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Springfield, Illinois

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2204B


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA452
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 29, 2017 in St. Joseph, IL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28, registration: N2204B
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that, while landing at night, the threshold and right side runway lights were out of service at the airport. He added that, he "must have been closer [to the ground] than [he] estimated" on approach because the airplane landed flat. Subsequently, the nose landing gear collapsed, the airplane veered left and he attempted to correct with right rudder. The airplane came to rest left of the runway in an adjacent cornfield.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Boeing E75N1, N57941, Metropolitan Registered Pharmacists Inc: Incident occurred July 30, 2017 at St. Louis Regional Airport (KALN), Alton, Madison County, Illinois

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saint Louis

Metropolitan Registered Pharmacists Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N57941

Aircraft went off runway.

Date: 30-JUL-17
Time: 16:14:00Z
Regis#: N57941
Aircraft Make: BOEING STEARMAN
Aircraft Model: E75N1
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: ALTON
State: ILLINOIS

Piper PA-23-250, N900AM, Aerial Imaging Inc: Incident occurred July 28, 2017 in South Bend, St. Joseph County, Indiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Plaines, Illinois

Aerial Imaging Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N900AM

Aircraft sustained minor damage from a birdstrike, landed without incident.

Date: 28-JUL-17
Time: 22:36:00Z
Regis#: N900AM
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA27
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: SOUTH BEND
State: INDIANA

Piper PA-24, N6616P: Incident occurred July 29, 2017 at Oskaloosa Municipal Airport (KOOA), Mahaska County, Iowa

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita

http://registry.faa.gov/N6616P

Aircraft landed and gear collapsed.

Date: 29-JUL-17
Time: 12:20:00Z
Regis#: N6616P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: OSKALOOSA
State: IOWA