Sunday, July 29, 2018

Robinson R44, N479AT: Incident occurred July 27, 2018 at Palm Beach County Park/Lantana Airport (KLNA), West Palm Beach, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Lost control while performing maneuvers.

Date: 27-JUL-18
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N479AT
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 91
City: WEST PALM BEACH
State: FLORIDA



 



LANTANA, Fla. - Two people suffered minor injuries following a small helicopter crashed at Lantana Airport Friday, according to Palm Beach County Fire Rescue. 

Crews arrived at the scene at 7 p.m. and found the small helicopter resting on its side. 

Two people on board the aircraft were evaluated by paramedics and treated for minor injuries. They did not require to be transported to a hospital, officials say.

The cause of the crash is being investigated by the Federal Aviation Administration. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wptv.comp

Flightstar SC II, registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flight, N953RJ: Accident occurred July 27, 2018 near Concord Airpark (2G1), Lake County, Ohio

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N953RJ    

Location: Painesville, OH
Accident Number: CEN18LA301
Date & Time: 07/27/2018, 1645 EDT
Registration: N953RJ
Aircraft: FLIGHTSTAR SC II
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 27, 2018, about 1645 eastern daylight time, a Flightstar SC II, N953RJ, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain during approach to land on runway 2 at the Concord Airpark (2G1), near Painesville, OH. The student pilot received serious injuries and his passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that he had purchased the airplane a few months prior to the accident and had performed some repairs in the interim, including replacing a broken propeller. He said that he planned to have the repairs inspected by a certificated mechanic and the airplane had not been flown since its purchase. On the day of the accident, the pilot and his spouse were performing taxi practice with no intention for flight. He said that they were taking turns with the controls. He said that on one of his turns he must have gone too fast and the airplane unexpectedly became airborne. When this happened, the airplane was already 3/4 of the way down the runway and he didn't think there was enough room to land on the remaining runway, so he elected to "go around". The pilot was unable to maintain altitude and maneuvered the airplane to land but struck trees during the attempted landing. In his report the pilot indicated that there were no mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airplane.

In a telephone conversation the pilot reported that he had set the propeller blade pitch angles based on information from the airplane maintenance records using a digital protractor. He acknowledged that his method of setting the propeller blade angles could have been slightly off. He had intended to have a certified mechanic check his work but that had not been done since he had not intended to fly the airplane when the accident occurred.

The weather conditions at the Willoughby Lost Nation Municipal Airport, Willoughby, Ohio, about the time of the accident included a temperature of 23° C, a dew point of 12° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. The carburetor icing susceptibility at these readings is moderate icing at cruise power settings, and serious icing at descent power settings. The calculated density altitude was 2,273 ft. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s):None 
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s):None 
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/02/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   21 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model), 0 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHTSTAR
Registration: N953RJ
Model/Series: SC II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2001
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: 325
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  998 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: HKS
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 700E
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 60 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LNN, 626 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1655 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 9000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 11000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 3 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Painesville, OH (2G1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Painesville, OH (2G1)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1645 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Concord Airpark (2G1)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 998 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 2
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2181 ft / 38 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor

Latitude, Longitude:  41.666944, -81.197222

Location: Painesville, OH
Accident Number: CEN18LA301
Date & Time: 07/27/2018, 1700 EDT
Registration: N953RJ
Aircraft: FLIGHTSTAR SC II
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 27, 2018, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Flightstar SC II, N593RJ, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain during approach to land on runway 2 at the Concord Airpark (2G1), near Painesville, OH. The pilot received serious injuries and his passenger received minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: FLIGHTSTAR

Registration: N953RJ
Model/Series: SC II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LNN, 626 ft msl
Observation Time: 1655 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 9000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 11000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Painesville, OH (2G1)
Destination:  Painesville, OH (2G1)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Serious

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  41.666944, -81.197222




This evening, July 27th, just after 5 PM, the Lake County Sheriff’s Office responded to a reported plane crash in Concord Twp. Upon arrival deputies found that an ultralight plane made an emergency landing in a wooded area behind the homes on Summerwood Drive in Concord Township. Both the male and female passengers have been transported to the hospital for evaluation by Concord Township Fire. 


 Although this accident is in our patrol area it will be investigated by the Ohio State Highway patrol who is responsible for investigating such plane accidents. Future inquiries regarding this accident can be referred to the Ohio State highway patrol post in Chardon.


Chief Deputy Frank Leonbruno




CONCORD TOWNSHIP, Ohio - An ultralight aircraft made an emergency landing in a wooded area in Concord Township, and two people were taken to a hospital, authorities said.


Just after 5 p.m., the Lake County Sheriff’s Office responded to a reported plane crash. Upon arrival at a wooded area behind homes on Summerwood Drive, deputies found the ultralight aircraft, according to a Facebook post by the sheriff’s office.


A man and a woman were taken to a nearby hospital for evaluation by Concord Township Fire, the post states.


Original article ➤ https://www.news5cleveland.com

Aeronca 7AC, N85506: Fatal accident occurred July 28, 2018 in Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N85506 

Location: Alexandria, MN
Accident Number: CEN18FA297
Date & Time: 07/28/2018, 1923 CDT
Registration: N85506
Aircraft: Aeronca 7AC
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 28, 2018, about 1923 central daylight time, an Aeronca 7AC single-engine airplane, N85506, impacted powerlines and terrain while maneuvering at a low altitude near Alexandria, Minnesota. The pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the private pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local area flight departed Chandler Field Airport (AXN), Alexandria, Minnesota, about 1918.

There were multiple witnesses who saw and/or heard the airplane flying at low altitude before the accident. Two witnesses reported that the airplane had approached their cabin on the north shore of Lake Latoka from the northeast and overflew their cabin at treetop level, which they estimated to be about 50 ft above the ground. One witness stated that the airplane had "barely cleared the trees" when the airplane overflew his cabin. The witnesses reported that the airplane then descended below treetop level while flying south over Lake Latoka. The witnesses stated that they observed the airplane complete at least two low passes over a house located at the southwest side of the lake.

Another witness, who acknowledged being a friend of the pilot, owned the house located on the southwest side of Lake Latoka. The witness was inside his house eating dinner when he heard an airplane overfly his house. He reported that it was common for the pilot to overfly his house at a low altitude. The witness stated that the airplane's engine sounded normal when it overflew his house. He noted that he had a "very bad feeling" that the airplane had crashed when his house lights flickered shortly after the airplane overflew his house. The accident site was located about a mile north-northwest of his house.

Three additional witnesses reported seeing the airplane approach their position, about 1/4 mile northeast of the accident site, at a low altitude and slow airspeed. These witnesses reported that the airplane was flying toward the northwest when it descended behind a small ridge and collided with powerlines. Two of the witnesses reported that they couldn't hear the engine as the airplane approached their position; however, they noted they had music playing at the time. The witnesses reported that they heard an audible "thud" when the airplane impacted the ground.

The accident site was located in a grass drainage ditch northwest of the intersection of Townhall Road and 10th Avenue SW. There were multiple powerlines and a fractured power pole strung across the road on a northwest heading. The main wreckage, which consisted of the entire airplane, was found inverted in the drainage ditch facing south. There was no evidence of an inflight or postimpact fire. Flight control cable continuity was established from each flight control surface to its respective cockpit control. Both main landing gear oleo-struts and the propeller exhibited damage consistent with an inflight wire impact. There was no evidence of a wire strike on either wing or the empennage. The recording tachometer indicated 2,665.72 hours. The forward seat throttle was positioned about 3/4 full travel. The airplane was not equipped with a mixture control. The primer control was IN and secured. The magneto switch was on BOTH. The carburetor heat control was OFF. The cabin heat control was OFF. The airplane was not equipped with an electric master switch, but the single 10 ampere circuit breaker was not tripped. The single communication radio was selected to the common traffic advisory frequency (123.0 megahertz). The airplane was not equipped with a transponder. The fuel shutoff valve was ON. Fuel was recovered from the main/header tank and both right and left auxiliary wing tanks. The fuel samples were blue in color and had an odor consistent with 100 low-lead aviation fuel. The fuel caps were installed and secured on all fuel tanks. The fuel selectors for the auxiliary wing tanks were in the OFF position. A functional test of the fuel shutoff valve did not reveal any anomalies and confirmed fuel flow from the main/header tank. The fuselage mounted gascolator had shattered during impact and fuel was observed flowing from the fuel supply line. The postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal airplane operation during the flight.

The engine remained attached to the firewall. The propeller remained attached to the propeller flange. One propeller blade was bent aft about midspan and exhibited chordwise scratching and leading-edge gouging that was consistent with an inflight wire strike. The other propeller blade exhibited a slight aft bend, a single leading-edge gouge, and minor chordwise scratching near the blade tip. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the propeller was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation, and acceptable cylinder pressures were measured using a differential pressure gauge. The induction manifold and intake pipes exhibited signatures of normal operation, with no excessive fuel staining observed. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. A borescope inspection of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies with the cylinders, pistons, valves, valve seats, or lower spark plugs. The right magneto attached to its installation point and provided spark on all posts while the crankshaft was rotated. The left magneto remained attached to the engine; however, the impulse coupling did not function as the crankshaft was rotated. The left magneto was removed and provided a spark on all posts when rotated by hand. Right magneto-to-engine timing was confirmed to be at top-dead-center on the number 1 cylinder. A full teardown of the engine did not reveal any internal component failures. Adequate lubrication oil was observed throughout the engine and there was no evidence of oil starvation or excessive heat. No metal material was observed after a magnet was passed through the engine sump. The oil filter tube pickup and oil filter screen were free of metallic material. Throttle control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the carburetor throttle arm. The carburetor mixture arm was safety-wired in the full rich position. The carburetor bowl contained about 1/2 fluid ounce of fuel; however, the airplane had been inverted for nearly 24 hours before being recovered. The carburetor bowl did not contain evidence of water or particulate contamination. Disassembly of the carburetor did not reveal any anomalies with the single-piece venturi, metal floats, or needle valve. The postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation during the flight.

According to FAA records, the 64-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with single-engine land airplane, single-engine sea airplane, and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on October 28, 2016, with a limitation for corrective lenses. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings. A pilot logbook was not recovered during the on-scene investigation.

The 1946-model-year airplane, serial number 7AC-4246, was a high-wing monoplane of fabric-covered steel tube and wood construction. The airplane was powered by a 90-horsepower, 4-cylinder, Continental C90-8F reciprocating engine, serial number 47229-9-8. The engine provided thrust through a fixed-pitch, two-blade, Sensenich 76AK-2-43 propeller, serial number 23704. The two-seat airplane was equipped with a fixed conventional landing gear. The airplane had a maximum allowable takeoff weight of 1,300 pounds. According to maintenance documentation, the last annual inspection was completed on June 28, 2018, at 5,980 total airframe hours. The airplane had accumulated 11.72 hours since the last annual inspection. The airframe had accumulated a total service time of 5,991.72 hours when the accident occurred. The engine had accumulated 791.72 hours since being overhauled on January 17, 1978. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. The nearest aviation weather reporting station was located at Chandler Field Airport (AXN) about 3 miles southeast of the accident site. At 1853, about 30 minutes before the accident, the AXN automated surface observing system reported: wind 350° at 4 knots, 10 miles surface visibility, a clear sky, temperature 26°C, dew point 12°C, and an altimeter setting 30.13 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aeronca
Registration: N85506
Model/Series: 7AC
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AXN, 1425 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 350°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Alexandria, MN (AXN)
Destination: Alexandria, MN (AXN)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  45.882500, -95.449722

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Kenneth "Ken" James Ryan

JULY 18, 1954 ~ JULY 28, 2018 (AGE 64)

Ken Ryan age 64, of Alexandria, died on Saturday, July 28th, 2018.  Memorial service will be held on Saturday, August 4, 2018, 10:00 a.m. at the United Methodist Church in Alexandria.  Visitation will be held on Friday, August 3, 2018, 4:00 - 7:00 PM at the Anderson Funeral Home and one hour prior to the service at the church on Saturday.

Donations may be made to:
Butterfly Hill Nature Pre-School
2210 East 6th Avenue, Alexandria MN 56308

United Methodist Church
2210 East 6th Avenue, Alexandria MN 56308
Tel: 1-320-763-4624

Alexandria Technical and Community College
1601 Jefferson Street, Alexandria MN 56308
Web: http://www.alextech.edu/foundation

https://www.andersonfuneral.net



(Alexandria, MN)  A pilot is dead following a Saturday evening plane crash near Alexandria.  Authorities have now identified the pilot as 64 year old Kenneth James Ryan of Alexandria.  Ryan was an instructor at Alexandria Technical and Community College.  He also served on several committees including the Alexandria Planning Commission and was a member of the Alexandria Municipal Airport Commission.  He was also a Computer Repair Technologist in the U.S. Air Force before being honorably discharged in 1976.  Ken is a retired Adult and Pediatric Urologic Surgeon as well.  


The plane appears to have flown into an REA power pole.  Ryan was alone in the plane.  The aircraft landed on its roof on the west side of Town Hall Road, near the intersection of 10th Avenue SW.  Power lines were scattered on the road.  Medical personnel arrived on scene and found the sole occupant of the plane to be deceased.


Saturday night's plane crash took out power for nearly an hour. Friends gathered at the crash site Sunday morning say Ken was an experienced pilot.  FAA records indicate the aircraft was a 1946 fixed wing single-engine plane.


The crash took place after 7:00pm, about 24 hours after another plane crashed in the southeast side of Lake Winona.  On Friday night, a pilot was doing "touch and goes" from the Alexandria Airport when his plane lost power. That pilot was able to get out of the aircraft and was not injured.


Local authorities contacted the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board to handle the investigation.


Original article ➤  https://www.voiceofalexandria.com








Authorities have released the name of a pilot who died after his airplane sheared off a power pole and crashed west of Alexandria Saturday night.

His name is Kenneth James Ryan, 64, of Alexandria. Ryan was an instructor at the Alexandria Technical and Community College, and served on the Alexandria Planning Commission.  

The small aircraft ended up on its roof in a ditch near the intersection of Town Hall Road and 10th Avenue SW in LaGrand Township shortly before 7:30 pm.

Three ambulances arrived on scene but left without transporting anyone. The Douglas County Sheriff's Office confirmed that Ryan, who flying alone, died in the crash.

Within minutes of the crash being reported, several other vehicles were parked on Town Hall Road with their lights flashing, including those from the Douglas County Sheriff's Office, the Alexandria Police Department, State Patrol and Alexandria Fire Department.

Downed powerlines were also on the road.

Local authorities contacted the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board to handle the investigation.

It was the second airplane crash near Alexandria in two days. At about 7 p.m. Friday night, a pilot was conducting "touch and goes" from the Alexandria Airport when his single-engine Piper Archer lost power and he crash-landed on the southwest side of Lake Winona, about a mile southeast of Saturday's crash. He was able to get out of the aircraft and was not injured.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.echopress.com

Zenith Zodiac 650-B, N650NU: Incident occurred July 27, 2018 at Millard Airport (KMLE), Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska

Landed short of runway into the grass.

http://registry.faa.gov/N650NU

Date: 27-JUL-18
Time: 18:00:00Z
Regis#: N650NU
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: ZODIAC 650B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: OMAHA
State: NEBRASKA





The pilot of a small plane sustained minor injuries when his plane landed short of a runway at the Millard Airport just before noon Friday.

The pilot declined to be taken to the hospital, so crews checked him out at the airport. A minor fuel leak also was reported, Douglas County 911 dispatchers said.

Two people were on board the plane, dispatchers said.

The runway is on the west end of the airport.

A photo of the plane posted on Twitter by an Omaha police officer shows the plane with its nose down in the grass near a runway.

On May 27, a Beech P35 airplane crashed on takeoff at the airport, killing David Steier, 62, and Arlene Steier, 61. The plane left the runway, went through several grass medians and was briefly airborne before appearing to stall, federal investigators said.

The airplane’s right wing then struck the ground and the airplane cartwheeled and burst into flames, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.omaha.com






OMAHA, Neb. (WOWT) -- The pilot of a small plane declined medical treatment Friday after a hard landing at the Millard Airport.

Authorities were initially alerted to a report of a "plane crash" around noon.

First crews on the scene reported no evidence of fire and that the aircraft had apparently come up short of the runway.

The pilot was the only person on board.

Omaha Fire Department Acting Battalion Chief Jeff Andersen said, "He just came in low and slow and hit ground before the runway. He's fine. Doesn't want to go to the hospital. Airplane minor, minor damage to the airplane."

The plane wound up with its nose in the ground but there didn't appear to be much structural damage to the aircraft.

A crash at the Millard Airport two months ago took the lives of David Steier, 63, and Arlene Steier, 61. Details here.

That tragic crash came exactly two months ago - on May 27th.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wowt.com

Cessna 177 Cardinal, N3477T: Accident occurred July 28, 2018 at Gillespie Field Airport (KSEE), El Cajon, San Diego County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Diego, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N3477T

Location: San Diego/El Cajon, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA205
Date & Time: 07/28/2018, 1000 PDT
Registration: N3477T
Aircraft: Cessna 177
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 28, 2018, about 1000 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 177 airplane, N3477T, experienced a loss of engine power during takeoff at the Gillespie Field Airport (SEE), San Diego/El Cajon, California. The private pilot and passenger were not injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross country flight. The flight was originating at the time and destined for Catalina Airport (AVX) Avalon, California.

According to the pilot, shortly after takeoff, the engine experienced a loss of power and the airplane settled back towards the runway. Subsequently, the left wing struck the runway and sustained substantial damage during the forced landing.

The airplane was recovered to a secure storage facility for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3477T
Model/Series: 177 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SEE, 387 ft msl
Observation Time:  1747 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 9 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: San Diego/El Cajon, CA (SEE)
Destination:  Avalon, CA (AVX)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.826111, -116.972500 (est)



EL CAJON, Calif. (KGTV) — Two people were injured after an aircraft crashed at Gillespie Field Saturday.

The hard landing was reported just before 11 a.m. Heartland Fire Department confirmed at least two people were injured in the crash.

The extent of damage to the aircraft was not immediately clear.

Airfield officials have yet to release what led to the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.10news.com

Cessna 172 Skyhawk: Accident occurred July 28, 2018 at Knox County Airport (4I3), Mount Vernon, Ohio

MOUNT VERNON, OH (WCMH) - A small plane crashed at the Knox County Airport Saturday morning.

According to investigators, the pilot of a Cessna 172 was coming in for a landing at the Knox County Airport when he experienced smoke in the cockpit. The pilot began making an emergency landing, but the plane crashed. 

The pilot was the only person on board. He was able to escape the wreckage before the plane burst into flames. No injuries have been reported at this time. 

Investigators from the Ohio State Highway Patrol and the Knox County Sheriff’s Office are responding to the scene.

The Knox County Airport is a public-use airport just outside of Mount Vernon. The airport is closed while authorities investigate and work to clear the wreckage. 

No further information was immediately available. The crash remains under investigation.  

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbc4i.com

Van’s RV-9A, N899RV: Accident occurred July 28, 2018 at Park Township Airport (KHLM), Holland, Michigan

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N899RV

Location: Holland, MI
Accident Number: GAA18CA466
Date & Time: 07/28/2018, 0950 EDT
Registration: N899RV
Aircraft: VANS RV9
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during landing, the airplane bounced. He initiated a go around, the airplane veered left, touched back down on the ground, and impacted trees.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 46, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/28/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/04/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 220.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 35.5 hours (Total, this make and model), 168 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 29.7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: VANS
Registration: N899RV
Model/Series: RV9 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 90537
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/05/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 513 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBIV, 689 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1353 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 136°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Holland, MI (HLM)
Type of Clearance: VFR; VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 0830 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: PARK TOWNSHIP (HLM)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 603 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2999 ft / 59 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.796667, -86.162500 (est)


PARK TWP. (WHTC AM/FM) -- A homebuilt plane crashed at Park Township Airport, 1269 Ottawa Beach Rd. just before 10 a.m. Saturday, July 28, 2018. Park Township Fire and Ottawa County Sheriff's deputies responded to the crash, along with airport officials.

Ottawa County Sheriff's Sgt. Brian Buter, a road patrol shift supervisor, had been at the U.S. Coast Guard Festival but came to the airport.

"We learned that on his approach, he was at, I believe at 70 knots and on his initial touchdown, he bounced -- terminology for not having good, solid contact when he was hitting the runway to slow down and take off again," Buter said.

That bounce threw the plane off just enough that his second landing attempt was unsuccessful, Buter said, and the pilot steered through the field, shutting down his engine to avoid propeller damage. The plane stopped near a stand of trees at the edge of the airfield.

The pilot was uninjured, and declined comment when asked.

The aircraft is a 2006 single-engine, fixed-wing homebuilt Van's RV-9A, according to FAA records. The plane is registered to John Boer of Holland, according to FAA records.

Park Township Trustee Skip Keeter, an airport board member, said the last crash at the Park Twp. airport was about eight years ago

"I'm sure our airport committee will meet early next week to review what happened," Keeter said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://whtc.com



OTTAWA COUNTY, Mich. — The Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office is investigating a single-engine airplane that incurred a mishap during its landing and ended up in a wooded area Saturday morning.

The incident occurred at 9:54 a.m. Saturday at the Park Township Airport located at 1269 Ottawa Beach Road.

The investigation showed that pilot John Boer of the Holland area was returning from Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and was attempting to land on the runway at a speed of approximately 70 knots. During his touchdown on the west end of the runway he incurred a “bounce” on the landing and elected to retry the touchdown.

However, as Boer was attempting to leave the runway he lost control of his Van's RV-9A, and the plane came to rest in a wooded area off the north end of the runway.

Boer, who was operating solo, was not hurt. No other people were injured in the accident.

There was some moderate damage to the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration was contacted and will be investigating further next week.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://fox17online.com




PARK TOWNSHIP, Mich. - The Ottawa County Sheriff's Office is investigating a single engine plane crash that suffered from a "mishap" at its landing and ended up in a wooded area of the Park Township Airport on Saturday morning.

According to the sheriff's office, the incident happened just before 10 a.m. on Saturday. Holland-area pilot, John Boer, was returning from Oshkosh, Wisconsin and attempted to land a Van's RV-9A plane on Park Township Airport's runway at about 70 knots.

During his touchdown on the west end of the runway, Boer incurred a "bounce" on the landing and tried to retry the touchdown, deputies say. When Boer attempted to leave the runway a second time, he lost control of the aircraft and came to rest in a wooded area off the north end of the runway.

Boer was alone and uninjured in the incident. No one else was reportedly hurt, but there was some moderate damage to the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration was contacted and will be investigating further later this week. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wzzm13.com