Monday, July 23, 2018

Piper PA-28-181, N4337F: Incident occurred July 20, 2018 in Wahoo, Saunders County, Nebraska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Omaha

Landed in a field.

BLN Enterprises LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N4337F

Date: 20-JUL-18
Time: 20:43:00Z
Regis#: N4337F
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 28 181
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WAHOO
State: NEBRASKA

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 195B Businessliner, N195N; accident occurred July 21, 2018 at Ken Jernstedt Airfield (4S2), Hood River County, Oregon

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N195N



Location: Hood River, OR
Accident Number: GAA18CA444
Date & Time: 07/21/2018, 0930 PDT
Registration: N195N
Aircraft: Cessna 195
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during landing, as the tailwheel touched down, the airplane veered sharply left. He applied full right rudder and brake to no avail. The airplane exited the runway to the left, the right main landing gear collapsed, and the right wing struck the ground. The airplane came to rest in a nose-down attitude.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The Federal Aviation Administration inspector reported that, during a postaccident examination, he did not observe any anomalies with the rudder cables, tailwheel assembly, and brakes.

The automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about 16 minutes after the accident, the wind was from 240° at 6 knots. The airplane landed on runway 25. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Runway excursion
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing gear collapse
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/22/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/25/2017
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 6071.7 hours (Total, all aircraft), 466 hours (Total, this make and model), 5100 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 12.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7.8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N195N
Model/Series: 195 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1953
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 16075
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 5
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/11/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3445.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Jacobs
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R755B2
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 275 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K4S2, 630 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1646 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 195°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 2300 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 10°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Puyallup, WA (PLU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hood River, OR (4S2)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0825 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: KEN JERNSTEDT AIRFIELD (4S2)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 638 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 25
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3040 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 45.672500, -121.530833 (est)

Piper PA-34-200T Seneca, N3048H: Incident occurred July 20, 2018 at Rostraver Airport (KFWQ), Monongahela, Washington County, Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny

Nose gear collapsed on landing.

Senair: http://registry.faa.gov/N3048H

Date: 20-JUL-18
Time: 22:10:00Z
Regis#: N3048H
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 34 200T
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MONONGAHELA
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Cozy Mark IV, N93CF: Incident occurred July 20, 2018 at Pittsburgh/Butler Regional Airport (KBTP), Pennsylvania

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allegheny

Aircraft made a hard landing.

http://registry.faa.gov/N93CF

Date: 20-JUL-18
Time: 00:30:00Z
Regis#: N93CF
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: COZY MK IV
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BUTLER
State: PENNSYLVANIA

Bell 206B, N352CT: Accident occurred July 20, 2018 in Todd Mission, Grimes County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Gatineau, Quebec
Bell Helicopter; Fort Worth, Texas
Rolls-Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N352CT

Location: Todd Mission, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA290
Date & Time: 07/20/2018, 1215 CDT
Registration: N352CT
Aircraft: Bell 206
Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 20, 2018, about 1215 central daylight time, a high skid-equipped Bell 206B helicopter, N325CT, lost control after takeoff and impacted terrain near Todd Mission, Texas. The right seat private helicopter pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries, and two passengers sustained no injury. The helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal sightseeing flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the pilot's private helipad in Pinehurst, Texas, about 0900.

In a conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge on July 24, the pilot reported that the purpose of the local area flight was for sightseeing with a family member and friends. After flying in the local area and refueling, the pilot landed on a grass field to facilitate the passengers switching their seat positions in the helicopter. During the seat switching process, the pilot reduced the throttle to the flight idle position. After the passengers switched seats and secured their restraint systems, with one passenger stationed in the front left seat, and two passengers stationed in the cabin, the pilot increased the throttle to 100 percent and lifted off from the field.

About 3 seconds after liftoff, and about 15 feet above ground level with about 5 knots of forward airspeed and heading about 270 degrees, the helicopter made 4 360-degree revolutions to the right. The pilot reported she applied full left pedal with no response from the helicopter. During the loss of control sequence, the pilot observed the torque gauge "jump" and she heard a "whining" noise emit from the engine. Prior to the helicopter impacting terrain, the pilot reduced the throttle to the flight idle position. The left skid impacted the ground, the helicopter rolled to the left, and came to rest on the left side of the fuselage. The pilot executed an emergency shutdown and the occupants egressed from the helicopter without further incident.


Photograph 1 - View of the helicopter
 (courtesy of the Texas Renaissance Festival). 

After egressing from the helicopter, the occupants were located in an area with adequate cellular phone reception and contacted first responders for assistance. The helicopter was not equipped with an emergency locator transmitter, nor was it required to be.

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor system, the fuselage, the tailboom, and the tail rotor system. The pilot reported that there were no preexisting mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airframe and engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The helicopter was recovered from the field and transported to a secure facility for a future examination of the airframe and engine.

The 5-seat capacity helicopter, serial number 340, was built in 1969. The helicopter was powered by a 400 horsepower Rolls-Royce 250-C20 turboshaft engine, serial number CAE801330. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N352CT
Model/Series: 206 B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Foresteen C. Corey
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDWH, 152 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Houston, TX (DWH)
Destination: Pinehurst, TX

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.251944, -95.844722 (est)









GRIMES COUNTY, Tex. (KBTX) - A pilot and her granddaughter suffered minor injuries Friday afternoon after their helicopter crashed onto the grounds of the Texas Renaissance Festival in Grimes County.


Two others on board were not injured.


Deputies say the helicopter was attempting to take off from the property when a mechanical issue with a rotor forced it to fall back to the ground.


Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are on the way to the scene to investigate the accident.


The pilot, 73, is from Pinehurst, and her granddaughter, 17, is from Tomball. Both were taken to Houston Methodist Willowbrook Hospital.


One of the uninjured passengers is from Florida, and the other is from Canada.


Story and video ➤ http://www.kbtx.com

Piper PA-32R-301T, N8090T: Accident occurred July 20, 2018 at Austin–Bergstrom International Airport (KAUS), Texas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio

Exited the runway while taxiing to park.

High Tail LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8090T

Date: 20-JUL-18
Time: 03:25:00Z
Regis#: N8090T
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 32R 301T
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: AUSTIN
State: TEXAS

Fuel Related: Cessna 210C, N3611Y; accident occurred July 21, 2018 in Blum, Hill County, Texas


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas
Continental; Mobile, Alabama 
Textron Aviation Inc; Wichita, Kansas


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N3611Y

Location: Blum, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA287
Date & Time: 07/21/2018, 1155 CDT
Registration: N3611Y
Aircraft: Cessna 210C
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel related
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 21, 2018, at 1155 central daylight time, a Cessna 210C, N3611Y, was substantially damaged during a forced landing to a field near Blum, Texas. The airline transport pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Granbury Regional Airport (GDJ), Granbury, Texas, and was destined to Hilltop Lakes Airport (0TE4), Hilltop Lakes, Texas.

The pilot stated that she completed a preflight inspection during which she sumped the fuel system. The fuel sump samples did not contain water or contaminant. She said that her first attempt to start the engine was unsuccessful, so she waited about 30 minutes for the starter to cool before attempting another start. Upon the second start attempt, the engine started and "ran normally," and the subsequent engine run-up was "normal".

After takeoff, the airplane departed GDJ traffic pattern and proceeded on course at a cruise-climb airspeed; all "engine indications were "normal". Upon reaching a cruise altitude of 3,500 ft mean sea level, engine power and speed were set to 22 inches of manifold pressure and 2,200 rpm, and the mixture was set to 13 gallons per hour. About 20 minutes after departure, the engine began to run "rough" and because of the hot weather conditions the pilot suspected vapor lock. She switched the fuel selector position from the right to the left fuel tank, but the engine roughness worsened so she switched the selector back to the right fuel tank. She then selected the boost pump to LOW and then HIGH, but those selections had no effect on the engine roughness. The engine began to lose power rapidly. The pilot retarded the throttle control but that did not affect the engine.

About 1,000 ft above ground level, the pilot selected a field for a forced landing. She said that she complied with the aircraft manufacturer's procedure and landed on the field with landing gear retracted because the engine driven hydraulic pump was being powered by a windmilling engine. She selected flaps to 30 degrees and advanced the throttle control to silence the gear warning horn. On short final to the field, she turned the ignition switch OFF. She said that the landing touchdown was "firm," and the airplane slid to a stop very quickly. She estimated that 2 minutes elapsed from the onset of engine roughness to landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Investigator-in-Charge (IIC) asked the pilot why she did not lower the landing gear for the forced landing; she said the airplane checklist stated that the landing gear was not to be lowered, and that it would take her about 3 minutes to manually pump the landing gear down. She said it would take her about 3 minutes to manually pump the landing gear down during landing gear swing tests that she did during the airplane's maintenance. She said the 3 minutes was without air loads on the airplane because it was a gear swing test with the airplane on jacks. She said that she would rather focus on flying the airplane rather than pumping the landing gear during the approach for the forced landing. She said that the outcome landing with the landing gear partially extended would have been worse than landing with the gear retracted. She said the she did not have enough time to lower the landing gear due to the altitude the airplane was at during the approach to a field. She said there is no way to tell if a field is rough while the airplane is 2 miles away from the field.

When the pilot was asked on separate occasions by the NTSB IIC and the FAA inspector whether she advanced the mixture control to the full rich position when the engine roughness occurred; she said that she did not remember. She said that she did not change the mixture control position after the forced landing. The pilot later stated that the mixture was only slightly leaned because of the low cruise altitude. She said its normal while flying the accident airplane to start leaning as climb power is set, or even during takeoff from high elevation airports. She said that at some point in trying to restart the engine, she thought that she moved the mixture to full rich, but it wasn't much of a move. She said the time available to attempt a restart was very short. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Flight Engineer
Age: 76, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Glider; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/09/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/20/2017
Flight Time:   2598.3 hours (Total, all aircraft), 605.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 2206.6 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 1.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1.1 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3611Y
Model/Series: 210C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1962
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 21058111
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2998 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1547.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-470-S2
Registered Owner: Pilot
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane was equipped with a Continental IO-470-S2, serial number CS-102886-3-A-I, engine that was last overhauled at the time of installation onto the airframe, dated January 15, 1976. At the time of the accident, the time since overhaul of the engine was 474.45 hours.

The pilot held an airframe and powerplant mechanic certificate and performed maintenance on the airplane. The pilot stated she owned the airplane since its new purchase in 1962 and was last flown in 2003. In 2004 she decided to begin flying the airplane. The airplane received its last annual inspection in September 2018. She suspected that the loss of engine power occurred at the time of the accident was due to vapor lock because of two prior occurrences of power losses that occurred on hot days, as follows:

On May 29, 2003 from a flight from Mineral Wells Airport (MLW), Mineral Wells, Texas to Horseshoe Bend Airport (F78), Weatherford, Texas the airplane experienced an engine power loss occurred during landing rollout when the engine was at idle and would not restart. She said the idle speed was adjusted "slightly" and subsequent engine starts and ground runs were normal "once the engine had cooled."

On July 19, 2003, while en route from F78 to Easterwood Field Airport (CLL), College Station, Texas, the engine ran rough and subsequently quit. The engine was restarted after the throttle was retarded rapidly to idle from where it had been set for cruise. The engine ran from there until landing at Marlin Airport (T15), Marlin, Texas and died again on landing rollout. The following day the engine started and ran normally through a full-power ground run. An airframe and power plant mechanic with inspection authorization helped her in draining every sump, checking every vent, and checking every fuel filter that we could access. Nothing out of the ordinary was found.

The pilot stated that following the engine power loss on July 19, 2003, all the fuel lines in the engine compartment were replaced. She said that the airplane electric boost pump was modified after both losses of engine power due to a sticking solenoid valve in the fuel/vapor return line between the engine driven fuel pump and fuel selector. The removal of the solenoid valve and replacement of two electrically-driven fuel boost pumps with one fuel boost pump was completed through a major repair and alteration dated September 2, 2004, to modify the fuel boost pump system to the configuration installed in Cessna 210D airplanes.

The 1963 Cessna 210C Owner's Manual stated that flaps are operated hydraulically by the same system that operated the landing gear. The airplane retractable tricycle landing gear is extended and retracted by hydraulic actuators, powered by an engine-driven hydraulic pump.

The Owner's Manual Forced Landing (Complete Engine Failure) procedure stated, in part, "(5) If field is smooth and hard, extend the landing gear within gliding distance of field. (6) If engine is windmilling, extend flaps as necessary within gliding distance of field." The Owner's Manual does not require manual extension of the landing gear following engine power loss.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CPT, 854 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1130 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Granbury, TX (GDJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hilltop Lakes, TX (0TE4)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:1100 CDT 
Type of Airspace: Class E Wreckage and Impact Information
Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.054444, -97.308611 (est) 

A post-accident examination of the accident site by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane was resting on a flat and dry dirt field with the landing gear retracted and the flaps extended to the full flap, 30-degree position. The FAA inspector stated that it had not rained for about six weeks and the surface was hard and its surface was in a condition as some turf airstrips. The master switch, ignition key switch, boost pump switch, and the fuel selector were in the OFF positions. The throttle and propeller controls were in the full forward positions. The mixture control was near the idle cutoff position. The left and right fuel tanks were each about ½ full of liquid consistent with 100 low lead aviation fuel. The fuselage was wrinkled.

Following the recovery of the airplane to a salvage facility, the engine with the airframe were secured to a trailer and the propeller replaced in preparation for and engine test run under the supervision of a NTSB Air Safety Investigator. The fuel supply to the engine was plumbed into the left wing tank fuel lines. The top spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal operation. The plugs were then reinstalled. The engine was primed using the electric boost pump and started immediately and allowed to warm up. The propeller was cycled at an engine speed of 1,000 rpm. A magneto check was performed at an engine speed of 1,800 rpm and the corresponding reduction in speed was approximately 125 rpm. There were no anomalies when engine power was increased to full power. The external fuel supply was then plumbed into the right wing fuel tank lines and a second test run was performed with similar results. Both test runs were about 5-6 minutes in duration. There were no fuel system leaks noted during the test runs.

The fuel selector was removed, and its examination revealed no blockage and no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

The fuel pump, fuel servo, and manifold valve were removed for subsequent flow testing at Continental Motors under the supervision of an NTSB Air Safety Investigator. Testing of the fuel pump revealed that the pump produced adequate fuel flow and pressure for an IO-470 engine. Bench testing of the fuel servo and the manifold valve yielded results that did not meet factory specifications for a new part; fuel injection systems must be set up and adjusted to each individual engine and airframe combination. The throttle body/metering unit had a leak during benched testing. The leak during bench testing emanated from an internal O-ring. There were no leaks from the throttle body/metering unit during the engine test run.


Location: Blum, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA287
Date & Time: 07/21/2018, 1155 CDT
Registration: N3611Y
Aircraft: Cessna 210C
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 21, 2018, at 1155 central daylight time, a Cessna 210C, N3611Y, experienced a loss of engine power during cruise flight at 3,500 feet mean sea level. The pilot then performed a forced landing to a field near Blum, Texas. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airline transport pilot was uninjured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Granbury Regional Airport, Granbury, Texas and was destined to Hilltop Lakes Airport, Hilltop Lakes, Texas.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3611Y
Model/Series: 210C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Pilot
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: CPT, 854 ft msl
Observation Time: 1130 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 36°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 240°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Granbury, TX (GDJ)
Destination: Hilltop Lakes, TX (0TE4) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:

Just JA30 SuperSTOL, N825PW: Fatal accident occurred May 06, 2019 -and- Accident occurred July 22, 2018 near Lake Chelan Airport (S10), Chelan County, Washington

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N825PW

Location: Chelan Falls, WA
Accident Number: GAA18CA443
Date & Time: 07/22/2018, 0730 PDT
Registration: N825PW
Aircraft: Just JA30 SUPERSTOL
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area undershoot
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that as he made the approach over a river to land at his private airstrip, he "came in too low and hit a dock," that was moored to the side of the river. The airplane's propeller struck the dock and the landing gear separated from the airplane which slid about 25ft on the airstrip and came to a stop.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mounts.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s):None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 119.5 hours (Total, all aircraft), 44.6 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Just
Registration: N825PW 
Model/Series: JA30 SUPERSTOL Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2014
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: JA 308-07-13
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/06/2017, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 156.5 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 914UL
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 115 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEAT, 1229 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1455 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 200°
Lowest Cloud Condition:Clear 
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:/ 
Wind Direction:290° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.23 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Chelan, WA (S10)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Chelan, WA (S10)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0730 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: PVT AIRSTRIP (PVT)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 732 ft
Runway Surface Condition:Dry 
Runway Used: NW
IFR Approach:None 
Runway Length/Width:490 ft / 150 ft 
VFR Approach/Landing:Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries:1 None 
Aircraft Damage:Substantial 
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 47.786944, -119.993056 (est)

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

http://registry.faa.gov/N825PW

Location: Chelan, WA
Accident Number: WPR19FA133
Date & Time: 05/06/2019, 0629 PDT
Registration: N825PW
Aircraft: Just JA30 SUPERSTOL
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On May 6, 2019, at 0629 Pacific daylight time, a JA30 Superstol airplane, N825PW impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Lake Chelan Airport (S10), Chelan, Washington. The sport pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed in the post-crash fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

The accident site was located about 550 ft from the approach end of runway 20 on a heading of 157°. The examination of the site revealed that the airplane impacted terrain in a vertical attitude. Most of the airplane was consumed by the post-crash fire. The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Just
Registration: N825PW
Model/Series: JA30 SUPERSTOL Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KEAT, 1229 ft msl
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 30 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 47.867778, -119.937500 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Kenneth William VanAssche

Kenneth William VanAssche

CHELAN — The pilot killed Monday in a plane wreck is remembered by loved ones as full of life and a passion for understanding how things worked.

Kenneth W. Van Assche, 68, of Chelan Falls died when his plane crashed into an orchard about 6:30 a.m. on the 500 block of Howard Flats Road next to Lake Chelan Airport.

Van Assche had one daughter, his nephew David Van Assche told The Wenatchee World Wednesday.

Van Assche was “always willing to go out of his way to help people” and “excited and passionate about his work and play,” David Van Assche said.

Semi-retired after operating a tractor company for years, Van Assche pursued his dream of getting his pilot’s license last year, David Van Assche said.

Van Assche was a longtime member of the Cascade Drift Skippers snowmobile club. Club members mourned his death on the group’s Facebook page, recounting his kind ways, snowmobiling trips and the gatherings he hosted at his home on the Columbia River.

Rebecca H. wrote: Kenny had so many friends for good reason. "I remember the time Kenny was awarded the 'Sir Helpsalot' trophy designed especially and only for him. Kenny was one of a kind and will be missed by many friends.”

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

Original article ➤ https://www.wenatcheeworld.com





UPDATE: The Chelan County Coroner has identified the victim of a Monday morning plane crash near the Chelan Airport as 68-year-old Kenneth William Van Assche of Chelan Falls. Positive identification was made from dental records. The Coroner listed the cause of death as asphyxia due to the inhalation of products of combustion and thermal injuries. The cause of the plane crash is being investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board.
=====

The pilot of a fixed-wing aircraft was killed early this morning in a crash near the Chelan Airport.

The Chelan County Sheriff’s Office and Chelan Fire and Rescue responded to the crash scene to find the plane nose down in the orchard and completely engulfed in flames. 

As Zimmerman mentioned, the investigation into the early morning plane crash has now been turned over to the Chelan County Coroner’s office and to investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board. The NTSB is an independent U.S. government investigative agency responsible for civil transportation accident investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://lakechelannow.com