Sunday, October 1, 2017

Boeing T-45C Goshawk, US Navy: Accident occurred October 01, 2017 in Tellico Plains, Monroe County, Tennessee

An undated file photo of Lt. Patrick L. Ruth, 31, of Metairie, Louisiana. Ruth was one of two pilots who were killed Oct. 1 when their T-45C aircraft crashed in Tellico Plains, Tennessee. 

An undated file photo of Lt. j.g. Wallace E. Burch, 25, of Horn Lake, Mississippi. Burch was one of two pilots who were killed Oct. 1 when their T-45C aircraft crashed in Tellico Plains, Tennessee. 



TELLICO PLAINS - UPDATE Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017: The U.S. Navy has identified the two pilots who died in a plane crash in Cherokee National Forest on Sunday as 31-year-old Lt. Patrick L. Ruth, of Metairie, Louisiana, and 25-year-old Lt. j.g. Wallace E. Burch, of Horn Lake, Mississippi.

Both pilots were assigned to the "Eagles" of Training Squadron (VT) 7 based at Naval Air Station Meridian, Mississippi, the Navy said. 

Ruth had been a member of the squadron since 2015, and had served in the Navy for nine years. Burch joined VT-7 in 2016, and had served in the Navy for three years. 

The Navy previously said the T-45C Goshawk was carrying an instructor and a pilot when it crashed near Tellico Plains.

The investigation into the cause of the crash is ongoing.

UPDATE Monday, Oct. 2, 2017 at noon: The U.S. Navy has confirmed that the two pilots aboard a military aircraft that crashed in the Cherokee National Forest did not survive the crash.

Monroe County EMA Director David Chambers expects a military investigation into how the crash happened.

Earlier, officials said that an instructor and trainer were on board the T-45C Goshawk.

A community near the crash is sending prayers to the families of the pilots who were lost.

"It's sad, it's heartbreaking," said resident Marcie Moats.

Moats works at the Green Cove Store and Motel, just a few miles from the crash.

"And when you hear like a siren, and a few minutes later another one and few minutes later another one, then that's out of the ordinary."

It wasn't ordinary for resident Charles Murphy either--he saw the plane before it crashed.

"It was extremely low," said Murphy. "Otherwise nothing seemed wrong with it."

He says planes fly over all the time.

"We were unable to hear a boom or anything," said Murphy. "And until the emergency vehicles started appearing everywhere, did not know that anything had happened."

But the response of the community to help in whatever way they could encouraged Murphy.

"It's just what it's about," said Murphy. "You know, people taking care of people. But, you know, that's a rough day."

UPDATE Monday, Oct. 2, 2017 at 10:30 a.m.: Crews have arrived at the Cherokee National Forest to begin searching the site of a U.S. Navy jet crash.

The U.S. Navy said the T-45C Goshawk jet was flying from Meridian, Miss. It was carrying an instructor and a student at the time of the crash. 

On Sunday, UT Lifestar and Knox County Sheriff's Office helicopters were sent to that area to look for parachutes from above, but Monroe County EMA says none were found.

A helicopter returned Monday morning to begin searching.

The Monroe County Sheriff's Facebook page shared a post stating the crash happened near the fish hatchery on River Road in Tellico Plains.

A release from the U.S. Navy said two pilots were aboard the aircraft, an instructor and a student. Their status is unknown at this time.

The Chief of Naval Air Training is investigating the site of the crash as well as Monroe County authorities, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the U.S. Forestry Division.

David Chambers with Monroe County EMA said the operations in that area have been suspended, and security will be maintained overnight.

The aircraft was a T-45C Goshawk jet flying from Meridian, Miss. and was training near the area, according to the U.S. Navy's Twitter account.

The aircraft can carry a crew of two people and can fly at speeds of 645 miles per hour.

UT Lifestar and Knox County Sheriff's Office helicopters were sent to that area to look for parachutes from above, but Monroe County EMA says none were found.

UPDATE, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 at 7:40 p.m.: Monroe County Sheriff's Office is at the scene of this crash. The FAA could not offer details about the crash and referred 10News to the the U.S. military for more information.

According to the Adjutant General Terry M. Haston with the Tennessee National Guard, "All Tennessee National (Guard) Aircraft are accounted for."

Previous story: Monroe County Sheriff's Office says county units are on the way to the scene of a plane crash in the Cherokee National Forest.

The Monroe County Sheriff's Facebook page shared a post stating the crash happened near the fish hatchery on River Road in Tellico Plains.

Dispatch says crews are on their way to the scene now.

It's unknown at this time what kind of plane and whether or not there are injuries.


Story and video ➤ http://www.wkyc.com

MONROE COUNTY, Tenn. (WVLT) -- The United States military confirmed to Local 8 News a military aircraft crashed Sunday in Tellico Plains.

In a post to its Facebook page, the Monroe County Sheriff's Office said the jet crashed in the Cherokee National Forest near the fish hatchery on River Road.

Investigators told Local 8 News they are keeping civilians three miles away from the crash site because the jet had explosives in it.

The U.S. Navy said in a news release that it's possibly a T-45 Goshawk jet aircraft from Training Air Wing ONE, based out of Meridian, Mississippi. The release stated the aircraft was training in the area and had not yet returned to the air station.

The Navy said there were two pilots aboard the aircraft — an instructor and a student. Their status is unknown at this time, but Federal authorities at the scene said they assume the crash is fatal.

"All indications are that there are no survivors, Monroe County Emergency Management Director David Chambers said. "We were able to get all the way to the cockpit area of the site, so as of this time we're assuming that — until we can have confirmation — there was no sign of survivors."

Authorities stopped recovery efforts Sunday night because of the explosives present at the crash site. The National Guard will be on the scene Monday to help find the plane.

Chambers said there's currently a no-fly zone around the crash site, to prevent any unnecessary air traffic.

Story and video:  http://www.local8now.com



TELLICO PLAINS (WATE) – Monroe County Emergency Management Agency confirms a military aircraft did crash near Tellico Plains Sunday evening and that there are likely no survivors in the crash.

The military plane was coming from Meridian, Mississippi.

According to a press release from a Navy base in Meridian, Mississippi said that a T-45C has been reported missing. “At this time, we know the wing had a T-45C Goshawk training in the vicinity of Tellico Plains that has not yet returned to the air station. The two passengers on board the T-45C were an instructor and a student. Their status is unknown at this time,” they said in the release.

The call came in around 4:00 p.m. The crash reportedly happening in the Cherokee National Forest near the Fish Hatchery on River Road.

A spokesperson for the FAA referred WATE 6 On Your Side to the U.S. Military. The Tennessee National Guard said it was not one of their planes. A spokesperson for the National Guard Public Affairs office in Virginia says “To the best of my knowledge, it was not a National Guard aircraft.”

The U.S. Navy did send a tweet out saying that a T-45C was training in the area of Tellico Plains.

Story and video:  http://wate.com




The U.S. Navy said on Twitter its aircraft crashed in the Cherokee National Forest near Tellico Plains Sunday afternoon, WBIR-TV in Knoxville reported.

The station quoted a Navy news release saying a pilot instructor and a student were aboard the T-45C jet out of Meridian, Miss., that was training in the area.

A witness described the crash to the Times Free Press on Sunday night. 

John DeArmond described himself in an email as a retired engineer who used to do contract work for the naval air station at Charleston, S.C., now called Joint Base Charleston. He's also an aviation enthusiast.

DeArmond said he lives about a mile and a half from the crash site and that the Air National Guard out of Knoxville routinely runs "NAP-of-the-earth" drills up through the Tellico River valley.

"It is a thrill to hear the immense roar and if one is quick enough, get a glimpse of the fighters," he wrote.

He said he was sitting in the Green Cove Store and Motel at about 4:40 p.m.Sunday when a fighter jet passed directly overhead "going low and slow and not sounding healthy." 

He drove up River Road and arrived at the crash site at the Holder Cove campground about 2 miles above the Tellico Trout Hatchery. He saw debris on the road and a burning engine high on the hill above the road.

"The fire burned out before I left. There was an odor of lube oil but no jet fuel odor. My conclusion is that the pilot ran out of fuel," DeArmond wrote.

He went back to the store and watched local responders and later federal officials pass by on their way to the site. He said a medical chopper dropped down, loaded up something and "took off in a bee line toward Knoxville."

The investigation will continue today, authorities said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.timesfreepress.com

New restaurant opens at Helena Regional Airport (KHLN), Lewis and Clark County, Montana



After more than six months without a restaurant at the Helena Regional Airport, Smokejumper Station is now open for business. 

The restaurant, which opened last week, has options for people to sit down or order at the counter for faster service. Owner Paul Mabie said he’s opening a market adjacent to the restaurant with daily soups and a sandwich and salad bar. A coffee and snack bar has been open for several months for travelers once they pass through security, but Mabie said he wants the restaurant to attract non-travelers as well.

While the restaurant should have steady business as the only food option in the airport, Mabie said he expects a lot of his business to be non-travelers. Boeing is close by and several government buildings are on the airport complex. During his first week in business, Mabie had tables filled with firefighters and people from the National Guard.


Smokejumper Station Owner Paul Mabie discusses the restaurant's future.


“There’s a lot of hidden business here,” he said.

Mabie has 20 years in the hospitality industry and has worked at the ticket counter for SkyWest Airlines. His chef moved from Livingston and used to be the executive chef at Chico Hot Springs. He’s hired 30 mostly part-time people and expects to hire more once the market opens and the restaurant starts catering for the 7,000-square-foot meeting space at the airport.

Since the former airport restaurant Captain Jack’s closed, Mabie has renovated the entire space and developed a menu to appeal to everyone since it’s the only option at the airport.

“We really gave the entire place a face-lift,” he said.




The menu features salads, burgers, sandwiches and burritos and will eventually have several Thai and Vietnamese options as well. 

Mabie is incorporating as many Montana-made products as possible. Local and organic chicken will come from Montana and the grass-fed beef comes from a ranch in Wilsall. The coffee is from Kalispell and the tea from Big Timber. The airport owns a unique liquor license which allows people to get beer, wine and spirits at the restaurant and to go.

Smokejumper Station starts serving breakfast at 5 a.m. and is open until 8 p.m. seven days a week. It will eventually stay open until 11 p.m.

Original article and photo gallery ➤ http://helenair.com

New York City Police Department deploys first plane since 1959, will be used to detect nuclear terrorism

A. Daniels (left), co-pilot K. Conlan (center) and pilot J. Varga (right) on September 29, 2017 in New Jersey. 



Over the years, the NYPD has deployed everything from bicycles to Segways to a blimp. Now, for the first time in 58 years, it’s the proud owner of an airplane, the Daily News has learned.

Federal funds covered most of the cost of the $3 million single-engine turboprop, which carries ultra-sensitive equipment that can detect radiation from the air.

“If we detect a potential dirty bomb in the port, it’s already too close,” said Inspector James Coan, commanding officer of the Aviation Unit. “The plane allows us to detect an anomaly a half-a-day to a day before it reaches the port.”

 The plane, used during last month’s UN General Assembly, also carries a camera with infrared capabilities that can send sharp images and video back to headquarters in real time.

The plane can stay in the air five to six hours without refueling, besting NYPD helicopters that can fly for no more than two hours.

The longer air time would allow the plane, for example, to fly over a New York City-bound container ship 200 miles from the city that might have radioactive material aboard.


Pilot J. Varga flying the new plane. It is equipped with 10 leather seats, can stay in the air for five to six hours without refueling.



"The equipment will be able to tell the nature of the isotope and the strength of the isotope," Coan said. “We then notify the Coast Guard, and they will stop the vessel and board it to locate the source of the reading.”

 The Department of Homeland Security provided 75% of the funding while the city kicked in 25%, he said.

With 10 leather seats, the plane is crewed by two pilots and someone to operate the surveillance devices. Fifteen members of the 85-person unit are trained to fly it.

The plane has no NYPD markings to make it less conspicuous, and the department asked The News not to disclose its make, model or tail number.

“We operate it like an unmarked police car,” Coan said.

The NYPD has had its own air force since 1929, when it founded the first police aviation unit in the country, using the planes of the era, Coan said.

“The reason was that pilots from World War I were coming back barnstorming and doing things like landing in Central Park and flying recklessly,” he said.

In 1949, the department added its first helicopter, a Bell 47. A decade later, it moved to an all-helicopter fleet.

“In an urban area, the helicopters had more utility than the planes,” Coan said.

 Starting around 2010, Coan began considering adding a plane to the department’s fleet.

“When I first started talking about it, they said ‘Why do we need a plane?’” he said.



He learned that most large municipal and state police agencies have planes. But there was another reason.

With stopping another terror attack after 9/11 a priority, Coan recognized there was a gap in the security net that protects the city, which has one of the busiest ports in the country.

 “There’s a tremendous amount of stuff going in and out of the port,” he said. “Defending the port was the perfect application for the plane.”

By the way, the department’s blimp, festooned with NYPD logos, was most notably deployed during the protests surrounding the 2004 Republican National Convention.

Original article and photo gallery ➤ http://www.nydailynews.com

Brantly B-2B, N2284U, registered to Attitude Toys Inc and operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred October 01, 2017 in Midland, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Attitude Toys Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2284U

NTSB Identification: CEN18FA001
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 01, 2017 in Midland, MI
Aircraft: BRANTLY B 2B, registration: N2284U
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 1, 2017, at 1447 eastern daylight time, a Brantly B-2B helicopter, N2284U, was substantially damaged during landing in an open field near Midland, Michigan. The pilot sustained fatal injuries and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to Attitude Toys, Inc. and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the same open field shortly before the accident.

A witness reported flying with the accident pilot from the Jack Barstow Airport (KIKW), about 10 miles east-northeast from the accident site, earlier in the day. The pilot landed near the southwest corner of the field in order to attend a family gathering at a home adjoining the field. This witness stated that some minor turbulence was encountered, but that the flight was otherwise uneventful.

The passenger stated that during the gathering, he decided to take a flight around the field with the pilot. He recalled that the helicopter "shook" a little on takeoff, which he thought was related to local winds. He noted that the tail of the helicopter started to "sway" as they flew over the house located along the east edge of the field, but that the pilot subsequently steadied the helicopter. Near the northeast corner of the field, the helicopter began descending, slowly at first and then more rapidly. He again attributed this to local wind conditions. The rotor speed increased, but the helicopter impacted the ground and subsequently rolled onto its left side before coming to rest. He added that the engine did not quit and that he turned it off with the ignition/magneto key after the accident.

The field was about 900 feet (north to south) by 800 feet (east to west). The accident flight departed from near the southwest corner of the field. The home the helicopter flew over was located along the eastern edge of the field, about 300 feet from the northern boundary. The accident site was located at the north boundary of the field, which was about 0.16 mile north-northeast from the departure point. The helicopter came to rest on its left side oriented on a northwesterly bearing.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

Paul W. Pangborn, 76, of Midland, passed away Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. The son of the late Weyant and Helen (Johnson) Pangborn was born May 29, 1941 in Belding, later moving to Midland where he was raised and educated. He was the first graduating class of the current Midland High School. Paul served his country with the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War. He was an owner and operator of Pangborn Marine where he made many close friends. Paul was a member of the Total Freedom Flyers. He was an amazing man and a family hero. He will be greatly missed. 

Paul is survived by his fiancée, Joanne Jolliffe; son, Jon (Amy) Pangborn of Midland; daughter, Janis (Michael) Schweinsberg of Midland; step-daughter, Jacqueline (Jeff) Haller; step-son, Chris Jolliffe; grandchildren, Ashley Bair, Andrew (Corina) Bair, Lexi (Justin) Burkett, Kacelyn Pangborn, Bryanna Mogg, Devon Schweinsberg, Nicole, Jessica and Whitney; and three great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his brother, Ken (Pat) Pangborn; nieces, Jennifer (Dave) St. Sauver, Tammy, Terri, Tiffany, Mary; nephews, Mick, Marc, Mark, Cory; sister-in-law, Ruth Pangborn; brother-in-law, Ron Rumple. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his brother, Dan.


Funeral services will take place at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 at Wilson MILLER Funeral Home with Fr. Kevin Maksym of Blessed Sacrament Church officiating. Military and committal services will follow in Midland City Cemetery. Family will receive friends at the funeral home on Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. and on Thursday from 10 a.m. until the time of service. Memorials in Paul's name may be offered to the local Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Chapter No. 1093 for the purpose of educating the Young Eagles. Personal messages of condolence may be offered at www.wilson-miller.com




A 76-year-old Midland man died after the helicopter he was piloting crashed Sunday.

The Midland County Sheriff’s Office reported this morning the crash occurred at 2:48 p.m. in Lee Township. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Paul Weyant Pangborn was piloting the aircraft, which took off from a North 11 Mile Road address with a passenger, Pangborn’s 16-year-old grandson, Devon Schweinsberg, of Lee Township.

The helicopter flew east toward North 11 Mile Road, then headed north to West Olson Road. Pangborn started to head west, but the helicopter rotated and for unknown reasons started to slowly descend. It crash landed in a field near the corner of North 11 Mile and West Olson roads, tilting onto its right side.

Pangborn and Schweinsberg were taken to MidMichigan Medical Center-Midland. Pangborn later was pronounced dead. Schweinsberg was treated for minor injuries and was released.

Pangborn owned the 1965 Brantly Hynes model B-2B helicopter, Federal Aviation Administration registration number N2284U, that he was piloting.

Deputies were assisted by Lee Township firefighters, MidMichigan Medical Center EMS and Deputy Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Dennis Wagner.

“The family has asked to have time to grieve without interruption,” Midland County Sheriff Scott Stephenson stated in a media release. “The property owners of where the crash occurred have asked for people to respect their privacy and not trespass on their property.”

Original article ➤ http://www.ourmidland.com



MIDLAND COUNTY (WJRT) - (10/01/17) - A 76-year-old grandfather died when his helicopter crashed in Midland County Sunday.

Sheriff Scott Stephenson said his 16-year-old grandson, the only other person on board, survived and only had minor injuries.

The man was identified as Paul Pangborn of Midland.

The crash happened on 11 Mile Road north of M-20 and south of Olson Road just after 2:45 p.m.

The teen told investigators the helicopter had lifted off, and he felt there may have been a change in the wind. It knocked the helicopter on it's side, broke the rotors and smashed the windshield. The helicopter then went into a tailspin and crashed.

Pangborn later died at the hospital.

The sheriff said Pangborn had flown to his grandson's birthday party and had just picked him up when the crash happened.

The helicopter was a Brantly-Hynes 1965 Model B-2 Single Engine, according to Stephenson.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be taking over the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.abc12.com





MIDLAND, MI (WNEM) -  A helicopter crashed down in Midland on 11 Mile Rd, north of M20 and south of Olson.

The chopper had two passengers, a 76-year-old grandfather, Paul Pangborn, and his grandson.

The grandfather picked up his grandson in Lee Township for a helicopter ride for his 16th birthday. 

The helicopter was a vintage Brantly Hynes Model 2B, which was made in 1965.

Responders got the call around 3 p.m. on Oct. 1.


Pangborn died in the crash and the grandson was treated at Mid-Michigan Medical Center.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wnem.com




MIDLAND COUNTY, MICHIGAN -- A helicopter crashed Sunday afternoon in Midland County, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The crash took place around 1:45 p.m. Sunday, October 1st in Midland County. 

Michigan State Police Lt. David Kaiser said the crash occurred north of the city of Midland, north of M-20, and there were two people inside the rotorcraft. 

Officials with the Midland County Sheriff's Office could not be immediately reached for comment on injuries or conditions of those in the helicopter. 

Federal Aviation Administration officials did not provide any further information regarding the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the incident along with the National Transportation Safety Board and Midland County Sheriff's Office.


Original article and comments ➤ http://www.mlive.com

Beech V35B Bonanza, N6KG: Incident occurred October 01, 2017 at Nashua Airport / Boire Field (KASH), Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aircraft on landing went off the side of the runway.

http://registry.faa.gov/N6KG

Date: 01-OCT-17
Time: 16:36:00Z
Regis#: N6KG
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: V35
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NASHUA
State: NEW HAMPSHIRE




NASHUA, New Hampshire —

Nashua Fire Rescue said it responded to a small plane crash Sunday at the Nashua Airport, also known as Boire Field.

Fire officials said the plane was attempting to land on the runway but hit the adjacent grassy area. That caused the plane to veer off the runway and travel several hundred yards before stopping in a culvert along the outer edge of the field.

Both occupants got out on their own and were uninjured.

There was no fuel leakage or hazards found.

The airport was closed until authorities were able to remove the plane.

The Nashua Airport Authority and the New Hampshire Department of Transportation will investigate the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wmur.com

Piper PA-32R-301T Saratoga II TC, N1054S: Accident occurred October 01, 2017 at Block Island State Airport (KBID), New Shoreham, Washington County, Rhode Island

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aircraft landed and went off the end of the runway, through a fence into a field.

http://registry.faa.gov/N1054S

Date: 01-OCT-17
Time: 17:00:00Z
Regis#: N1054S
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BLOCK ISLAND
State: RHODE ISLAND




NEW SHOREHAM, R.I. (WJAR) — Two people were med-flighted to a local hospital after a small plane crash on Block Island early Sunday afternoon.

The crash happened shortly before 1 pm. 

The New Shoreham Police Chief, Vincent Carlone told NBC 10 that the pilot overshot the plane landing over the runway while attempting to make a smooth landing.

The plane crossed over Center Road, made contact with a fence and landed in a field 50 yards away from the runway.

Photos from the scene show the plane in several pieces following the crash.

Rhode Island Airport Corporation Official, Bill Fischer tells NBC 10 the victims suffered minor injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://turnto10.com



NEW SHOREHAM, R.I. (WPRI) – Two people were taken to the hospital after a small plane crash on Block Island Sunday afternoon.

New Shoreham Police Chief Vincent Carlone told Eyewitness News that there were two people onboard the plane, both of whom were injured and flown to Rhode Island Hospital via medical helicopter. Carlone said their injuries were minor.

Photos from the scene showed that the plane came to rest upside-down in a field, in several pieces.

Carlone said the plane overshot the runway while attempting to land at about 1 p.m. and crossed Center Road before ending up in the field.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wpri.com




A single-engine plane carrying two passengers overshot the runway during an attempt to land at Block Island Airport and crashed in the field across Center Road. 

A New Shoreham police officer at the scene said the two passengers were not seriously injured. 

The plane was in several pieces, and the fence surrounding the airport was damaged, as was the guardrail on the other side of the street, which looked like it had been clipped. 

The accident happened just before 1pm on Sunday, October 1st 

Original article  ➤ http://www.blockislandtimes.com

Aviation industry a huge lift for Southern Illinois' economy



Unless we are traveling or picking up someone from the airport, most of us likely do not give much consideration to the role aviation plays in the ability of Southern Illinois to work and its impact on the regional economy — and it is a significant impact.

“I think it is a very exciting time for aviation in Southern Illinois,” said Doug Kimmel, airport director for Veterans Airport of Southern Illinois.

Kimmel and other aviation and economic development leaders in the region say the industry is in growth mode.

“We’ve seen our operations here — things like aircraft takeoffs and landings increase fourfold in the last year,” he said.

Much of the increase is because of the presence of Airgo, a Centralia-based company which offers aviation training. Kimmel says the company is helping Chinese flight students achieve their private pilot licenses and earn in-flight hours with the goal of becoming airline pilots in their home country.




Cape Air continues to offer passenger service from the airport located between Herrin and Marion to St. Louis International Airport at Lambert Field. He says Cape Air’s ridership is also on the upswing.

“I think we can attribute that to a new airfare structure they have,” he said. “They are using a tiered structure where the sooner you booker your flight, the cheaper your seat.”

He says the airline, which offers multiple flights to and from St. Louis daily, is a significant economic development tool.

“For us a region, passenger service is one more arrow in the quiver for economic development,” he said. “It’s part of our transportation infrastructure. Just like Interstate 57 or Amtrak, it’s a means of accessing Southern Illinois without having to drive. For leisure travelers, it is a convenience. But from a business and economic perspective, it opens our region up for immediate access, not only for our business people to get to other places, but for others to be able to come here.”

Gary Shafer, manager of the Southern Illinois Airport, located between Carbondale and Murphysboro, said the ability to get to and from the region is vital.

“Access is critically important to participate in national and international commerce,” he said. “Having the ability to go from one of these airports to anywhere in the world is so important.”

Shafer says the strength of aviation nationally comes from an increase in the number of people flying nationally as well as the increase in the use of private jets by business, and an increase in demand for commercial pilots and mechanics.

The need for additional pilots is of particular importance to Shafer and Southern Illinois Airport, which serves as the base for Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s aviation program. Annually, the program turns out dozens of pilots, airplane mechanics and other aviation professionals as one of the nation’s top aviation programs.

“The university is a strong and large tenant of the airport facility,” Shafer said. “It has been that way since 1960 and they have grown considerably since then. It has been and continues to be a great partnership.”

Carbondale Economic Development Director Steve Mitchell said the airport is an asset to the community and region.




“For the Southern Illinois Airport, the benefits are multi-faceted,” he said. “Not only do you have the great work of SIU aviation and the attention that particular program brings to SIU and the region, but having the airport here is hugely important during site selection and site visits for businesses considering Southern Illinois. I don’t think the region could really move forward without some sort of air transportation. It’s a major factor as companies look at our community and region for potential business placement.”

The airports are not just for coming and going, but also are actively pursuing businesses to locate on their property.

“One of the missions we have is to develop property,” Shafer said. “We have identified a number of parcels for both aviation and non-aviation development. We’ve ramped up our efforts to attract companies her that could take advantage of low-cost space, available talent in the aria and other resources that are available here with a relatively low cost of living. I expect we’ll continue to see that across the region.”

Shafer said several companies have located on airport property and that these businesses continue to make an impact on the local and regional economies.

“We are working closely with the Southern Illinois Airport Authority to place aviation-related businesses on their property,” said Cheryl Benn, executive director of Jackson Growth Alliance. "Any business that serves the aviation industry such as those that manufacture parts or do maintenance or those businesses which have a need for flying as part of their business operations are all a good fit.”

A 2011 State of Illinois economic impact study of every airport in the state showed that airports are key players in regional economy. The study showed that the Southern Illinois Airport had an economic impact of $68 million annually and that Veterans Airport of Southern Illinois had an impact of nearly $22 million.

Both airport directors think those numbers are lean.

“I’d guess it has gone up since then,” Kimmel said. “With the addition of Airgo, new buildings in the airport business park and more all have really generated a lot of activity for our communities. Plus, since we just finished the construction of the new airline terminal, that was a construction job of $15 million that generated a lot of economic development itself.”

Shafer added, “The study included the purchases by the businesses that are located here, payroll figures, supplies and inputs and the turn-over of those dollars. I think they study used a multiplier of 1.2, which I think is very conservative.”

Combined, the impact of just the two larger airports in the region approaches $100 million annually, without considering the numerous smaller airports across the region. Together, it means that aviation is a big part of the local economy, and leaders expect more.

“I think the years will show that it all plays together — the educational aspects, the business aspects and the access,” Kimmel says. “Route 13, I-57, Amtrak and the airports all combining as a sort of crossroads for transportation that can attract and accommodate business activity. I wholeheartedly see future growth. The sky is the limit for potential.”

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Beechcraft P35 Bonanza, N877DM: Fatal accident occurred October 06, 2015 near Chadron Municipal Airport (KCDR), Dawes County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

John J. Prickett: http://registry.faa.gov/N877DM 




NTSB Identification: CEN16FA005 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 06, 2015 in Chadron, NE
Aircraft: BEECH P35, registration: N877DM
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 6, 2015, about 1125 mountain daylight time, a Beech P35 (Bonanza) single-engine airplane, N877DM, collided with trees and terrain during cruise flight near Chadron, Nebraska. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight with an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan on file. Day instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) prevailed at the accident site. The cross-country flight departed Chadron Municipal Airport (CDR), Chadron, Nebraska, at 1121, and was destined for Alliance Municipal Airport (AIA), Alliance, Nebraska.

According to available flight plan information, on the morning of the accident the pilot filed two flight plans using a direct user access terminal service. The first flight plan was for an IFR flight from North Platte Regional Airport, North Platte, Nebraska, to CDR. The second IFR flight plan was for the accident flight between CDR and AIA. The pilot filed for a direct routing from CDR to BOOKY (a IFR reporting point), then direct to JIVAM (an initial approach fix to AIA), and a cruise altitude of 7,000 ft mean sea level (msl). A fixed-base operator (FBO) employee at CDR reported seeing the airplane arrive on the ramp about 1050. The pilot and passenger subsequently entered the main lobby briefly to use the restroom. The pilot did not use the FBO's weather system before he exited the lobby to the ramp. The FBO employee then observed the pilot walk around the airplane a couple of times before he boarded. The airplane taxied from the ramp about 1110.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic control (ATC) track data, the airplane transmitted automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B) position data throughout the flight. A review of the ADS-B data established that the flight departed CDR on runway 11 about 1121:19. After departure, the flight turned right toward the south and proceeded toward the intended destination.

At 1122:16, the pilot established radio contact with Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and transmitted, "Eight seven seven delta mike, off of Chadron, I would like to pick up an IFR to, ah, Alliance." The controller replied, "November eight seven seven delta mike, Denver Center roger, ah, stand-by." About 8 seconds later, the controller issued a discrete transponder code, which the pilot correctly acknowledged. At 1122:52, the assigned transponder code updated on the controller's display, which indicated the flight was at 4,200 ft msl and had a ground speed of 145 knots. According to the ADS-B data, the flight proceeded south between 4,200 and 4,400 ft msl and at ground speeds between 135 and 155 knots.

According to recorded ATC transmissions, there were no verbal exchanges between the controller and the pilot during the 2.5 minutes following the issuance of the transponder code; however, the controller was actively communicating with several other aircraft that were operating within his airspace sector. At 1125:16, the ADS-B data indicated that the airplane was at 4,200 ft msl and had a ground speed of 143 knots. No additional track data was received from the airplane. At 1125:23, the controller transmitted, "November eight seven seven delta mike, radar contact nine miles south of the Chadron airport, say altitude." There was no response from the pilot.

According to ADS-B track data and topographic elevation data, the airplane encountered rising terrain as it continued south from the departure airport. The airplane subsequently impacted treetops and a ridgeline about 10 miles south of the departure airport at 4,200 ft msl. The height of the ridgeline was about 900 ft above the departure airport elevation.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to FAA records, the 61-year-old pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with single-engine land, multi-engine land, and instrument airplane ratings. The single-engine land rating was limited to commercial privileges. He had been employed as a pilot by American Airlines since 1989 and was type-rated for the Boeing 727, Boeing 737, Boeing 757, Boeing 767, Douglas DC-9, Fokker 100, and Lockheed JetStar. He also held a flight instructor certificate with single-engine, multi-engine, and instrument airplane ratings and a flight engineer certificate for turbojet airplanes. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued on June 10, 2015, with a limitation for corrective lenses. On the application for his current medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 18,900 hours of total flight experience, of which 400 hours were flown within the previous 6 months.

A current pilot logbook was not located during the investigation; the pilot's most recent logbook entry was dated December 16, 2004. According to an insurance application that was submitted for the operation of the airplane, dated July 24, 2015, the pilot reported having a total flight experience of 19,010 hours, of which 939 hours were flown within the previous year. The pilot reported having flown 195 hours in Beech Bonanza airplanes. According to the insurance application, the pilot's last flight review was completed on June 20, 2015.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a 1963 Beech P35 (Bonanza), serial number D-7238. The airplane was a single-engine, low-wing, monoplane of conventional aluminum construction. The airplane was powered by a 285-horsepower, 6-cylinder Continental IO-520-CB-C-BB reciprocating engine, serial number 576182. The engine provided thrust through a constant-speed, three-blade, Hartzell PHC-C3YF-1RF propeller, serial number EE2277A. The airplane was equipped for operations in IMC. The airplane had a maximum allowable takeoff weight of 3,300 pounds and a total fuel capacity of 110 gallons. The FAA issued the airplane a standard category airworthiness certificate on August 6, 1963.

The airplane's recording tachometer was destroyed during the postimpact fire, which precluded a determination of the airplane's total service time at the time of the accident. According to the maintenance logbooks, the last annual inspection was completed on June 11, 2015, at 4,078.86 total airframe hours. At the time of the annual inspection, the engine had accumulated 1,953.08 hours since new and 212.77 hours since the last major overhaul, which was completed on April 29, 2005. The static system, altimeter system, automatic pressure altitude reporting system, and transponder were last tested on March 13, 2015. A postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The National Weather Service (NWS) Surface Analysis Chart issued at 1200 depicted a cold front extending from southern Wyoming east into central Nebraska then northeast into southern Minnesota. The weather station models depicted cloudy skies and a variable surface wind under 5 knots for locations near the accident site. The NWS Area Forecast Discussion issued at 0704 mentioned areas of dense fog and low cloud ceilings near the departure airport and the planned destination. Further, the forecast indicated a slow improvement in weather conditions through the morning hours; however, the conditions were not forecast to improve above marginal visual meteorological conditions (VMC). At the time of the accident, the terminal forecast for CDR indicated a surface wind from 100° at 8 knots, visibility greater than 6 miles, scattered clouds at 700 ft above ground level (agl), and an overcast ceiling at 2,000 ft agl.

At 1053, about 32 minutes before the accident, the CDR automated surface observing system (ASOS) reported: calm wind, 9 miles surface visibility, broken ceiling at 1,500 ft agl and an overcast ceiling at 3,400 ft agl, temperature 14°C, dewpoint 11°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.25 inches of mercury.

At 1153, about 28 minutes after the accident, the CDR ASOS reported: calm wind, 9 miles surface visibility, few clouds at 1,600 ft agl and an overcast ceiling at 3,000 ft agl, temperature 15°C, dew point 11°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of mercury.

An individual, who had been working outside near the accident site, reported that throughout the morning there had been light precipitation, mist, fog, and low clouds that obscured the surrounding ridgelines. The individual also recalled that the weather conditions had improved shortly before noon.

A review of weather briefing requests made to official vendors revealed that the pilot had not received a formal weather briefing before departure.

COMMUNICATIONS

A review of available ATC information confirmed that the flight had received normal services and handling. A transcript of the voice communications recorded during the flight are included in the docket materials associated with the investigation.

The departure airport was equipped with a remote communication outlet (RCO) that provided a radio link to Columbia Flight Service Station; however, on the day of the accident, a notice to airman (NOTAM) indicated that the RCO was out of service. A RCO is routinely used by pilots to obtain an IFR clearance while on the ground. If a RCO is out of service, a pilot can telephone a flight service station to obtain an IFR clearance or, if the weather conditions permit, they can choose to depart under VFR and obtain an IFR clearance when airborne.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The initial impact point was identified by broken treetops that preceded a ridgeline, fractured tree limbs found along the ridgeline, red paint chips found on the ridgeline that matched the paint color of the airplane's lower fuselage, and a portion of the airplane's VHF marker beacon antenna. The initial impact point was about 250 ft south-southeast of the final recorded ADS-B position.

The main wreckage was in a canyon/ravine to the south-southeast of the initial impact point. A wreckage debris path, which initiated from the ridgeline, was about 560 ft long and oriented on a 160° magnetic heading. A large area of burnt ground and vegetation surrounded the main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, right wing, engine, and propeller. A majority of the fuselage, including the cockpit and cabin, had been consumed during the postimpact fire. The left wing had separated from the fuselage and was located further down in the ravine. Flight control cable continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress. The flaps were fully retracted. The nose and right main landing gear were fully retracted. The left main landing gear had separated from the wing during the impact sequence. The altimeter's Kollsman window was centered on 30.24 inches of mercury.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall, and the propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange. The three-blade propeller exhibited chordwise scratches, spanwise S-shape bends, and a leading edge gouge. One blade exhibited significant blade twisting along its span. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. Neither magneto provided a spark when rotated by hand; however, both magnetos exhibited damage consistent with impact and prolonged exposure to fire. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. A borescope inspection of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies with the cylinders, pistons, valves, or valve seats. The vacuum pump produced suction when rotated by hand. The mechanical fuel pump did not rotate freely by hand; however, further disassembly revealed thermal damage to the internal pump components. The fuel pump vanes and drive coupling were not fractured. The fuel metering unit inlet screen was clear and free of any obstructions. The postaccident examination did not reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal engine operation during the flight.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Regional West Medical Center, located in Scottsbluff, Nebraska, performed an autopsy on the pilot at the request of the Dawes County Attorney. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident. The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on specimens obtained during the autopsy. The test results were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and all tested drugs and medications.

ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

According to available ATC information, the pilot had not received an IFR clearance and, therefore, was still operating under VFR when the airplane impacted rising terrain at 4,200 ft msl. According to federal regulations, the Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), and FAA Order 7110.65 (Air Traffic Control), a pilot operating under VFR is responsible for terrain, obstacle, and cloud clearance until reaching the minimum en route altitude (MEA) or the minimum IFR altitude (MIA). The MEA is the lowest published altitude between radio navigation fixes that assures acceptable navigational signal coverage and meets obstacle clearance requirements between those fixes. However, any flight segment not on a published airway or route, such as the direct routing used on the accident flight, the MIA is 1,000 ft above the highest obstacle within a horizontal distance of 4 nautical miles (nm) from the course to be flown in a non-mountainous area. The departure airport and accident site were in a designated non-mountainous area. According to ATC documentation, the MIA was 6,000 ft msl over the departure airport and increased to 6,300 ft msl about 10 nm south of the airport.

According to the FAA Terminal Procedures Publication, the departure airport had non-standard takeoff minimums for runway 11 (a climb to 4,800 ft msl at 240 ft per nm if departing in IMC, or 1,200 ft agl ceiling and 3 sm visibility if departing in VMC). Although adherence with takeoff minimums and departure procedures are not required for 14 CFR Part 91 operations, the AIM encourages their use to ensure obstacle and terrain clearance.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA005
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 06, 2015 in Chadron, NE
Aircraft: BEECH P35, registration: N877DM
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 6, 2015, about 1125 mountain daylight time, a Beech model P35 single-engine airplane, N877DM, was destroyed during a postimpact fire after colliding with trees and terrain during cruise flight near Chadron, Nebraska. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. An instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed for the accident flight. Day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed at Chadron Municipal Airport (CDR), Chadron, Nebraska; however, instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) likely prevailed at the accident site. The personal flight departed CDR at 1121 and was enroute to Alliance Municipal Airport (AIA), Alliance, Nebraska.

According to preliminary Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Air Traffic Control (ATC) information, the airplane had transmitted Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) position data throughout the accident flight. A preliminary review of the available ADS-B data indicated that the flight departed runway 11 about 1121:19 (hhmm:ss). After departure, the flight made a right turn toward the south and proceeded toward the intended destination.

At 1122:16, the pilot established radio contact with Denver Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and then transmitted, "877DM, off of Chadron, I would like to pickup an IFR to, ah, Alliance." The controller replied, "Alright, 877DM, Denver Center roger, ah, stand-by." About 8 seconds later, the controller issued a discrete transponder code which the pilot correctly acknowledged. At 1122:52, the transponder code updated on the controller's radar scope, and indicated that the flight was at 4,200 feet mean sea level (msl) and had a ground speed of 145 knots. According to the available ADS-B data, as the flight proceeded southbound, the recorded altitudes varied between 4,200 to 4,400 feet msl with ground speeds varying between 135 and 155 knots.

According to ATC voice recordings, during the 2.5 minute period after the transponder code was issued to the accident flight, the controller communicated with multiple aircraft operating within the airspace sector. However, during the same 2.5 minute period, there were no recorded communications between the controller and the accident flight. At 1125:16, the ADS-B data indicated that the airplane was at 4,200 feet msl and had a ground speed of 143 knots. No additional ADS-B data was received from the accident airplane after 1125:16. At 1125:23, the controller transmitted, "N877DM, radar contact 9 miles south of the Chadron airport, say altitude." There was no response received from the accident flight.

According to the available aircraft position data and topographic elevation data, the flight encountered rising terrain as it continued southbound from the departure airport. The airplane impacted treetops and a ridgeline located at 4,200 feet msl. The initial impact point was located about 10 miles south of the departure airport, which was identified by broken treetops that preceded the ridgeline, fractured tree limbs found on the ridgeline, red paint chips found on the ridgeline that matched the paint color of the lower fuselage, and a portion of a very high frequency (VHF) marker beacon antenna. The final ADS-B position data, recorded at 1125:16, at 4,200 feet msl, was located 250 feet north-northwest of the initial impact point.

The main wreckage was located in a canyon/ravine located to the south-southeast of the initial impact point. A wreckage debris path, which initiated from the ridgeline, was about 560 feet long and oriented on a 160-degree magnetic heading. A large area of burnt ground and vegetation surrounded the main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, empennage, right wing, engine, and propeller. A majority of the fuselage, including the cockpit and cabin, had been consumed during the postimpact fire. The left wing had separated from the fuselage and was found further down in the ravine. Flight control continuity could not be established due to impact and fire damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress. The altimeter's Kollsman window was centered on 30.24 inches-of-mercury.

The engine remained partially attached to the firewall and the propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange. The three-blade propeller exhibited chordwise scratches, spanwise S-shape bends, and a leading edge gouge. One blade exhibited significant blade twisting along its span. Internal engine and valve train continuity was confirmed as the engine crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders in conjunction with crankshaft rotation. Neither magneto provided a spark when rotated by hand; however, both magnetos exhibited damage consistent with impact and prolonged exposure to fire. The upper spark plugs were removed and exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. A borescope inspection of each cylinder did not reveal any anomalies. The vacuum pump produced suction when rotated by hand. The mechanical fuel pump did not rotate freely by hand; however, further disassembly revealed thermal damage to the internal pump components. The fuel pump vanes and drive coupling were not fractured. The fuel metering unit inlet screen was clear and free of any obstructions. The postaccident examination revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal engine operation.

At 1053, the CDR automated surface observing system reported: calm wind; 9 mile surface visibility; broken ceiling at 1,500 feet above ground level (agl) and an overcast ceiling at 3,400 feet agl; temperature 14 degrees Celsius, dew point 11 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.25 inches of mercury.

At 1153, the CDR automated surface observing system reported: calm wind; 9 mile surface visibility; few clouds at 1,600 feet agl and an overcast ceiling at 3,000 feet agl; temperature 15 degrees Celsius, dew point 11 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 30.24 inches of mercury.

An individual, who was outside working near the accident site, reported that throughout the morning there had been light precipitation, mist, fog, and low clouds that obscured the surrounding ridgelines. The individual also recalled that the weather conditions had improved shortly before noon.