Sunday, October 1, 2017

Boeing T-45C Goshawk, US Navy: Accident occurred October 01, 2017 in Tellico Plains, Monroe County, Tennessee

An undated file photo of Lt. Patrick L. Ruth, 31, of Metairie, Louisiana. Ruth was one of two pilots who were killed Oct. 1 when their T-45C aircraft crashed in Tellico Plains, Tennessee. 

An undated file photo of Lt. j.g. Wallace E. Burch, 25, of Horn Lake, Mississippi. Burch was one of two pilots who were killed Oct. 1 when their T-45C aircraft crashed in Tellico Plains, Tennessee. 



TELLICO PLAINS - UPDATE Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017: The U.S. Navy has identified the two pilots who died in a plane crash in Cherokee National Forest on Sunday as 31-year-old Lt. Patrick L. Ruth, of Metairie, Louisiana, and 25-year-old Lt. j.g. Wallace E. Burch, of Horn Lake, Mississippi.

Both pilots were assigned to the "Eagles" of Training Squadron (VT) 7 based at Naval Air Station Meridian, Mississippi, the Navy said. 

Ruth had been a member of the squadron since 2015, and had served in the Navy for nine years. Burch joined VT-7 in 2016, and had served in the Navy for three years. 

The Navy previously said the T-45C Goshawk was carrying an instructor and a pilot when it crashed near Tellico Plains.

The investigation into the cause of the crash is ongoing.

UPDATE Monday, Oct. 2, 2017 at noon: The U.S. Navy has confirmed that the two pilots aboard a military aircraft that crashed in the Cherokee National Forest did not survive the crash.

Monroe County EMA Director David Chambers expects a military investigation into how the crash happened.

Earlier, officials said that an instructor and trainer were on board the T-45C Goshawk.

A community near the crash is sending prayers to the families of the pilots who were lost.

"It's sad, it's heartbreaking," said resident Marcie Moats.

Moats works at the Green Cove Store and Motel, just a few miles from the crash.

"And when you hear like a siren, and a few minutes later another one and few minutes later another one, then that's out of the ordinary."

It wasn't ordinary for resident Charles Murphy either--he saw the plane before it crashed.

"It was extremely low," said Murphy. "Otherwise nothing seemed wrong with it."

He says planes fly over all the time.

"We were unable to hear a boom or anything," said Murphy. "And until the emergency vehicles started appearing everywhere, did not know that anything had happened."

But the response of the community to help in whatever way they could encouraged Murphy.

"It's just what it's about," said Murphy. "You know, people taking care of people. But, you know, that's a rough day."

UPDATE Monday, Oct. 2, 2017 at 10:30 a.m.: Crews have arrived at the Cherokee National Forest to begin searching the site of a U.S. Navy jet crash.

The U.S. Navy said the T-45C Goshawk jet was flying from Meridian, Miss. It was carrying an instructor and a student at the time of the crash. 

On Sunday, UT Lifestar and Knox County Sheriff's Office helicopters were sent to that area to look for parachutes from above, but Monroe County EMA says none were found.

A helicopter returned Monday morning to begin searching.

The Monroe County Sheriff's Facebook page shared a post stating the crash happened near the fish hatchery on River Road in Tellico Plains.

A release from the U.S. Navy said two pilots were aboard the aircraft, an instructor and a student. Their status is unknown at this time.

The Chief of Naval Air Training is investigating the site of the crash as well as Monroe County authorities, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the U.S. Forestry Division.

David Chambers with Monroe County EMA said the operations in that area have been suspended, and security will be maintained overnight.

The aircraft was a T-45C Goshawk jet flying from Meridian, Miss. and was training near the area, according to the U.S. Navy's Twitter account.

The aircraft can carry a crew of two people and can fly at speeds of 645 miles per hour.

UT Lifestar and Knox County Sheriff's Office helicopters were sent to that area to look for parachutes from above, but Monroe County EMA says none were found.

UPDATE, Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017 at 7:40 p.m.: Monroe County Sheriff's Office is at the scene of this crash. The FAA could not offer details about the crash and referred 10News to the the U.S. military for more information.

According to the Adjutant General Terry M. Haston with the Tennessee National Guard, "All Tennessee National (Guard) Aircraft are accounted for."

Previous story: Monroe County Sheriff's Office says county units are on the way to the scene of a plane crash in the Cherokee National Forest.

The Monroe County Sheriff's Facebook page shared a post stating the crash happened near the fish hatchery on River Road in Tellico Plains.

Dispatch says crews are on their way to the scene now.

It's unknown at this time what kind of plane and whether or not there are injuries.


Story and video ➤ http://www.wkyc.com

MONROE COUNTY, Tenn. (WVLT) -- The United States military confirmed to Local 8 News a military aircraft crashed Sunday in Tellico Plains.

In a post to its Facebook page, the Monroe County Sheriff's Office said the jet crashed in the Cherokee National Forest near the fish hatchery on River Road.

Investigators told Local 8 News they are keeping civilians three miles away from the crash site because the jet had explosives in it.

The U.S. Navy said in a news release that it's possibly a T-45 Goshawk jet aircraft from Training Air Wing ONE, based out of Meridian, Mississippi. The release stated the aircraft was training in the area and had not yet returned to the air station.

The Navy said there were two pilots aboard the aircraft — an instructor and a student. Their status is unknown at this time, but Federal authorities at the scene said they assume the crash is fatal.

"All indications are that there are no survivors, Monroe County Emergency Management Director David Chambers said. "We were able to get all the way to the cockpit area of the site, so as of this time we're assuming that — until we can have confirmation — there was no sign of survivors."

Authorities stopped recovery efforts Sunday night because of the explosives present at the crash site. The National Guard will be on the scene Monday to help find the plane.

Chambers said there's currently a no-fly zone around the crash site, to prevent any unnecessary air traffic.

Story and video:  http://www.local8now.com



TELLICO PLAINS (WATE) – Monroe County Emergency Management Agency confirms a military aircraft did crash near Tellico Plains Sunday evening and that there are likely no survivors in the crash.

The military plane was coming from Meridian, Mississippi.

According to a press release from a Navy base in Meridian, Mississippi said that a T-45C has been reported missing. “At this time, we know the wing had a T-45C Goshawk training in the vicinity of Tellico Plains that has not yet returned to the air station. The two passengers on board the T-45C were an instructor and a student. Their status is unknown at this time,” they said in the release.

The call came in around 4:00 p.m. The crash reportedly happening in the Cherokee National Forest near the Fish Hatchery on River Road.

A spokesperson for the FAA referred WATE 6 On Your Side to the U.S. Military. The Tennessee National Guard said it was not one of their planes. A spokesperson for the National Guard Public Affairs office in Virginia says “To the best of my knowledge, it was not a National Guard aircraft.”

The U.S. Navy did send a tweet out saying that a T-45C was training in the area of Tellico Plains.

Story and video:  http://wate.com




The U.S. Navy said on Twitter its aircraft crashed in the Cherokee National Forest near Tellico Plains Sunday afternoon, WBIR-TV in Knoxville reported.

The station quoted a Navy news release saying a pilot instructor and a student were aboard the T-45C jet out of Meridian, Miss., that was training in the area.

A witness described the crash to the Times Free Press on Sunday night. 

John DeArmond described himself in an email as a retired engineer who used to do contract work for the naval air station at Charleston, S.C., now called Joint Base Charleston. He's also an aviation enthusiast.

DeArmond said he lives about a mile and a half from the crash site and that the Air National Guard out of Knoxville routinely runs "NAP-of-the-earth" drills up through the Tellico River valley.

"It is a thrill to hear the immense roar and if one is quick enough, get a glimpse of the fighters," he wrote.

He said he was sitting in the Green Cove Store and Motel at about 4:40 p.m.Sunday when a fighter jet passed directly overhead "going low and slow and not sounding healthy." 

He drove up River Road and arrived at the crash site at the Holder Cove campground about 2 miles above the Tellico Trout Hatchery. He saw debris on the road and a burning engine high on the hill above the road.

"The fire burned out before I left. There was an odor of lube oil but no jet fuel odor. My conclusion is that the pilot ran out of fuel," DeArmond wrote.

He went back to the store and watched local responders and later federal officials pass by on their way to the site. He said a medical chopper dropped down, loaded up something and "took off in a bee line toward Knoxville."

The investigation will continue today, authorities said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.timesfreepress.com

New restaurant opens at Helena Regional Airport (KHLN), Lewis and Clark County, Montana



After more than six months without a restaurant at the Helena Regional Airport, Smokejumper Station is now open for business. 

The restaurant, which opened last week, has options for people to sit down or order at the counter for faster service. Owner Paul Mabie said he’s opening a market adjacent to the restaurant with daily soups and a sandwich and salad bar. A coffee and snack bar has been open for several months for travelers once they pass through security, but Mabie said he wants the restaurant to attract non-travelers as well.

While the restaurant should have steady business as the only food option in the airport, Mabie said he expects a lot of his business to be non-travelers. Boeing is close by and several government buildings are on the airport complex. During his first week in business, Mabie had tables filled with firefighters and people from the National Guard.


Smokejumper Station Owner Paul Mabie discusses the restaurant's future.


“There’s a lot of hidden business here,” he said.

Mabie has 20 years in the hospitality industry and has worked at the ticket counter for SkyWest Airlines. His chef moved from Livingston and used to be the executive chef at Chico Hot Springs. He’s hired 30 mostly part-time people and expects to hire more once the market opens and the restaurant starts catering for the 7,000-square-foot meeting space at the airport.

Since the former airport restaurant Captain Jack’s closed, Mabie has renovated the entire space and developed a menu to appeal to everyone since it’s the only option at the airport.

“We really gave the entire place a face-lift,” he said.




The menu features salads, burgers, sandwiches and burritos and will eventually have several Thai and Vietnamese options as well. 

Mabie is incorporating as many Montana-made products as possible. Local and organic chicken will come from Montana and the grass-fed beef comes from a ranch in Wilsall. The coffee is from Kalispell and the tea from Big Timber. The airport owns a unique liquor license which allows people to get beer, wine and spirits at the restaurant and to go.

Smokejumper Station starts serving breakfast at 5 a.m. and is open until 8 p.m. seven days a week. It will eventually stay open until 11 p.m.

Original article and photo gallery ➤ http://helenair.com

New York City Police Department deploys first plane since 1959, will be used to detect nuclear terrorism

A. Daniels (left), co-pilot K. Conlan (center) and pilot J. Varga (right) on September 29, 2017 in New Jersey. 



Over the years, the NYPD has deployed everything from bicycles to Segways to a blimp. Now, for the first time in 58 years, it’s the proud owner of an airplane, the Daily News has learned.

Federal funds covered most of the cost of the $3 million single-engine turboprop, which carries ultra-sensitive equipment that can detect radiation from the air.

“If we detect a potential dirty bomb in the port, it’s already too close,” said Inspector James Coan, commanding officer of the Aviation Unit. “The plane allows us to detect an anomaly a half-a-day to a day before it reaches the port.”

 The plane, used during last month’s UN General Assembly, also carries a camera with infrared capabilities that can send sharp images and video back to headquarters in real time.

The plane can stay in the air five to six hours without refueling, besting NYPD helicopters that can fly for no more than two hours.

The longer air time would allow the plane, for example, to fly over a New York City-bound container ship 200 miles from the city that might have radioactive material aboard.


Pilot J. Varga flying the new plane. It is equipped with 10 leather seats, can stay in the air for five to six hours without refueling.



"The equipment will be able to tell the nature of the isotope and the strength of the isotope," Coan said. “We then notify the Coast Guard, and they will stop the vessel and board it to locate the source of the reading.”

 The Department of Homeland Security provided 75% of the funding while the city kicked in 25%, he said.

With 10 leather seats, the plane is crewed by two pilots and someone to operate the surveillance devices. Fifteen members of the 85-person unit are trained to fly it.

The plane has no NYPD markings to make it less conspicuous, and the department asked The News not to disclose its make, model or tail number.

“We operate it like an unmarked police car,” Coan said.

The NYPD has had its own air force since 1929, when it founded the first police aviation unit in the country, using the planes of the era, Coan said.

“The reason was that pilots from World War I were coming back barnstorming and doing things like landing in Central Park and flying recklessly,” he said.

In 1949, the department added its first helicopter, a Bell 47. A decade later, it moved to an all-helicopter fleet.

“In an urban area, the helicopters had more utility than the planes,” Coan said.

 Starting around 2010, Coan began considering adding a plane to the department’s fleet.

“When I first started talking about it, they said ‘Why do we need a plane?’” he said.



He learned that most large municipal and state police agencies have planes. But there was another reason.

With stopping another terror attack after 9/11 a priority, Coan recognized there was a gap in the security net that protects the city, which has one of the busiest ports in the country.

 “There’s a tremendous amount of stuff going in and out of the port,” he said. “Defending the port was the perfect application for the plane.”

By the way, the department’s blimp, festooned with NYPD logos, was most notably deployed during the protests surrounding the 2004 Republican National Convention.

Original article and photo gallery ➤ http://www.nydailynews.com

Brantly B-2B, N2284U, registered to Attitude Toys Inc and operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred October 01, 2017 in Midland, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Attitude Toys Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2284U

NTSB Identification: CEN18FA001
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 01, 2017 in Midland, MI
Aircraft: BRANTLY B 2B, registration: N2284U
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 1, 2017, at 1447 eastern daylight time, a Brantly B-2B helicopter, N2284U, was substantially damaged during landing in an open field near Midland, Michigan. The pilot sustained fatal injuries and the passenger sustained minor injuries. The helicopter was registered to Attitude Toys, Inc. and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the same open field shortly before the accident.

A witness reported flying with the accident pilot from the Jack Barstow Airport (KIKW), about 10 miles east-northeast from the accident site, earlier in the day. The pilot landed near the southwest corner of the field in order to attend a family gathering at a home adjoining the field. This witness stated that some minor turbulence was encountered, but that the flight was otherwise uneventful.

The passenger stated that during the gathering, he decided to take a flight around the field with the pilot. He recalled that the helicopter "shook" a little on takeoff, which he thought was related to local winds. He noted that the tail of the helicopter started to "sway" as they flew over the house located along the east edge of the field, but that the pilot subsequently steadied the helicopter. Near the northeast corner of the field, the helicopter began descending, slowly at first and then more rapidly. He again attributed this to local wind conditions. The rotor speed increased, but the helicopter impacted the ground and subsequently rolled onto its left side before coming to rest. He added that the engine did not quit and that he turned it off with the ignition/magneto key after the accident.

The field was about 900 feet (north to south) by 800 feet (east to west). The accident flight departed from near the southwest corner of the field. The home the helicopter flew over was located along the eastern edge of the field, about 300 feet from the northern boundary. The accident site was located at the north boundary of the field, which was about 0.16 mile north-northeast from the departure point. The helicopter came to rest on its left side oriented on a northwesterly bearing.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

Paul W. Pangborn, 76, of Midland, passed away Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017. The son of the late Weyant and Helen (Johnson) Pangborn was born May 29, 1941 in Belding, later moving to Midland where he was raised and educated. He was the first graduating class of the current Midland High School. Paul served his country with the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War. He was an owner and operator of Pangborn Marine where he made many close friends. Paul was a member of the Total Freedom Flyers. He was an amazing man and a family hero. He will be greatly missed. 

Paul is survived by his fiancée, Joanne Jolliffe; son, Jon (Amy) Pangborn of Midland; daughter, Janis (Michael) Schweinsberg of Midland; step-daughter, Jacqueline (Jeff) Haller; step-son, Chris Jolliffe; grandchildren, Ashley Bair, Andrew (Corina) Bair, Lexi (Justin) Burkett, Kacelyn Pangborn, Bryanna Mogg, Devon Schweinsberg, Nicole, Jessica and Whitney; and three great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his brother, Ken (Pat) Pangborn; nieces, Jennifer (Dave) St. Sauver, Tammy, Terri, Tiffany, Mary; nephews, Mick, Marc, Mark, Cory; sister-in-law, Ruth Pangborn; brother-in-law, Ron Rumple. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his brother, Dan.


Funeral services will take place at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 at Wilson MILLER Funeral Home with Fr. Kevin Maksym of Blessed Sacrament Church officiating. Military and committal services will follow in Midland City Cemetery. Family will receive friends at the funeral home on Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. and on Thursday from 10 a.m. until the time of service. Memorials in Paul's name may be offered to the local Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Chapter No. 1093 for the purpose of educating the Young Eagles. Personal messages of condolence may be offered at www.wilson-miller.com




A 76-year-old Midland man died after the helicopter he was piloting crashed Sunday.

The Midland County Sheriff’s Office reported this morning the crash occurred at 2:48 p.m. in Lee Township. The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Paul Weyant Pangborn was piloting the aircraft, which took off from a North 11 Mile Road address with a passenger, Pangborn’s 16-year-old grandson, Devon Schweinsberg, of Lee Township.

The helicopter flew east toward North 11 Mile Road, then headed north to West Olson Road. Pangborn started to head west, but the helicopter rotated and for unknown reasons started to slowly descend. It crash landed in a field near the corner of North 11 Mile and West Olson roads, tilting onto its right side.

Pangborn and Schweinsberg were taken to MidMichigan Medical Center-Midland. Pangborn later was pronounced dead. Schweinsberg was treated for minor injuries and was released.

Pangborn owned the 1965 Brantly Hynes model B-2B helicopter, Federal Aviation Administration registration number N2284U, that he was piloting.

Deputies were assisted by Lee Township firefighters, MidMichigan Medical Center EMS and Deputy Chief Medical Examiner Dr. Dennis Wagner.

“The family has asked to have time to grieve without interruption,” Midland County Sheriff Scott Stephenson stated in a media release. “The property owners of where the crash occurred have asked for people to respect their privacy and not trespass on their property.”

Original article ➤ http://www.ourmidland.com



MIDLAND COUNTY (WJRT) - (10/01/17) - A 76-year-old grandfather died when his helicopter crashed in Midland County Sunday.

Sheriff Scott Stephenson said his 16-year-old grandson, the only other person on board, survived and only had minor injuries.

The man was identified as Paul Pangborn of Midland.

The crash happened on 11 Mile Road north of M-20 and south of Olson Road just after 2:45 p.m.

The teen told investigators the helicopter had lifted off, and he felt there may have been a change in the wind. It knocked the helicopter on it's side, broke the rotors and smashed the windshield. The helicopter then went into a tailspin and crashed.

Pangborn later died at the hospital.

The sheriff said Pangborn had flown to his grandson's birthday party and had just picked him up when the crash happened.

The helicopter was a Brantly-Hynes 1965 Model B-2 Single Engine, according to Stephenson.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be taking over the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.abc12.com





MIDLAND, MI (WNEM) -  A helicopter crashed down in Midland on 11 Mile Rd, north of M20 and south of Olson.

The chopper had two passengers, a 76-year-old grandfather, Paul Pangborn, and his grandson.

The grandfather picked up his grandson in Lee Township for a helicopter ride for his 16th birthday. 

The helicopter was a vintage Brantly Hynes Model 2B, which was made in 1965.

Responders got the call around 3 p.m. on Oct. 1.


Pangborn died in the crash and the grandson was treated at Mid-Michigan Medical Center.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wnem.com




MIDLAND COUNTY, MICHIGAN -- A helicopter crashed Sunday afternoon in Midland County, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The crash took place around 1:45 p.m. Sunday, October 1st in Midland County. 

Michigan State Police Lt. David Kaiser said the crash occurred north of the city of Midland, north of M-20, and there were two people inside the rotorcraft. 

Officials with the Midland County Sheriff's Office could not be immediately reached for comment on injuries or conditions of those in the helicopter. 

Federal Aviation Administration officials did not provide any further information regarding the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be investigating the incident along with the National Transportation Safety Board and Midland County Sheriff's Office.


Original article and comments ➤ http://www.mlive.com

Beech V35B Bonanza, N6KG: Accident occurred October 01, 2017 at Nashua Airport / Boire Field (KASH), Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine


http://registry.faa.gov/N6KG

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA003
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
occurrence occurred Sunday, October 01, 2017 in Nashua, NH
Aircraft: BEECH V35, registration: N6KG


NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft on landing went off the side of the runway.

Date: 01-OCT-17
Time: 16:36:00Z
Regis#: N6KG
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: V35
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: NASHUA
State: NEW HAMPSHIRE




NASHUA, New Hampshire —

Nashua Fire Rescue said it responded to a small plane crash Sunday at the Nashua Airport, also known as Boire Field.

Fire officials said the plane was attempting to land on the runway but hit the adjacent grassy area. That caused the plane to veer off the runway and travel several hundred yards before stopping in a culvert along the outer edge of the field.

Both occupants got out on their own and were uninjured.

There was no fuel leakage or hazards found.

The airport was closed until authorities were able to remove the plane.

The Nashua Airport Authority and the New Hampshire Department of Transportation will investigate the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wmur.com

Piper PA-32R-301T Saratoga II TC, N1054S: Accident occurred October 01, 2017 at Block Island State Airport (KBID), New Shoreham, Washington County, Rhode Island



Additional participating entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N1054S




Location: Block Island, RI
Accident Number: GAA18CA021
Date & Time: 10/01/2017, 1230 EDT
Registration: N1054S
Aircraft: PIPER PA32R
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot reported that during landing, the airplane touched down about "150 ft. beyond [the runway] numbers" and he immediately "removed flaps and applied brakes." He added that he was "unable to stop the forward momentum of the plane," and he believed he was going to overrun the runway, so he applied full power to go-around. Subsequently, the airplane overran the runway before a climb rate could be established, and during the runway excursion, the airplane struck a chain link fence. During the impact, the right wing separated from the fuselage, and the airplane rolled inverted down a ravine before coming to a stop back on the main landing gear. The pilot further reported after the accident that he believed he came in "too fast" for landing.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to fuselage, empennage, and both wings.

The pilot did not report that there were any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's use of an incorrect airspeed during landing, which resulted in a runway overrun.

Findings

Aircraft 
Landing distance - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Fence/fence post - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Landing area undershoot

Landing-landing roll
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Landing-aborted after touchdown
Runway excursion
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Landing

Roll over

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age:64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/11/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/29/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 358 hours (Total, all aircraft), 34 hours (Total, this make and model), 55 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N1054S
Model/Series: PA32R 301T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 3257448
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/10/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2215 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-540-HIA
Registered Owner: FAHERTY, RICHARD L.
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBID, 107 ft msl
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 6°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.35 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SUSSEX, NJ (FWN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Block Island, RI (BID)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1130 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 



Airport Information

Airport: BLOCK ISLAND STATE (BID)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 107 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2502 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Go Around; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 41.167500, -71.585000 (est) Additional participating entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N1054S


Location: Block Island, RI
Accident Number: GAA18CA021
Date & Time: 10/01/2017, 1230 EDT
Registration: N1054S
Aircraft: PIPER PA32R
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that during landing, the airplane touched down about "150 ft. beyond [the runway] numbers" and he immediately "removed flaps and applied brakes." He added that he was "unable to stop the forward momentum of the plane," and he believed he was going to overrun the runway, so he applied full power to go-around. Subsequently, the airplane overran the runway before a climb rate could be established, and during the runway excursion, the airplane struck a chain link fence. During the impact, the right wing separated from the fuselage, and the airplane rolled inverted down a ravine before coming to a stop back on the main landing gear. The pilot further reported after the accident that he believed he came in "too fast" for landing.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to fuselage, empennage, and both wings.

The pilot did not report that there were any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age:64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/11/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/29/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 358 hours (Total, all aircraft), 34 hours (Total, this make and model), 55 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N1054S
Model/Series: PA32R 301T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 3257448
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/10/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2215 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-540-HIA
Registered Owner: FAHERTY, RICHARD L.
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBID, 107 ft msl
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 6°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Light and Variable, Variable
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.35 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SUSSEX, NJ (FWN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Block Island, RI (BID)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1130 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: BLOCK ISLAND STATE (BID)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 107 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2502 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing:  Full Stop; Go Around; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 41.167500, -71.585000 (est)



NEW SHOREHAM, R.I. (WJAR) — Two people were med-flighted to a local hospital after a small plane crash on Block Island early Sunday afternoon.

The crash happened shortly before 1 pm. 

The New Shoreham Police Chief, Vincent Carlone told NBC 10 that the pilot overshot the plane landing over the runway while attempting to make a smooth landing.

The plane crossed over Center Road, made contact with a fence and landed in a field 50 yards away from the runway.

Photos from the scene show the plane in several pieces following the crash.

Rhode Island Airport Corporation Official, Bill Fischer tells NBC 10 the victims suffered minor injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://turnto10.com



NEW SHOREHAM, R.I. (WPRI) – Two people were taken to the hospital after a small plane crash on Block Island Sunday afternoon.

New Shoreham Police Chief Vincent Carlone told Eyewitness News that there were two people onboard the plane, both of whom were injured and flown to Rhode Island Hospital via medical helicopter. Carlone said their injuries were minor.

Photos from the scene showed that the plane came to rest upside-down in a field, in several pieces.

Carlone said the plane overshot the runway while attempting to land at about 1 p.m. and crossed Center Road before ending up in the field.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://wpri.com




A single-engine plane carrying two passengers overshot the runway during an attempt to land at Block Island Airport and crashed in the field across Center Road. 

A New Shoreham police officer at the scene said the two passengers were not seriously injured. 

The plane was in several pieces, and the fence surrounding the airport was damaged, as was the guardrail on the other side of the street, which looked like it had been clipped. 

The accident happened just before 1pm on Sunday, October 1st 

Original article  ➤ http://www.blockislandtimes.com