Saturday, May 25, 2019

Grumman AA1: Accident occurred May 03, 2019 in Grena, Denmark

NTSB Identification: GAA19WA249
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Friday, May 03, 2019 in Grena, Denmark
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AA1, registration:
Injuries: 1 Minor.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The government of Denmark has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a GRUMMAN AA1 airplane that occurred on May 03, 2019. The NTSB has appointed a U.S. Accredited Representative to assist the government of Denmark's investigation under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13.

All investigative information will be released by the government of Denmark.

Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane RG, personal flight operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N6123T: Fatal accident occurred May 25, 2019 near McKinnon St. Simons Island Airport (KSSI), Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

  
https://registry.faa.gov/N6123T

Location: St. Simons Island, GA
Accident Number: ERA19FA179
Date & Time: 05/25/2019, 0923 EDT
Registration: N6123T
Aircraft: Cessna TR182
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 25, 2019, about 0923 eastern daylight time, a Cessna TR182, N6123T, was destroyed when it impacted terrain during a visual approach to McKinnon St Simons Island Airport (SSI), St Simons Island, Georgia. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The personal flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight was filed for the flight that originated from Savannah/Hilton Head Island Airport (SAV), Savannah, Georgia, about 0859.

According to preliminary information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the flight was cleared by Jacksonville Approach Control at 0919 for the visual approach to runway 22 at SSI, and instructed to switch radio frequency to the SSI common traffic advisory frequency, which the pilot acknowledged. No further communications were received and radar contact was lost at 0923, when the airplane was about 5 miles northeast of SSI at an altitude of 1,300 feet mean sea level. That altitude and below is usually were Jacksonville Approach Control loses radar coverage in that area. A witness subsequently observed a fire in a wooded area of a sparsely populated section of residential development and notified law enforcement.

The wreckage came to rest nose down in an approximate 3-ft crater, oriented about a heading of 210° magnetic and most of it was consumed by postcrash fire. No debris path was observed, with the exception of two tree strikes immediately above the wreckage. The engine and forward fuselage remained in the crater. The landing gear was partially extended; however, the preimpact position of the landing gear could not be confirmed. The left wing was folded inverted near the crater. The left flap remained attached and was partially melted. The left aileron had partially separated and melted. The right wing sustained more fire and impact damage than the left wing. The right flap separated and sustained impact and thermal damage. The right aileron partially separated and also sustained impact and thermal damage. Measurement of the flap actuator corresponded to a flaps retracted position. The left elevator separated and the right elevator melted near the elevator trim jackscrew. Measurement of the jackscrew corresponded to a 20° tab up (nose down) elevator trim position. The rudder separated and was fragmented. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the elevator and rudder bellcranks to the cabin area. Continuity was confirmed from the left aileron to the left wing root and control cables from the right wing were also identified but had been partially consumed by fire.

The engine was recovered from the crater and separated from the airframe for examination. The propeller had separated from the engine and was also recovered from the crater. One propeller blade exhibited s-bending and leading edge gouges. Another propeller blade exhibited tip curling and bending, while the third propeller blade sustained a tip separation. The valve covers and top spark plugs were removed from the engine; the spark plug electrodes were intact and gray in color. The rear engine accessories were also removed. The single-drive dual magneto sustained impact damage and could not be tested. The engine driven fuel pump and propeller governor also sustained impact damage and could not be tested. The fuel strainer screen was recovered and no debris in the screen was observed. The carburetor sustained impact damage; its float was removed and it had also sustained impact damage. The front section of the engine had sustained impact damage and the crankshaft could not be rotated by hand via an accessory gear drive; however, borescope examination of all six cylinders did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions.

The four-seat, high-wing, retractable tricycle landing gear airplane, was manufactured in 1982. It was powered by a Lycoming O-540, 235-hp engine equipped with a three-blade, constant-speed, Hartzell propeller. A turbocharger was subsequently installed via supplemental type certificate.

The pilot, age 80, held a commercial pilot certificate, with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate, with a rating for airplane single-engine and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on March 1, 2017. At that time, the pilot reported a total flight experience of 4,600 hours. The pilot also had a Basic Medical date of February 27, 2018.

The recorded weather at SSI, at 0853, was: wind from 260° at 10; visibility 10 miles; clear sky; temperature 27° C; dew point 17° C; altimeter 30.15 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6123T
Model/Series: TR182 No Series
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SSI, 18 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 17°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 260°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Savannah, GA (SAV)
Destination: St. Simons Isla, GA (SSI)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage:Destroyed 
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  31.232500, -81.354722

In Memoriam: Roger H. Crane
SER-GA-122 – Group IV

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the death of a fellow CAP member, Capt Roger H. Crane, SER GA-122. Capt Crane joined CAP in March 2007 and is a well-known, highly regarded pilot and certified flight instructor. He and his wife, Dolly, have their home in Bluffton, South Carolina.

He was involved in a single-aircraft crash in St. Simons Island, Georgia, on 25 May 2019. He was engaged in a private flight in his personally owned Cessna 182 when it went down in a wooded area on the northern part of the island at approximately 0925.

The FAA and NTSB are currently investigating the incident, along with authorities in Glynn County, Georgia. Please be advised that this was not a CAP mission.

People who know Capt Crane commented on his love of flying and his dedication to aviation excellence. He was an outstanding mentor to many members of this organization. Capt Crane holds an extensive number of CAP qualifications, including mission pilot, transport mission pilot, mission check pilot, instructor pilot, orientation pilot and instrument pilot. He is also a Certified Flight Instructor (CFI) and Certified Flight Instructor – Instrument (CFI-I). He also has served as Logistics Officer, Operations Officer, and Standardization/Evaluation Officer for GA-122.

We ask that you keep Capt Crane’s family, friends, and CAP colleagues in your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.

Andrea Van Buren
Commander at Georgia Wing, Civil Air Patrol




ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Georgia - UPDATE 5/26/2019, 3:12 P.M.: The Glynn County Police Department said the pilot who died in a plane crash on St. Simons Island Saturday was 80-year-old Roger Crane from Bluffton, South Carolina.

Though the Cessna 182 single engine airplane has can carry up to four passengers, officials believe Crane was the only person on board.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board is at the crash site and has taken over the investigation of the crash.

Original Story:

A pilot was killed after a small plane crashed in a wooded area north of the airport on St. Simons Island, according to police.

The plane was flying from Savannah to McKinnon St. Simons Island Airport. Fire rescue was called just before 9:30 a.m. after neighbors reported seeing it go down.

Police say firefighters found the Cessna 182 engulfed in flames. When they got the fire out, they found the pilot – the only person on the plane – dead.

Investigators took Action News Jax's Brittney Donovan to the crash site off Sinclair Plantation Drive.

Parts of the plane were tangled in tree branches, much of it unrecognizable.

Original article ➤ https://www.actionnewsjax.com


GLYNN COUNTY, Georgia  — Investigators have identified the pilot killed in Saturday's plane crash that happened on Saint Simons Island.

Roger Crane, 80, from Bluffton, SC, died after the Cessna 182 airplane he was flying crashed off Lawrence Road on the north end of Saint Simons Island, according to the Glynn County Police Department.

Glynn County Fire and police responded to the scene at around 9:25 a.m. When they arrived they saw a heavy fire off Sinclair Plantation Road. Once the fire was extinguished, authorities were able to determine that a plane crash occurred.

Before the crash, police say the plane departed Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport and was en route to the McKinnon-Saint Simons Island Airport.

The Federal Aviation Administration reported that four people were on board at the time of the crash, but police say Crane was the only person on the plane, though the plane is designed to carry four people.

Investigators from the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Original article ➤ https://www.firstcoastnews.com



Glynn County Police have identified the pilot of a single-engine Cessna plane that crashed on the north end of St. Simon’s Island Saturday morning as 80-year-old Roger Crane of Bluffton.

Glynn County Police Department confirmed that the Crane was the sole occupant of the plane and died in the crash.

Around 9:30 AM, authorities and fire personnel responded to reports of a Cessna C182 that crashed into a wooded area off of Sinclair Plantation Road. The FAA says the airplane was traveling from Savanna/ Hilton Head International Airport to the McKinnon- Saint Simons Island.

“Although the plane is designed for 4 passengers, we have no information that leads us to believe that anyone was present on the plane besides the pilot,” said Brian Scott with Glynn County Police.

According to authorities, no homes or bystanders were impacted.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.savannahnow.com







A plane carrying four people has crashed on the north end of St. Simons Island, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

There is no word on the identity or status of the passengers at this time.

According to the Glenn County Police Department, rescue personnel responded to a wooded area off Lawrence Road on the North end of Saint Simons Island in response to reports of a plane crash. 

Officials say that the Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane RG was due to land around 9:25 a.m. at McKinnon St. Simons Island Airport from Savannah but the plane never made it there.

Police say that the plane was not based at the Saint Simons Island Airport and that there are no homes or bystanders affected by the incident.

First Coast News was able to identify a plane that filed a similar flight plan out of Savannah headed for arrival at St. Simons Island Airport during that timeframe. According to flight records, that aircraft showed a cruising altitude of 3,900 ft. before taking a sharp dive in a matter of minutes to 1,600 ft before losing communication. 

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has been made aware of the crash.

Coast Guard Mayport is not assisting.

Official Statement from the FAA:

"A Cessna C182 aircraft crashed at McKinnon St Simons Island Airport in Brunswick, Ga., about 9:30 a.m. today. Check with local authorities for information about the condition of the four people on board. The aircraft took off from Savannah International Airport. The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will determine the probable cause of the accident"

A media briefing on the crash is scheduled for 2 p.m. today and First Coast News will stream it live on our website and our Facebook page.

Malcolm McKinnon Airport is a county-owned public-use airport located five miles east of the central business district of Brunswick, a city in Glynn County..

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.11alive.com

Friday, May 24, 2019

Cessna 560 Citation Encore, N832R: Fatal accident occurred May 24, 2019 in Atlantic Ocean

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miami, Florida
Textron Aviation; Kansas City, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N832R

Location: Atlantic Ocean, AO
Accident Number: ERA19LA180
Date & Time: 05/24/2019, 1755 EDT
Registration: N832R
Aircraft: Cessna 560
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

On May 24, 2019, about 1755 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 560, N832R, was destroyed when it impacted the Atlantic Ocean. The airline transport pilot was not found and presumed fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated, and the flight was being conducted as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 positioning flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from St. Louis Regional Airport (ALN), Alton, Illinois, about 1430 and was destined for Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

According to the owner of the airplane, he purchased the airplane two days prior to the accident. The airplane had recently undergone a progressive inspection, which was completed on May 22, 2019. The owner then hired a contract pilot to fly the airplane to FXE to have some avionics work done. On the day of the accident, the owner tracked the progress of the flight using an online commercial service once it departed ALN about 1430. Shortly after 1700, he received a call from the avionics shop at FXE telling him the airplane did not arrive. He then reviewed the airplane's online flight track again and saw that it had overflown FXE at FL390 and was heading toward the Atlantic Ocean.

According to preliminary air traffic control radar and radio communication information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot established communications with the Atlanta Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) and reported he was level at FL390, and that the air was smooth. Later, the air traffic controller tried to communicate with the pilot to tell him to contact the Jacksonville ARTCC, but the controller was unable to make contact with the pilot. The controller made several attempts to contact the pilot on different radio frequencies, to no avail. The controller then advised Jacksonville ARTCC that communications with the flight had been lost. The Jacksonville controllers then continued to monitor the flight via radar. The flight transitioned through Jacksonville and Miami ARTCC airspace without any radio contact.

The US Air Force dispatched two aircraft to intercept the accident airplane. One of the interceptor pilots reported that he could see the pilot unconscious and slumped over the controls. The intercept airplanes followed the accident airplane until it descended and impacted the Atlantic Ocean about 310 miles east of FXE.

The US Coast Guard initiated a search after the accident, which was suspended on May 25, 2019. The pilot and the airplane were not recovered.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and multiengine land. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued on June 26, 2018. He reported 9,016 total hours of flight experience. He held numerous type ratings including a type rating for the Cessna 560 and had a certification for single pilot for the Cessna 560.

The airplane was manufactured in 2001, and it was powered by two Pratt and Whitney JT15D-5D engines. According to the airplane's owner, all of the airplane's maintenance logs were onboard the airplane during the accident flight. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N832R
Model/Series: 560 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLL, 11 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 413 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 15 knots / 20 knots, 70°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.08 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Alton, IL (ALN)
Destination: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 27.323889, -72.593333 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Juan Carlos Gonzalez Mejia was at the controls of a small jet that crashed in the Atlantic Ocean about 300 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, the U.S. Coast Guard said Monday.

The search for the Cessna Citation V ended late Saturday after it crashed about 6 p.m. Friday.

"Suspending a search is one of the most difficult decisions we ever have to make, and we never make it lightly,” Christopher Eddy, search and rescue mission coordinator at Coast Guard 7th District, based in Miami, said in a statement.

“We always want the best case scenario to happen and will continue to monitor for new information that could aid responders," Eddy said.

Gonzalez Mejia was the only person aboard the plane. Pilots of Florida Air National Guard F-15s that were sent to intercept the Citation watched it crash into the ocean, the Coast Guard said.

In this case, “intercept” means the F-15s approached the Cessna and tried to communicate with the pilot.

Records show the plane is registered to a limited liability corporation in Manalapan, a barrier island off Lantana.

The aircraft left St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton, Ill. at 1:35 p.m., an FAA spokeswoman said.

The plane was supposed to land at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.

What caused the plane to crash remains unclear.

Before suspending its search, the Coast Guard conducted aerial searches concentrated in an area of 642 square nautical miles.

https://www.sun-sentinel.com


FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida  (WSVN) - The U.S. Coast Guard has suspended its search for the pilot of a Cessna 560 Citation Encore that crashed off the coast of South Florida.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard, the Cessna 560 Citation Encore had taken off from St. Louis Regional Airport, Friday afternoon, and was headed to Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.

Officials said the aircraft crashed into the Atlantic Ocean, 221 miles northeast of the Bahamas.

Officials said the pilots of two F-15 fighter jets from the Florida Air National Guard witnessed the crash.

Officials said the pilot was only one on board. They said he was unable to reach air traffic control for more than an hour.

During that time, the Federal Aviation Administration tracked the flight on radar before the plane crashed.

Coast Guard conducted aerial searches covering 642 square nautical miles before calling off the search, late Saturday night.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wsvn.com




FORT LAUDERDALE, Florida - A Cessna 560 Citation Encore crashed in the Atlantic Ocean Friday afternoon -- away from its designated flight path -- about 310 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. 

Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport air traffic controllers lost communication with the Cessna 560 Citation Encore and asked the U.S. Air Force to investigate.

The Florida Air National Guard dispatched two F-15 fighter jets from the Homestead Air Reserve. The pilots intercepted the Cessna 560 shortly before it went down. 

"Only the pilot was aboard," FAA spokesperson Kathleen Bergen wrote in an 8 p.m. e-mail. "The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed."

The Cessna 560 Citation Encore left from St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton, Illinois, about 2:35 p.m., and it descended rapidly and crashed out in the ocean about 6 p.m., according to Bergen. The F-15 fighter jets did not fire at the Cessna 560 Citation Encore. 

According to FlightAware records, the N832R Cessna 560 Citation Encore, owned by Hypo Consulting LLC, made a sudden drop in speed about 5:45 p.m. AirNav RadarBox records show there were erratic changes in speed and altitude. 

The plane headed toward the Grand Bahama International Airport in Freeport, Bahamas, and crashed east of the Leonard M. Thompson International Airport in Mash Harbour, Bahamas. The U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater HC-130 Hercules airplane crew responded to the downed aircraft about 221 miles northeast of the Marsh Harbor, Bahamas. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.local10.com

A Cessna 560 Citation Encore headed for South Florida kept going and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean about 300 miles east of Fort Lauderdale on Friday night.

The Federal Aviation Administration said preliminary information indicates only the pilot was aboard the Cessna 560 Citation Encore, which flew out of St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton Illinois about 1:35 p.m. Friday and was destined for Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.

The aircraft crashed 310 miles east of Fort Lauderdale about 6 p.m., the FAA said.

The condition of the pilot is unclear, but the FAA said U.S. Air Force F-15 fighter jets from the Florida Air National Guard “intercepted,” or spotted the aircraft and flew alongside it, before it went down. The Florida Air National Guard is based at Homestead Air Reserve Base.

“The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed,” the FAA said in a statement. “FAA air traffic controllers tracked the flight on radar during that time.”

The FAA referred questions about the pilot’s condition to the U.S. Coast Guard. A spokesman for the Coast Guard’s southeast district said crews were responding to the crash but did not disclose further details Friday evening.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.miamiherald.com

U.S. Coast Guard crews are searching the Atlantic Ocean for a downed aircraft about 300 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, authorities said Friday night.

It is believed the pilot was the only person aboard the Cessna 560 Citation Encore when it crashed around 6 p.m., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane is registered to a limited liability corporation in Manalapan, records show.

The aircraft left St. Louis Regional Airport in East Alton, Illinois at 1:35 p.m., an FAA spokeswoman said.

The plane was supposed to land at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, she said.

“The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed,” said Kathleen Bergen, FAA’s spokeswoman.

“FAA air traffic controllers tracked the flight on radar during that time,” Bergen said. “U.S. Air Force F-15s intercepted the Cessna 560 Citation Encore shortly before it went down.”

It is unclear what caused the plane to crash or whether the pilot survived.

Flight records show that at 5:45 p.m. the Cessna 560 Citation Encore made a quick drop in speed and a slight drop in altitude. In one minute, it went from going 413 mph at 39,000 feet to 295 mph at 38,900 feet.

At 5:57 p.m. the aircraft’s flight path became erratic for about 13 minutes as it was seemingly tossed in all directions, flightaware.com records show.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.sun-sentinel.com

A Cessna 560 Citation Encore crashed Friday into the Atlantic Ocean 310 miles east of Fort Lauderdale, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

The aircraft departed from St. Louis Regional Airport in Illinois at 1:35 p.m. CDT and was set to land at Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, the FAA said. It crashed at around 6 p.m.

Only the pilot was aboard the aircraft, the FAA said. 

"The aircraft was out of communication with air traffic controllers for more than one hour before it crashed," a statement from the FAA read. "FAA air traffic controllers tracked the flight on radar during that time."

The FAA said U.S. Air Force F-15s intercepted the jet shortly before it went down.

The U.S. Coast Guard has been called out to respond to the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.nbcmiami.com

Cirrus SR22 GTS, N809SR: Fatal accident occurred May 24, 2019 in Grover, Wayne County, Utah

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N809SR 

Location: Grover, UT
Accident Number: WPR19FA154
Date & Time: 05/24/2019, 1122 MDT
Registration: N809SR
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 24, 2019, about 1122 mountain daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N809SR, impacted terrain about 6 miles southeast of Grover, Utah. The private pilot and passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to Tierra Grande Aviation LLC, and operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the vicinity of the accident site, and the flight was operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan. The flight departed Canyonlands Field Airport (CNY), Moab UT about 1042 and was destined for Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Las Vegas, Nevada.

Witnesses reported that they heard the airplane and when they looked up, they observed it nose down descending like a corkscrew. The airplane descended behind a hillside; shortly thereafter they heard an explosion and saw smoke rise from the area.

At 1055 the Hanksville Airport (HVE), Hanksville, Utah, located about 30 miles northeast of the accident site reported wind from 170o at 6 knots, clear skies, 10 statue miles visibility, temperature 15o C, dewpoint 2o C and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury. A high Resolution Rapid Refresh numerical model over the accident site depicted a freezing level at 9,755 ft, and supported broken to overcast clouds with bases near 3,300 ft agl and tops to 15,000 ft.

The airplane was removed to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N809SR
Model/Series: SR22 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HVE, 4463 ft msl
Observation Time: 1055 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 30 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Moab, UT (CNY)
Destination: Las Vegas, NV (HND) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 38.174444, -111.248611

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.
Lynn Ann Anderson Simonsen and her husband Christian Clinton Simonsen.


Christian Clinton Simonsen

February 4, 1953 - May 24, 2019
Born in Gilroy, California
Resided in Morgan Hill, California

Christian Clinton Simonsen, born February 4, 1953 in Gilroy, CA, passed away in a plane crash in Grover, UT on Friday, May 24, 2019, along with his wife, Lynn Ann Anderson-Simonsen. Chris and Lynn were on their way home to Morgan Hill, CA after visiting several National Parks in Utah and visiting with Christian Jr., Jen, and Leandra in Salt Lake City.

Chris was preceded in death by his brother, Wade Simonsen, brother-in-law David Perez, mother Elizabeth (Rhodes) Simonsen, father Harry C. Simonsen, and by his adoptive mother Bonnie L. Simonsen. Chris is survived by his 2 sons, Christian Jr. (Jennifer) of Salt Lake City, UT and Dan (Tiffany) of Frisco, TX; step-daughters Karri Becker of Fargo, ND, Jodi Satterlee of Reno, NV, Hannah Anderson of Morgan Hill, CA, Cailey Anderson of Arcatia, CA; granddaughters Presley, Skylar, and Leandra; brothers Eric Simonsen and Sean Simonsen (Michele); sisters Laurie Perez and Jean Alkire (Randy Beaver). He is also survived by his many nieces and nephews: Anthony and Steven Perez (Laurie), Nathaniel and Julia Lierly (Jeanne), Keith Simonsen and Kelly Benshoof (Wade), Sean and Valerie Simonsen (Sean), and Melody and Laura Simonsen (Eric). He leaves behind Uncle Ed and Sandy Johnson, Ruth Johnson, step-brother Ed Thorp, and cousins Christopher Linthurst, Jennifer Linthurst, Christie Gamble, Judy Guardino, Paul Corbin, and Patty Lua. 

Chris leaves behind many beloved colleagues from his work and his Saturdays on the golf course with his golf buddies. He was married to Karen Simonsen of Frisco, TX, the mother of his children, and to Lynn Anderson of Morgan Hill, whom he had married March 13, 2018. He was born in Gilroy, CA but spent his adolescence growing up in Stillwater, MN, where, with his brothers Eric and Wade, he found his passion for fishing and science. After graduating from high school at Deerfield Academy in Deerfield, MA, Chris went to Stanford and then the University of Utah, where he earned a PhD in Molecular Biology. After graduation, Chris began his career with Genentech and worked with many of the Bay Area’s leading scientists over the years. He also worked for Invitron, Aragen, Sierra BioSource, Serologicals Corp, and most recently, Alector. Over the past 3 years, Chris lived with Lynn and Hannah and Cailey in Morgan Hill. A fisherman who loved his summer trips to Alaska with the boys and the occasional Simonsen female family member. Chris enjoyed spending the Christmas holidays with Lynn and her daughters in Hawaii, and liked that it was becoming a tradition. He will be greatly missed by his family, friends, and colleagues.

A Memorial Service will be held Friday, June 7, 2019 at 11:00A.M at LIMA-CAMPAGNA-JOHNSON FUNERAL HOME, 17720 Monterey Street, Morgan Hill, followed by a reception and celebration of Chris’ life to be held at Mama Mia’s Gilroy. Donations to Moreland Little League may be made in lieu of flowers. 

http://www.limacampagnamortuaries.com

Lynn Ann (Heldt) Anderson Simonsen
July 13, 1969 - May 24, 2019
Resident of Morgan Hill

On Friday, May 24, Lynn Ann Anderson Simonsen and her husband Christian Clinton Simonsen were involved in a tragic accident when the small plane Chris was piloting went down in Wayne County Utah. Lynn and Chris had only been married a little over a year but their love for each other was evident to all who knew them. In the last year they had visited Alaska, Europe, Las Vegas, Disneyland and Hawaii. They loved snorkeling, cooking and going on long bikes rides together in Morgan Hill where they lived.

Lynn was born in Long Island, NY and moved to San Jose, CA in 1974. She received her Masters degree in Molecular Biology from San Jose State University. Jane Goodall was Lynn's childhood idol. It was because of Jane's work that Lynn became interested in biology.

Lynn loved her job as a scientist and had worked side by side with Chris for over 15 years, most recently at Alector. Although her love for Chris was strong, her heart and soul were her daughters Cailey Marie Anderson and Hannah Angela Anderson. She was very proud of her girls and raised them with an abundance of love and time. She was loved by all their friends and always welcomed them with a smile. She was an awesome mom, a wonderful daughter, a cherished sister and a best friend to many.

Lynn is survived by her parents Robert and Margie Heldt, siblings and their spouses Karen and Barry Braverman, Bob Heldt, Jr. and Karen Kramer and Michael and Allison Heldt, as well as nieces Samantha, Chelsea, and nephews Ben, Matthew, Alex and Eric. She is also survived by her ex husband John Anderson, many aunts, uncles, friends and neighbors.  

A Memorial for Lynn and Chris Simonsen will be held Saturday June 15th at 11:00am at the Lima-Campagna-Johnson funeral home in Morgan Hill. In lieu of flowers, if you wish to make a donation, please consider the Jane Goodall Institute: https://www.janegoodall.org/donate/


WAYNE COUNTY, Utah, May 30, 2019 (Gepharpt Daily) — Officials have identified a husband and wife who died in plane crash that occurred late Friday morning in the Grover area of Wayne County.

The pilot of the Cirrus SR22 GTS was identified as Christian C. Simonsen, and the passenger was identified as his wife, Lynn Ann Anderson-Simonsen of Morgan Hill, California, said a news release from the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office.

A previous news release said Wayne County Sheriff’s officials were dispatched to Miner’s Mountain Road in the Grover area on a report of a single-engine plane crash at about 11:22 a.m.

The sheriff’s office requested Wayne County EMS to respond and had WCSO Search and Rescue on standby, according to the news release issued by WCSO Friday afternoon.

Witnesses reported that they heard an explosion and saw smoke after the plane disappeared from their view.

Upon arrival at the crash site, WCSO saw a “large debris field and fire were present throughout the area,” the news release states.

Two occupants of the aircraft were found deceased at the site, the sheriff’s office said; they were the only people aboard.

The Medical Examiner’s Office went to the scene and conducted an investigation.

The remains of the deceased were transported to the State Medical Examiner’s Office for further investigation.

The cause of the crash is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board as well as an investigator from the aircraft manufacturer.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://gephardtdaily.com



WAYNE COUNTY, Utah, May 24, 2019 (Gepharpt Daily) — The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating a fatal plane crash that occurred late Friday morning in the Grover area of Wayne County.

At about 11:22 a.m., the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched to Miner’s Mountain Road in the Grover area on a report of a single-engine plane crash.

The sheriff’s office requested Wayne County EMS to respond and had WCSO Search and Rescue on standby, according to a news release issued by WCSO at 5:34 p.m. Friday.

Witnesses reported that they heard an explosion and saw smoke after the plane disappeared from their view.

Upon arrival at the crash site, WCSO saw a “large debris field and fire were present throughout the area,” the news release states.

Two occupants of the aircraft were found deceased at the site, the sheriff’s office said. It appeared that they were the only people aboard.

The Medical Examiner’s Office went to the scene and conducted an investigation.

The remains of the deceased were transported to the State Medical Examiner’s Office for further investigation.

The cause of the crash is as yet unknown and is under investigation by the NTSB.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://gephardtdaily.com



GROVER, Wayne County — Two people died when the plane they were in crashed in a rural area Friday morning, officials said.

Emergency crews received a report from someone who said they saw a single-engine plane crash near Miner's Mountain Road in Grover shortly after 11:20 a.m., according to Wayne County spokeswoman Kassidee Brown.

Wayne County Sheriff's deputies came across large debris field and fire near the area reported. They found what appeared to be two occupants in the plane and both were dead, Brown added.

Their names and ages weren't immediately released.

In a statement, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Allen Kenitzer said the plane was a Cirrus SR22 and it crashed under "unknown circumstances."

The FAA is handling the investigation into the crash. An official from the Utah State Medical Examiner's Office was also dispatched to the scene, Brown said.

Friday's crash is the second fatal Utah aviation crash in the past 7 days. Last Friday, a Utah couple was killed when the helicopter they were in crashed into mountainous terrain in Utah County. The cause of that crash is also under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.ksl.com

GROVER, Utah — A small plane crashed Friday in southern Utah, killing both people on board.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating a crash of a Cirrus SR22 aircraft in Grover, the board announced on its official Twitter page shortly after 5 p.m.


The crash happened around 11 a.m. near Miner’s Mountain Road, according to a press release from the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office. First responders found a debris and field fire at the site and two people deceased.


Witnesses saw the aircraft disappear from their view, heard an explosion and saw smoke, then called 911 to report it.


Grover is located between Capitol Reef National Park and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://fox13now.com


Wayne County Sheriff's Office
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

On Friday May, 24th 2019, at approximately 11:22am Wayne County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched to Miner’s Mountain Road in the Grover area. The reporting party called 911 to report they had witnessed a plane crash.

Wayne County Sheriff’s Office requested Wayne County EMS and Wayne County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue are on standby.

Wayne County Sheriff’s Office received further information that it was a single engine aircraft.

Witnesses stated the aircraft disappeared from their view; they heard an explosion and saw smoke.

Upon Wayne County Sheriff’s Office arrival at the crash site, a large debris field and fire were present throughout the area.

There appeared to be two occupants in the aircraft, both were found deceased.

The investigator for the medical examiner’s office responded to the scene and conducted his investigation.

The remains of the occupants will be transported to the State Medical Examiner’s Office for further investigation.

The National Transportation Safety Board will be conducting an investigation into the cause of the crash.

Loss of Control on Ground: Guimbal Cabri G2, N369PA; accident occurred May 23, 2019 at St. Louis Downtown Airport (KCPS), Cahokia, St. Clair County, Illinois

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Louis, Missouri

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N369PA


Location: St. Louis, IL
Accident Number: GAA19CA279
Date & Time: 05/23/2019, 1410 CDT
Registration: N369PA
Aircraft: Guimbal CABRI
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

The helicopter flight instructor reported that, during a training flight, he briefed the student pilot on the procedures required to land with a simulated stuck left pedal. The student began a descent to enter a shallower-than-normal glide path to the runway surface, and he completed his final checks for the maneuver and continued the approach.

Upon contacting the runway, the helicopter veered to the left, and the instructor elected to abort the landing. As the helicopter lifted off, it began to yaw to the left at a rapid rate, while drifting to the left of the runway. Recognizing the helicopter was in a spin, they attempted to correct by leveling the helicopter "long enough for the aircraft to regain tail-rotor authority." The helicopter's left skid impacted the mud on the left side of the runway and the helicopter rolled onto its left side.

The Federal Aviation Administration's Helicopter Flying Handbook, FAA-H-8083-21A, provides information and guidance in a section titled "Landing – Stuck Neutral or Right Pedal" which stated in part:

The landing profile for a stuck neutral or a stuck right pedal is a low-power approach terminating with a running or roll-on landing. The approach profile can best be described as a shallow to normal approach angle to arrive approximately 2–3 feet landing gear height above the intended landing area with a minimum airspeed for directional control.

During the approach the flight instructor directed the student pilot to "utilize throttle manipulation to control the yaw caused by a fixed input on the anti-torque system."

The manufactures service letter, SL 19-002 A, states, "During in-flight tail rotor control failure simulation, pilots should never use the twist grip to control yaw."

The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main rotor, fuselage and tail-boom.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation station located on the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was variable at 4 knots.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 32, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Helicopter; Instrument Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/18/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/27/2018
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 653 hours (Total, all aircraft), 425 hours (Total, this make and model), 545 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 135 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 32 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/29/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 62 hours (Total, all aircraft), 62 hours (Total, this make and model), 11 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Guimbal
Registration: N369PA
Model/Series: CABRI G2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2015
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1109
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/08/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1543 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1839.8 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-J2A
Registered Owner: D H Helicopter Inc
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: D H Helicopter Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCPS, 413 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 295°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: St Louis, IL (CPS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: St. Louis, IL (CPS)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1410 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: St Louis Downtown (CPS)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 412 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5301 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 38.570278, -90.155000 (est)


CAHOKIA • A helicopter pilot and an aviation student escaped unharmed after their helicopter crashed Tuesday at St. Louis Downtown Airport. 

They were returning from a flight training session about 2:40 p.m when the helicopter crashed on the airport's secondary runway, said Patti Beck, a spokeswoman with Bi-State Development. Bi-State owns the airport.

The airport's secondary runway was closed after the crash. The primary runway remained open to air traffic.

Beck did not have more details. 

The helicopter had taken off from the airport shortly after 2 p.m. and flew about 25 miles over the Metro East, according to the online flight tracking site FlightAware. It was set to arrive at the airport at about 2:45 p.m. 

The Federal Aviation Administration was called to the scene to investigate the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.stltoday.com



CAHOKIA, Illinois — A helicopter crashed at St. Louis Downtown Airport in St. Clair County, Illinois at around 2:40 pm Thursday afternoon.  There are no injuries in this crash.

The crash happened on the airport’s secondary runway, which remains closed until further notice. The primary runway is unaffected.

There were two people, a student, and an instructor, onboard the helicopter during the accident.  No cause for the accident has yet been determined.  The FAA has been notified.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://fox2now.com