Thursday, December 29, 2016

Incident occurred December 29, 2016 at Asheville Regional Airport (KAVL), Buncombe County, North Carolina



ASHEVILLE, N.C. (WLOS) — First responders rushed to Asheville Regional Airport on Thursday after a pilot reported having problems landing.

The plane eventually landed without incident, but several passengers said it was the scariest landing they had experienced.

Passengers said the plane tried to land twice, and they said the pilot announced he couldn't get the flaps down. They said he also announced there was difficulties because of wind shear.

A Delta spokesperson said that's when a plane comes down and headwind makes it speed up, and then tail wind makes it suddenly slow down. A Delta spokesperson said the plane was actually operated by Express Jet.

Passengers said seven or eight people threw up.

"We were at all times going really fast, slow, and doing a lot of up and down, up and down, and that's where the people were getting sick," said Ashley Abrams, who was flying from Orlando.

A spokesperson said the airport followed proper protocol. She said the protocol is a pilot reports a problem to the tower, the tower reports it to the airport and the airport calls fire and EMS.

Story and photo gallery:   http://wlos.com

Cessna 310, Mustang Sally Aviation, N488SS: Incident occurred December 29, 2016 at Long Beach Airport (KLGB), Los Angeles, California

MUSTANG SALLY AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N488SS 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: LONG BEACH

LANDING WITH NOSE LANDING GEAR RETRACTED.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 22:55:00Z
Regis#: N488SS
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LONG BEACH

State: CALIFORNIA

AIRCRAFT NOSE GEAR FAILED TO LOCK IN DOWN POSITION RESULTING IN GEAR UP LANDING. PILOT HAD NOTIFIED ATC OF SYSTEM FAILURE; ARFF ALERTED.

Date: 29-DEC-16
Time: 22:55:00Z
Regis#: N488SS
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: LONG BEACH
State: CALIFORNIA



The pilot of a twin-engine plane made an emergency, gear-up landing at the Long Beach Airport Thursday afternoon after experiencing mechanical issues.

The unidentified pilot, who was the only person on board, was not injured during the touch down that took place at about 3:00PM, said airport spokeswoman Cassie Chauvel.

The incident began when the pilot of the small aircraft informed the LGB tower of mechanical problems and circled for about 20 minutes in an attempt to fix the issue, said Long Beach Fire Department (LBFD) spokesman Mark Miller. The pilot was unable to solve the issue and instead landed without the plane’s rear landing gear completely lowered.

The pilot was able to land safely and walk away from the plane, Miller said. There was no fire or fuel spill but authorities were still on the runway Thursday afternoon in search of any major damage to the road.

Authorities did not say what airport the pilot departed from or the original destination.

Source:   http://lbpost.com



A small plane had a rough landing at Long Beach Airport Thursday afternoon when its landing gear didn’t properly deploy, but nobody was hurt, according to authorities.

The twin-engine Cessna touched town with its rear wheels still up shortly before 3 p.m., Long Beach Fire Department spokesman Capt. Mark Miller said.

The plane’s pilot had warned the control tower he was having mechanical problems, and the fire department sent engines and ambulances in preparation for a crash, but they turned out to be unneeded, Miller said.

There was no fire or fuel spill, and the pilot walked away unhurt, he said.

The pilot was the only person aboard, airport spokeswoman Cassie Chauvel said.

Crews moved the plane and were still working around 3:30 p.m. to make sure the runway wasn’t damaged, Miller said.

Because the plane landed on a runway not used for commercial flights, the incident didn’t cause any delays for travelers, according to Chauvel.

Source:  http://www.presstelegram.com

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N182SX: Hangar roof partially collapsed on plane due to tornado

Greg Stanford owns one of the damaged planes.









LAMAR COUNTY, AL (WBRC) - In Lamar County, people got a better idea of Tuesday night's damage after the sun came up on Wednesday. That was especially evident at the Lamar County Airport. 

The National Weather Service office in Birmingham said an EF0 or EF1 caused damage at the Lamar County Airport and surrounding areas. 

Winds destroyed one hangar and severely damaged another one. One plane's engine was ripped open and the wing was almost taken off of another one.

The winds pulled the hangar from its foundation and blew out the sheet metal walls and the insulation.

Most of the damage appears to be confined the area of Highway 17 and Beaver Creek Road just south of the city limits of Sulligent.

"Everything on the radar showed. They were telling us about the tire center, the building across. They never mentioned the airport but I can tell from where it was on the plot that we probably had damage here," Greg Stanford, who owns one of the damaged planes, said.

"My friend that has the hanger over here had called me, he had already got here and said it was devastated," he added.

Stanford described the damage to his plane.

"The metal hanger is pushed over, just disintegrated. Everything is piled to the side. Most of the plane damage looked like damage from the hangar falling on it. But by the way it crumpled the gear, it's going to be a total loss," Stanford explained.

One of his biggest fear may be realized.

He was concerned before the storm that the airport may close because of a lack of planes kept here.

Now that may be the case due to all the damage from Tuesday's severe weather.

The same storm that wrecked the airport also destroyed a nearby tire shop and leveled a home.

A woman in the house had to be rescued on Tuesday night.

http://www.kplctv.com






AIRCRAFT:   N182SX; 1985 Cessna R182; S/N R18202025

ENGINE:   Lycoming 0-540-J3C5D; Prop McCauley B3D32C407-C –OH 2008; Approx 161.0 SPOH

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE: Approx. 1,044.3 SMOH; 2,377.3 TT; AFTT 2,377.3

EQUIPMENT:  (2) Garmin 430W’s; MX20; WSI AV200; JPI EGT-701; WX500; STEC 55X; KI256 FD; GMA340; Wingtip landing lights

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Hangar roof partially collapsed on plane due to tornado

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: Prop strike, empennage twisted 45 degrees; both wings spar damage, both elevators, center section & windshield severe.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:   AMF Springfield, TN   

REMARKS: Was a beautiful airplane. Guardian Stby Vacuum pump; Air oil separator.

Read more here:   http://www.avclaims.com/N182SX.htm

Couple Arrested After Disrupting Delta Flight From Minneapolis–Saint Paul To Los Angeles

Anna Christine Koosmann & Blake Adam Fleisig 
(credit: MSP Airport Police)



MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – An Edina woman remains in custody after she and a man disrupted a Delta Air Lines flight headed from Minneapolis to Los Angeles Wednesday night, causing it to be delayed.

According to MSP officials, the incident occurred on Delta flight 2565 from Minneapolis to Los Angeles.

The flight departed MSP at 6:20 p.m., but returned at 7:35 p.m. after 35-year-old Blake Adam Fleisig, of Los Angeles, and 36-year-old Christine Anne Koosmann were being disruptive.

Cellphone video taken by passenger Patrick Whalen shows a couple being escorted off the flight by several police officers.

“In my a million miles on Delta, I’ve never seen anything like this,” Whalen said. “The captain gets on and says, ‘If people in the back don’t start following instructions of the flight crew, I’m going to turn the plane around.'”

Whalen says a flight attendant told him Koosmann had tried to use the bathroom shortly after takeoff and became physical when she was told to stay seated. The couple was given one more warning before the flight turned around.

“When you turn a plane around, you know international flights have slots, so they can’t wait, so all those people missed their flights,” Whalen said.

Passengers cheered as the couple were removed. Fleisig appeared to get physical with another passenger in the video, while the woman curses.

Fleisig was arrested on charges of disorderly conduct, brawling or fighting. Koosmann was also arrested on charges of disorderly conduct.

Delta officials released this statement Thursday morning regarding the incident:

“The flight crew of Delta 2565 from Minneapolis-St. Paul to Los Angeles elected to return to Minneapolis shortly after takeoff when two passengers refused to follow crew instructions, became aggressive and created a disruption in the cabin. The passengers were removed by local law enforcement. The flight re-departed without further incident. The safety of Delta customers and employees is our top priority.”

Whalen says he appreciates the response of the flight crew.

“They handled it very well,” Whalen said. “All of the passengers were ready to go back there and take matters into their own hands.”

MSP officials said Fleisig cooperated with police and was released Wednesday night. Koosman was not being cooperative and is currently being held in Hennepin County Detention Center.

Story, video and photo:   http://minnesota.cbslocal.com

Piper PA 46-350P Malibu Mirage, N301BK, Cambusmoon Inc: Accident occurred December 29, 2016 at John C. Tune Airport (KJWN), Nashville, Tennessee

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Cambusmoon Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N301BK


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA105

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, December 29, 2016 in Nashville, TN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/20/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 46, registration: N301BK
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, during the landing roll, the airplane “began to drift sharply to the left.” The pilot reported that, although there were no wind gusts reported, he felt as though a wind gust was pushing the airplane to the left. He attempted to maintain directional control with rudder pedal application, and he applied full right aileron. The airplane continued to drift to the left, and the pilot attempted to abort the landing by applying full throttle and 25° of flaps. He reported that the airplane continued to drift to the left and that he was not able to achieve sufficient airspeed to rotate. The airplane exited the runway, the pilot pulled the throttle to idle, and he applied the brakes to avoid obstacles. However, the airplane impacted the runway and taxiway signage and came to rest in a drainage culvert. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings.

The published METAR for the accident airport reported that the wind was from 290° at 15 knots, and wind gusts exceeded 22 knots 1 hour before and 1 hour after the accident. The pilot landed the airplane on runway 20. The maximum demonstrated crosswind component for the airplane was 17 knots.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s loss of directional control during the aborted landing in gusting crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion.







NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A small plane made a hard landing off the runway at a West Nashville airport on Thursday.

The Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority confirms it happened at 1:25 p.m. at the John C. Tune airport just off the Centennial Boulevard exit of Briley Parkway.

The Piper PA-46 reportedly ran off the runway while landing and came to rest in a grassy area near the Runway Safety Area.

Christian Straubinger witnessed the incident and rushed over to help.

“It was very scary,” explained Straubinger. “My voice is shot from yelling and calling 911. I was just afraid of a fire. That was my biggest concern.”

The pilot and the two passengers on board were not injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified shortly after the incident. According to their records, the plane is registered to a company out of Glenview, Illinois.

Story and video:  http://wkrn.com



A single-engine plane crashed early Thursday afternoon at John C. Tune Airport in Nashville but no one was injured, authorities said.

The crash took place at just before 1:30 p.m just off the runway at the airport at 110 Tune Airport Drive, northwest of downtown Nashville.

Nashville International Airport spokeswoman Shannon Sumrall said three people were on board when the crash took place but no one was hurt.

The identity of those on board the plane was not immediately known.

According to a statement from the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority, a general aviation aircraft (Piper PA-46) arriving at the airport ran off the runway before promptly coming to rest outside the runway safety area.

Nashville Fire Department responded to the incident and the cause of the crash was not immediately known Thursday afternoon, airport authorities said.

As of about 3:30 p.m., she said, the runway was open.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash and will investigate, authorities said.

Source:   http://www.tennessean.com 




NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Officials have confirmed a small plane crashed at John C. Tune Airport.

The wreck happened around 1:25 p.m. Thursday at the airport in the 100 block of Tune Airport Drive.

Authorities said three people were on board, and all made it out of the plane safely.

The plane, a single engine Piper PA-46, ran off the runway before coming to rest outside the runway safety area after arriving at the airport.

The cause of the crash was unknown.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration were notified as the investigation remained ongoing.

Source:    http://www.newschannel5.com




NASHVILLE, Tenn.--Police and Fire crews responded to the John C. Tune Airport on Thursday after a small airplane went off the runway.

The single-engine Piper PA-46 reportedly went off the runway, leaving the runway blocked. Thankfully, nobody on board was reported injured.











NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – A small plane made a hard landing off the runway at a West Nashville airport on Thursday.

The Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority confirms it happened at 1:25 p.m. at the John C. Tune airport just off the Centennial Boulevard exit of Briley Parkway.

The Piper PA-46 reportedly ran off the runway while landing and came to rest in a grassy area near the Runway Safety Area.

Christian Straubinger witnessed the incident and rushed over to help.

“It was very scary,” explained Straubinger. “My voice is shot from yelling and calling 911. I was just afraid of a fire. That was my biggest concern.”

The pilot and the two passengers on board were not injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration was notified shortly after the incident. According to their records, the plane is registered to a company out of Glenview, Illinois.


Story and video:  http://wkrn.com






A single-engine plane crashed early Thursday afternoon at John C. Tune Airport in Nashville but no one was injured, authorities said.

The crash took place at just before 1:30 p.m just off the runway at the airport at 110 Tune Airport Drive, northwest of downtown Nashville.

Nashville International Airport spokeswoman Shannon Sumrall said three people were on board when the crash took place but no one was hurt.

The identity of those on board the plane was not immediately known.

According to a statement from the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority, a general aviation aircraft (Piper PA-46) arriving at the airport ran off the runway before promptly coming to rest outside the runway safety area.

Nashville Fire Department responded to the incident and the cause of the crash was not immediately known Thursday afternoon, airport authorities said.

As of about 3:30 p.m., she said, the runway was open.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash and will investigate, authorities said.

Source:   http://www.tennessean.com 






NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Officials have confirmed a small plane crashed at John C. Tune Airport.

The wreck happened around 1:25 p.m. Thursday at the airport in the 100 block of Tune Airport Drive.

Authorities said three people were on board, and all made it out of the plane safely.

The plane, a single engine Piper PA-46, ran off the runway before coming to rest outside the runway safety area after arriving at the airport.

The cause of the crash was unknown.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration were notified as the investigation remained ongoing.

Cessna 172M Skyhawk, Fischer Aviation, N5253R: Accident occurred December 27, 2016 in Warwick, Orange County, New York

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA102
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, December 27, 2016 in Warwick, NY
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N5253R

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Fischer Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N5253R

FAA Flight Standards District Office: TETERBORO

AIRCRAFT STUCK DEER UPON LANDING

Date: 27-DEC-16
Time: 21:40:00Z
Regis#: N5253R
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WARWICK
State: NEW YORK

Quicksilver GT500, N3265K: Incident occurred December 28, 2016 near Bellefontaine Regional Airport (KEDJ), Logan County, Ohio

http://registry.faa.gov/N3265K

FAA Flight Standards District Office: COLUMBUS

AIRCRAFT CAUGHT IN CROSSWIND UPON LANDING AND SLID OFF SIDE OF RUNWAY BREAKING AXLE AND LANDING GEAR.

Date: 28-DEC-16
Time: 19:25:00Z
Regis#: N3265K
Aircraft Make: QUICKSILVER
Aircraft Model: GT500
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BELLEFONTAINE

State: OHIO


An experimental plane sits in a plowed farm field north of the Bellefontaine Regional Airport runway after it was damaged in a Wednesday crash. Pilot Steve Sherrick of West Mansfield walked away from the crash. 



Steve Sherrick of West Mansfield was able to walk away from his damaged plane, go across a plowed, muddy farm field and another 300 yards or so to the main terminal of the Bellefontaine Regional Airport, 3100 W. State Route 47, to report the 1:15 p.m. crash.

“He came into the lobby holding his muddy shoes in his hands and told me he just crashed,” said Matt Chamberlain, an employee of Midwest Corporate Air Inc., which operates the airport for the city.

Source:   http://www.examiner.org

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

San Diegans are tired of airport noise and tired of complaining

Point Loma, Mission Beach and La Jolla residents at an Airport Noise Advisory Committee meeting on Dec. 21, 2016. 



Even the most prolific complaint writer is fatigued.


Steve Crow, a Point Loma Heights resident of 10 years, complained about airplane noise far more than anyone else in 2016, filing 20,068 complaints. In February alone, he filed 4,084 complaints, as many as 251 in a day. In November, he lodged 39.


"It really just started two years ago," Crow said about planes flying over his neighborhood. "But I've stopped logging complaints because it wears on you."


Crow was working from home when he began submitting hundreds of complaints a day. He said he made calls to city council members and local politicians only to receive a "stock response" each time.


"You're up against an industry and you're just residents, that's all you are," he said. "You've got to dedicate time to something else. Do you move? Yeah, probably. I don't want to, but there's just not going to be a resolution."


An airport authority spokeswoman said an improvement in operations is responsible for the recent downturn in complaints, as well as heightened community awareness of flight paths and daily airport operations.


Explaining the increase

In late 2015, complaints began to rise from several a month to thousands as the Federal Aviation Administration rolled out its plan for the SoCal Metroplex, a project that would alter arrival and departure flight paths at 19 Southern California airports.

For San Diego, the proposal meant departing planes, after taking off toward the west, would turn sooner and fly closer to previously quiet neighborhoods. However, after months of negative feedback from the community, the FAA placed the turning point almost two miles south of the peninsula, farther south than its current location.

Airport authority spokeswoman Rebecca Bloomfield said there were no actual changes in airport operations at the time, and it was the proposal that caused an immediate increase in noise complaints.

Documents provided by the airport authority tell a different story. They show early turns below 6,000 feet and curfew violations, two main causes for noise in Point Loma and nearby neighborhoods, have increased since 2014.

"When they say there was no change, that worries me," said Casey Schnoor, a member of an airport noise subcommittee. "When you look at the data, things were changing."

Early turns occur when air traffic controllers either instruct a pilot to turn before reaching an established waypoint, or approve a pilot's request to do so. The points were created to keep flights on a route straight off the peninsula and around it to avoid unnecessary noise while taking off.

At a November airport noise meeting, FAA officials said controllers allow early turns for three reasons: weather, safety, and most concerning for the committee members, distance between planes, known as separation.

Dr. Lila Schmidt, a physician and Point Loma resident, told FAA officials in November that spacing planes out will cut down on noise, "but you won't have as much money coming into San Diego."

She suggested air traffic control - responsible for incoming and outgoing flights on the runway - only permit flights to depart every five minutes, which she said would allow planes to avoid bunching up and would reduce early turns.

In response, Barry Davis, an air traffic manager for the FAA, told her "that will never happen" because passengers will have to wait too long on the runway before taking off.

In a recent report, inewsource found airlines are paying an increasing number of fines for breaking the Airport Authority rule that says planes can't take off between 11:30 p.m. and 6:30 a.m.

Although fines are higher and more frequent than in previous years, violations have increased from 47 in 2014 to 55 through November of this year.

How the airport authority responds

"There's only so many things the airport can do," airport authority spokeswoman Bloomfield said. The takeoff curfew is not an FAA rule.

Bloomfield told inewsource the authority can only make recommendations to the FAA, air traffic control and airlines on issues like early turns and curfew violations. She said once flights are on the runway, the FAA is in charge. Air traffic control directs planes on when to depart and when it is safe to make a turn.

The airport authority can't stop flights from taking off after 11:30 p.m., but it can levy fines of up to $30,000 if the local rule is broken, Bloomfield said, and airlines have long been aware of the curfew.

To combat community concern over noise, the airport authority recently increased the frequency of airport noise meetings from quarterly to every other month and created a subcommittee allowing the public to communicate directly with FAA officials.

But community members who continue to submit noise complaints say that effort may not be enough.

"Every meeting we get told, 'we'll look into it,'" Schmidt said. "I just want to hear 'we fixed it.'"

Reed more here:  http://www.cbs8.com

Allegiant Air apologizes for diverted Ogdensburg flight

OGDENSBURG - Allegiant Air has offered an apology to passengers for a Christmas Eve flight originally bound from Ogdensburg to Florida that was forced to land in Syracuse because of a mechanical problem.

A spokeswoman for Allegiant Air confirmed that the Dec. 24 flight from Ogdensburg experienced a midair mechanical problem that forced the pilot to land at Hancock International Airport in Syracuse.

Allegiant Air Flight 1711 departed Ogdensburg at 12:40 p.m. enroute to Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport when the flight’s captain made a decision to reroute the plane to Syracuse, according to Allegiant Air Spokeswoman Krysta Levy.

“The aircraft experienced a mechanical issue in flight, and the captain diverted to Syracuse Hancock International Airport,” Ms. Levy said in a statement. “The aircraft landed safely and was met by airport fire crews as a precaution.”

The Allegiant Air spokeswoman did not elaborate on the nature of the mechanical issue that forced the diversion of Flight 1711.

Ms. Levy said there were 160 passengers and six crew members on the flight, and that all of those on board deplaned safely at the Syracuse terminal gate.

A replacement aircraft was dispatched to carry the passengers on to their final Fort Lauderdale destination, according to Ms. Levy. She said the passengers landed in Fort Lauderdale at 8:45 p.m. local time on Christmas Eve.

She said the airline apologized to the passengers for the disruption of service. “We sincerely apologize to our passengers for the inconvenience and disruption to their plans,” Ms. Levy said. “Passengers were provided $100 vouchers for future travel on Allegiant as well as food service in the gate area.”

Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority Executive Director Wade A. Davis praised Allegiant Air for its handling of the Christmas Eve incident, and the role the airline is playing in helping spur economic activity in the region. “Ogdensburg International Airport is accomplishing great things for the local economy and safety in aviation is number one,” Mr. Davis said in an email. “OGS commends the professionalism of Allegiant to make the right calls to keep the traveling public safe. Thanks to these professionals, flights out of OGS are operated safely and efficiently.”

Story and comments:  http://www.watertowndailytimes.com

Ogdensburg International Airport close to getting $1 million from FAA for having 10,000 outbound passengers

OGDENSBURG -- The Ogdensburg Bridge and Port Authority is close to winning a $1 million bonus from the Federal Aviation Administration that they are all but calling it a done deal.

“We’re forecasting 10,225 enplanements” for the year at Ogdensburg International Airport, said OBPA Executive Director Wade Davis on Wednesday, which would exceed the 10,000 passengers on outbound flights in 2016 that the FAA said would be needed to claim the big bonus.

“We’re going to be very close,” Davis said.

If they don’t make 10,000 enplanements their bonus will be $150,000 that the OBPA can use for airfield improvements and equipment purchases.

Davis wouldn’t give us an exact number as of today, but with three Allegiant Air flights to Florida through Saturday of about 150 passengers each and up to 27 passengers a day with Cape Air flights to Albany and Boston, he was comfortable with the 10,225 number by midnight Saturday night, “depending on weather,” Davis said.

A promotion the OBPA announced in November will account for 150 passengers. Anyone traveling on Allegiant and Cape Air out of Ogdensburg who bought two or more outbound tickets at once would get a “two-for-one” ticket deal, and as of Wednesday, about 150 ticket buyers had taken advantage of that.

“We have not hit 10,000 yet, but we are on track,” he said. “We’ve never hit that number. We’re very excited about it.”

“The weather in the North Country is certainly a concern, so I don’t want to say we’ll get there for certain, but we’re fairly sure we’ll make it,” Davis said.

A runway extension completed this year allows Allegiant jets to land and take off from Ogdensburg, so the airline started up their low-cost flights to Florida from the airport. Money was also put into improvements to the terminal building and parking areas.

On Dec. 24, an Allegiant Ogdensburg-to-Ft. Lauderdale flight made an unscheduled landing in Syracuse.  Davis referred questions about the incident to Allegiant public relations staff who did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

However, WWNY reported the plane suffered mechanical problems of an undisclosed nature and passengers were transferred to another plane to complete their journey.

Source:   http://northcountrynow.com

Cessna 172B Skyhawk, N6941X: Accident occurred December 28, 2016 near Sauk Prairie Airport ( 91C), Prairie du Sac, Sauk County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6941X

Location: Prairie Du Sac, WI
Accident Number: CEN17LA090
Date & Time: 12/28/2016, 1230 CST
Registration: N6941X
Aircraft: CESSNA 172B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The private pilot was conducting a local flight. He reported that, during the flight, the engine started to run roughly. He decided to return to the airport for a precautionary landing. About 4 miles from the airport and while lined up for landing, the pilot increased the engine throttle with no response; the airplane lost total power. He decided to land the airplane on a roadway about 1 mile from the airport. After landing on the roadway and coming to a complete stop, the pilot restarted the engine and attempted to taxi off the roadway. While he was taxiing the airplane, it struck three roadway signs and a fence, which resulted in structural damage to the left wing.

After the airplane was recovered, small amounts of water were present in the fuel from both wing sumps and the gascolator. The engine was started, ran normally, and both magnetos checked within normal limits. The loss of engine power could have resulted from water in the fuel but the definitive reason could not be determined.

Although the pilot landed the airplane successfully on the roadway after having engine power problems, his decision to taxi the airplane from the roadway and his failure to avoid the roadway signs and fence resulted in substantial damage to the airplane. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to taxi the airplane from the roadway and his subsequent failure to maintain clearance from signs and a fence after a successful emergency landing following a total loss of engine power.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Fluid type
Fuel - Fluid condition

Personnel issues
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Monitoring environment - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Effect on operation
Sign/marker - Effect on operation

Factual Information 

On December 28, 2016, about 1230 central standard time, a Cessna 172B single engine airplane, N6941X, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage after it struck roadway signs while attempting to taxi after a successful emergency landing near Prairie Du Sac, Wisconsin. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Sauk-Prairie Airport (91C), Prairie Du Sac, Wisconsin about 1130.

The pilot reported that he was flying locally at 4,500 feet after departing from 91C. The engine started to run rough and the pilot applied carburetor heat. He decided to return to the airport for a precautionary landing. About 4 miles from the airport, and lined up for landing on runway 18, the pilot increased the engine throttle but had no response. He decided to land on a roadway about 1 mile from the airport.

After landing on the roadway and coming to a stop, the pilot started the engine and attempted to taxi off the roadway. While taxiing, the airplane struck 3 road signs and an iron fence, resulting in structural damage to the left wing.

The local Sheriff closed the highway as the airplane was loaded onto a trailer and transported to 91C where it was examined by an FAA inspector. Approximately 4-5 gallons of fuel were present in each wing tank. Small amounts of water were present in the fuel from both wing sumps and the gascolator. The engine was started, ran normally, and both magnetos checked within normal limits. The fuel appeared to be automotive fuel. The pilot confirmed that he used automotive fuel. Review of the logbooks did not disclose that the airplane was approved for the use of automotive fuel.

History of Flight

Taxi
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/06/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/22/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 3401 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3401 hours (Total, this make and model), 3401 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N6941X
Model/Series: 172B B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1960
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17247841
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/28/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6357 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-300 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MSN
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1155 CST
Direction from Accident Site: 260°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Thin Broken / 13000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 20000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 210°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.74 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / -3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Prairie Du Sac, WI (91C)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Prairie Du Sac, WI (91C)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1130 CST
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Sauk-Prairie Airport (91C)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 832 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.297778, -89.755833 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA090
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, December 28, 2016 in Prairie Du Sac, WI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172B, registration: N6941X
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 28, 2016, about 1230 central standard time, a Cessna 172B single engine airplane, N6941X, registered to a private individual, sustained substantial damage after it struck roadway signs while attempting to taxi after a successful emergency landing. The private pilot and one passenger were not injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the area and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from the Prairie Du Sac Airport (91C) about 1130.

The pilot reported that he was flying locally at 4,500 feet after departing from 91C. The engine started to run rough and the pilot applied carburetor heat. He decided to return to the airport for a precautionary landing. About 4 miles from the airport, and lined up for landing on runway 18, the pilot increased the engine throttle, but had no response. He decided to land the airplane on US Highway 12, about 1 mile from the airport. After landing on the roadway and coming to a stop, the pilot started the engine and attempted to taxi off the roadway. While taxiing, the airplane struck 3 road signs and an iron fence, resulting in structural damage to the left wing.

The local Sheriff closed the highway as the airplane was loaded onto a trailer and transported to 91C where it was examined by an FAA inspector. Approximately 4-5 gallons of fuel were present in each wing tank. Small amounts of water were present in the fuel from both wing sumps and the gascolator. The engine was started, ran normally, and both magnetos checked within normal limits. The fuel appeared to be automotive fuel.

The pilot confirmed that he used automotive fuel. Initial review of the logbooks did not disclose that the airplane was approved for the use of automotive fuel.





PRAIRIE DU SAC – No one was injured Wednesday when a plane made an emergency landing on U.S. Highway 12 near the Sauk Prairie Airport.

At about 12:30 p.m., a southbound 1961 single-engine Cessna headed to the airport lost power over the Baraboo Bluffs, prompting the pilot to land unexpectedly. The plane touched down on Highway 12's southbound lanes near the intersection with Sauk County Highway Z.

The pilot, 69-year-old pilot Stephan L. Arnold of Madison, restored power after the landing and attempted to take off, but hit a road sign, causing the plane to cross the median and come to rest on the east side of U.S. 12 next to Sauk Prairie Cemetery. Arnold and his passenger were unhurt.

A pair of witnesses, Anthony Kirkus and wife Meg of Wisconsin Dells, were driving north on U.S. 12 when they saw the plane headed for their car’s windshield.

Kirkus said “the plane touched down right as we passed it going the other way, it was crazy.”

The plane did not show any outward signs of having a problem, aside from flying extremely low, Kirkus said. “Just before it landed, we saw this low-flying plane that almost hit a set of wires going across the highway,” Kirkus said. “It just missed that and then we said, ‘Well, this is definitely landing on Highway 12.’”

Deputies directed vehicles around the landing site Wednesday afternoon, temporarily slowing traffic on U.S. 12. The plane sustained moderate damage and was towed to the airport.

The Sheriff’s Office was assisted by several agencies, including Sauk City Fire, Sauk Prairie EMS, Sauk Prairie Police, the county Highway Department, the state Department of Transportation and the Federal Aviation Administration.

Source:   http://www.wiscnews.com




SAUK CITY, Wis. - The Sauk County Sheriff's Department said a plane made an emergency landing on U.S. Highway 12 just north of Sauk City on Wednesday afternoon.

Two people were in the aircraft when the plane made the landing just before 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, according to the sheriff's department. No injuries were reported.

A sheriff's chief deputy told News 3 that the plane had taken off from the Sauk-Prairie Airport in Prairie Du Sac.

The pilot, a Madison man, told deputies he lost power and landed on the road. When he regained power, he tried to take off again and hit a sign post, the official said. There was some damage to the plane, which was being towed back to the airport Wednesday afternoon.

The highway where the plane landed is just north of an airport outside of Sauk City.

A stretch of Highway 12 was closed briefly after the landing but was reopen before about 1 p.m., officials said.


Source:   http://www.channel3000.com















Anthony Kirkus was driving, his wife, Meg, was in the passenger seat, and an airplane was headed for their car's windshield.

This was Wednesday just after noon as the couple was driving north on Highway 12 near Highway Z outside of Prairie Du Sac, adjacent to Sauk Prairie Airport and a cemetery.

"The plane touched down right as we passed it going the other way. It was crazy," said Kirkus, who lives in Wisconsin Dells.

Stephen L. Arnold, of Madison, was operating the 1960 single-engine Cessna when the plane lost power, prompting the emergency landing, the Sauk County Sheriff's Office said. Arnold and a passenger were not injured, the Sheriff's Office said.

"Just before it landed, we saw this low-flying plane that almost hit a set of wires going across the highway," Kirkus said. "It just missed that and then we said, 'Well, this is definitely landing on Highway 12.'"

"It was coming straight at us, and I thought a little optimistically that it was going to land nearby because it was not really lining up with us and then it came down," he said.

Arnold, 69, attempted to take off from the highway after the plane regained power, the Sheriff's Office said. But the aircraft struck a road sign, sending it over the median before stopping on the east side of the highway.

The moderately damaged plane was towed to the nearby airport, the Sheriff's Office said.

Source:  http://host.madison.com