Thursday, March 1, 2018

Commentary: Citizens deserve vote on McClellan-Palomar Airport (KCRQ) changes




By KRISTINE WRIGHT

San Diego County’s proposed expansion of McClellan-Palomar Airport (Palomar Airport) has raised many concerns for local residents as it bypasses legal documents guaranteeing Carlsbad citizens a vote on any airport expansions.

Carlsbad’s Municipal Code 21.53.015 (1980) was established by foresighted citizens who predicted an expansion of the Palomar Airport. The city also approved a Conditional Use Permit (CUP172) which allows specific permitted uses.

The county states in the proposed Palomar Airport Master Plan that there is no construction planned to “expand the airport boundaries,” and a vote is not needed. The county is attempting to usurp Carlsbad’s authority to interpret its own municipal code by using “extension” rather than “expansion” to prevent Carlsbad citizens from voting.

The county doesn’t have to abide by Carlsbad’s vote according to legal experts. However, statements in the county’s own past documents, website and definitions by the Land Use Compatibility Plan (LUCP) define these proposed changes as an “expansion.” And officials are claiming that they need an expansion for safety reasons.

County-owned Palomar Airport is located completely within the city of Carlsbad, at one of our busiest intersections. The proposal is to move the runway 123 feet north, lengthen the runway up to 900 feet east toward El Camino Real, over a landfill considered unstable ground.

Increased noise levels due to the expanded runway, increased airport activity and newly routed landing patterns will affect everyone in North County. Palomar Airport, according to the FAA, has strict rules for all commercial passenger airlines allowing them to operate when the tower is open from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. All other aircraft are regulated by a Voluntary Noise Abatement Program which allows pilots of private planes to operate 24/7. There are strict regulations concerning altitudes, but when preparing to land, planes may fly at any safe altitude resulting in lower flying aircraft over our homes. Some pilots choose not to obey established flight patterns. The expanded airport would mainly benefit private corporate aircraft.

The county claims the expanded airport would be “quieter” due to the larger, modern private jets. To make it profitable, there would be many more flights though-all which operate 24/7. The runway would expand from 4,897 feet to , feet, only 4 feet shorter than John Wayne Airport.

Planes will be allowed to fill their fuel tanks to capacity, which increases weight, requiring more thrust for takeoff, therefore more noise 24/7. Increased decibel levels will affect anyone in the vicinity of the airport. Ground-level noise monitors have been removed from north Carlsbad (north of Palomar Airport Road) thereby making it unclear how noise levels are measured in that region, or how data in the proposed master plan is reliable. How conclusive are summaries indicating that noise levels are below a certain threshold, if there is no monitoring? Further, noise complaints are recorded by the county with no resulting action.

Expanded operations at the airport will include increased vehicle traffic to an area that is already congested. The county’s proposed plan has not incorporated expected increases in traffic due to future housing and commercial developments at the intersection of Palomar Airport Road and El Camino Real. With the addition of airport traffic including rental car agencies, gridlock is imminent.

County staff state the airport expansion is needed for safety reasons. Palomar Airport, classified B-II, allows larger corporate aircraft (classified C-III or D-III), to access the airport. The county states an expansion is necessary for these C-III and D-III jets and the expansion is required to allow these jets to fly farther without stopping to refuel. These aircraft are too large for Palomar Airport as it is now! The county wants to spend taxpayer dollars to accommodate private C-III and D-III aircraft already using our Class B-II airport.

Palomar Airport already has commercial passenger flights, so a longer runway is not needed for the community’s needs. The airport is safe now, according to legal experts, otherwise it would not be approved to operate. If expanded, the runway would be lengthened up to 900 feet toward El Camino Real resulting in planes flying lower over our roads and over an unsafe landfill.

The expansion would only favor private corporate/special interests and not affect the community’s ability to fly as passengers. Any expansion will affect not only Carlsbad residents, but citizens of San Marcos, Vista and Oceanside who have voiced their concerns. All of us will be affected! Our quality of life, our health and our community values are at stake. We want a voice!

Wright is a longtime Carlsbad resident. For more information on the topic see www.c4fa.org and Facebook Citizens for a Friendly Airport.

Original article ➤ http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N615JA: Fatal accident occurred February 28, 2018 near Ocean City Municipal Airport (KOXB), Worcester County, Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland
Cessna/Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N615JA

Location: Ocean City, MD
Accident Number: ERA18LA094
Date & Time: 02/28/2018, 1930 EST
Registration: N615JA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 28, 2018, about 1930 eastern standard time, a Cessna 172S, N615JA, was destroyed when it impacted the Atlantic Ocean about 1 mile east of Ocean City Municipal Airport (OXB), Ocean City, Maryland. The private pilot was fatally injured. The passenger has not been located and was presumed fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Middle River Aviation and was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Night, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed Martin State Airport (MTN), Baltimore, Maryland, about 1755.

According to flight school personnel at MTN, the pilot rented the airplane on the day of the accident for a short cross-country flight to OXB. Preliminary information from air traffic control revealed that the pilot flew direct and obtained flight following en route to OXB. He cancelled flight following during the approach to OXB and there were no further radio communications from the pilot. A review of preliminary radar data showed the airplane descended from 2,000 ft to 700 ft above ground level before radar coverage was lost. Witnesses at OXB reported seeing the airplane conduct a touch-and-go landing before departing the traffic pattern. According to the flight school, the airplane was not rented for an overnight trip and the pilot was expected to return to MTN.

The following morning, when the flight school office manager arrived at work, she noticed that the airplane had not returned, and reported it missing to her manager. She contacted OXB and was informed that the airplane was not at the airport. The office manager called surrounding airports and the Coast Guard to attempt to locate the missing airplane. After the airplane was not accounted for at any of the airports, the flight school initiated a search flight along the pilot's last known flight route. About 1030, they reported seeing an oil slick 2 miles off the end of runway 14, at OXB. The GPS coordinates were shared with the Civil Air Patrol and the Coast Guard.

According to the Maryland Natural Resources Police, they received a call of a missing airplane that was conducting touch-and-go landings at OXB. A search of the shoreline ensued, and debris was sighted. During the search, a fuel oil slick was discovered that was still bubbling to the surface. They positioned their vessel around the highest concentration of fuel and oil and anchored. Divers subsequently discovered a wing and the fuselage of the airplane. Shortly after, the pilot was found within the wreckage.

The wreckage was located in the Atlantic Ocean about 1 mile from the shoreline, at depth of 50 ft.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating, and a Federal Aviation Administration first-class airman medical certificate issued August 24, 2017, with no limitations. According to flight school records, the pilot had accumulated about 81 hours of total flight experience.

At 1853, the recorded weather at OXB, about 1 mile west of the accident site, included winds 230 at 6 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, and overcast clouds at 12,000 ft above ground level. The temperature was 11 degrees° (C), the dew point was 5° C, and the altimeter setting was 29.99 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N615JA
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: MIDDLE RIVER AVIATION LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: OXB
Observation Time: 1953 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 230°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 10000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: BALTIMORE, MD (MTN)
Destination:  OCEAN CITY, MD (OXB)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  38.288056, -75.091944

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Marcson Ngwa was one of the confirmed occupants of the plane that has believed to have crashed in the ocean. 


OCEAN CITY — One victim from a plane crash in the ocean has been recovered but the search for a second has been suspended due to the current storm battering the mid-Atlantic coast.

Sometime Wednesday evening, a Cessna 172S Skyhawk airplane left Martin State Airport in Baltimore County en route to Ocean City. The occupants of the plane have been identified by the U.S. Coast Guard as Banica Richard Robinson and Marcson Ngwa.

According to a Coast Guard release, the plane was seen practicing touch-and-go landings at the Ocean City Municipal Airport on Wednesday evening. Shortly after 10 a.m. on Thursday, federal officials notified the Maryland State Police (MSP) Special Operations Division that the aircraft had not returned to Martin State Airport as expected.

When it was determined the plane did not return to Martin State Airport as planned and was not located at the Ocean City Municipal Airport where it had last been seen, a multi-agency search effort in and around the Ocean City Municipal Airport was initiated.

Around 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, an MSP Aviation Command Trooper 4 and Civil Air Patrol crew located what was described as an oil slick in the ocean about 1.5 miles from the Ocean City Municipal Airport. According to sources, an airplane tire was found floating in the oil slick.

According to the MSP, rescue personnel continued to focus their search on the area late Thursday afternoon. Throughout the afternoon on Thursday, sources have confirmed debris consistent with an airplane has been recovered in a vast area off the coast, including some as far as five miles out. In addition, a Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) dive team was searching for possible victims in the area where the oil slick was discovered.

Shortly before 5 p.m. on Thursday, Maryland State Police, the NRP and the Coast Guard conducted side-scanning operations in an underwater debris field. The debris field was located approximately five miles from the initial oil slick.

Rescue personnel determined the aircraft was in a severely deteriorated condition and a body was recovered from among pieces of the plane. The recovered body was a male wearing the same clothing as described on the pilot who left Martin State Airport on Wednesday, presumably Robinson. Authorities did not identify the body recovered. The deceased is being transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore for an autopsy.

Search efforts concluded just before 6 p.m. on Thursday as a monster storm began to arrive along the mid-Atlantic coast. Dive teams will resume search and recovery efforts once the storm passes and ocean conditions improve.

According to Ocean City Emergency Management, the storm, which is already bring extreme high winds reaching as high as 70 mph and rain, is expected to linger in the resort area throughout the weekend.

The Maryland State Police Underwater Recovery Unit with assistance from the U.S. Coast Guard, the NRP, the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, MSP troopers and members of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center are conducting the search and rescue operation and the investigation continues. A command center was established at the Maryland NRP Boathouse at the commercial harbor in West Ocean City.

Little is known about the victims at this point. Marcson Ngwa’s Facebook page identifies him as a self-employed entrepreneur and aviator and a banner picture on the top of his page shows an airplane. His Facebook page reveals he posted a “today’s motivation” every day without fail.


Original article can be found here ➤  https://mdcoastdispatch.com


Marcson Ngwa who was born in Cameroon and  a native of Bafut Fondom.  After coming to the United States to pursue his dream to become a pilot, he obtained his license as a private pilot from the Middle River Aviation School in Baltimore Maryland and was working towards obtaining his commercial pilot license. On 02/28/2018, Marcson’s plane was reported missing and later seen on 03/01/2018 crashed about 1.5km offshore in Ocean City. Marcson's remains was retrieved and a photo of him was presented for identification on March  6th 2018 at the JB Jenkins funeral home Landover MD.



OCEAN CITY, Md. — The search for a downed plane off the coast of Assateague Island has been halted due to high winds, but is expected to resume once the storm passes and conditions improve.

Dive teams at the site were successful in recovering a body around 5 p.m. Thursday, but then suspended the search at 6 p.m., according to Maryland State Police.

"There's nothing we can do in this high wind," said Sgt. DaVaughn Parker, a state police public information officer, on Friday.

The body was wearing the same clothing worn by the pilot, and was taken to the medical examiner's office in Baltimore for an autopsy, state police said. 

The two people on board at the time of the crash have been identified as Banica Richard Robinson and Marcson Ngwa, according to the Coast Guard, but Parker said the identity of the recovered body would not be released until the autopsy is completed.

Assateague Island is a 37-mile-long barrier island south of Ocean City, Maryland. It is bordered by the Atlantic Ocean on the east and the Sinepuxent Bay on the west. The southernmost portion of the island is in Virginia.

The plane took off from Martin State Airport in Baltimore at about 5:30 p.m. Wednesday and was last seen practicing touch-and-go landings near the Ocean City Municipal Airport at about 6:15 p.m., according to Petty Officer Ronald Hodges, a Coast Guard spokesman in Baltimore.

The Cessna 172S Skyhawk had two people onboard and was later reported overdue, Hodges said.

A spokeswoman for the Federal Aviation Administration said Friday the agency issued an alert notice after the plane did not arrive at the Ocean City Municipal Airport. The alert was canceled when it was confirmed the aircraft crashed off the coast of Ocean City. The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine the cause of the accident, she said.

Hodges identified the plane's tail number as N615JA. That corresponds to a plane registered to Middle River Aviation, a flight school in Baltimore, according to the Federal Aviation Administration's website.

No one answered the phone at Middle River Aviation on Friday, and there was no response to a message seeking comment on Friday.

On its website, the company said it is "the largest airplane and helicopter training aviation schools on the Northeast."

In addition to operating a flight school, Middle River Aviation also offers small planes and helicopters for rent by the hour.

Neither of the people on board the missing plane are listed as staff or instructors on Middle River's website. A company newsletter from September features a photo of Ngwa in front of a Cessna Skyhawk CE 172 after passing his private pilot airplane practical and flight test.

On his Facebook page, where friends and family left tributes to him Friday, Ngwa described himself as a "Young, Motivated, Energetic & Committed Entrepreneur and Aviator. He's a Go-Getter."

After the plane was reported overdue on Wednesday, Maryland Natural Resources Police and other agencies began a search at the north end of Assateague, said agency spokeswoman Candy Thomson. 

An oil slick was spotted about 1 ½ miles off the northern end of the island Thursday morning, according to multiple police agencies at the scene.

Later on Thursday, a debris field was located about 5 miles from the oil slick, Parker said. It was there that divers finally located the wreckage and recovered the body.

Dive teams will resume searching for other the other person who was aboard the plane once the storm passes and conditions on the ocean permit, Parker said. 

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.delmarvanow.com

Marcson Ngwa

OCEAN CITY, Md.- Maryland State Police said rescue personnel recovered one person Thursday night following a small plane crash that occurred the evening before off the coast of Ocean City.

Coast Guard spokesman Petty Officer Ronald Hodges said a Cessna 172S Skyhawk with two people on board, took off from Martin State Airport in Baltimore around 5:30 p.m. Wednesday and was last seen doing touch-go-landings at Ocean City Municipal Airport around 6:15 p.m. Authorities confirm Banica Richard Robinson and Marcson Ngwa were the two people on board.

Once the plane became overdue, Maryland State Police and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center got involved in the search, according to Hodges.

Debris was located about a mile off the coast of Ocean City. Natural Resources Police discovered an oil sheen in the water and a Maryland State Police helicopter confirmed it. It was at that point that the Coast Guard got involved in the search and recovery effort, Hodges said. 

According to MSP, rescue personnel conducted side scanning operations in an underwater debris field that was located approximately five miles from that initial oil slick spot at around 5 p.m.

MSP said they recovered one body among pieces of the plane, and the debris was found in severely deteriorated conditions. MSP said the body recovered was male and was wearing the same clothing as described on the pilot. The body will be transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Baltimore for an autopsy, police said.

Coast Guard Station Ocean City had two small boats participating in the search for the two people on board the plane. Coast Guard Atlantic City had a helicopter searching for the victims and the Maryland State Police dive team was also involved in the search. A command center has been established at the Maryland Natural Resources Police Boathouse on Harbor Road in West Ocean City. 

According to MSP, search efforts ended around 6 p.m. Thursday and dive teams will continue to search for other passengers once the coming storm passes and ocean conditions allow. 

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wboc.com




OCEAN CITY, Md. (WBFF) - The body of a crash victim was recovered Thursday evening after a small plane went missing on the way to Ocean City, reported Maryland State Police on Thursday.

The Cessna 172S Skyhawk had left Martin State Airport Wednesday night and did not return, said police in a news release Thursday afternoon.

Officials ultimately found the plane "in severely deteriorated conditions"; an oil slick was found in the Atlantic Ocean about 1 1/2 miles from the Ocean City airport, then a field of debris about 5 miles from the oil slick.

The body of a man wearing the same clothes as described on the pilot was recovered among the pieces of the plane.

Aviation officials found "what is described as an oil slick in the ocean, about 1.5 miles from the Ocean City Airport."

State Police, Natural Resources Police and the Coast Guard jointly conducted scanning operations in an underwater debris field, according to the news release.

The body will be taken to the Medical Examiner's office for an autopsy.

Search efforts ended at 6 p.m. Thursday, and dive teams will resume searching for other passengers after the expected storm on Friday passes, according to a news release.

Assistance has been provided by Maryland State Police Underwater Recovery Unit, US Coast Guard, Natural Resources Police, Worcester County Sheriff's Office, Maryland State Police troopers and members of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.  A command center has been set up at the Maryland Natural Resources Police Boathouse on Harbor Road in West Ocean City.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://foxbaltimore.com


Maryland State Police divers found the body of person in the wreckage of a plane that was reported missing Thursday and was discovered crashed in the waters off the coast of Ocean City.

Divers recovered the body from the fuselage of a Cessna 172S Skyhawk that had been reported missing just after 10 a.m. Thursday. The aircraft had left Martin State Airport en route to Ocean City Wednesday night, but did not return as expected to the originating airport, authorities said.

The Air Force Rescue Coordination Center began the search when the beacon from the Cessna 172 was not transmitting the location, according to a statement from the U.S. Coast Guard.

The body was discovered just after 5 p.m., said U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Ronald Hodges, a spokesman. Coast Guard officials said that they believe two people were aboard the plane and identified them as Banica Richard Robinson and Marcson Ngwa. Authorities did not identify the body that was recovered.

As police searched the area near Ocean City Airport, they located what was described as an oil slick in the ocean, about 1.5 miles from airport, state police said in a statement. Rescue crews focused their search on that area and Natural Resources Police officers recovered debris believed to be from the plane, the statement said.

Officials said the search included the State police Underwater Recovery Unit along with the U.S. Coast Guard, Natural Resources Police, Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

Original article ➤ https://www.washingtonpost.com






A single-engine aircraft that took off from Martin State Airport Wednesday night for Ocean City may have crashed off the shore there.

Maryland State Police say they're working with local and federal agencies in looking for the missing plane and the two aboard. 

Just after 10 a.m. Thursday, federal authorities notified state troopers that the Cessna 172S Skyhawk left the Baltimore County airport and hadn't returned.

The U.S. Coast Guard identified the two missing as Banica Richard Robinson and Marcson Ngwa. They didn't say where the two are from or where the plane is registered. The plane was supposed to return to Martin State and wasn't transmitting its location beacon. They were last seen practicing touch-and-gos at the Ocean City airport Wednesday evening.

Authorities searched near that airport. A state police helicopter and Civil Air Patrol personnel found what's described as an oil slick in the ocean, about 1 1/2 miles from the airport. Rescuers are focusing on that area.

While the aircraft itself hasn't been spotted, natural resources police have found debris believed to be associated with an aircraft. State police divers are on the scene. In addition to the Coast Guard, the Worcester County Sheriff's Office and members of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center are also assisting.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wbal.com




OCEAN CITY, Md. —  Federal, state and local authorities are searching Thursday for a missing plane in Worcester County.

An aircraft believed to be a single-engine, four-passenger plane left Martin State Airport Wednesday night and was seen was practicing touch-and-gos at the Ocean City Municipal Airport that evening. Officials said they began their search when the plane did not return to the Martin State airport and was not transmitting its location beacon.

The Coast Guard has identified Baniva Richard Robinson and Marcson Ngwa as the missing passengers.

Authorities searched an area near the Ocean City Airport late Thursday morning. They found what is described as an oil slick in the ocean around 11:30 a.m., about 1.5 miles from the Ocean City Airport. Rescue personnel are focusing their search on that area.

Although the aircraft has not been found, Maryland Natural Resources Police officers in the water near the oil slick recovered debris believed to be associated with an aircraft, state police said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wbaltv.com






OCEAN CITY — A few more details have emerged late this afternoon about the reported plane crash off the resort coast Wednesday night or early Thursday morning while an exhaustive multi-agency search for the occupants and debris continue.

According to the Maryland State Police (MSP), shortly after 10 a.m. on Thursday, federal officials notified the MSP Special Operations Division that an aircraft believed to be a single-engine, four-passenger plane left Martin State Airport in Baltimore County on Wednesday night en route to Ocean City and had not yet returned.

It is unknown at this point how many individuals were on the plane, but different sources throughout the afternoon have told The Dispatch the plane was occupied by a student pilot and an instructor, although that has not been confirmed officially. When it was determined the plane did not return as planned to the Martin State Airport and was not located at the Ocean City Municipal Airport, a search of the area near the Ocean City airport was initiated on Thursday morning.

The crew of the MSP Aviation Command Trooper 4 and Civil Air Patrol personnel have located what is described as an oil slick in the ocean about 1.5 miles from the Ocean City Airport. According to sources, an airplane tire was found floating in the oil slick.

According to the MSP release, rescue personnel continue to focus their search on the area late Thursday afternoon. Throughout the afternoon on Thursday, sources have confirmed debris consistent with an airplane have been recovered in a vast area off the coast, including some as far as five miles out. In addition, a Maryland Natural Resources Police (NRP) dive team was searching for possible victims in the area where the oil slick was discovered.

While the search and rescue operation continues, it will likely be complicated by the pending massive nor’easter expected to arrive in the area with high winds and heavy seas. The Maryland State Police Underwater Recovery Unit is on scene, with assistance from the U.S. Coast Guard, the NRP, the Worcester County Sheriff’s Office, MSP troopers and members of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

According to the Ocean City Police Department, the OCPD’s efforts at this time include searching the resort coastline for debris. A command center has been established at the Maryland NRP Boathouse at the commercial harbor in West Ocean City.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://mdcoastdispatch.com

Beechcraft B60 Duke, N77MM: Accident occurred March 01, 2018 in Ferris, Ellis County, Texas

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N77MM

Location: Ferris, TX
Accident Number: GAA18CA149
Date & Time: 03/01/2018, 1100 UTC
Registration: N77MM
Aircraft: BEECH B
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel exhaustion
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Ferry 

The pilot in the multi-engine, retractable landing gear-equipped airplane reported that during an instrument flight rules cross-country flight, about 5,000ft MSL, the left engine surged several times and he performed an emergency engine shutdown. Shortly afterward, the right engine lost power.

During the emergency descent, the airplane struck tree tops, and landed hard in a field with the landing gear retracted.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, the engine mounts and the lower fuselage.

The pilot reported that he had requested 200 gallons of fuel from his home airport FBO, but they did not fuel the airplane. The pilot did not check the fuel quantity during his preflight inspection.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration Airplane Flying Handbook, Chapter 2, page 2-7, pilot's must always positively confirm the fuel quantity by visually inspecting the level of each tank.

The PIC reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper preflight inspection of the fuel level, which resulted in a loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to lower the landing gear before the emergency landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Fuel - Not inspected (Cause)
Fuel - Fluid level (Cause)
Main landing gear - Not used/operated (Factor)

Personnel issues
Preflight inspection - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Contributed to outcome

History of Flight

Enroute
Fuel exhaustion (Defining event)

Emergency descent
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Landing

Hard landing

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 79, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Waiver Time Limited Special
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/16/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/27/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 6400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2200 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N77MM
Model/Series: B 60
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1982
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: P-587
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/01/2017, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6775 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 2210 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-541
Registered Owner: MIKE & MAYO PARTNERS LP
Rated Power: 380 hp
Operator: MIKE & MAYO PARTNERS LP
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCRS, 448 ft msl
Observation Time: 1653 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 185°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / 12°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1800 ft agl
Visibility: 6 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots, 350°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: DALLAS, TX (ADS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: MEXIA, TX (LXY)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1030 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  32.301389, -96.372222 (est)






FERRIS, Texas -  A pilot safely executed an emergency landing in a muddy field after losing power somewhere over Ferris Thursday afternoon.

The crash, which he walked away from, occurred at about 11 a.m. near the 100 block of Cochise Drive.

A Federal Aviation Administration statement says the pilot of the Beechcraft B60 Duke was alone and suffered minor injuries in the crash. FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said the pilot reported both engines lost power on a flight from Addison Airport to Mexia.

Resident Karina Montelongo heard the sound of the crash while she was inside her home adjacent to the crash site.

“I heard a sound similar to when a garbage truck moves the containers except the difference is that it was louder. It kind of shook a little bit, enough to where it woke up the little one,” Montelongo said. “We went out and looked and saw the plane out there nearly in our backyard. The good thing is that he was OK and nobody was hurt.”

Montelongo stated she noticed first responders having a difficult time getting emergency vehicles to the crash site due to its muddy conditions. She then allowed emergency personnel to use the family’s four-wheelers.

On scene, the nose of the Beechcraft B60 Duke appeared to have been torn off and the left engine could be seen in several large pieces.

The FAA website states that the plane — first manufactured in 1982 — had a current certification through June 30, 2019, stated an Associated Press report. It shows the owner of the plane as Mike and Mayo Partners LP out of Dallas.

The crash remains under investigation by the FAA.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.waxahachietx.com

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-7H4: Accident occurred November 19, 2017 in Los Angeles, California

Southwest Airlines Company: http://registry.faa.gov/N740SW 

NTSB Identification: DCA18CA074
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 121: Air Carrier operation of Southwest Airlines
Accident occurred Sunday, November 19, 2017 in Los Angeles, CA
Aircraft: BOEING 737 7H4, registration: N740SW

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Air Tractor Inc AT-402B, N38HT, registered to and operated by United States Department of Agriculture / Agricultural Research Service: Accident occurred August 02, 2017 at San Angelo Regional Airport (KSJT), Tom Green County, Texas

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N38HT

Location: San Angelo, TX
Accident Number: GAA17CA469
Date & Time: 08/02/2017, 1835 CDT
Registration: N38HT
Aircraft: AIR TRACTOR INC AT 402
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Public Aircraft 

Analysis

The pilot of a tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll in crosswind conditions, the airplane began an un-commanded slow turn to the right. He added that he applied left brake and left rudder, but the airplane continued to the right. Subsequently the airplane ground looped to the right, the left main landing gear collapsed, and the left wing impacted the ground.

The left wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system on the airport reported, about 10 minutes after the accident, that the wind was from 90° at 9 knots. The pilot landed on runway 36. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in crosswind conditions.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Other weather encounter
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing gear collapse

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Single
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider; Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Glider; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/30/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 6960 hours (Total, all aircraft), 240 hours (Total, this make and model), 6682 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 88 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AIR TRACTOR INC
Registration: N38HT
Model/Series: AT 402 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 402B-1011
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/12/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9170 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time: 543.3 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt and Whitney
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-27
Registered Owner: USDA/ARS
Rated Power: 680 hp
Operator: USDA/ARS
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSJT, 1916 ft msl
Observation Time: 2251 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 143°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 2900 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 19°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 9000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 60°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: San Angelo, TX (SJT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: San Angelo, TX (SJT)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1625 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: SAN ANGELO RGNL/MATHIS FIELD (SJT)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1918 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8049 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  31.356667, -100.499167 (est)

LET L-23 Super Blanik, N304MG: Accident occurred July 30, 2017 near Miami Homestead General Aviation Airport (X51), Miami-Dade County, Florida

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Lauderdale, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

N304MG LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N304MG



Location: Homestead, FL
Accident Number: GAA17CA477
Date & Time: 07/30/2017, 1600 EDT
Registration: N304MG
Aircraft: LET L 23 SUPER BLANIK
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of lift
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot of a non-powered glider reported that while on the downwind for landing, the glider was higher than normal due to lift that was encountered. He added that while on final approach, the glider encountered a gusting headwind, which reduced the ground speed. The glider was unable to maintain sufficient altitude, and touched down short of the intended runway.

The fuselage sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

The automated weather observation system located 9 miles east of the accident airport reported, about 2 minutes before the accident, that the wind was from 260° at 14 knots, gusting to 23 knots. 27U was the intended runway. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The glider's encounter with atmospheric conditions where the lift was not sufficient to maintain flight, which resulted in the pilot landing short of the intended runway.

Findings

Environmental issues
Wind - Ability to respond/compensate (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight


Approach-VFR pattern final
Other weather encounter
Loss of lift (Defining event)

Landing
Landing area undershoot

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 17, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s):

Glider; Helicopter

Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/06/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/10/2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 131 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 27 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 58 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: LET
Registration: N304MG
Model/Series: L 23 SUPER BLANIK NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Glider
Year of Manufacture: 1992
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 917929
Landing Gear Type: Tandem
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT:
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: N304MG LLC
Rated Power:
Operator: N304MG LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHST, 7 ft msl
Observation Time: 1958 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 98°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4100 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 26°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots/ 23 knots, 260°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Homestead, FL (X51)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:  None
Destination: Homestead, FL (X51)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1400 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: MIAMI HOMESTEAD GENERAL AVIATION (X51)
Runway Surface Type: Unknown
Airport Elevation: 7 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27U
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2500 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  25.502222, -80.541389 (est)