Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Cirrus SR20, operated by AMP Air LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N101AD: Accident occurred March 06, 2018 at Harford County Airport (0W3), Churchville, Maryland

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baltimore, Maryland

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N101AD


Location: Churchville, MD
Accident Number: ERA18LA098
Date & Time: 03/06/2018, 2117 EST
Registration: N101AD
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 6, 2018, about 2117 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corp. SR20, N101AD, was substantially damaged during an aborted landing at Harford County Airport (0W3), Churchville, Maryland. The private pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries. Night, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight was operated by AMP Air LLC under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed Tom B. David Field Airport (CZL), Calhoun, Georgia at 1700.

The pilot stated that before departure he checked the weather using several online weather resources and found that the destination airport was reporting visual meteorological conditions. About 30 minutes prior to their arrival it started snowing. He descended from 9,500 ft to 4,000 feet, to get out of the snow and to warmer temperatures. After reaching 4,000 ft he continued to descend and encountered a temperature inversion. With snow continuing to accumulate on the wings, he elected to divert and land at the closest airport. He approached the runway at a slightly higher airspeed than normal and the airplane "balooned" during touchdown and drifted off the side of the runway. He attempted a full power go-around, but was unable to gain enough airspeed to become airborne again. The airplane subsequently impacted two landscaping trucks. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airplane.

Photographs of the airplane taken by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the engine and the tail had separated from the airframe, and there was damage to the left wing and landing gear.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He reported 501 hours of total flight experience. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued on May 31, 2016.

Runway 10 at 0W3 was 2,000 feet-long by 40 feet-wide, and was constructed of asphalt. A two light precision approach path indicator was installed on the left side of the runway. There were 62-foot-tall trees located 1,321 feet from the runway threshold.

The weather conditions reported at Phillips Army Airfield (APG), Aberdeen, Maryland, about 6 miles south of the accident site, included wind from 160° at 12 knots, gusting to 17 knots, visibility 5 statute miles, light rain, temperature 4° C, dew point 2° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.91 inches of mercury.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 50, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/31/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/28/2017
Flight Time:   501 hours (Total, all aircraft), 443 hours (Total, this make and model), 27 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N101AD
Model/Series: SR20 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1198
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/24/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1912.9 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360 SER
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAPG, 57 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2103 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 165°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  5 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:  Broken / 1100 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots / 17 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Light - Rain
Departure Point: CALHOUN, GA (CZL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: MOUNT HOLLY, NJ (VAY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1700 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: HARFORD COUNTY (0W3)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 408 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Wet
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2000 ft / 40 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  39.566944, -76.202500

Location: Churchville, MD
Accident Number: ERA18LA098
Date & Time: 03/06/2018, 2117 EST
Registration: N101AD
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 6, 2018, about 2117 eastern standard time, a Cirrus Design Corp. SR20, N101AD, was destroyed during landing at Harford County Airport (0W3), Churchville, Maryland. The private pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries. Night, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The flight was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot stated that before departure he checked the weather using several online weather resources and found that the destination airport was reporting visual meteorological conditions. About 30 minutes prior to their arrival it started snowing. He descended from 9,500 ft to 4,000 feet, to get out of the snow and to warmer temperatures. After reaching 4,000 ft he continued to descend and encountered a temperature inversion. With snow continuing to accumulate on the airplane, he elected to divert and land at the closest airport. He landed at a slightly higher airspeed than normal and the airplane ballooned during touchdown and drifted off the side of the runway, impacting two equipment trucks.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed the engine and the tail had separated from the airframe, and there was damage to the left wing.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The four-seat, low wing airplane was manufactured in 2002 and was equipped with a Continental IO-360, 200-horsepower reciprocating engine.

The weather conditions reported at Phillips Army Airfield (APG), Aberdeen, Maryland, about 6 miles south of the accident site, included wind from 160° at 12 knots, gusting to 17 knots, visibility 5 statute miles, light rain, temperature 4° C, dew point 2° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.91 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N101AD
Model/Series: SR20 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAPG, 57 ft msl
Observation Time: 2103 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / 2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots/ 17 knots, 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1100 ft agl
Visibility:  5 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: CALHOUN, GA (CZL)
Destination:  MOUNT HOLLY, NJ (VAY) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  39.566944, -76.202500

HARFORD COUNTY, MD — A plane with two people inside crashed near the Harford Airport in Aldino Tuesday evening, according to a Harford County emergency official. The crash happened before 9:30 p.m.

The aircraft crashed in the 3800 block of Aldino Road, according to Rich Gardiner, spokesman for the Harford County Volunteer Fire and EMS Association.

Nobody was injured, Gardiner said, and there were two people in the plane at the time.

There was no fire, and there were not any road closures as a result of the plane crash, he added.

According to Gardiner, the cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://patch.com

Ryanair offers cheaper training to pilots after staffing troubles



LONDON (Reuters) - Ryanair has cut the price of a course for new pilots to fly its 737 planes, the Irish budget airline’s operations chief said on Wednesday, as it tries to avoid more staffing problems. 

Ryanair was forced to cancel thousands of flights last year as it did not have enough standby pilots to ensure the smooth running of its schedule. 

While Ryanair has denied there was a pilot shortage, chief operations officer Peter Bellew told reporters the move would help Ryanair grow without fresh problems.

“What we’re going to do now for the next couple of years is we’re going to get ahead of the game,” he said, adding that even if Ryanair chose to expand a bit quicker than planned, “we’re not going to have any limiting resource around pilots.” 

Pilots wishing to join Ryanair will have to pay 5,000 euros ($6,200) for their so-called type rating course to fly the 737, down from 29,500 euros.

A type rating determines which kind of planes pilots fly, often a 737 or an A320 at Europe’s low cost carriers, and is done after gaining an airline transport license.

The price varies from airline to airline and is not included in the fees for training at pilot schools, which can be around 80,000 pounds.

Bellew said Ryanair had also reactivated links with pilot training schools and ordered seven new simulators. Cancellations, which started last September, sparked a pilot revolt, prompting Ryanair to recognize unions for the first time.

Chief executive Michael O’Leary said on Tuesday that talks with unions could cause some disruption to flights in Ireland and Portugal in the coming months.

He also said he expected flights to be disrupted in April 2019 after Britain leaves the European Union, but on Wednesday, chief marketing officer Kenny Jacobs played down those comments.

“We don’t think Ryanair aircraft are going to be grounded in 2019 because of Brexit,” he said, adding the agreement of a transition period for Britain’s departure would delay any possible disruption to January 2021.

“There is a blueprint for transition that is going in the right direction, but there is not a deal done yet,” he said.

Jacobs also welcomed the Britain’s announcement that it wants to remain part of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA).

He was speaking at the launch of Ryanair’s winter schedule, including a new route from London Stansted to Nantes, and its environmental policy. 

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.reuters.com

Piper PA-28R-200 Arrow II, N33807, registered to McClelland Aviation Inc and operated by the CFI: Accident occurred March 06, 2018 near Paso Robles Municipal Airport (KPRB), San Luis Obispo County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N33807

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report

Location: Paso Robles, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA101
Date & Time: 03/06/2018, 2230 PST
Registration: N33807
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-200
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On March 6, 2018 about 2230 Pacific standard time, a Piper PA-28R-200, N33807, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain following an emergency landing near Paso Robles Airport (PRB), Paso Robles, California. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and the private pilot were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to McClelland Aviation Inc. and operated by the CFI under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The cross-country flight originated from Reid-Hillview Airport of Santa Clara County (RHV), San Jose, California at 1900.

The CFI reported that after they executed a touch and go at PRB, and during the initial climb, they heard a "loud tick" noise and the Low Vacuum annunciator light illuminated. The CFI retracted the landing gear and instructed the pilot to retract flaps. At 350-400 ft above ground level, the airplane lost engine power and the CFI executed an emergency landing to a nearby field.

In a postcrash interview with the National Transportation Safety Board Investigator-in-Charge, the CFI stated that there was 48 gallons of fuel and 6 quarts of oil on board prior to takeoff.

The following day, an Federal Aviation Administration Inspector examined the wreckage and noted that the oil dipstick cap was loose, and that the engine contained about 1 quart of oil. The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N33807
Model/Series: PA 28R-200 200
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:





UPDATE (12 a.m.) - The Paso Robles Department of Emergency Services has released new details on the crash-landing.

Battalion Chief Paul Patti reports a student pilot and his flight instructor experienced engine failure before reaching full altitude. The cause of the failure was not known.

The instructor took over the controls and tried to return to the airport. The aircraft was gliding with no engine power as the pilot maneuvered the plane away from homes, power lines and traffic before falling short of the airport, Patti said.

The fire department affirms the student and pilot were not injured. The plane has moderate damage. It did not leak oil or fuel into the field.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were contacted. CAL FIRE, Paso Robles police and the airport manager assisted.

ORIGINAL STORY - A small plane crash-landed in a man's yard in Paso Robles Tuesday night. 

KSBY viewer Jim Norman took a Facebook Live video when he heard the crash landing around 8:30 p.m. in his yard, which is on the 3300 block of Dry Creek Road. 

"They're gonna light him up now, so I'll turn off my lights," he said, referring to a helicopter shining a spotlight on the plane, which had crash-landed in a field minutes earlier. "That's an airplane."

Norman estimates the single-engine Piper Arrow landed about 150 yards away south of the runway and Dry Creek Road.

"Nobody landed on my house, so, that's a bonus for me!" Norman said. "Everybody's all good."

Norman told KSBY the plane landed safely without power in the field, wheels up, and no injuries.

Two people were reportedly in the plane at the time of the crash.

According to FlightAware, the plane is registered to McClelland Aviation in San Jose and made a successful flight from Salinas to San Jose early in the evening.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ksby.com





PASO ROBLES – Earlier this Tuesday evening at approximate 8:30 p.m. the Paso Robles Department of Emergency Services responded to an Aircraft incident near the Paso Robles Airport. Arriving responders found an upright plane in a field just south of Dry Creek Road.

The plane, a single-engine Piper aircraft took off from the Paso Robles Airport with two passengers who had just had a brief layover from the Bay Area. A student pilot and his instructor experience engine failure before they reached full altitude.

The instructor immediately took over the plane’s controls and attempted to return and land safely at the airport. The instructor was able to maneuver and glide the plane away from homes, power line and traffic lines. He failed short in his attempt to reach the airport and landed in the field.

Battalion Chief Paul Patti reports that neither person on the plane sustained injuries. The plane sustained moderate damage without the release of any contaminants into the environment. The cause of the engine failure is unknown at this time.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) were contacted from the scene. Resources were provided by CAL Fire, the Paso Robles Police Department and the Paso Robles Airport Manager.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://pasoroblespress.com 



PASO ROBLES, Calif. - A single-engine Piper aircraft that took off from the Paso Robles Airport made an emergency landing Tuesday night around 8:30 shortly after takeoff. When emergency responders arrived they found the aircraft upright in a field just south of Dry Creek Road.

Officials with the City of Paso Robles said, aboard the plane was an instructor and student pilot.  The plane had been on a brief layover from the Bay Area before taking off in Paso.  The plane suffered engine failure before it reached full altitude. The pilot was able to maneuver the aircraft away from homes, power lines and traffic before gliding into a field near the airport.

CAL FIRE, the Paso Police Department, and the Paso Robles Airport Manager assisted in the incident.

There were no injuries reported.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.keyt.com

Robinson R44 Raven II, N789MR: Fatal accident occurred June 12, 2016 at Jonesboro Municipal Airport (KJBR), Craighead County, Arkansas

Floyd Vuncannon during an interview with Region 8 News in 2010.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas 
Robinson Helicopter Company; Torrance, California 
Lycoming Engines; White, Georgia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N789MR

Location: Jonesboro, AR
Accident Number: CEN16FA215
Date & Time: 06/12/2016, 1530 CDT
Registration: N789MR
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Location: Jonesboro, AR
Accident Number: CEN16FA215
Date & Time: 06/12/2016, 1530 CDT
Registration: N789MR
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Low altitude operation/event
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

During the 2 to 3 hours before the accident, a witness saw the commercial pilot drinking from a cup that smelled like alcohol and noticed that he refilled the cup two or three times. He then heard the pilot say that he was going to put on an airshow. The helicopter lifted off at a 45° angle backward and upward, reach an altitude of about 125 ft, and then descend out of sight behind hangars. A postaccident examination revealed that the helicopter's tail contacted the ground behind the hangars resulting in separation of both tail rotor blades. The helicopter then rose above the hangars and began to spin. The helicopter descended again, impacted terrain, and burst into flames. The examination of the wreckage did not reveal evidence of any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation of the helicopter. Toxicology testing detected diphenhydramine, a sedating antihistamine, and elevated levels of ethanol in the pilot's blood and tissues. The pilot was most likely impaired by the combination of ingested alcohol and the use of diphenhydramine, both of which are central nervous system depressants. The impairing effects of the combination of these substances most likely contributed to his decision to fly after drinking alcohol as well as his inability to maintain control of the helicopter.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain helicopter control during takeoff. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's impairment due to his combined use of alcohol and diphenhydramine, which led to his improper decision to fly after drinking alcohol and degraded his ability to maintain control of the helicopter. 

Findings

Aircraft
Performance/control parameters - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Alcohol - Pilot (Factor)
OTC medication - Pilot (Factor)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Factor)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Prior to flight
Miscellaneous/other

Takeoff
Collision during takeoff/land

Maneuvering-low-alt flying
Abrupt maneuver
Low altitude operation/event (Defining event)

On June 12, 2016, about 1530 central daylight time, a Robinson Helicopter Company, R44 II, Raven, helicopter, N789MR, impacted terrain during takeoff from the Classic Airstrip (23AR), near Jonesboro, Arkansas. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The helicopter was destroyed during the impact and subsequent ground fire. The helicopter was registered to Floyd Vuncannon Aviation Inc. and was operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airport about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from 23AR at the time of the accident.

A witness, who was visiting a friend at an airstrip located just west of 23AR, reported that before noon, he saw the accident pilot drinking from a red cup that smelled like alcohol. The pilot refilled the cup 2 or 3 times during the next 2 or 3 hours. During the day, he saw the pilot going between hangars. When the witness finished working on a task, he heard the pilot say that he was going to put on an airshow. The witness saw the accident pilot getting into his helicopter, which was located east of him on 23AR. The witness observed the helicopter lift off at a 45° angle backward and upward. The helicopter rose to about 125 ft and then descended out of sight behind hangars that were located between 23AR's runway and the west airstrip. The witness reported that he thought he "heard it hit" but the engine never shutdown. The helicopter began to rise upwards above the hangars and it began to spin around. It appeared that the tail rotor was not working and the skids were bent as if it had hit the ground. The helicopter continued to rise to about the same height as when it lifted off. The helicopter then descended again, impacted terrain, and burst into flames in the middle of the west airstrip. The witness stated that another witness nearby called 911 and they waited for first responders to arrive. 

Floyd Vuncannon

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Gyroplane; Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Gyroplane; Helicopter
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 6000 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The 73-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, rotorcraft helicopter, rotorcraft gyroplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate, expiring October 31, 2017, with airplane single engine, rotorcraft helicopter, and rotorcraft gyroplane ratings. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate issued on May 1, 2014, with the limitations that he "must wear corrective lenses and possess glasses for near and intermediate vision." At the time of that medical examination, he reported 6,000 hours total flight time and 110 hours in the 6 months before that examination. A review of excerpts from the pilot's logbook did not reveal an entry for a flight review. The logbook pages were not totaled, and the last entry was dated August 2, 2015. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY
Registration: N789MR
Model/Series: R44 II II
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 10561
Landing Gear Type: Skid;
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/02/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1242.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AE1A5
Registered Owner: FLOYD VUNCANNON AVIATION INC
Rated Power: 245 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

N789MR, serial number 10561, was a Robinson R44 II, Raven, four-place, two-bladed, single main rotor, single-engine helicopter, with a spring and yield skid type landing gear. The primary structure of its fuselage was welded steel tubing and riveted aluminum sheet. The tailcone was a monocoque structure consisting of an aluminum skin. A Lycoming IO-540- AE1A5, serial number L-29728-48A, engine rated at 260 horsepower, powered the helicopter. However, according to the helicopter's type certificate, the engine had a 5-minute takeoff rating of 245 horsepower and a maximum continuous rating of 205 horsepower.

A review of helicopter logbook excerpts that were provided by a FAA inspector, showed that the helicopter's last annual inspection was completed on July 2, 2015. At the time of that inspection, the helicopter had accumulated a total time of 1,242.1 hours.

The helicopter manufacturer issued, R44 Service Bulletin (SB)-78B, on December 20, 2010, and issued a revised SB on September 28, 2012. The SB, in part, stated:

TO: R44 and R44 II owners, operators, and maintenance personnel

SUBJECT: Bladder Fuel Tank Retrofit

ROTORCRAFT AFFECTED: R44 helicopters S/N 0001 thru 2064, and R44 II helicopters S/N 10001 thru 12890, unless previously accomplished.

TIME OF COMPLIANCE: As soon as practical, but no later than 30 April 2013.

BACKGROUND: This bulletin requires R44 helicopters with all-aluminum fuel tanks to be retrofitted with bladder-type tanks. In addition to a factory retrofit program, a field kit is now available. To improve the R44 fuel system's resistance to a post-accident fuel leak, this retrofit must be performed as soon as possible.

The review of the helicopter logbook excerpts did not reveal an entry for the installation of the bladder fuel tanks as called for by the SB. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJBR, 262 ft msl
Observation Time: 1538 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 273°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C / 21°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 90°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.02 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:  Moderate - In the Vicinity - Thunderstorms - No Precipitation
Departure Point: Jonesboro, AR (23AR)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Jonesboro, AR (23AR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1530 CDT
Type of Airspace: 

At 1538, the recorded weather at the Jonesboro Municipal Airport, near Jonesboro, Arkansas, located about 5 miles west of 23AR, included wind 090° at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, present weather thunderstorms in the vicinity, temperature 34° C, dew point 21° C, and altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury. 

Airport Information

Airport: CLASSIC AIRSTRIP (23AR)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 260 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

23AR was a private, non-towered airport, which was owned by an individual. It was located about 7 miles east of Jonesboro, Arkansas. The airport had an estimated elevation of 260 ft above mean sea level. The airport's published runway 17/35 was 2,600 ft by 80 ft with a turf surface.

Another, privately-owned, north/south-oriented turf runway was located about 350 ft west of 23R's published runway.



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  35.826389, -90.549167 

The main helicopter wreckage was located about 1,800 ft on a magnetic heading of 35° from the intersection of Highway 18 and Barnhill Road. The turf, in a circular shaped area around the helicopter was found charred. Portions or the helicopter wreckage were discolored, deformed, and consumed by fire consistent with a ground fire.

The helicopter's resting heading was about 270° magnetic. The tailcone was folded to the left and separated near its forward end. Most of the aluminum and fiberglass components of the fuselage were discolored, deformed, and consumed by fire. The separated aft section of the tailcone was located about 20 ft south of the airframe. The tail rotor gearbox remained attached to the aft bulkhead of the separated section of the tailcone. The empennage separated from the aft bulkhead and was located about 40 ft south of the airframe. The main rotor gearbox and main rotor were separated from the airframe and found about 3 ft north of the airframe. Ground scars north of the airframe were consistent with main rotor blade strikes. Main rotor blade tip pieces were recovered in and near the ground scars and yellow paint that matched the paint on the main rotor blade tips was transferred to the dirt inside the scars.

Both tail rotor blades were separated near their roots and were found east of the airframe on the other side of the hangar located between 23R and the west airstrip. A series of ground scars consistent with the shape, size, and spacing of tail rotor blade strikes were located east of the location that the tail rotor blades were found.

An on-scene examination of the wreckage revealed that all flight control rod ends remained attached to their attachment points. Sections of push pull tubes were not continuous, separated from their original location, and/or consumed by fire. All flight control discontinuities exhibited either thermal damage or separations consistent with overload. No preimpact anomalies were detected in the flight control system.

The fuel mixture control knob was found in the full rich position. The mixture control wire was found disconnected near its fuel mixture arm on the engine fuel control servo unit. The throttle linkage sustained thermal damage and its position could not be determined. The governor switch sustained thermal damage and its position could not be determined.

The right skid tube was located under the main wreckage and it sustained thermal damage. The four struts that attached the left and right skid tubes were separated from the airframe and were thermally damaged. The aft cross tube appeared to be thermally deformed. A portion of the front cross tube was consumed by fire and the remaining end was not bent near its elbow.

Observed damage to the cabin structure included deformation, discoloration, and consumption by fire. The removable cyclic and collective were recovered from under seat debris, and the removable pedals were installed. The pedals were found in a neutral position. The vertical tube of the cyclic control was bent aft. The cyclic grip was consumed by fire. The aft left and right doors were found in the main wreckage and they sustained thermal damage. The two front doors were not identified or found in the wreckage.

The upper and lower frames were bent and had some separations in their tubes. The surface of the separations exhibited angular and jagged features consistent with overload. The lower edge of the vertical firewall was deformed. The tailcone was bent to the left and thermally damaged at its forward end.

The separated aft section of the tailcone exhibited deformation damage consistent with several tail rotor blade strikes. The empennage was separated from the aft bulkhead. The surface of the separation was rough and jagged. The lower vertical stabilizer was bent to the right as viewed from its aft looking forward. A segment of the tail rotor guard that included the guard's curved section was separated below its forward mount and forward of its aft mount. The surfaces of the guard's separations were angular and jagged. The aft section of the tail rotor guard remained attached to its mount and the tip of the tail rotor guard exhibited witness marks consistent with scuffing on its lower left surface. The tailskid had some witness marks on its lowest bottom surface consistent with scuffing.

Sections of the V-belts were consumed by fire with charred sections remaining in the grooves of the upper sheave and on the ground below the lower sheave. The alignment strut's outer rod end for the upper sheave exhibited a separation consistent with overload. No scoring was visible on the sheave face. Scoring was visible on the rod end jam nut adjacent to the aft sheave face. The overrunning clutch operated properly. The actuator was extended about 1 inch.

The main rotor gearbox was separated at the upper housing. The main rotor driveshaft was bent about 15° at the swashplate. The mast tube was bent and exhibited thermal discoloration and damage. Both elastomeric teeter stops were consumed by fire and their brackets were bent across the center. One droop stop tusk was bent downward and the spindle was found cracked with and an angular and jagged separation surface. The other spindle coning bolthole was deformed. Both main rotor blades exhibited thermal damage and deformation consistent with impact damage.

The lower frame tube adjacent to the intermediate flex coupling exhibited rotational scoring. The tail rotor driveshaft was bent near its forward end and was disconnected just aft of the bend. The tail rotor drive shaft damper bearing bracket was separated from the bulkhead. The damper bearing exhibited thermal damage and would not rotate. The tail rotor gearbox rotated with no anomalies. Oil was visible in its sight gage. The blades were separated near their roots. The surface of the tail rotor blades' separations exhibited angular and jagged features consistent with overload. Both blades were bent to the right and they exhibited leading edge damage at their tips. One blade exhibited deformation damage that was consistent with contact with rivet locations on the tailcone. Witness marks running chordwise near the blade tips were present on both blades, which appeared to be consistent with terrain contact.

Observed damage to the cooling fan included discoloration and it was deformed around its forward edge. The cooling scroll was consumed by fire. The alternator and its cooling fan exhibited thermal damage.

The engine was found lying upright and it remained attached to its tubular engine mounts. The exterior surfaces of the engine were discolored consistent with exposure to a post-impact fire. Sections of the oil sump were consumed in the fire. The fuel servo was found separated and partially thermally consumed. The remaining rear mounted accessories exhibited features consistent with fire damaged.

The engine was partially disassembled. The engine's crankshaft was rotated by turning the cooling fan, and continuity of the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valve train were confirmed. Thumb compression and suction were observed from all six cylinders as the engine was rotated. The interiors of the cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope and no anomalies were noted. The two-piece fuel injector nozzles were disassembled and found to be unobstructed. Disassembly of both magnetos revealed that their internal components sustained thermal damage. The removed sparkplug electrodes exhibited light brown coloration and worn out normal condition when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Arkansas State Crime Lab Medical Examiner's Office conducted an autopsy on the pilot and took toxicological samples. The autopsy indicated that the pilot's cause of death was multiple blunt force injuries and the manner of death was an accident. No significant natural disease was identified during the autopsy.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory performed toxicological testing on the samples taken during the autopsy. The toxicology report indicated that the samples sustained putrefaction and listed the following findings:

418 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Blood
336 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Heart
309 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Lung
182 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Kidney
152 (mg/dL, mg/hg) Ethanol detected in Urine

Diphenhydramine detected in Urine

0.049 (ug/ml, ug/g) Diphenhydramine detected in Blood
Pioglitazone detected in Urine
Valsartan detected in Urine
Valsartan detected in Blood

Ethanol is the intoxicant commonly found in beer, wine, and liquor. It acts as a central nervous system (CNS) depressant. After ingestion, at low doses, it impairs judgment, psychomotor functioning, and vigilance; at higher doses it can cause coma and death. The effects of ethanol on aviators are generally well understood; it significantly impairs pilots' performance, even at very low levels. Federal Aviation Regulations prohibit any person from acting or attempting to act as a crewmember of a civil aircraft while having 0.040 gm/dl (40 mg/dl) or more ethanol in the blood. Ethanol may also be produced in the body after death by microbial activity.

Diphenhydramine is a sedating antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms and as a sleep aid. It is available over the counter under many names including Benadryl and Unisom. Diphenhydramine carries the following FDA warning: "may impair mental and/or physical ability required for the performance of potentially hazardous tasks (e.g., driving, operating heavy machinery)." The therapeutic range of diphenhydramine is 0.0250 to 0.1120 ug/ml; this is the range of blood levels where psychoactive effects are expected. Diphenhydramine undergoes postmortem redistribution where, after death, the drug can leech from storage sites back into blood. Central postmortem levels may be about two to three times higher than peripheral levels. Compared to other antihistamines, diphenhydramine causes marked sedation; it is also classed as a CNS depressant, and this is the rationale for its use as a sleep aid. Altered mood and impaired cognitive and psychomotor performance may also be observed. In a driving simulator study, a single dose of diphenhydramine impaired driving ability more than a blood alcohol concentration of 0.100%.

Valsartan is a prescription blood pressure medication often marketed with the name Diovan. It is not generally considered impairing. Pioglitazone is a prescription medication for diabetes; it is often marketed with the name Actos. It is not generally considered impairing and does not lead to the development of hypoglycemia.

Review of the pilot's FAA medical records indicated that he had reported no chronic medical conditions and no medication use to the FAA.

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA215
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, June 12, 2016 in Jonesboro, AR
Aircraft: ROBINSON HELICOPTER COMPANY R44 II, registration: N789MR
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 12, 2016, about 1530 central daylight time, a Robinson Helicopter Company, R44 II helicopter, N789MR, impacted terrain during takeoff from the Classic Airstrip (23AR), near Jonesboro, Arkansas. The pilot, who was the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The helicopter was destroyed during the impact and subsequent ground fire. The helicopter was registered to Floyd Vuncannon Aviation Inc. and was operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the airport about the time of the accident, and the flight was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from 23AR at the time of the accident.

A witness at 23AR reported that he saw the accident. He, in part, indicated that the saw the accident pilot coming from his hangar back to another hangar. When the witness finished working on a task, he heard the accident pilot say that he was going to put on an airshow. The witness was in the process of departing from the airport when he saw the accident pilot getting into his helicopter across the runway on the airstrip, east of his location. The witness observed that the helicopter lifted off at a 45-degree pitch-up attitude. The helicopter rose to about 125 feet and descended out of sight behind hangars between the two airstrips. The witness indicated that he thought he "heard it hit" but the engine never shutdown. The helicopter began to rise upwards above the hangars and it began to spin around. It appeared that the tail rotor was not working and the skids were bent as if it had hit the ground. It continued to rise to approximately the same liftoff height. The helicopter descended again, impacted terrain, and burst into flames in the middle of the west airstrip. The witness stated that another witness nearby called 911 and they waited for first responders to arrive.

The 73-year-old pilot held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, rotorcraft helicopter, rotorcraft gyroplane, and instrument airplane ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate, expiring October 31, 2017, with airplane single engine, rotorcraft helicopter, and rotorcraft gyroplane ratings. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate issued on May 1, 2014, with limitations that the pilot "must wear corrective lenses and possess glasses for near and intermediate vision." At the time of that medical examination, he reported 6,000 hours total flight time to date and 110 hours in the six months before that examination. A review of excerpts from the pilot's logbook, acquired by a FAA inspector, did not reveal an entry for a flight review. The logbook pages were not totaled and the last entry was dated August 2, 2015.

N789MR, serial number 10561, was a Robinson R44 II, Raven, four-place, two-bladed, single main rotor, single-engine helicopter, with a spring and yield skid type landing gear. The primary structure of its fuselage was welded steel tubing and riveted aluminum sheet. The tailcone was a monocoque structure consisting of an aluminum skin. A Lycoming IO-540-AE1A5, serial number L-29728-48A, engine rated at 205 horsepower, powered the helicopter. The helicopter had a five-minute takeoff rating of 245 horsepower.

A review of helicopter logbook excerpts, acquired by a FAA inspector, showed that the helicopter's last annual inspection was completed on July 2 2015. At the time of that inspection, the helicopter had accumulated a total time of 1,242.1 hours.

The helicopter manufacturer issued, R44 Service Bulletin (SB)-78B, on December 20, 2010, and issued a revised SB on September 28, 2012. The SB, in part, indicated:

TO: R44 and R44 II owners, operators, and maintenance personnel
SUBJECT: Bladder Fuel Tank Retrofit
ROTORCRAFT AFFECTED: R44 helicopters S/N 0001 thru 2064, and R44 II
Helicopters S/N 10001 thru 12890, unless previously accomplished.
TIME OF COMPLIANCE: As soon as practical, but no later than 30 April 2013.
BACKGROUND: This bulletin requires R44 helicopters with all-aluminum
fuel tanks to be retrofitted with bladder-type tanks. In addition to a
factory retrofit program, a field kit is now available. To improve the R44
fuel system's resistance to a post-accident fuel leak, this retrofit must
be performed as soon as possible.

The review of the helicopter logbook excerpts did not reveal an entry for the installation of the fuel tank mandatory SB.

At 1538, the recorded weather at the Jonesboro Municipal Airport, near Jonesboro, Arkansas, was: Wind 090 degrees at 4 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; present weather thunderstorms in the vicinity; temperature 34 degrees C; dew point 21 degrees C; altimeter 30.02 inches of mercury.

23AR was a private, non-towered airport, which was owned by an individual. It was located about seven miles east of Jonesboro, Arkansas. The airport had an estimated elevation of 260 feet above mean sea level. The airport's published runway 17/35 was a 2,600 feet by 80 feet runway with a turf surface.

Another north/south oriented turf runway west of the published runway existed. It was located about 350 feet west of the published runway and it was owned by another individual.

The main helicopter wreckage came to rest about 1,800 feet and 35 degrees from the intersection of Highway 18 and Barnhill Road. The helicopter's resting heading was about 270 degrees magnetic. The tailcone was folded to the left and separated near its forward end. Most of the aluminum and fiberglass components of the fuselage were discolored, deformed, and consumed by fire. The aft section of the tailcone was separated and it came to rest approximately 20 feet south of the airframe. The tail rotor gearbox remained attached to the aft bulkhead of the aft section of the tailcone. The empennage was separated from the bulkhead and the empennage came to rest approximately 40 feet south of the airframe. Both tail rotor blades were separated near their roots and came to rest east of the airframe on the other side of a hangar. The main rotor gearbox and main rotor was separated from the airframe and found resting about three feet north of the airframe. Ground scars north of the airframe were consistent with main rotor blade strikes. Main rotor blade tip pieces were recovered in and or near the scars and yellow paint was transferred to the dirt inside the scars.

A series of ground scars consistent with the shape, size, and distance apart for tail rotor strikes were located east of the location that the tail rotor blades had come to rest.

An on-scene examination of the wreckage was conducted. All flight control rod ends remained attached to their attachment points. Sections of push pull tubes were not continuous, separated from their original location, and/or consumed by fire. All flight control discontinuities exhibited either thermal damage or separations consistent with overload. No preimpact anomalies were detected in the flight control system.

The fuel mixture control knob was found in the full rich position. The mixture control wire was found disconnected near its fuel mixture arm on the engine fuel control servo unit. The throttle linkage sustained thermal damage and its position could not be determined. The governor switch sustained thermal damage and its position could not be determined.

The right skid tube was recovered from under the main wreckage and it sustained thermal damage. The four struts were separated from the airframe and were thermally damaged. The aft cross tube appeared to be thermally deformed. A portion of the front cross tube was consumed by fire. The remaining end was not bent near its elbow. The tailskid had some witness marks on its lowest bottom surface consistent with scuffing.

Observed damage to the cabin structure included deformation, discoloration, and consummation by fire. The removable cyclic and collective were recovered from under seat debris. The removable pedals were installed. The pedals were found in a neutral position. The vertical tube of the cyclic control was bent aft. The cyclic grip was consumed by fire. The aft left and aft right doors were recovered in the main wreckage and sustained thermal damage. The two front doors were not identified or found in the wreckage.

The upper and lower frames were bent and had some separations in their tubes. The surface of the separations exhibited angular and jagged features consistent with overload. The lower edge of the vertical firewall was deformed. The tailcone was bent to the left and thermally damaged at its forward end. An aft tailcone bay by its tail rotor was separated from the tailcone and the separated tailcone exhibited deformation damage consistent with several tail rotor blade strikes. The empennage was separated from the aft bulkhead. The surface of the separation was rough and jagged. The lower vertical stabilizer was bent to the right as viewed from its aft looking forward. A segment of the tail rotor guard that included the curved section of the tail rotor guard was separated below its forward mount and forward of its aft mount. The surfaces of the guard's separations were angular and jagged. The aft section of the tail rotor guard remained attached to its mount and the tip of the tail rotor guard exhibited witness marks consistent with scuffing on its lower left surface.

Sections of the V-belts were consumed by fire with charred sections remaining in the grooves of the upper sheave and on the ground below the lower sheave. The alignment strut's outer rod end for the upper sheave exhibited a separation consistent with overload. No scoring was visible on the sheave face. Scoring was visible on the rod end jam nut adjacent to the aft sheave face. The overrunning clutch operated properly. The actuator was extended approximately one inch.

The main rotor gearbox was separated at the upper housing. The main rotor driveshaft was bent approximately 15 degrees at the swashplate. The mast tube was bent and exhibited thermal discoloration and damage. Both elastomeric teeter stops were consumed by fire. Their brackets were bent across the center. One droop stop tusk was bent downward and the spindle was found cracked. The surface of its crack separation was angular and jagged. The other spindle coning bolthole was deformed.
Both main rotor blades exhibited thermal damage and deformation consistent with impact damage.

The lower frame tube adjacent to the intermediate flex coupling exhibited rotational scoring. The tail rotor driveshaft was bent near its forward end and was disconnected just aft of the bend. The tail rotor drive shaft damper bearing bracket was separated from the bulkhead. The damper bearing exhibited thermal damage and would not rotate. The tail rotor gearbox rotated with no anomalies. Oil was visible in its sight gage. The blades were separated near their roots. The surface of the tail rotor blades' separations exhibited angular and jagged features consistent with overload. Both blades were bent to the right and they exhibited damage to their leading edge at their tips. One blade exhibited deformation damage that was consistent with rivet locations on tailcone. Witness marks running chordwise near the blade tips were present on both blades, which appeared to be consistent with terrain contact.

Observed damage to the cooling fan included discoloration and it was deformed around its forward edge. The cooling scroll was consumed by fire. The alternator's cooling fan was deformed.

The engine was found lying upright and it remained attached to its tubular engine mounts. The exterior surfaces of the engine were discolored consistent with exposure to a post-impact fire. Sections of the oil sump were consumed in the fire. The fuel servo was found separated and partially thermally consumed. The remaining rear mounted accessories exhibited features consistent with fire damaged.

The engine was partially disassembled. The engine was rotated by turning the cooling fan and continuity of the crankshaft to the rear gears and to the valve train was confirmed. Thumb compression and suction was observed from all six cylinders as the engine was rotated. The interiors of the cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope and no anomalies noted. The two-piece fuel injector nozzles were disassembled and were found to be unobstructed. Disassembly of both magnetos revealed their internal components sustained thermal damage. The removed sparkplug electrodes exhibited light brown coloration and worn out normal condition when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug chart.

The Arkansas State Crime Lab Medical Examiner's Office was asked to conduct an autopsy and to take toxicological samples.

The turf, in a circular shaped area around the helicopter was found charred. Portions or the helicopter wreckage were discolored, deformed, and consumed by fire consistent with a ground fire.