Friday, March 05, 2021

Cessna 150J, N60290: Accident occurred March 03, 2021 in Lodi, San Joaquin County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oakland, California

Aircraft experienced engine issues and landed in an orchard. 


Date: 03-MAR-21
Time: 20:42:00Z
Regis#: N60290
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 150
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: LODI
State: CALIFORNIA

Cirrus SR22, N8163V: Accident occurred March 03, 2021 at Punta Gorda Airport (KPGD), Charlotte County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft landed and nose wheel collapsed. 


Date: 03-MAR-21
Time: 20:10:00Z
Regis#: N8163V
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PUNTA GORDA
State: FLORIDA

Cessna 182E Skylane, N2948Y: Incident occurred March 02, 2021 at Magic Valley Regional Airport (KTWF), Twin Falls County, Idaho

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boise, Idaho

Aircraft taxiing and struck a sign. 


Date: 02-MAR-21
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N2948Y
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 91
City: TWIN FALLS
State: IDAHO

Cessna 172G Skyhawk, N4456L: Accident occurred March 03, 2021 near Sisters Eagle Airport (6K5), Deschutes County, Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft crashed in a field under unknown circumstances.

Outlaw Aviation LLC


Date: 04-MAR-21
Time: 01:43:00Z
Regis#: N4456L
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: SISTERS
State: OREGON

Beech 23, N2374J: Incident occurred March 03, 2021 at Hawkins County Airport (KRVN), Rogersville, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aircraft landed and gear collapsed. 


Date: 03-MAR-21
Time: 20:30:00Z
Regis#: N2374J
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 23
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ROGERSVILLE
State: TENNESSEE

Cessna 182F Skylane, N3574U: Incident occurred March 04, 2021 at Walla Walla Regional Airport (KALW), Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aircraft veered off runway and left main wheel came off. 

N3574U LLC


Date: 04-MAR-21
Time: 01:21:00Z
Regis#: N3574U
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: WALLA WALLA
State: WASHINGTON

Mooney M20K, N231BL: Incident occurred March 04, 2021 in Jonesboro, Craighead County, Arkansas

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas

Aircraft prior to lift, lost engine power and slid into the mud. 

Solethium LC


Date: 04-MAR-21
Time: 23:50:00Z
Regis#: N231BL
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20K
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: JONESBORO
State: ARKANSAS

Ranger R7, N150VR: Incident occurred March 04, 2021 at Atlanta Speedway Airport (KHMP), Hampton, Henry County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft gear collapsed on landing and veered off the runway into the grass.

Sky Bear Aviation LLC


Date: 04-MAR-21
Time: 16:10:00Z
Regis#: N150VR
Aircraft Make: VASHON
Aircraft Model: RANGER R7
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: HAMPTON
State: GEORGIA

Beechcraft C23 Sundowner 180, N67013: Fatal accident occurred March 04, 2021 near Krens Farm Airport (14VA), Hillsboro, Loudoun County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia

Aircraft crashed in a wooded area under unknown circumstances. 

Del Ag Aero LLC


Date: 04-MAR-21
Time: 20:10:00Z
Regis#: N67013
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 23
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 1
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: HILLSBORO
State: VIRGINIA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

A 77-year-old Hillsboro man was killed Thursday afternoon when his single-engine plane crashed in a wooded area of western Loudoun County, according to Virginia State Police.
 
Police were notified of the crash at 3:09 p.m. on Thursday, March 4. Officers responded to the 35000 block of Charlestowne Pike in the western Loudoun County community of Hillsboro, where they found the downed plane with a single occupant, according to Corinne Geller, spokeswoman for the Virginia State Police.
 
The Beechcraft C23 Sundowner 180 aircraft had taken off just moments before from a nearby private airstrip, Geller said in a news release.
 
The pilot and only occupant of the aircraft, William Krens, 77, of Hillsboro, Virginia, died at the scene, Geller said.
 
Both the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were notified. The cause of the crash remains under investigation, Geller said.



The Virginia State Police have confirmed the identity of the pilot who died in a March 4 plane crash near Hillsboro.

William Krens, 77, was a veteran pilot and the owner/manager of the Krens Farm Airport, a private airstrip on the family’s property along Rt. 9 west of Hillsboro.

The crash happened just after 3 p.m. Thursday.

Virginia State Police and the Loudoun County Sheriff’s Office responded to the scene and located the Beechcraft C23 Sundowner aircraft in a wooded area of a field. 

Krens was the only occupant of the plane and died at the scene.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

Wednesday, March 03, 2021

Robinson R66 Turbine, N1767: Fatal accident occurred March 02, 2021 in Kodiak, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska 

Rotorcraft crashed under unknown circumstances.

Kodiak Helicopters LLC

Date: 03-MAR-21
Time: 02:11:00Z
Regis#: N1767
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: R66
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 1
Aircraft Missing: Yes
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Aircraft Operator: DENALI FLYING SERVICE
City: KODIAK
State: ALASKA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

Andy Teuber


ANCHORAGE, Alaska -- The U.S. Coast Guard on Wednesday suspended the search in waters off Alaska for an overdue helicopter piloted by the former head of Alaska’s largest tribal health care organization, who resigned last week after allegations of sexual misconduct surfaced against him.

Andy Teuber, 52, former head of the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, left Anchorage about 2 p.m. Tuesday in a Robinson R66 helicopter enroute to Kodiak Island, the Coast Guard said in a statement.

The Coast Guard was contacted about three hours later by family when he didn't arrive in Kodiak, about 250 miles (400 kilometers) south of Anchorage.

“After an extensive search with our available assets resulting in inconclusive findings, it’s with a heavy heart that we have to suspend this search pending any new information. I offer my deepest condolences to those affected by this incident," Cmdr. Matthew Hobbie, the Coast Guard search and rescue coordinator, said in a statement.

The Coast Guard used a helicopter, HC-130 Hercules airplane and the cutter Stratton to search about 1,022 square miles (2,647 square kilometers) over 13 hours.

Coast Guard Petty Officer Lexie Preston said ending searches is based upon weather, water temperatures and the survivability rate of the missing person.

Preston said that planes searching for Teuber on Tuesday found a debris field in the Gulf of Alaska, about 65 miles (105 kilometers) northeast of Kodiak.

However, she said searchers could not “confirm that was that helicopter.” Crews searching Wednesday did not locate the debris, Preston said.

“The debris that was initially located yesterday evening was consistent with debris that would have been found on the overdue helicopter," Hobbie said.

Teuber owns the helicopter, which is used for sightseeing and charter trips through his company, Kodiak Helicopters LLC, according to state records.

Teuber abruptly resigned on February 23 from the health care organization and as a member of the University of Alaska Board of Regents. At the time, no reason was given.

However, his former assistant described a pattern of abusive behavior, harassment and coerced sexual counters by Teuber in a three-page letter to consortium officials that was obtained by the Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica. She resigned the same day.

“Andy unrelentingly coerced, forced, and required sex of me,” Savanah Evans said in the letter.

The Associated Press does not usually name victims of alleged sexual misconduct, but the Anchorage Daily News said she gave permission to use her name. Their story was published online Tuesday.

She claimed the abuse, much of which took place in consortium offices, derailed her personal and professional life.

In an email to the newspaper on Monday, Teuber denied Evans’ allegations, calling it a “completely consensual personal relationship.”

“The allegations of wrongdoing that I have been made aware of are false, and these allegations and their timing appear designed to portray me unjustly and falsely; to damage my personal and family relationships; but especially to sabotage my recent engagement and new marriage; and to undermine my professional prospects,” Teuber wrote.

Teuber led the consortium for over a decade and was paid more than $1 million per year.

The consortium is co-owner and manages the Alaska Native Medical Center, one of three hospitals in Anchorage. The health organization provides services to more than 170,000 Alaska Natives and employs more than 3,000 people.

The consortium said it will conduct its own independent, outside investigation.

Teuber had headed the health consortium since 2008, according to a biography posted on the Alaska Federation of Natives webpage.

Teuber also served on the federation's board and has been president of the Kodiak Area Native Association since 2006.



Piper PA-28R-200 Cherokee Arrow II, N56258: Fatal accident occurred October 30, 2019 near DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (KPDK), Atlanta, Georgia


Negotiations over an insurance payout to a DeKalb County resident whose home was damaged in the 2019 crash of an airplane out of DeKalb-Peachtree Airport has been “resolved” in an undisclosed manner, according to an attorney. 

John Patterson was one of two residents left temporarily homeless in the October 30, 2019 crash of a private airplane that hit their townhomes at 2421 Peachwood Circle near I-85. The crash killed the pilot and a passenger. Debris smashed a huge hole in the roof of Patterson’s spare bedroom and fell through the floor into the kitchen below.

Patterson and his attorney, Alan Armstrong, said a month after the crash that they were seeking insurance compensation but were running into a hitch about whether the pilot was covered for the instrument-based flying he was doing at the time. 

Insufficient insurance is a common problem in private airplane crashes, Armstrong and other experts say. There is no federal or Georgia requirement that non-commercial pilots have liability insurance at all, and some beginners have policies that pay only $100,000. Policies that pay out $1 million total per incident are common, but that amount can quickly be consumed by the scale of damage and injuries from airplane crashes.

Asked for an update about the Peachwood Circle case, Armstrong in December said, “The matter is resolved,” adding that he cannot discuss the details. Patterson did not respond to a comment request.

DeKalb County Superior Court records show no filings for legal action in the matter.

Located on Clairmont Road in Chamblee on the Brookhaven border, PDK has a long history of accidents, including an infamous 1973 case where a jet crashed into a Buford Highway apartment building, killing seven people on the plane and severely injuring a resident with burning fuel. 

Since 2000, three residential properties have been hit by planes from PDK in DeKalb, Brookhaven, Chamblee and Lilburn. A total of 17 people have been killed in accidents in that time period, all pilots or passengers. Other planes from PDK have wrecked in residential or commercial areas or on highways. 

The 2019 crash raised safety concerns with some nearby residents as development increases around what was once a remote, semi-rural airport. However, experts say that PDK’s accident rates are not unusual and the risk to any given property is tiny. PDK officials have said that most accidents and near-misses happen within the airport property.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta Georgia
Piper Aircraft Inc; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania


Location: Atlanta, GA
Accident Number: ERA20FA021
Date & Time: 10/30/2019, 1032 EDT
Registration: N56258
Aircraft: Piper PA28R
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On October 30, 2019, about 1032 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28R, N56258, was destroyed following an inflight break up, and impact with a residential building and terrain near DeKalb-Peachtree Airport (PDK), Atlanta, Georgia. The commercial pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was filed for the flight that originated at PDK about 1014 and was destined for Mid-Carolina Regional Airport (RUQ), Salisbury, North Carolina.

According to air traffic control communication and radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot established communication with the ground controller at PDK and advised that he had received Automatic Terminal Information Service Hotel (H). The 0953, weather observation included variable wind at 6 knots, visibility 6 miles with mist, with an overcast ceiling at 400 feet above ground level. Before departing, the pilot received an IFR release with instructions to fly a heading of 090°. The controller then cleared the flight for takeoff on runway 12L with a left turn to a heading of 090°, and advised the pilot the current winds were 150° at 5 knots.

The pilot established communication with the departure controller as he was climbing through 2,000 feet in a right turn to a heading of 090°. The controller instructed him to climb to 5,000 feet and proceed direct to the Athens (AHN) VORTAC. Additionally, the controller advised him of moderate precipitation extending to the east for 10 miles along their route of flight to AHN. The pilot began a right turn to the southeast and the controller instructed the pilot to turn left direct AHN, advising the pilot that it appeared that they were heading southbound. The pilot turned eastbound and the controller asked if they were showing a route direct to AHN, to which the pilot responded "affirmative." The airplane continued eastbound for approximately three miles before again turning southbound. The controller instructed the pilot to fly a heading of 090° and the pilot advised that they had "…lost their vacuum gauge." At that time the airplane was at 5,000 feet and turned to the northeast briefly before it entered a right turn and rapidly descended to 3,700 feet. The controller instructed the pilot to maintain "wings level" and maintain 4,000 feet; however, the pilot did not respond. The controller made additional transmissions to the pilot to maintain wings level without a response, there were no additional communications with the flight, and radar contact was lost.

An examination of the accident site revealed the airplane impacted a residential apartment building 1.5 miles southeast of PDK. The airplane struck the wooden roof near the back wall, then continued through the second floor coming to rest in the kitchen area. The engine was located inside the apartment crawl space and kitchen area, while the fuselage and cockpit remained outside of the residence back door. Additionally, the right main gear and sections of the right wing flap were located on the second floor of the adjacent apartment. The debris field was about 790 feet in length on a magnetic heading of about 270° from the crash site. At the beginning of the debris field, a portion of the right wing tip was located on the roof of another residential building. Within the debris field was a portion of the left wing tip, right aileron, horizontal stabilizer and vertical stabilizer with the rudder attached by one hinge.

The engine remained attached to its mounts and the firewall. One of the three propeller blades were broken at the base of the propeller hub. All the propeller blades had scoring and impact marks throughout the span of the blades. The left wing aileron was not located during the initial search.

Flight control continuity was not confirmed, but flight control cable terminations were observed intact at the rudder pedal assembly in the cockpit. The aileron cable chain was fracture separated with one end still attached to the cable. The stabilator cables remained attached to the stabilator idler arm in the cockpit. The flap control cable remained attached to the flap selector handle. All the cables were separated between the cockpit controls and the control surfaces with signatures consistent with overload due to impact or cuts made to facilitate recovery of the wreckage.

The left wing spar inboard attach flanges were located at the accident site; a small section of the wing box which had separated from the main wreckage revealed a fracture of the lower spar cap that occurred on the outboard pair of attach bolts. The fracture surface was clean and smooth with no apparent indications of fatigue progression and exhibited damage signatures consistent with impacting the building. The outboard section of the left wing was separated chordwise at the main spar splice joint and the fractures were consistent with overload. It was located on the ground near the entrance gate to an apartment complex.

The right wing spar was located near the fuselage, it remained attached to the wing box. The outboard portion of the right wing was separated chordwise at the main spar splice joint and the fractures were consistent with overload. The outer section of the left wing was recovered from the roof of a residential building.

The stabilator's left and right tips were located in the debris field away from the fuselage. The center portion of the stabilator was impact damaged and separated chordwise about mid-span and the fractures were consistent with overload. The trim tab remained attached to the portions of the stabilator by its hinges. The forward spar of the stabilator was separated about 12" either side of the aircraft centerline. The center portion of the forward stabilator spar, including the balance tube and weight, remained attached to the tailcone bulkhead at its hinges.

The vertical stabilizer and rudder were separated from the tailcone and the fractures were consistent with overload. It was located along the debris field between the wing tips and the main wreckage. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer by its upper hinge. The rudder horn was separated from the rudder and the rudder cables remained attached to the horn. The rudder stops were intact and unremarkable.

The wreckage was recovered and retained for further examination.

According to FAA airmen records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane. At the time of the accident, the pilot held a third-class medical certificate issued on April 18, 2018 and reported 4,850 hours of flight experience.

The weather conditions reported about 1027 at PDK, about 1.5 miles northwest of the accident site, included visibility of 3 statute miles, overcast sky at 400 feet agl, light rain and mist, wind variable at 3 knots, temperature 19°C, dew point 19°C, and a barometric altimeter setting of 30.11 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N56258
Model/Series: PA28R 200
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PDK, 998 ft msl
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 19°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 400 ft agl
Visibility:  3 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.11 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Atlanta, GA (PDK)
Destination: Salisbury, NC (RUQ)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 33.856944, -84.290556 (est)






Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N5815E; accident occurred March 03, 2020 at Madison Municipal Airport (KIMS), Jefferson County, Indiana




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Indianapolis, Indiana

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
Location: Madison, Indiana
Accident Number: CEN20CA112
Date & Time: March 3, 2020, 17:06 Local
Registration: N5815E
Aircraft: Cessna 172 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

According to the flight instructor, during the third approach, he took the controls from the student pilot and informed the student that he would land the airplane. The airplane was configured with "minimal flaps" due to gusting crosswind conditions. During landing, the wind shifted from a quartering headwind to a direct crosswind. The airplane bounced on touchdown and subsequently exited the right side of the runway, entered soft mud, and then nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing lift strut. The instructor stated that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The flight instructor's failure to maintain directional control during landing in gusting crosswind conditions, which resulted in a runway excursion and nose-over.

Findings
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Instructor/check pilot
Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Environmental issues Gusts - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Crosswind - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Other weather encounter
Landing-flare/touchdown Abnormal runway contact
Landing-flare/touchdown Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-flare/touchdown Runway excursion
Landing-flare/touchdown Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Landing-flare/touchdown Nose over/nose down

Student pilot Information

Certificate: None 
Age: 18, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None None 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 4 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4 hours (Total, this make and model), 4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Flight instructor Information

Certificate: Flight instructor 
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: September 11, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: July 24, 2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 1127 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 1043 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 17 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5815E
Model/Series: 172 N
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 17271942
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: November 1, 2019 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1769.6 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A4N
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: IMS,819 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 21:55 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 19 knots / 27 knots 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 270° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / 0°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Madison, IN (IMS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Madison, IN (IMS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 16:20 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Madison Muni IMS 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 819 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 21 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 38.759998,-85.464721(est)

Loss of Engine Power (Partial): Bell 206L-1 Long Ranger, N32AE; accident occurred March 04, 2020 in Clark, Randolph County, Missouri

 















Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri
Air Evac Lifeteam; O’Fallon, Missouri
Transportation Safety Board of Canada; Gatineau, FN
Rolls Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana 
Bell Helicopter; Fort Worth, Texas

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N32AE

Location: Clark, Missouri
Accident Number: CEN20LA113
Date & Time: March 3, 2020, 18:42 Local
Registration: N32AE
Aircraft: Bell 206
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air taxi & commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Unspecified)

Factual Information

On March 4, 2020, about 1842 central standard time, a Bell 206 L1 helicopter, N32AE, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Clark, Missouri. The commercial pilot, two crewmembers, and one patient were uninjured. The helicopter was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 helicopter air ambulance flight.

The pilot reported that during cruise on the patient transfer flight, the helicopter yawed right, the rotor rpm warning light illuminated, and the rpm aural indication sounded. The engine continued to operate but was producing less than 90% power. The pilot reduced collective and turned the helicopter toward a field for a precautionary landing. The helicopter touched down hard and the tail boom sustained substantial damage.

A postaccident examination of the helicopter revealed that a pneumatic line, exhibited a separation near its filter connection. The pneumatic line and filter were shipped to the engine manufacturer for examination, which revealed that the tube was fractured completely through at the toe of the weld between the tube and its filter fitting. Surface smearing was present on sections of the separation; however, the separation exhibited surfaces consistent with fatigue that initiated near the top of the tube.

The tube’s outer diameter surface near the elbow separation exhibited rub damage. A photo of the engine bay showed that a red ribbed hose was present in the engine bay near the tube separation and the ribbed hose exhibited discoloration on its outer surface.

Measurements taken during non-destructive examination revealed that the height of the weld root reinforcement exceeded its component specifications. The remaining tube and weld measurements met their component specifications.

A polished cross-section through the weld on the fitting side fracture revealed the fatigue fracture was located at the toe of the weld, initiating at the approximate intersection of the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal of the tube. There were no material anomalies at the fatigue origin location. The fatigue fracture progressed approximately along the intersection between the HAZ and weld metal near the outer diameter surface before proceeding into the HAZ to the inner diameter surface at this plane of examination. Additionally, the weld and base metal microstructures were consistent with the materials required by the component specifications and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed that the tube, fitting, and weld materials also met component specifications.

The outer diameter of the filter housing exhibited depressions and deformations consistent with tool marks.

The line was sectioned near its intact (non-failed) connector weld for a computed tomography (CT) examination, which revealed indications of three voids within that tube weld area. The void indications ranged in diameter from 0.0019 to 0.0026 inch. 

A pneumatic leak check was performed 114.9 hours before the accident flight. The tube was last removed 238.9 hours before the accident flight. A leak in the pneumatic line can cause the engine control system to enter a sub-idle fuel flow condition and result in an engine power loss.

After the accident, the operator examined their fleet of helicopters equipped with Rolls Royce 250-C30 engines and no other pneumatic line leaks were found. According to the engine manufacturer, this was the first occurrence of failure involving this pneumatic line design, which was released in 1998. Since that time, the fleet equipped with the pneumatic line had accumulated a total of 17 million flight hours.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial 
Age: 55, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter 
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 14, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: February 29, 2020
Flight Time: 5252 hours (Total, all aircraft), 383 hours (Total, this make and model), 4221 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell 
Registration: N32AE
Model/Series: 206 L1 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 45327
Landing Gear Type: Skid 
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: February 13, 2020 100 hour 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Turbo shaft
Airframe Total Time: 27820.7 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls Royce
ELT: C126 installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: 250-C30P
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 650 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand air taxi (135)
Operator Does Business As: 
Operator Designator Code: EVCA

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC) 
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCOU,778 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 19 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 18:54 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 181°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Kirksville, MO (MU92)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Columbia, MO (91MO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 18:12 Local
Type of Airspace: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 3 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.277221,-92.357498(est)





Loss of Control on Ground: Vans RV-8, N878DZ; accident occurred March 04, 2020 at Cincinnati West Airport (I67), Harrison, Hamilton County, Ohio

 



Tailwheel Yoke 

Tailwheel Fork (Key Slide Fully Extended) 

Tailwheel Fork (Key Slide Stuck Fully Retracted)

 Tailwheel Fork (Disassembled) 



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cincinnati, Ohio

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://data.ntsb.gov/Docket 
 
https://registry.faa.gov/N878DZ


Location: Harrison, OH

Accident Number: CEN20CA114
Date & Time: 03/04/2020, 1402 EST
Registration:N878DZ 
Aircraft: Vans RV8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that he made a normal landing approach to the runway with a direct crosswind of 15 knots, gusting to 23 knots. The pilot was initially able to maintain directional control with normal flight control inputs after the airplane touched down on the main landing gear; however, when the tailwheel touched down, the tail began to weathervane, and the airplane veered right. The pilot was unable to regain directional control by applying full left rudder and left brake before the airplane departed the right side of the runway and struck a precision approach path indicator lights system. The left wing, left horizontal stabilizer, and left elevator sustained substantial damage.

Postaccident examination and a functional test of the steerable tailwheel revealed that the spring actuated key slide would stick in the retracted position within the tailwheel fork, which allowed the tailwheel to fully caster instead of being steerable within the normal limits intended for takeoff and landing. Additional examination revealed that the slot in the tailwheel fork that held the spring-actuated key slide was slightly deformed and that the key had several raised edges that caused the key to bind when fully retracted in the slot. It is likely that the tailwheel was able to fully caster during landing, which resulted in the pilot's inability to maintain directional control after the tailwheel touched down during the landing roll.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The malfunction of the steerable tailwheel, which resulted in a loss of directional control during the landing roll and subsequent impact with the precision approach path indicator lights system.

Findings

Aircraft Landing gear steering system - Malfunction
Aircraft Directional control - Attain/maintain not possible
Environmental issues Runway/taxi/approach light - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Sys/Comp malf/fail (non-power)
Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion
Landing-landing roll Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:No 
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/04/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/18/2020
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 22000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 125 hours (Total, this make and model), 17000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 270 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 90 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N878DZ
Model/Series: RV8
Aircraft Category:Airplane 
Year of Manufacture:2004 
Amateur Built:Yes 
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 81885
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:2 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/11/2020, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 438 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner: Caye Palmas Transport Inc.
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Caye Palmas Transport Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: I67, 584 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1355 EST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 7500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots / 21 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 270°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Cynthiana, KY (0I8)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Harrison, OH (I67)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1340 EST
Type of Airspace:Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Cincinnati West Airport (I67)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 584 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 19
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2808 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.259167, -84.774444 (est)

Loss of Control in Flight: LET L-23 Super Blanik, N296BA; accident occurred March 01, 2020 near Moontown Airport (3M5), Brownsboro, Madison County, Alabama

 

View of glider as found facing approximate direction of travel

View of glider as found facing opposite direction of travel

Wreckage Diagram/Airport View




Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:
https://data.ntsb.gov/Docket

https://registry.faa.gov/N296BA

Location: Huntsville, AL
Accident Number: ERA20CA116
Date & Time: 03/01/2020, 1400 CST
Registration: N296BA
Aircraft: Let L 23 SUPER BLANIK
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis

According to the glider pilot, the purpose of the flight was to release from the tow about 300 ft above ground level, return to the airport, and land on the departure runway in the opposite direction, which would simulate the response to a "rope-break" emergency during the initial climb. After departure from the runway and release from the tow, the pilot completed a 270° turn on the north side of the runway and had to make another 90°, left base-to-final turn to return toward the runway. While still on the base leg, the glider encountered an 11-knot wind from the south, gusting to 18 knots. The pilot believed that the glider must have encountered "wind shear" as he "lost all elevator control," and the glider then impacted terrain. The Federal Aviation Administration inspector who conducted a postaccident examination of the glider reported that he established flight control continuity. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the glider that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain glider control and his exceedance of the glider's critical angle of attack while maneuvering in gusting wind conditions, which resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Angle of attack - Capability exceeded
Environmental issues Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach Other weather encounter
Approach Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Approach Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial; Private
Age: 69, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Glider
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/23/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  1834 hours (Total, all aircraft), 295 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Let
Registration: N296BA
Model/Series: L 23 SUPER BLANIK No Series
Aircraft Category:Glider
Year of Manufacture: 1994
Amateur Built:No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 948117
Landing Gear Type: Tandem
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/30/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 90 Hours
Engines:
Airframe Total Time: 1680 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: Huntsville Soaring Club
Rated Power:
Operator: Huntsville Soaring Club
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMDQ, 763 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1955 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 325°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 18 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 3°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Huntsville, AL (3M5)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Huntsville, AL (3M5)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Moontown (3M5)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 655 ft
Runway Surface Condition:Dry 
Runway Used: 09
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2180 ft / 160 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Simulated Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:2 Serious 
Latitude, Longitude: 34.747222, -86.460833 (est)