Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Hoover Arnold AR-6, registered to the pilot and operated as Race 11, N616DH (and) Reberry 3M1C1R, registered to Hot Stuff Air Racing LLC and was operated as Race 1, N913FT: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada
Reno Air Races Association; Reno, Nevada
International Formula One Inc.; Reno, Nevada 

N616DH  Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf  

N616DH  Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N616DH

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR16LA185A
Date & Time: 09/18/2016, 1118 PDT
Registration: N616DH
Aircraft: HOOVER DAVID ARNOLD AR 6
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Air Race/Show 

On September 18, 2016, about 1118 Pacific daylight time, a tailwheel equipped experimental amateur built (EAB) Hoover Arnold AR-6, N616DH, struck a tailwheel equipped EAB Reberry 3M1C1R, N913FT, during the takeoff roll at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, in the AR-6 was not injured and the airline transport pilot in the 3M1C1R, sustained minor injuries. The AR-6 was registered to the pilot and operated as Race 11. The 3M1C1R was registered to Hot Stuff Air Racing LLC., Kissimmee, Florida, and was operated as Race 1. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight, which was originating at the time of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either airplane.

The race heat consisted of 8 airplanes, each positioned in a staggered formation on the runway. Figure 1 depicts the position of each airplane prior to the race start. Flaggers were located to the right of each row on the runway edge. Additionally, a race start flagger was located on the right side of the runway, in front of the first row of airplanes. Prior to the race start, all of the airplanes are at takeoff power, waiting for the race start signal. The race start is signaled by the race start flagger raising and subsequently dropping a green flag along with flaggers on the second and third row raising and dropping white flags.


Figure 1: Formula One Staggered Race Start Diagram with Race 1 and 11 and Flagger Locations Depicted

The pilot of Race 11 reported that he was in the back row of the Formula 1 staggered start sequence on runway 8. Once he saw the green flag for start, he initiated takeoff and observed both airplanes to the left and right of him accelerating faster than he did. As the tail of the airplane came up, the pilot observed Race 1 stationary on the runway and he attempted to swerve out of the way and get the airplane airborne. Subsequently, Race 11 impacted Race 1.

The pilot of Race 1 reported that he was in the number four position, which was located in the middle row, inside position. He stated that when running the engine up in anticipation of the start, about 20 seconds before the green flag drop, the engine was not running well enough for flight and he made the decision to shut the engine down to signal the starters to halt the starting process. The pilot recalled that a flagman on his row put his hands in an 'X' over his head and he decided to open his canopy to make it clear he was out of the race and so everyone could see him. The pilot further reported that an alternate airplane was signaled to taxi on to the runway to replace his entry and that he felt confident the communications had reached the appropriate people as he waited for personnel to push his airplane off the runway. The pilot stated that shortly after, he saw the flagman run out on to the runway waving his hands over his head as if something was wrong and observed the airplane to his right start his takeoff roll. A few seconds later, Race 6 and Race 8 passed by him on either side, and subsequently, he was impacted from behind. A completed Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident Report Form (6120.1) was not received from the pilot of Race 1.

The race starter, who was standing in the rear bed of his truck during the start of the race, reported that he observed all of the Formula One aircraft engines running in all three rows. Prior to raising the green start flag, he lowered the red flag and slowly returned it to the bed of his truck and grabbed the green flag and raised it up. The race starter stated that he observed that all of the aircraft were running and at the scheduled take off time, he dropped the green flag. He observed the front row start their take-off roll and immediately observed Race 1's propeller stop, and the canopy open. He then observed the third row of aircraft taking off and approach the second row, followed by the collision between Race 11 and Race 1.

The flagger, who was positioned on the second row as depicted in figure 1, reported that everything seemed to appear normal leading up to the race start. He observed the second row "Red Flagger" hold up one finger indicating the one-minute time hack and then getting a firm thumbs up from each of the two pilots positioned in the second row. The flagger stated that his attention then turned to the Reno Starter Position, who was located past the front row of aircraft and that he observed the green flag being raised and the red flag being lowered; he followed by raising his green flag. Seconds later, the Reno Starter dropped the green flag and he followed by dropping his green flag drop in sequence with the Reno Starter and proceeded to run several yards back to clear himself away from the runway. The flagger stated that when he turned around to view the runway, he saw Race 1 stationary on the runway and Race 11 directly behind his position. A second later, the collision occurred.

Examination of Race 1 revealed that the upper portion of the rudder and vertical stabilizer were separated. Multiple propeller slash marks were observed on the right wing, which was partially separated. Examination of Race 11 revealed that the left wing was structurally damaged, and the left main landing gear structure was compressed upward through the wing structure.

Multiple recorded videos of the accident were provided by various witnesses located on the taxiway or the ramp.

One video, captured from a vehicle located on the taxiway adjacent to the third row of airplanes, revealed that a golf cart with a red flag attached to the back of it, drove from the runway edge into the rocky infield between the runway and taxiway to an area abeam the second row about 13 seconds prior to the race start. A flagger, standing near the edge of the runway, was observed raising a white flag and moving it downward, signaling the start of the race to the third row 3 seconds later. As the third row of airplanes began their takeoff sequence, the car began moving forward, abeam the third row of the airplanes. The video showed that at the time of the impact between Race 1 and Race 11, the golf cart that had the red flag attached to the back of the seating area was parked in the rocky infield, and the flag remained attached to the golf cart. Shortly after, the video panned forward briefly, providing view of the truck, where the race starter was positioned. No flags were observed being displayed at the race starters truck.

Onboard video from Race 1, revealed that the camera was mounted in the forward area of the cockpit, providing video of the pilot, and surrounding runway environment, including the third row of airplanes and flaggers adjacent to the third row. About 4 seconds from the start of the video, the engine was heard running erratically. At 11 seconds, the pilot was observed looking to his right and began shutting down the engine along with starting to open the canopy 2 seconds later. Between 16 and 17 seconds, the canopy was opened. At the same time, a flagger was observed on the ramp side of the runway, dropping a white flag, signaling the start of the race to the third row. At 25 to 26 seconds, airplanes were observed passing on both the left and right side of his position, followed by the left wing and landing gear of Race 11 colliding with the empennage and right wing of Race 1 about a second later. It was noted that during the 10 seconds from the canopy opening to the time of the collision, Race 11 was observed drifting slightly left during the takeoff roll.

Onboard video from Race 11, revealed that the camera was mounted behind the pilot's left shoulder, providing a view of the left side of the engine cowling, left wing, small portion of the left side of the cockpit and instrument panel, along with the left side of the runway, which included Race 69. About 1 minute after the start of the video, Race 11 and Race 69 were observed starting their takeoff roll. About 11 seconds later, the left wing was observed striking Race 1. During the 11 seconds of the takeoff roll, Race 11 was observed drifting slightly left.

The International Formula One Procedure Rules, revision R2, dated January 2007, outlined the start procedures as the following:

1. The red flag will come up at T-5 minutes. It will be replaced by the green flag at T-10 seconds. Drop of the green flag signals the start of the race.

2. The race starts when the starter's flag drops. The starting time for all aircraft will be taken from the time the first aircraft crosses the start line, in flight, after the scatter lap.

3. Premature starts within 5 seconds will be penalized 30 seconds but the race will not be stopped. Starts earlier than 5 seconds will result in disqualification.

4. All rows will launch simultaneously. Anyone aborting take-off will abort straight ahead and attempt to clear to the end of the runway expeditiously.

There was no additional guidance outlining abort procedures in the event of a rough running engine prior to the start of the race.

According to the Director of Operations of the International Formula One organization, three briefs were conducted the morning of the accident. The third brief, which was held at the end of the runway, covered various items including positioning of the airplanes for the takeoff grid, startup procedures, and abort procedures. The Director of Operations stated that they discussed with the pilots that once the green flag drops, if the pilots are experiencing engine trouble they were instructed to hold their line on the takeoff grid and roll out [to the end of the runway].

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/22/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  17227 hours (Total, all aircraft), 64 hours (Total, this make and model), 12956 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 183 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 28 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: HOOVER DAVID
Registration: N616DH
Model/Series: ARNOLD AR 6 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Unknown
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 01
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
07/21/2016, Condition 
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection: 4 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 129.6 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-200
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRNO, 4410 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1755 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 153°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: RENO/STEAD (RTS)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5050 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 08
IFR Approach:None 
Runway Length/Width: 7608 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  39.664444, -119.891111

N913FT  Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N913FT  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N913H

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR16LA185B
Date & Time: 09/18/2016, 1118 PDT
Registration: N913FT
Aircraft: REBERRY BRIAN 3M1C1R
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Collision during takeoff/land
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Air Race/Show 

On September 18, 2016, about 1118 Pacific daylight time, a tailwheel equipped experimental amateur built (EAB) Hoover Arnold AR-6, N616DH, struck a tailwheel equipped EAB Reberry 3M1C1R, N913FT, during the takeoff roll at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, in the AR-6 was not injured and the airline transport pilot in the 3M1C1R, sustained minor injuries. The AR-6 was registered to the pilot and operated as Race 11. The 3M1C1R was registered to Hot Stuff Air Racing LLC., Kissimmee, Florida, and was operated as Race 1. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight, which was originating at the time of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either airplane.

The race heat consisted of 8 airplanes, each positioned in a staggered formation on the runway. Figure 1 depicts the position of each airplane prior to the race start. Flaggers were located to the right of each row on the runway edge. Additionally, a race start flagger was located on the right side of the runway, in front of the first row of airplanes. Prior to the race start, all of the airplanes are at takeoff power, waiting for the race start signal. The race start is signaled by the race start flagger raising and subsequently dropping a green flag along with flaggers on the second and third row raising and dropping white flags.

Figure 1: Formula One Staggered Race Start Diagram with Race 1 and 11 and Flagger Locations Depicted.

The pilot of Race 11 reported that he was in the back row of the Formula 1 staggered start sequence on runway 8. Once he saw the green flag for start, he initiated takeoff and observed both airplanes to the left and right of him accelerating faster than he did. As the tail of the airplane came up, the pilot observed Race 1 stationary on the runway and he attempted to swerve out of the way and get the airplane airborne. Subsequently, Race 11 impacted Race 1.

The pilot of Race 1 reported that he was in the number four position, which was located in the middle row, inside position. He stated that when running the engine up in anticipation of the start, about 20 seconds before the green flag drop, the engine was not running well enough for flight and he made the decision to shut the engine down to signal the starters to halt the starting process. The pilot recalled that a flagman on his row put his hands in an 'X' over his head and he decided to open his canopy to make it clear he was out of the race and so everyone could see him. The pilot further reported that an alternate airplane was signaled to taxi on to the runway to replace his entry and that he felt confident the communications had reached the appropriate people as he waited for personnel to push his airplane off the runway. The pilot stated that shortly after, he saw the flagman run out on to the runway waving his hands over his head as if something was wrong and observed the airplane to his right start his takeoff roll. A few seconds later, Race 6 and Race 8 passed by him on either side, and subsequently, he was impacted from behind. A completed Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident Report Form (6120.1) was not received from the pilot of Race 1.

The race starter, who was standing in the rear bed of his truck during the start of the race, reported that he observed all of the Formula One aircraft engines running in all three rows. Prior to raising the green start flag, he lowered the red flag and slowly returned it to the bed of his truck and grabbed the green flag and raised it up. The race starter stated that he observed that all of the aircraft were running and at the scheduled take off time, he dropped the green flag. He observed the front row start their take-off roll and immediately observed Race 1's propeller stop, and the canopy open. He then observed the third row of aircraft taking off and approach the second row, followed by the collision between Race 11 and Race 1.

The flagger, who was positioned on the second row as depicted in figure 1, reported that everything seemed to appear normal leading up to the race start. He observed the second row "Red Flagger" hold up one finger indicating the one-minute time hack and then getting a firm thumbs up from each of the two pilots positioned in the second row. The flagger stated that his attention then turned to the Reno Starter Position, who was located past the front row of aircraft and that he observed the green flag being raised and the red flag being lowered; he followed by raising his green flag. Seconds later, the Reno Starter dropped the green flag and he followed by dropping his green flag drop in sequence with the Reno Starter and proceeded to run several yards back to clear himself away from the runway. The flagger stated that when he turned around to view the runway, he saw Race 1 stationary on the runway and Race 11 directly behind his position. A second later, the collision occurred.

Examination of Race 1 revealed that the upper portion of the rudder and vertical stabilizer were separated. Multiple propeller slash marks were observed on the right wing, which was partially separated. Examination of Race 11 revealed that the left wing was structurally damaged, and the left main landing gear structure was compressed upward through the wing structure.

Multiple recorded videos of the accident were provided by various witnesses located on the taxiway or the ramp.

One video, captured from a vehicle located on the taxiway adjacent to the third row of airplanes, revealed that a golf cart with a red flag attached to the back of it, drove from the runway edge into the rocky infield between the runway and taxiway to an area abeam the second row about 13 seconds prior to the race start. A flagger, standing near the edge of the runway, was observed raising a white flag and moving it downward, signaling the start of the race to the third row 3 seconds later. As the third row of airplanes began their takeoff sequence, the car began moving forward, abeam the third row of the airplanes. The video showed that at the time of the impact between Race 1 and Race 11, the golf cart that had the red flag attached to the back of the seating area was parked in the rocky infield, and the flag remained attached to the golf cart. Shortly after, the video panned forward briefly, providing view of the truck, where the race starter was positioned. No flags were observed being displayed at the race starters truck.

Onboard video from Race 1, revealed that the camera was mounted in the forward area of the cockpit, providing video of the pilot, and surrounding runway environment, including the third row of airplanes and flaggers adjacent to the third row. About 4 seconds from the start of the video, the engine was heard running erratically. At 11 seconds, the pilot was observed looking to his right and began shutting down the engine along with starting to open the canopy 2 seconds later. Between 16 and 17 seconds, the canopy was opened. At the same time, a flagger was observed on the ramp side of the runway, dropping a white flag, signaling the start of the race to the third row. At 25 to 26 seconds, airplanes were observed passing on both the left and right side of his position, followed by the left wing and landing gear of Race 11 colliding with the empennage and right wing of Race 1 about a second later. It was noted that during the 10 seconds from the canopy opening to the time of the collision, Race 11 was observed drifting slightly left during the takeoff roll.

Onboard video from Race 11, revealed that the camera was mounted behind the pilot's left shoulder, providing a view of the left side of the engine cowling, left wing, small portion of the left side of the cockpit and instrument panel, along with the left side of the runway, which included Race 69. About 1 minute after the start of the video, Race 11 and Race 69 were observed starting their takeoff roll. About 11 seconds later, the left wing was observed striking Race 1. During the 11 seconds of the takeoff roll, Race 11 was observed drifting slightly left.

The International Formula One Procedure Rules, revision R2, dated January 2007, outlined the start procedures as the following:

1. The red flag will come up at T-5 minutes. It will be replaced by the green flag at T-10 seconds. Drop of the green flag signals the start of the race.

2. The race starts when the starter's flag drops. The starting time for all aircraft will be taken from the time the first aircraft crosses the start line, in flight, after the scatter lap.

3. Premature starts within 5 seconds will be penalized 30 seconds but the race will not be stopped. Starts earlier than 5 seconds will result in disqualification.

4. All rows will launch simultaneously. Anyone aborting take-off will abort straight ahead and attempt to clear to the end of the runway expeditiously.

There was no additional guidance outlining abort procedures in the event of a rough running engine prior to the start of the race.

According to the Director of Operations of the International Formula One organization, three briefs were conducted the morning of the accident. The third brief, which was held at the end of the runway, covered various items including positioning of the airplanes for the takeoff grid, startup procedures, and abort procedures. The Director of Operations stated that they discussed with the pilots that once the green flag drops, if the pilots are experiencing engine trouble they were instructed to hold their line on the takeoff grid and roll out [to the end of the runway]. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/08/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: REBERRY BRIAN
Registration: N913FT
Model/Series: 3M1C1R NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2011
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 013
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: O-200-D
Registered Owner: Hot Stuff Air Racing
Rated Power:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRNO, 4410 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1755 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 153°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: RENO/STEAD (RTS)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5050 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 08
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7608 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  39.664444, -119.891111

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: HOOVER DAVID ARNOLD AR 6, registration: N616DH
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: REBERRY BRIAN 3M1C1R, registration: N913FT
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 18, 2016, about 1118 Pacific daylight time, a tailwheel equipped experimental amateur built (EAB) Hoover Arnold AR-6, N616DH, struck a tailwheel equipped EAB Reberry 3M1C1R, N913FT, during takeoff roll on runway 8 at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the AR-6 was not injured and the airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the 3M1C1R, sustained minor injuries. The AR-6 was registered to the pilot and was operating as Race 11. The 3M1C1R was registered to Hot Stuff Air Racing LLC., Kissimmee, Florida, and was operated as Race 1. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight, which were originating at the time of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either airplane.

The pilot of Race 11 reported that he was positioned in the middle of the back row of the staggered start sequence for the Formula 1 Race. When the green flag dropped he initiated his takeoff roll and that as the tail of his airplane came up, he observed Race 1 stationary on the runway at his 12'oclock position. He swerved in an attempt to avoid the airplane, however, subsequently collided with Race 1.

The pilot of Race 1 reported that he was in the number four position (middle row, center) in the starting grid, which was the middle inside position with three aircraft ahead of him in the front row, one airplane to his right, and three airplanes behind his position. The pilot reported that about 20 seconds before the green flag dropped, the engine was not running correctly and he shut it down and signaled the starters to halt the start/takeoff process. Shortly after, Race 11 struck Race 1.

Postaccident examination of Race 1 revealed that the upper portion of the rudder and vertical stabilizer were separated. Multiple propeller slash marks were observed on the right wing, which was partially separated from the fuselage.

Examination of Race 11 revealed that the left wing was structurally damaged and the left main landing gear structure was compressed upward through the wing structure.

Glasair I, N70GG: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Analysis

The airline transport pilot reported that the engine operated normally during the takeoff and initial climb to join up in race formation for the start of a closed course air race. During the initial climb, the pilot tested the nitrous system with no anomalies noted.

At the start of the race, the airplanes began a descent toward the first pylon. The pilot reported that she smoothly opened the throttle to full and turned the nitrous system on. The airplane flew normally as it accelerated, and the engine sounds were normal. As the airplane passed pylon No. 5, the engine suddenly stopped producing power. The pilot then pulled up and declared a mayday. She subsequently saw smoke begin to fill the cabin and flames on both sides of the engine cowling and in the cockpit under the instrument panel. The pilot subsequently landed on a runway, and emergency personnel extinguished the fire.

The airplane owner reported that the engine had backfired before the loss of power. The backfire caused an explosion in the induction system, which broke the induction elbow. The throttle body and nitrous injector dropped into the bottom of the cowling and sprayed flammable fluid into the engine compartment, which resulted in the fire and loss of power.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The failure of an induction elbow following an engine backfire, which resulted in an in-flight fire and loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N70GG

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA184
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: OGG RICHARD A OGG GLASAIR I, registration: N70GG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, about 1125 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur built Ogg Glasair I, N70GG, experienced an in-flight fire during a closed course air race flight at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to a private individual, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the air race flight, which originated from RTS about 10 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that at takeoff, she put the throttle into the full open position, and the engine ran normally. During the climb, she turned on the nitrous switch for a few seconds to test the system which was working correctly. A normal increase in power was felt, and all engine parameters were in the green. She turned off the nitrous system and reduced throttle appropriately to join the race formation. 

At the start of the race, all airplanes are aligned abreast of each other. The pilot reported that in race formation the wingman's eye is on the airplane to the left to keep arranged distance for safety. Wingman do not have much time to spend reading each engine parameter. She glanced at the instrument panel prior to the race, and all engine parameters were in the green.

At the start of the race, the airplanes begin a descent toward the first pylon. The pilot reported that she smoothly opened the throttle to full and turned the nitrous system on. She felt acceleration, the airplane flew normally, and the engine sounds were normal. While passing pylon number 5, the engine suddenly stopped producing power. The pilot stated that she pulled up and declared a mayday with the intent to land on runway 18, but then heard that the fire trucks were positioning for runway 14. The pilot pulled the propeller lever, but the propeller pitch did not change. Smoke began to fill the cockpit and flames were seen on both sides of the engine cowling and in the cockpit under the instrument panel. The propeller stopped turning; the pilot placed the mixture in the idle cutoff position and the fuel selector valve to the OFF position. She landed on runway 14, exited the airplane, and emergency response personnel extinguished the fire.

Examination of the airplane revealed that the forward part of the fuselage and inboard portion of the left wing sustained fire and structural damage.

The owner reported that the engine had backfired prior to the loss of power. The backfire caused an explosion in the induction system, breaking the induction elbow. The throttle body and nitrous injector dropped into the bottom of the cowling spraying flammable fluid into the engine compartment, which resulted in the fire and loss of power.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA184
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: OGG RICHARD A OGG GLASAIR I, registration: N70GG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, about 1125 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur built Ogg Glasair I, N70GG, experienced an in-flight fire during a closed course air race flight at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to a private individual, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the flight, which originated from RTS about 10 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that during the air race the engine was operating normally until passing pylon number 5, when it suddenly lost power. The pilot stated that she pulled up, declared a mayday, and aimed for runway 14. The pilot landed uneventfully on runway 14, exited the airplane, and the emergency response personnel subsequently extinguished the fire.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the forward part of the fuselage and inboard portion of the left wing sustained fire and structural damage.

American Champion 8KCAB Super Decathlon, Flying Blank LLC, N126WB: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 in Benton, Texas Township, Crawford County, Ohio

FLYING BLANK LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N126WB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD AND FLIPPED OVER, 1 MILE FROM BENTON, OHIO

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 21:49:00Z
Regis#: N126WB
Aircraft Make: CHAMPION
Aircraft Model: 8KCAB
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BENTON
State: Ohio



BUCYRUS, Ohio -- The La Crosse pilot, who performs his annual airshow during Riverfest, has survived a crash landing in an airplane. Again.

William Blank was the only one on board when he put his single-engine plane down in a farm field just before 6 p.m. Tuesday.

The 73 year old's plane flipped onto its top upon landing, but he was uninjured. The plane, however, suffered significant damage, because it nose-dived before coming to a stop after hitting uneven ground in the field.

Blank's 2005 American Champion Super Decathlon single-engine, fixed-wing aircraft was taken from the scene by an aircraft recovery service and the FAA was contacted.

The plane needed to be put down in Bucyrus, Ohio, after Blank left La Crosse because of apparent fuel problems.

The last time Blank crash-landed, he was a passenger.

Happened near Pickwick, Minn., in 2009. That plane had left La Crosse when it began having mechanical troubles. 

The plane crashed into a grove of trees on the edge of a field, but neither Blank nor the pilot was injured in the crash. 

Source:   http://www.1410wizm.com




A pilot from Wisconsin had an unexpected and bumpy ride through Crawford County Tuesday evening.

Troopers from the Bucyrus Highway Patrol Post are currently investigating a single engine, fixed-wing airplane crash. At approximately 5:49 p.m. the Bucyrus Post received a call of an aircraft on its top in a tilled field on Marion-Melmore Road between Benton Road and Brokensword Road.

Troopers determined that the pilot of the aircraft, William A. Blank, age 73 of La Crosse, Wisconsin, was travelling from Wisconsin to Mansfield Lahm Airport when the aircraft’s engine sustained a possible fuel starvation issue. The pilot attempted to restart the engine without success and was forced to make an off airport landing in a tilled field west of Marion-Melmore Road. The pilot was successful in the landing, however prior to the aircraft coming to a complete stop in the front of the aircraft nosedived due to striking an area of uneven terrain causing the aircraft to flip its top.

The pilot was secured in the cockpit by a five-point harness and did not sustain any injuries from the crash. The 2005 American Champion Super Decathlon single fixed wing aircraft sustained moderate damage to the propeller and wings. The FAA was contacted and the plane was removed from the scene by an aircraft recovery service.

The Highway Patrol was assisted on the scene by the Crawford County Sheriff’s Office and the Sycamore Fire and EMS.

Source:  http://crawfordcountynow.com

Mong Jerant Racer , N777FJ (and) Pitts S-1 Special, Van Nuys Acro, N767JW: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N777FJ 

VAN NUYS ACRO: http://registry.faa.gov/N767JW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: HOOVER DAVID ARNOLD AR 6, registration: N616DH
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: REBERRY BRIAN 3M1C1R, registration: N913FT

Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 18, 2016, about 1118 Pacific daylight time, a tailwheel equipped experimental amateur built (EAB) Hoover Arnold AR-6, N616DH, struck a tailwheel equipped EAB Reberry 3M1C1R, N913FT, during takeoff roll on runway 8 at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the AR-6 was not injured and the airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the 3M1C1R, sustained minor injuries. The AR-6 was registered to the pilot and was operating as Race 11. The 3M1C1R was registered to Hot Stuff Air Racing LLC., Kissimmee, Florida, and was operated as Race 1. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight, which were originating at the time of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either airplane.

The pilot of Race 11 reported that he was positioned in the middle of the back row of the staggered start sequence for the Formula 1 Race. When the green flag dropped he initiated his takeoff roll and that as the tail of his airplane came up, he observed Race 1 stationary on the runway at his 12'oclock position. He swerved in an attempt to avoid the airplane, however, subsequently collided with Race 1.

The pilot of Race 1 reported that he was in the number four position (middle row, center) in the starting grid, which was the middle inside position with three aircraft ahead of him in the front row, one airplane to his right, and three airplanes behind his position. The pilot reported that about 20 seconds before the green flag dropped, the engine was not running correctly and he shut it down and signaled the starters to halt the start/takeoff process. Shortly after, Race 11 struck Race 1.

Postaccident examination of Race 1 revealed that the upper portion of the rudder and vertical stabilizer were separated. Multiple propeller slash marks were observed on the right wing, which was partially separated from the fuselage.

Examination of Race 11 revealed that the left wing was structurally damaged and the left main landing gear structure was compressed upward through the wing structure.

Cirrus SR22: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 at Charleston Air Force Base/International Airport (KCHS), Charleston, South Carolina

Imagine Air Jet Services

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT, IMG107 SR22, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY IN THE OVERRUN AREA AND STRUCK APPROACH LIGHTS, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA. 


Date: 20-SEP-16

Time: 14:45:00Z
Regis#: IMG107
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Flight Number: IMG107
City: CHARLESTON
State: South Carolina

Aerotek Pitts S-1S Special, N91JW: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA500
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Reno, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/04/2017
Aircraft: AEROTEK PITTS SPECIAL, registration: N91JW
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped biplane, during the landing roll, the tailwheel became “stuck” in an expansion joint that runs down the centerline of the runway. She reported that when the tailwheel became unstuck, the biplane “swung wildly to the left,” the bottom right wing struck the ground, and the airplane came to a stop on the runway after turning 180° to the left. 

A video of the accident, taken by a camera mounted on the accident biplane and posted on social media, revealed that the biplane touched down on the runway to the left of the centerline. During the landing roll and after crossing the taxiway A2 intersection, the biplane began drifting right. The tailwheel is seen crossing the centerline expansion joint about 30° to the joint and then rolling over the joint without hesitation. The tail is then seen swinging to the right at an increasing rate. The biplane ground looped to the left, and the bottom right wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or anomalies with the airplane that would have prevented normal operation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a ground loop.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N91JW

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA500
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: AEROTEK PITTS SPECIAL, registration: N91JW
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped biplane, during the landing roll the tailwheel became "stuck" in an expansion joint that runs down the centerline of the runway. She reported that when the tailwheel came unstuck, the biplane "swung wildly to the left", the bottom right wing struck the ground, and the airplane came to a stop on the runway after turning 180° to the left.

A video of the accident, taken by a camera mounted on the accident biplane and posted on social media revealed that the biplane touched down on the runway to the left of the centerline. During the landing roll, after crossing the taxiway A2 intersection, the biplane began drifting to the right. The tailwheel is seen crossing the centerline expansion joint about 30° to the joint, and rolls over the joint without hesitation. The tail is then seen swinging to the right at an increasing rate. The biplane ground looped to the left and the bottom right wing sustained substantial damage.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies that would have prevented normal operation.

Mooney M20K, Dinkins Enterprises Inc., N777UU: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 in Charleston, South Carolina

DINKINS ENTERPRISES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N777UU

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, STRUCK THE PROPELLER ON THE RUNWAY, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA.  

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 13:41:00Z
Regis#: N777UU
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20K
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CHARLESTON
State: South Carolina

Papa 51 Thunder Mustang, N352BT, registered to TM-1 Ltd and operated by the airline transport pilot: Fatal accident occurred May 01, 2018 and Incident occurred September 18, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada
Hartzell Propeller / Hartzell Engine Technologies; Montgomery, Alabama
51 Aero; Reno, Nevada 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N352BT


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Reno, NV
Accident Number: WPR18FA131
Date & Time: 05/01/2018, 1930 PDT
Registration: N352BT
Aircraft: AMERICAN AIR RACING LTD THUNDER MUSTANG
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On May 1, 2018, about 1930 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur-built, American Air Racing Thunder Mustang (Blue Thunder II), N352BT sustained substantial damage during a forced landing at Reno/Stead Airport, Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to TM-1 Ltd. and operated by the airline transport pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The pilot was fatally injured. The local flight departed Reno about 1815. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

The airplane was taking part in an in-flight photography mission with another Thunder Mustang, with the photographs being taken from a Beechcraft Bonanza. After about one hour of flight, which included multiple north-south passes north of the airport, the group agreed to end the mission and return to Reno.

As the airplane's approached within about 2 miles of the airport from the north, the accident pilot transmitted a "mayday" call over the common traffic advisory frequency. The pilot of the other Thunder Mustang replied, asking for a confirmation, and the pilot responded again with a mayday call adding that he intended to land on runway 14. The other pilot watched as the accident airplane began to descend towards the airport. He observed it overshoot the runway 14 centerline to the south, and then begin a sweeping 180° left turn followed by a right turn to rejoin the centerline. By this time the airplane was midfield and low over the runway, flying at what he judged to be a high speed. He could not tell if the airplane had touched down or was still floating, and as it approached the end of the runway, it veered off the right side and nosed over.

The airplane came to rest inverted in a gravel area about 20 ft right of the runway edge, and 80 ft short of the runways paved end. The runway surface exhibited a 1,200-ft-long series of intermittent black rubber transfer marks, and propeller blade gouges leading from the runway centerline to the airplane.

A runway construction crew, along with the other pilots from the photography mission, all arrived at the accident site within about 3 minutes, followed a few minutes later by the local fire department. They observed that the vertical stabilizer had folded right against the horizontal stabilizer, and that the canopy was shattered by ground impact. The pilot remained in his seat within the airplane and his helmet appeared to be impinged against the gravel surface. After multiple attempts to move and lift the airplane, he was extracted about 45 minutes later.

The airplane was equipped with a liquid-cooled, fuel injected, 12-cylinder engine manufactured by Ryan Falconer Racing Engines, and a three-blade constant-speed propeller manufactured by Hartzell Propellers. The engine's fuel pump, water pump, propeller governor, auxiliary alternator, and both the scavenge and pressure oil pumps, were driven by the engine crankshaft via pulleys and two parallel serpentine belts. Post-accident examination revealed that the water pump pulley had separated from the pump drive flange. The pulley mounting bolt heads had detached, leaving their threaded stud ends still in the flange. Both serpentine belts had also detached, along with the top of the engine coolant outlet hose, which was adjacent to the pulley (Photo 1). No other mechanical anomalies were noted, and the pump assembly was retained for further examination.


Photo 1: Water Pump Pulley Assembly 


Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: AMERICAN AIR RACING LTD
Registration: N352BT
Model/Series: THUNDER MUSTANG NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRTS, 5053 ft msl
Observation Time: 1435 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 320°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.91 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Reno, NV (RTS)
Destination: Reno, NV (RTS)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.661389, -119.867778

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





An investigation is underway after a pilot died in an overturned plane at the Reno-Stead Airport Tuesday night. 

The incident happened around 7:45 p.m. on the south end of one of the runways. 

The unidentified pilot was the only one in the plane.

"This was a very experienced pilot, someone well known in the aviation community. Definitely, someone who had the experience to take off and land very well," says Brian Kulpin with Reno-Tahoe Airport Authority.

Before he died, first responders tried to resuscitate the pilot on the runway after he crashed and the plane flipped over.   

Crews towed the plane to where they can examine it.

The tower doesn't operate outside of the air races. Pilots communicate with other pilots, so no word on any emergency communications as the pilot tried to land.  

Story and video ➤ http://www.ktvn.com

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aircraft, experimental American Air Racing Papa 51 Thunder Mustang, on landing sustained minor damage. 

Date: 18-SEP-16
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N352BT
Aircraft Model: P51
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: RENO
State: Nevada