Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Arnold AR-6, N616DH (and) 3M1C1R, N913FT: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N616DH

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11


http://registry.faa.gov/N913H

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: HOOVER DAVID ARNOLD AR 6, registration: N616DH
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: REBERRY BRIAN 3M1C1R, registration: N913FT
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 18, 2016, about 1118 Pacific daylight time, a tailwheel equipped experimental amateur built (EAB) Hoover Arnold AR-6, N616DH, struck a tailwheel equipped EAB Reberry 3M1C1R, N913FT, during takeoff roll on runway 8 at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the AR-6 was not injured and the airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the 3M1C1R, sustained minor injuries. The AR-6 was registered to the pilot and was operating as Race 11. The 3M1C1R was registered to Hot Stuff Air Racing LLC., Kissimmee, Florida, and was operated as Race 1. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight, which were originating at the time of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either airplane.

The pilot of Race 11 reported that he was positioned in the middle of the back row of the staggered start sequence for the Formula 1 Race. When the green flag dropped he initiated his takeoff roll and that as the tail of his airplane came up, he observed Race 1 stationary on the runway at his 12'oclock position. He swerved in an attempt to avoid the airplane, however, subsequently collided with Race 1.

The pilot of Race 1 reported that he was in the number four position (middle row, center) in the starting grid, which was the middle inside position with three aircraft ahead of him in the front row, one airplane to his right, and three airplanes behind his position. The pilot reported that about 20 seconds before the green flag dropped, the engine was not running correctly and he shut it down and signaled the starters to halt the start/takeoff process. Shortly after, Race 11 struck Race 1.

Postaccident examination of Race 1 revealed that the upper portion of the rudder and vertical stabilizer were separated. Multiple propeller slash marks were observed on the right wing, which was partially separated from the fuselage.

Examination of Race 11 revealed that the left wing was structurally damaged and the left main landing gear structure was compressed upward through the wing structure.

Glasair I, N70GG: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N70GG

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA184
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: OGG RICHARD A OGG GLASAIR I, registration: N70GG
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, about 1125 Pacific daylight time, an experimental amateur built Ogg Glasair I, N70GG, experienced an in-flight fire during a closed course air race flight at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airplane was registered to a private individual, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant of the airplane, was not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the flight, which originated from RTS about 10 minutes prior to the accident.

The pilot reported that during the air race the engine was operating normally until passing pylon number 5, when it suddenly lost power. The pilot stated that she pulled up, declared a mayday, and aimed for runway 14. The pilot landed uneventfully on runway 14, exited the airplane, and the emergency response personnel subsequently extinguished the fire.

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed that the forward part of the fuselage and inboard portion of the left wing sustained fire and structural damage.

American Champion 8KCAB Super Decathlon, Flying Blank LLC, N126WB: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 in Benton, Texas Township, Crawford County, Ohio

FLYING BLANK LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N126WB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD AND FLIPPED OVER, 1 MILE FROM BENTON, OHIO

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 21:49:00Z
Regis#: N126WB
Aircraft Make: CHAMPION
Aircraft Model: 8KCAB
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BENTON
State: Ohio



BUCYRUS, Ohio -- The La Crosse pilot, who performs his annual airshow during Riverfest, has survived a crash landing in an airplane. Again.

William Blank was the only one on board when he put his single-engine plane down in a farm field just before 6 p.m. Tuesday.

The 73 year old's plane flipped onto its top upon landing, but he was uninjured. The plane, however, suffered significant damage, because it nose-dived before coming to a stop after hitting uneven ground in the field.

Blank's 2005 American Champion Super Decathlon single-engine, fixed-wing aircraft was taken from the scene by an aircraft recovery service and the FAA was contacted.

The plane needed to be put down in Bucyrus, Ohio, after Blank left La Crosse because of apparent fuel problems.

The last time Blank crash-landed, he was a passenger.

Happened near Pickwick, Minn., in 2009. That plane had left La Crosse when it began having mechanical troubles. 

The plane crashed into a grove of trees on the edge of a field, but neither Blank nor the pilot was injured in the crash. 

Source:   http://www.1410wizm.com




A pilot from Wisconsin had an unexpected and bumpy ride through Crawford County Tuesday evening.

Troopers from the Bucyrus Highway Patrol Post are currently investigating a single engine, fixed-wing airplane crash. At approximately 5:49 p.m. the Bucyrus Post received a call of an aircraft on its top in a tilled field on Marion-Melmore Road between Benton Road and Brokensword Road.

Troopers determined that the pilot of the aircraft, William A. Blank, age 73 of La Crosse, Wisconsin, was travelling from Wisconsin to Mansfield Lahm Airport when the aircraft’s engine sustained a possible fuel starvation issue. The pilot attempted to restart the engine without success and was forced to make an off airport landing in a tilled field west of Marion-Melmore Road. The pilot was successful in the landing, however prior to the aircraft coming to a complete stop in the front of the aircraft nosedived due to striking an area of uneven terrain causing the aircraft to flip its top.

The pilot was secured in the cockpit by a five-point harness and did not sustain any injuries from the crash. The 2005 American Champion Super Decathlon single fixed wing aircraft sustained moderate damage to the propeller and wings. The FAA was contacted and the plane was removed from the scene by an aircraft recovery service.

The Highway Patrol was assisted on the scene by the Crawford County Sheriff’s Office and the Sycamore Fire and EMS.

Source:  http://crawfordcountynow.com

Mong Jerant Racer , N777FJ (and) Pitts S-1 Special, Van Nuys Acro, N767JW: Accident occurred September 18, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N777FJ 

VAN NUYS ACRO: http://registry.faa.gov/N767JW

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: HOOVER DAVID ARNOLD AR 6, registration: N616DH
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA185B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 18, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: REBERRY BRIAN 3M1C1R, registration: N913FT

Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 18, 2016, about 1118 Pacific daylight time, a tailwheel equipped experimental amateur built (EAB) Hoover Arnold AR-6, N616DH, struck a tailwheel equipped EAB Reberry 3M1C1R, N913FT, during takeoff roll on runway 8 at the Reno-Stead Airport (RTS), Reno, Nevada. The airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the AR-6 was not injured and the airline transport pilot, sole occupant of the 3M1C1R, sustained minor injuries. The AR-6 was registered to the pilot and was operating as Race 11. The 3M1C1R was registered to Hot Stuff Air Racing LLC., Kissimmee, Florida, and was operated as Race 1. Both airplanes were operated by the pilots under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an air race flight, which were originating at the time of the accident. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for either airplane.

The pilot of Race 11 reported that he was positioned in the middle of the back row of the staggered start sequence for the Formula 1 Race. When the green flag dropped he initiated his takeoff roll and that as the tail of his airplane came up, he observed Race 1 stationary on the runway at his 12'oclock position. He swerved in an attempt to avoid the airplane, however, subsequently collided with Race 1.

The pilot of Race 1 reported that he was in the number four position (middle row, center) in the starting grid, which was the middle inside position with three aircraft ahead of him in the front row, one airplane to his right, and three airplanes behind his position. The pilot reported that about 20 seconds before the green flag dropped, the engine was not running correctly and he shut it down and signaled the starters to halt the start/takeoff process. Shortly after, Race 11 struck Race 1.

Postaccident examination of Race 1 revealed that the upper portion of the rudder and vertical stabilizer were separated. Multiple propeller slash marks were observed on the right wing, which was partially separated from the fuselage.

Examination of Race 11 revealed that the left wing was structurally damaged and the left main landing gear structure was compressed upward through the wing structure.

Cirrus SR22: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 at Charleston Air Force Base/International Airport (KCHS), Charleston, South Carolina

Imagine Air Jet Services

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT, IMG107 SR22, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY IN THE OVERRUN AREA AND STRUCK APPROACH LIGHTS, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA. 


Date: 20-SEP-16

Time: 14:45:00Z
Regis#: IMG107
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Flight Number: IMG107
City: CHARLESTON
State: South Carolina

Aerotek Pitts S-1S Special, N91JW: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N91JW

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA500
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Reno, NV
Aircraft: AEROTEK PITTS SPECIAL, registration: N91JW
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot of the tailwheel-equipped biplane, during the landing roll the tailwheel became "stuck" in an expansion joint that runs down the centerline of the runway. She reported that when the tailwheel came unstuck, the biplane "swung wildly to the left", the bottom right wing struck the ground, and the airplane came to a stop on the runway after turning 180° to the left.

A video of the accident, taken by a camera mounted on the accident biplane and posted on social media revealed that the biplane touched down on the runway to the left of the centerline. During the landing roll, after crossing the taxiway A2 intersection, the biplane began drifting to the right. The tailwheel is seen crossing the centerline expansion joint about 30° to the joint, and rolls over the joint without hesitation. The tail is then seen swinging to the right at an increasing rate. The biplane ground looped to the left and the bottom right wing sustained substantial damage.


The pilot reported that there were no mechanical failures or anomalies that would have prevented normal operation.

Mooney M20K, Dinkins Enterprises Inc., N777UU: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 in Charleston, South Carolina

DINKINS ENTERPRISES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N777UU

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, STRUCK THE PROPELLER ON THE RUNWAY, CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA.  

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 13:41:00Z
Regis#: N777UU
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20K
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: CHARLESTON
State: South Carolina

Papa 51 Thunder Mustang, TM-1 LTD, N352BT: Incident occurred September 18, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Reno, Nevada

TM-1 LTD:   http://registry.faa.gov/N352BT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL AMERICAN AIR RACING PAPA 51 LTD THUNDER MUSTANG, ON LANDING SUSTAINED MINOR DAMAGE, RENO-STEAD AIRPORT, RENO, NEVADA. 

Date: 18-SEP-16
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N352BT
Aircraft Model: P51
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: RENO
State: Nevada

Piper PA-28-181 Archer II, Central Texas College, N8218Z: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 at Skylark Field Airport (KILE), Killeen, Bell County, Texas

CENTRAL TEXAS COLLEGE:   http://registry.faa.gov/N8218Z

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Antonio FSDO-17

AIRCRAFT LANDED SHORT OF THE RUNWAY AND THE GEAR COLLAPSED, KILLEEN, TEXAS.  

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 14:41:00Z
Regis#: N8218Z
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KILLEEN
State: Texas








A small, single-engine aircraft crashed at Killeen’s Skylark Field on Tuesday morning, according to a release from the Texas Department of Public Safety.

DPS helped to secure the scene until airport staff received permission from federal authorities to clear the scene in order to resume normal operations, according to the release.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the aircraft landed short of runway 19 at the field, and the left side landing gear collapsed.

The pilot is a student at Central Texas College’s flight school and was alone in the cockpit.

According to CTC spokesman Bruce Vasbinder, this is the first incident the school has had in 11 years. The last incident occurred when landing gear failed to come down due to a mechanical issue.

The extent of the damage to the aircraft is still unknown, FAA spokesman Lynn Lunsford said.

The National Transportation Safety Board said Tuesday that it was waiting on a report from the FAA with the extent of the damage to the aircraft before deciding whether to launch its own investigation.

The crash came just a day after equipment, trucks and personnel were removed from Killeen Fire Station No. 4, which is at Skylark Field. The move was made because the station was only used three times in the last 12 months. A truck and equipment were sent to Fire Station No. 3 about 2.4 miles away, because the station was no longer required to have firefighters on-site by the FAA.

The relocation impacted arrival time by a few minutes, according to Killeen spokeswoman Hilary Shine. An aircraft, fire and rescue truck staffed by a firefighter with prior experience came from Fire Station No. 3. There was no fire on the scene.

Source:  http://kdhnews.com

Piper PA-24, N5306P: Incident occurred September 19, 2016 in Reidsville, Tattnall County, Georgia

http://registry.faa.gov/N5306P

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Atlanta FSDO-11

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, REIDSVILLE, GEORGIA.

Date: 19-SEP-16
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N5306P
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA24
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: REIDSVILLE
State: Georgia

Delta Airlines, Airbus A319-100, N323NB: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 at Salt Lake City International Airport ( KSLC), Utah

DELTA AIR LINES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N323NB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

DELTA FLIGHT DAL1606 AIRBUS A319 AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE, ENGINE SUSTAINED A BIRDSTRIKE, NO INJURIES, DAMAGE TO ENGINE SUBSTANTIAL, RETURNED AND LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH. 

Date: 21-SEP-16
Time: 20:46:00Z
Regis#: DAL1606
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A319
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: DAL-Delta Air Lines
Flight Number: DAL1606
City: SALT LAKE CITY
State: Utah

Israel Aircraft Industries ASTRA SPX, Navient Solutions Inc., N188AK: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 in Wilmington, New Castle County, Delaware

NAVIENT SOLUTIONS INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N188AK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Philadelphia FSDO-17

AIRCRAFT ON TAXI, STRUCK A PERIMETER FENCE, WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 16:15:00Z
Regis#: N188AK
Aircraft Make: IAI
Aircraft Model: ASTRA SPX
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: WILMINGTON
State: Delaware

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N734AV: Accident occurred September 20, 2016 in Delta, Millard County, Utah

TUMBLEWEED LEASING CO INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N734AV

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Salt Lake City FSDO-07

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING SUSTAINED SUBSTANTIAL DAMAGE, DELTA, UTAH

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N734AV
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Accident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Substantial
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: DELTA
State: Utah

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N9216C: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 in Tucson, Pima County, Arizona

ARIZONA FLYERS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9216C

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07

AIRCRAFT, ON LANDING, GEAR COLLAPSED, TUCSON, ARIZONA.  

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 16:10:00Z
Regis#: N9216C
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: TUCSON
State: Arizona

Rans S-6-ES Coyote II, N471EA: Incident occurred September 20, 2016 in Kewaskum, Wisconsin

http://registry.faa.gov/N471EA

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A HIGHWAY, NEAR KEWASKUM, WISCONSIN.  

Date: 20-SEP-16
Time: 15:55:00Z
Regis#: N471EA
Aircraft Make: RANS
Aircraft Model: S6
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: None
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KEWASKUM
State: Wisconsin

Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron, Tropical Isle Resort Inc., N413D: Fatal occurred September 17, 2016 in Broadus, Montana

TROPICAL ISLE RESORT INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N413D 

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05


NTSB Identification: WPR16FA182 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Broadus, MT
Aircraft: BEECH 95 B55 (T42A), registration: N413D
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, about 1300 mountain daylight time, a twin-engine Beech (Baron) 95-B55 airplane, N413D, impacted terrain about 20 miles east of Broadus, Montana. The owner/Airline Transport Pilot operated the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. The pilot and two passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight departed from the Billings Logan International Airport (BIL), Billings, Montana, about noon, with an intended destination of Rapid City Regional Airport (RAP), Rapid City, South Dakota.

The airplane wreckage was found by a ranch caretaker as he was returning to work from lunch, about 1300. The caretaker reported hearing an airplane during lunch, but he did not go outside to look for it nor did he hear the airplane impact the ground.

A National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator, A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, and a representative from Textron Aviation, the airplane manufacturer, responded to the accident site. The airplane came to rest on a 143-degree magnetic heading on flat land. The main wreckage was confined to the impact area, with all major components identified at the accident site. The airplane's control surfaces remained attached; the left propeller had separated from the left engine and was located just forward of the main wreckage. The right propeller separated and was located underneath the right side cabin fuselage. The nose landing gear was retracted, and pushed up and aft into the cabin where it impacted the front carry through spar.

Both the left and right wing bladder fuel tanks had been breached; however, the smell of 100 low-lead fuel was evident. Both the left and right wings were canted forward, with both engines partially separated from their respective wings. The left propeller blades had light chord wise scratches. The right propeller blades had no chord wise striations.

The airplane was recovered and is in a secured storage facility.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by emaileyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Investigators say the plane the Brown family was in was a twin engine Beechcraft Baron.

The Director of Aviation at Northwestern Michigan College says this type of plane is typically flown for private use or small charters.


It can carry up to six people.


He says it can be a complex aircraft, meant for a more experienced pilot.


“This is not a large aircraft. These are small aircraft. Slightly larger than what we would even train in here at NMC, but pretty common airplane,” says Alex Bloye, Director of Aviation at Northwestern Michigan College. “It's a pretty popular aircraft. It's known for its reliability and just being able to take people from point A to point B.”


The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.


Visitation for the Brown family will take place Monday, September 26 from 4-6pm.


This will be held at the Holy Childhood of Jesus Catholic Church in Harbor Springs.


The funeral is the next day, also at the Holy Childhood of Jesus Catholic Church in Harbor Springs.


Story and video:   http://www.9and10news.com 


Agusta A109S Grand, N91NM, North Memorial Health Care: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 near Chandler Field Airport (KAXN), Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota

EDITORIAL: Don't take emergency care for granted

Three people are in critical condition after this North Memorial Care helicopter crashed into the trees at 1438 Lakeside Drive on the east side of Lake Winona in Alexandria early Saturday morning.
• • •



It's so easy to take for granted all those who respond to emergency situations.

Ambulance crews are like electricity. They're expected to be there, no matter the time of day or night, no matter the conditions. Instead of flipping a switch, those who urgently need medical care call 911. Within seconds, help is on the way.

It happened again on a foggy Saturday morning about 2 a.m.

North Memorial Health Care responded to a call to transport a patient from the Douglas County Hospital to another medical facility to receive specialized care.

This time, however, something went wrong.

The helicopter crashed along Lake Winona, north of the Alexandria Municipal Airport.

The pilot, a flight nurse and a flight paramedic survived the crash and as of Monday, remained hospitalized at North Memorial Hospital in the Twin Cities. No patients were on board.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

The incident should invoke a jolt of appreciation from everyone in the community about how much we depend on ambulance crews and how we expect them to be there 24/7. It should open people's eyes to the fact that anytime ambulance personnel — in the air or on the ground — respond to an emergency situation, those involved put their lives on the line. Every time they go out on a call, they face risks — mechanical breakdowns, bad drivers on the road, less-than-ideal conditions and unexpected twists that can put their lives in peril.

The risk is real. There were seven air ambulance accidents across the U.S. in 2011 to 2013, which resulted in 19 fatalities, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. In 2010, the Wall Street Journal listed air ambulance at the most dangerous job in America. Thankfully, FAA initiatives and technological advancements are making headway in reducing the risks.

The incident also shines light on the task of rescuing the rescuers. Those who responded to the crash scene did an excellent job in helping the helicopter crew get the medical care they needed.

When the Douglas County Hospital was notified of the crash, it immediately activated its emergency response plan, calling in staff to assist in the response.

Carl Vaagenes, the hospital's CEO, said he was extremely proud of the response and performance from hospital staff and physicians who were working, and everyone who responded to the emergency. This included Douglas County Sheriff's dispatchers and deputies, Alexandria Police Department, Alexandria Fire Department, Valley Med Flight and Life Link.

In a statement, North Memorial also expressed its gratitude: "We would like to thank our fellow health care colleagues and first responders for their amazing response. ... We would also like to thank all of the health care professionals, EMS agencies, police agencies and fire departments for the support we have received from across the nation."

The community, in return, should also be thankful of all those who put their lives on the line to help save the lives of others.

Source:    http://www.echopress.com/opinion/editorial

Agusta A109S Grand, N91NM, North Memorial Health Care: Accident occurred September 17, 2016 near Chandler Field Airport (KAXN), Alexandria, Douglas County, Minnesota 


NORTH MEMORIAL HEALTH CARE: http://registry.faa.gov/N91NM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Minneapolis FSDO-15

NTSB Identification: CEN16FA372
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, September 17, 2016 in Alexandria, MN
Aircraft: AGUSTA A109, registration: N91NM
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 17, 2016, at 0207 central daylight time, an Agusta S.p.A A109S helicopter, N91NM, impacted trees and terrain near Chandler Field Airport (AXN), Alexandria, Minnesota. The commercial rated pilot and two crew members sustained serious injuries and the helicopter was destroyed. The helicopter was registered to North Memorial Health Care, Brooklyn Center, Minnesota, and operated by North Memorial Medical Center under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a positioning flight. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site and an instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan had been filed. The helicopter departed Brainerd Lakes Regional Airport (BRD), Brainerd, Minnesota about 0135 and was destined for the Douglas County Hospital helipad, Alexandria, Minnesota. 

The pilot stated that he received a call for a flight request about 0100, accepted the flight, and then filed an IFR flight plan to AXN. He was in radio contact with air traffic control (ATC), but radar contact was lost about half way through the flight. About 20 miles from AXN he noticed clouds quickly forming underneath the helicopter. The pilot was cleared for and attempted the RNAV GPS 22 approach to AXN as clouds were still forming beneath the helicopter. The pilot initiated a missed approach by utilizing the "go around" function of the helicopters autopilot. During the missed approach, the helicopter made an uncommanded left bank followed by a right bank. The pilot attempted to counteract the bank by applying opposite cyclic control. 

The helicopter impacted several tall trees and then the ground and continued into a wooded area. Several nearby residents were awake at the time of the accident and heard the helicopters engines and then the sound of the impact. Two other witnesses were outside of their homes east of the airport and observed the helicopter flying overhead prior to the accident. 

At 0201, the AXN weather observation recorded wind from 290 degrees at 10 knots, 9 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 400 ft, broken clouds at 3,600 ft, temperature 57 degrees F, dew point 57 degrees F, and altimeter setting 29.87 inches of mercury. 

At 0209, the AXN weather observation recorded wind from 290 degrees at 12 knots, 4 miles visibility, mist, broken clouds at 300 ft, temperature 57 degrees F, dew point 57 degrees F, and altimeter setting 29.87 inches of mercury. 

The helicopter has been retained for further examination.