Sunday, April 27, 2014

McDonnell Douglas 600N, N606BP: Accident occurred April 27, 2014 at Adelanto Airport (52CL), San Bernardino County, California

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California 
MD Helicopters Inc.; Mesa, Arizona
Rolls-Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items -   National Transportation Safety Board: 

https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N606BP



Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

NTSB Identification: WPR14LA173
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 27, 2014 in Adelanto, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/13/2017
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELICOPTER 600N, registration: N606BP
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The purpose of the flight was for the airline transport pilot (ATP) to evaluate and check out the commercial pilot in the helicopter. The commercial pilot reported that he was acting as pilot-in-command and at the controls. A witness reported that, as the helicopter lifted off, it initially tilted left. He added that he saw the commercial pilot increase pitch on the collective and that the helicopter then yawed right 90 degrees and tilted nose down. It left the ramp to the north of the property and then the whole fuselage continued banking left almost 90 degrees and spun nose right. The helicopter spun about three revolutions until it sounded like the engine power was reduced to flight idle. Once the power was reduced, the helicopter’s nose dropped, and the main rotor blade contacted a fence pole, which caused it to suddenly stop and the helicopter to land hard, during which the right skid collapsed. 

The witness reported that he had flown the helicopter for 25 minutes before the accident and completed one takeoff and one landing. He stated that all of the controls responded as commanded during his flight. No evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures were found during the examination of the recovered airframe and engine.

It is likely that the commercial pilot made improper control inputs and subsequently lost helicopter control immediately after liftoff. It could not be determined whether the ATP made corrective actions in an attempt to regain control because he was seriously injured and unable to make a statement.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The commercial pilot’s improper control inputs, which resulted in a loss of helicopter control during takeoff.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 27, 2014, about 1251 Pacific daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas Helicopters (MDHI) MD600N, N606BP, collided with terrain at Adelanto, California. Classic Rotors Museum was operating the helicopter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot (ATP) in the right seat sustained serious injuries, the commercial rated pilot in the left seat and one passenger in a rear seat sustained minor injuries. The helicopter sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The cross-country personal flight was departing when the accident occurred with a planned destination of Ramona, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

Due to the nature of injuries to the ATP, he was unable to provide a statement as to the circumstances of the accident.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector interviewed the commercial pilot shortly after the accident. The pilot stated that he was getting evaluated in order to be able to fly the helicopter for the museum and at the controls during the accident as pilot-in-command (PIC). Prior to the checkout, he informed the ATP that he had 10,000 hours of flight time, primarily working off fishing boats in Guam. The commercial pilot could not provide the inspector with records that validated the flight time, or that he was a current, active pilot. The last medical dated December 15, 1993, indicated a total flight time of 3,300 hours. Attempts to locate and contact the commercial pilot for more information related to the circumstances of the accident were unsuccessful.

A witness reported that he had flown the helicopter with the ATP for 25 minutes prior to the accident flight, and completed one takeoff and one landing. He stated that all controls responded as commanded during his flight. The commercial pilot and a passenger then boarded for the next flight. The winds were from the west, and the helicopter was on a heading of 250 degrees. When it lifted off the ground, it initially tilted to the left looking like it was going to dynamically roll over. He saw the commercial pilot increase pitch on the collective; the helicopter yawed to the right 90 degrees, and tilted nose down. It left the ramp to the north of the property; the whole fuselage continued to have a left bank angle of almost 90 degrees, and it spun nose right. The helicopter spun approximately three revolutions until it sounded like the power to the engine was reduced to flight idle. Once the power was reduced to flight idle, the nose of the helicopter went down, the main rotor blade came in contact with a fence pole causing sudden stoppage, and a hard landing collapsed the right gear. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge, an FAA inspector, and investigators from MD Helicopters and Rolls-Royce examined the recovered airframe and engine on May 28, 2014, at the facilities of Flight Trail Helicopters, Mesa, Arizona. 

Control continuity for the collective, cyclic, pedals and throttle were established. There was crush damage to the airframe with more damage on the right side than the left side.

Continuity of the drive train was established from the rotor hub through the transmission out to the NOTAR fan. The NOTAR gearbox chip detector was clean. The NOTAR rotated freely by hand.

The throttle moved freely from stop to stop, and followed movement of the throttle control in the cockpit.

The engine was left installed in the helicopter, and the engine was securely mounted. All external lines and connections were secure when checked by hand. 

The compressor impeller displayed some leading edge foreign object damage (FOD), but it could not be determined if the FOD damage occurred prior to or during the event sequence.

The fourth stage turbine wheel turned freely. The rotor head rotated when turned one direction; it did not rotate when the wheel was turned the opposite direction. The first stage turbine blades were examined with a lighted videoscope. The wheel turned freely, and there was no evidence of damage on the blades. 

The oil level for the engine was above the line. The oil was drained and the oil filter was clean.

The upper and lower magnetic chip detectors were clean.

The oil scavenge filter was clean. 

Fuel was drained from the airframe low pressure fuel filter; it appeared clear. 

N1 turned freely and was continuous from the compressor to the starter generator. 

The fuel nozzle was normal in appearance.


No evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction was noted during the examination. A detailed report is in the public docket for this accident.

NTSB Identification: WPR14LA173 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 27, 2014 in Adelanto, CA
Aircraft: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS HELICOPTER 600N, registration: N606BP
Injuries: 1 Serious,2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 27, 2014, about 1251 Pacific daylight time, a McDonnell Douglas Helicopter (MDHI) MD600N, N606BP, collided with terrain at Adelanto, California. Classic Rotors Museum was operating the helicopter under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The airline transport pilot sustained serious injuries; the commercial rated second pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The helicopter sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The cross-country personal flight was departing when the accident occurred with a planned destination of Ramona, California. Visual (VMC) meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed.

A witness reported that winds were from the west, and the helicopter was on a heading of 250 degrees. When it lifted off the ground, it initially tilted to the left looking like it was going to dynamically roll over. He saw the co-pilot increase pitch on the collective; the helicopter yawed to the right 90 degrees and tilted nose down. It left the ramp to the north of the property; the whole fuselage continued to have a left bank angle of almost 90 degrees, and it spun nose right. The helicopter spun approximately three revolutions until it sounded like the pilot got rid of the power bringing the engine to flight idle. Once the crew cut power to flight idle, the nose of the helicopter went down, the main rotor blade came in contact with a fence pole causing sudden stoppage, and a hard landing collapsed the right gear. Personnel on the ground assisted the crew getting out of helicopter. The pilot was unconscious inside of the helicopter, and one of the ground personnel assisted the pilot by supporting him. The witness called for emergency services, and the pilot was airlifted to a hospital.


ADELANTO • A pilot of a civilian helicopter suffered “significant” injuries Sunday after the aircraft carrying three people crashed to the ground shortly after take-off from Adelanto Airport, officials said. 

 The incident was reported at 12:51 p.m. off Poppy Road.

A McDonnell Douglas helicopter with two pilots and a passenger had just become airborne when it “began to rotate clockwise, then suddenly lost its hover and crashed,” San Bernardino County Fire Department spokesman Capt. Mark Murphy said in a written statement. “The impact collapsed the aircraft’s landing skids, causing it to then roll onto its right side.”

The pilot — only described as being in their 60s — was flown for treatment to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in Colton by a California Highway Patrol air unit.

The aircraft’s passenger and other pilot sustained minor injuries and were able to exit the helicopter on their own after the impact, Murphy said in the statement.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the aircraft is registered to Ramona-based Classic Rotors Museum, which keeps a presence in Adelanto, previous reports show.

The incident was under investigation Sunday by the National Transportation Safety Board and the county Sheriff’s Department in conjunction with the FAA.


Story, photo gallery, video and comments/reaction:   http://www.vvdailypress.com

ADELANTO >> A helicopter pilot was injured when the rotorcraft he was flying crashed just after takeoff near the Adelanto Airport on Sunday afternoon, authorities said.

The pilot had “significant injuries” and was airlifted to Arrowhead Regional Medical Center in Colton by a California Highway Patrol helicopter, according to a San Bernardino County Fire Department news release.

Just after takeoff, about 1 p.m., the helicopter, carrying two pilots and one passenger, began to spin clockwise, crashed to the ground and rolled over onto its right side, according to the release.

The other pilot and passenger sustained minor injuries, the Fire Department said.

The National Transportation Safety Board, the Federal Aviation Administration and the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department are investigating the crash, the Fire Department said.





Cessna 210E, N4962U and Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20, N20SF: Accident occurred April 27, 2014 in Port Richmond, California

Cessna 210E,  N4962U,  SANDERS AIRCRAFT INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4962U

Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20,   N20SF,  SANDERS AIRCRAFT INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N20SF

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA174A 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 27, 2014 in Port Richmond, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 210E, registration: N4962U
Injuries: 1 Fatal,2 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA174B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 27, 2014 in Richmond, CA
Aircraft: HAWKER SEA FURY TMK 20, registration: N20SF
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 27, 2014, about 1606 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 210E, N4962U, and a Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20, N20SF, collided in flight near Richmond, California. Sanders Aircraft, Inc., was operating both airplanes under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot in the Cessna sustained fatal injuries; the commercial pilot and one passenger in the Sea Fury were not injured. The Cessna was destroyed during the accident sequence, and the Sea Fury sustained substantial damage to the empennage. Both cross-country personal flights departed Half Moon Bay, California; the Sea Fury departed about 1530, and the Cessna departed about 1538. Both airplanes were en route to Eagle's Nest Airport, Ione, California. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans had been filed.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) interviewed the Sea Fury pilot, and the operator submitted a Pilot/Operator accident report, NTSB form 6120.1. The Sea Fury pilot and the Cessna pilot had flown their airplanes to Half Moon Bay to display them at an open house for the airport. The two pilots briefed the flight home, and determined their route of flight. The Sea Fury departed, flew overhead the airport, and rendezvoused with a Beechcraft A36 Bonanza for a photo shoot over the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California. They flew several 360 degree patterns over the bridge, and the pilot observed the Cessna during one of his turns, and noted that it was on the briefed course. He completed the photo work, and set his course for the return to Ione.

The Sea Fury pilot made radio contact with the Cessna pilot on a common, previously briefed frequency, and the Cessna pilot responded with his position. The Sea Fury pilot made visual contact with the Cessna, which was forward and to the left of his position, and the Cessna pilot responded that he had visual contact of the Sea Fury. The operator reported that the Cessna's airspeed was approximately 150 knots, and the airplane was under 3,000 feet msl. The Sea Fury's airspeed was approximately 200 knots, and the airplane was under 3,000 feet msl. The Sea Fury pilot stated that he would pass the Cessna low and to the left. 

Approaching from well behind, the Sea Fury pilot advised the Cessna pilot that the Sea Fury was low and to the left. The Cessna pilot acknowledged visual contact again, and broadcasted that he wanted to take a picture. The Sea Fury pilot replied that there would probably not be time due to the speed differential. The Sea Fury pilot observed the trajectory and flight profile of the Cessna abruptly change to a left roll so that he could see the top of the Cessna's wing. The Sea Fury pilot attempted to evade by pitching his airplane nose down; however, he felt and heard a thump, and realized that the two airplanes had collided. He pulled up and looked over his shoulder; he observed the Cessna inverted and going down. He squawked code 7700 on the transponder, and due to communications issues, reported the mid-air and position of the Cessna to air traffic control via relay by another aircraft.

The Sea Fury pilot concentrated on flying his airplane. He initiated a climb, and conducted a controllability check; he determined that he could control the airplane in the current configuration. He wanted to avoid populated areas, so he continued toward his home airport. He contacted company personnel, who decided to fly another company airplane to meet him, and examine the Sea Fury's condition. The Sea Fury pilot lowered the landing gear, and did a controllability check, which included turns. He lowered the flaps, and repeated the testing. He reduced airspeed to a landing compatible speed of 130 mph, and checked controllability again; he determined that he had adequate control to land. He had to abort the first landing attempt at his home airport due to emergency equipment on the runway; he made a full stop landing on runway 19 on the second attempt.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Cessna 210 Pilot

The operator reported that the 33-year-old pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot held a third-class medical certificate that was issued on February 28, 2012, with no limitations or waivers. The pilot also had an airframe and powerplant mechanic's certificate.

The operator reported that the pilot had a total flight time of 285 hours. He logged 6 hours in the last 90 days, and 2 in the previous 30 days. He had an estimated 37 hours in this make and model. He completed a flight review on July 26, 2012.

Sea Fury Pilot

The 52-year-old pilot reported that he held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. He held a second-class medical certificate issued on April 16, 2014, with the limitation that he must have reading glasses. He had an airframe and powerplant mechanic's certificate.

The operator reported a total flight experience of 5,646 hours, and a total of 143 flight hours in the accident airplane make and model. He completed a flight review on October 1, 2012.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

Cessna 210E

The airplane had a high wing with a single-engine; it was serial number 21058662. The operator reported that the airplane had a total airframe time of 6,384 hours at the most recent annual inspection dated September 10, 2013.

The engine was a Continental Motors Inc. (CMI) IO-520A, serial number 112377R. The operator reported that the time since major overhaul was 468 hours.

Sea Fury

The airplane had a low wing with a single engine; it was serial number ES9505. The operator reported that the airplane had a total airframe time of 6,378 hours at the most recent annual inspection dated August 1, 2013.

The engine was a Pratt &Whitney R4360, serial number PS15867A. The operator reported that the time since major overhaul was 85.2 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

An aviation routine weather report (METAR) for Oakland (KOAK), California, (elevation 9 feet, 11 nautical miles (nm) southeast of the accident site) was issued at 1553 PDT. It stated: wind from 260 degrees at 15 knots; visibility 10 miles; few clouds at 1,700 feet; temperature 17/63 degrees C/F; dew point 8/46 degrees C/F; altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Detailed reports on follow-up examinations of both airplanes are part of the public docket for this accident, and can be accessed by the Accident Docket link on the ntsb.gov home page.

Cessna 210

The Cessna 210 came to rest in about 10 feet of water in San Pablo Bay near Richmond, and the wreckage was retrieved on April 30. The recovered wreckage consisted of the fuselage and the engine. Neither wing was recovered. The propeller separated from the crankshaft, and was not located.

Sea Fury

The Sea Fury landed at its home base.

The Sea Fury was silver with dark blue and red accents. The Cessna had blue wingtips; it also had blue paint on the leading edge of both wings, on top of the cowling, and along the sides of the fuselage.

The IIC and an inspector from the Federal Aviation Administration examined the Sea Fury. The top remaining portion of the vertical stabilizer was crushed aft and down with blue paint transfer marks on the aft portion of the remaining metal. The operator reported that the missing vertical stabilizer section was about 12 inches long. The rudder had crush damage. The right elevator separated outboard of the middle hinge; about 2 feet of the elevator was missing. About 3 feet of the outboard section of the right horizontal stabilizer was missing. The outboard fracture surface was jagged and angular, and the upper surface had crushed inboard in an accordion fashion. Investigators observed blue paint transfer marks and scratches on the upper skin surface and within the folds of the metal. The scratches were a few degrees (outboard to inboard) from alignment with the longitudinal axis of the airframe.

The bottom of the right horizontal stabilizer had two slash cuts that were similar in shape to a propeller blade; the cuts were almost perpendicular to the chord line. The marks were10 inches apart from trailing edge to trailing edge, and 4 inches wide near their end point (tip). The metal was pushed up into the horizontal stabilizer cavity, and had black paint transfer on the metal surfaces. The forward cut was through both the bottom and top skins, and the edges of the cut in the top skin were curled up.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was conducted by Contra Costa County Office of the Sheriff- Coroner. The cause of death was reported as multiple blunt force injuries.

Toxicological tests on specimens recovered from the Cessna 210 pilot were performed by the FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute Forensic Toxicology Research Team. Analysis of the specimens for the pilot contained no findings for volatiles or tested drugs. They did not perform tests for carbon monoxide or cyanide.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Investigators examined the recovered wreckage of the Cessna 210 at Plain Parts, Sacramento, California, on May 6, 2014. A full report is contained within the public docket for this accident, and is accessible via the Accident Docket link on the ntsb.gov home page. 

Airframe

Only the inboard portion of the left wing spar was recovered, and continuity could not be established for the ailerons. Continuity was established for the elevators and rudder.

The airframe manufacturer's investigator determined that the landing gear was in the up position. The flap actuator was not recovered; the indicator was full down, but the handle was in a neutral position. The investigator determined that the elevator trim was in the neutral position.

Engine

The engine separated during the accident sequence. The front and left side of the engine sustained the most damage; cylinder number six's front fins were crushed aft, the exhaust valve spring was missing, the exhaust valve was bent aft, and the associated portion of the rocker shaft was missing. The fracture surface on the remaining portion of rocker shaft was jagged and angular. The intake push rod for cylinder number five was severely bent.

The crankshaft was manually rotated with a drive bar on the propeller mounting bolts. The crankshaft rotated with some resistance; and the valves for cylinders one, two, three, and four moved approximately the same amount of lift. The gears in the accessory case turned freely. Thumb compression was obtained on cylinders one, two, three, and four.

The spark plug electrodes corresponded to normal operation according to the Champion Aviation Check-A-Plug AV-27 Chart. Several plugs were caked with mud. 

A borescope inspection revealed no mechanical deformation on the valves, cylinder walls, or internal cylinder head.

The propeller flange was bent adjacent to the serial number, and the crankshaft cracked aft of the flange on the opposite side.

The engine driven fuel pump drive gear was undamaged, and the pump rotated freely. The gascolator screen was clean; there was some contamination in the bowl, and white, bubbly discoloration was evident. The metering unit of the throttle body was not recovered. The throttle body screen was clean. The mixture shaft rotated freely from stop to stop; the throttle shaft rotated freely.

The oil pump had light scoring on the internal walls; no deformation was observed on the gears.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Cessna 210 GPS Data Extraction

A Garmin GPSMAP 496 battery powered portable unit was recovered from the wreckage. The unit sustained crush and water damage, but the NTSB Recorders Laboratory used forensic equipment to successfully extract data from the nonvolatile memory chip. A complete report is part of the public docket for this accident. The IIC converted all times to PDT. The Garmin GPSMAP 496 was WAAS enabled, which can increase the accuracy of the GPS data by using ground stations to correct the signal; however, the recorded data lacked information regarding satellite signal quality and ground station utilization, therefore the accuracy of the data could not be validated.

The accident event was identified from the recording date and with the airplane on the ground at Half Moon Bay at a starting time of 1538:34. The last couple of minutes of data points indicated a northeasterly track at GPS derived groundspeeds around 150 knots. At 1558:14, the airplane began to descend with varied groundspeeds, and the final data point at 1558:22 was 212 knots at 854 feet.

Radar Track

A review of recorded data was completed, and plotted on a Google Earth map display. The radar data and plots of two tracks with a secondary beacon code of 1200 (visual flight rules) are in the public docket for this accident. The target for one track switched to code 7700.

All altitudes are the transponder mode C reported altitudes. FAA Advisory Circular AC 43-6C discusses altitude reporting equipment and transponder system maintenance and inspection practices. Paragraph 9.c. (2) states that an altimeter should display an altitude within 20 feet of a calibrated reference altimeter set to 29.92 inches of mercury. Paragraph 9.d states that the altitude reporting equipment associated with a radar beacon transponder should transmit data within 125 feet of the indicated datum of the altimeter normally used to maintain flight altitude.

At 1556:39, a target (arbitrarily identified in this report as target 1) was in the middle of San Raphael Bay and left of Red Rock Island at 1,800 feet; it maintained 1,800 feet until 1557.21. The target maintained 1,900 feet from 1557:25 until 1558:02. Another target (arbitrarily identified in this report as target 2) was south of Red Rock Island, and heading to the right side of San Raphael Bay at 1,500 feet. At 1557:11, target 2 was to the right side of San Raphael Bay and right of Red Rock Island at 1,300 feet.

At 1557:39, target 2 was maintaining 1,300 feet, and approaching the path of target 1. Target 2 appeared to cross the path of target 1 at 1557:44 at 1,300 feet and south of The Brothers Island off Point San Pablo. It appeared to be left of target 1's path at 1557:48 at 1,400 feet.

The targets began to merge; at 1557:53, there were targets at 1,900 and 1,400 feet. At 1557:58, there were targets at 1,900 and 1,500 feet. A target at 1558:02 was at 1,900 feet; a target at 1558:07 was at 1,700 feet; and a target at 1558:11 was at 1,800 feet. A target at 1558:16 was at 2,000 feet, this target appeared to descend to 1,800 feet as it continued northeast bound, and changed to a secondary beacon code of 7700.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 27, 2014, about 1606 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 210E, N4962U, and a Hawker Sea Fury, N20SF, collided in flight near Port Richmond, California. Sanders Aircraft, Inc., was operating both airplanes under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The private pilot in the Cessna sustained fatal injuries; the commercial pilot and one passenger in the Sea Fury were not injured. The Cessna was destroyed during the accident sequence, and the Sea Fury sustained substantial damage to the empennage. Both cross-country personal flights departed Half Moon Bay, California; the Sea Fury departed about 1530 and the Cessna departed at an unknown time. Both airplanes were en route to Eagle's Nest Airport, Ione, California. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed, and no flight plans had been filed.

The National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC) interviewed the Sea Fury pilot. The Sea Fury pilot stated the he and the Cessna pilot had flown their airplanes to Half Moon Bay to display them at an open house for the airport.

The pilot reported that after departure, he flew over the airport, and rendezvoused with a Beechcraft A36 Bonanza for a photo shoot over the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, California. They flew several 360-degree patterns over the bridge, completed their photo work, and he set his course for the return to Ione.

While en route the Sea Fury pilot broadcast on a common frequency, and the Cessna pilot responded with his position. The Sea Fury pilot made visual contact with the Cessna, which was ahead and to his left. He broadcast to the Cessna pilot that he would pass low and to the left. The Cessna pilot responded that it would be a good picture. The Sea Fury pilot replied that probably not due to the speed differential; the Sea Fury airspeed was about 200 miles per hour. The Sea Fury pilot proceeded on a path that he thought would allow adequate separation; however, as he was passing the Cessna, he felt and heard a thump and he realized that the two airplanes had collided. He pulled up and looked over his shoulder and he observed the Cessna inverted and going down.

The Sea Fury pilot stated that he concentrated on flying his airplane, and initiated a climb, and conducted a controllability check to determine that he could control the airplane in the current configuration. He wanted to avoid populated areas, so he continued toward his home airport. While en route he contacted company personnel, who decided to fly another company airplane to meet and examine the Sea Fury's condition. The Sea Fury pilot lowered the landing gear, and did a controllability check to include turns. He lowered the flaps, and repeated the testing. He reduced airspeed to a landing compatible speed of 130 mph, and checked controllability again. Determining that he had adequate control to land, he made a full stop landing at his home airport.

The Sea Fury is silver in color and the Cessna has blue wingtips with blue paint on the leading edge of both wings, on top of the cowling, and along the sides of the fuselage.

During the postaccident examination of the Sea Fury it was noted that the top remaining portion of the vertical stabilizer was crushed aft and down with blue paint transfer marks on the aft portion of the remaining metal. The operator reported that the missing vertical stabilizer section was about 12 inches long. The rudder had crush damage. The right elevator separated outboard of the middle hinge and about 3 feet of the elevator was missing. About 3 feet of the outboard section of the right horizontal stabilizer was missing. The outboard fracture surface was jagged and angular, and the upper surface had crushed inboard in an accordion fashion. Blue paint transfer marks and scratches were observed on the upper surface and within the folds of the metal.

The Cessna descended into San Pablo Bay, and the wreckage was retrieved on April 30. The recovered wreckage consisted of the fuselage and the engine. The left wing was not located. The propeller separated from the crankshaft, and was not located.

 
N4962U CESSNA 210E AIRCRAFT AND N20SF SEA FURY TMK 20 AIRCRAFT COLLIDED IN MIDAIR NEAR THE RICHMOND-SAN RAFAEL BRIDGE, N4962U CRASHED INTO THE BAY AND N20SF LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT AT EAGLES NEST AIRPORT, IONE, CA. THE ONE PERSON ON BOARD N4962U IS PRESUMED FATALLY INJURED, SAN PABLO, CA






 

David Everett Plumb Identified as Pilot Killed in Plane Crash Over San Pablo Bay 

The Contra Costa County Coroner says the pilot who was killed Sunday after colliding with another pilot was 33-year-old David Everett Plumb, a Rocklin resident.

According to press reports, Plumb's body was recovered on Wednesday after Coast Guard boats and helicopters scoured the waters for more than 48 hours looking for the missing plane.

Plumb's Cessna 210 crashed into the water after it collided midair with a vintage Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20. Reports indicate the pilot in the Sea Fury had pulled up to the left side of Plumb's plane, but it's unclear what happened next.

The Sea Fury's pilot saw Plumb's plane go down; he then flew about 100 miles to land his own plane.

The San Francisco Police Department spotted the fuselage of the Cessna 210 about 4 p.m. Tuesday under 13 feet of water, a little more than a mile from the Richmond shoreline.

An autopsy is scheduled for Plumb today (Thursday, May 1st). 



CoCo Sheriff PIO
Recovery of the  Cessna 210E. 
Salvage crew is at work now on fuselage recovery. 



One of the planes involved in a weekend collision in San Pablo Bay is a fixture at the National Championship Air Races.

The Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20 named "Dreadnought" regularly competes in the upper echelon, or Gold Class, of the Unlimited Division, including a win in the Unlimited Gold race in 1983.

It collided with a 1965 Cessna 210 on Sunday. The Cessna crashed into the bay and its wreckage was found on Monday, according to Jimmy Lee, spokesman for the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Department.

Lee told the Contra Costa Times newspaper on Monday that the pilot of the Cessna, who has not been identified, is presumed dead.

Dreadnought was able to continue flying and landed safely at the airport in Ione, Calif., about 40 minutes east of the crash site. The plane is owned by Sanders Aeronautics in Ione. Brothers Brian and Dennis Sanders own the plane. They also own Argonaut, another Hawker Sea Fury that is a regular at the air races.

The Cessna and Dreadnought were traveling together from the Pacific Coast Dream Machines show in Half Moon Bay, Calif., which is south of San Francisco.

Reno Air Races spokesman Mike Draper said he did not know the extent of damage to Dreadnought nor whether it would affect whether the plane will be in Reno in September for the 51st National Championship Air Races.

A person who answered the phone at Sanders Aeronautics in Ione, Calif., declined to comment on the damage to Dreadnought.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the accident, while the Contra Costa Sheriff's Department is spearheading the recovery effort of the Cessna.



 Coast Guard suspends search for downed aircraft near San Pablo Bay 

ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Coast Guard suspended its active search at 12 p.m. Monday for a pilot aboard a small aircraft that collided with another plane in mid-air above the San Pablo Bay in Richmond, Calif., Sunday.

"Our deepest sympathy goes out to the family of the missing person, the Coast Guard suspends a search and rescue case with extremely great care and deliberation, “ said Capt. Mike Day, Coast Guard Sector San Francisco deputy commander. “After a search area is saturated several times with a maximum number of assets, resources and crew effort, and persons in distress are still not located, a decision is made to suspend a case. “

At approximately 4 p.m. Sunday, Coast Guard Sector San Francisco command center received a call about a mid-air collision between a small Cessna plane and WWII-era aircraft. The Coast Guard immediately launched four rescue boat crews and one rescue helicopter crew and established a temporary safety zone in the water while the Federal Aviation Administration established a temporary flight-restriction zone in the air. The Coast Guard Cutter Pike searched through the night and was rejoined early Monday morning by a helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco.

After searching for approximately 20 hours, the Coast Guard has suspended search and rescue operations until new evidence is presented.

The Coast Guard and assisting agencies have searched approximately 40 square miles.

Searching were crews from:

Coast Guard Air Station San Francisco

Coast Guard Station Vallejo

Coast Guard Station Golden Gate

Coast Guard Station San Francisco

Coast Guard Cutter Pike

Contra Costa County

Oakland Police Department

Marin Sheriff's Department

San Rafael Police Patrol Boat

California Highway Patrol Aircraft

Sonoma Helicopter

For any questions regarding the recovery of the plane, contact Jimmy Lee, Contra Costa County Office of the Sheriff, (925) 313-2643 or jlee@so.cccounty.us.

See more at: http://www.uscgnews.com





 

Pilot believed to be inside plane's wreckage

RICHMOND, Calif. — 

Now that the wreckage of a mid-air plane crash has been located in San Pablo Bay, attention has turned to the recovery operation.

Monday evening, plans were being made to bring in divers to secure the debris. From there, a barge with a crane will hoist the single engine Cessna from about fifteen feet of water, northeast of the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge.

Allowing for some movement from water currents, that's not far from where witnesses saw it nose-dive Sunday afternoon.

"When that plane hits the water at that speed, it hits like concrete," Eric Johnson told KTVU, looking out at the water.

Johnson is the harbormaster at the Point San Pablo Marina, full of houseboats and recreational sailboats. He says it's been a rough 24 hours, knowing the pilot's body is presumed in the wreckage.

"They found a backpack, some stuff floated up, an armrest out of the plane, and a lot oil and fuel," described Johnson.

Witnesses said the Cessna 210 appeared to be missing a wing, and may have been clipped by a larger and faster plane, a vintage Hawker Sea Fury. The restored fighter plane is well-known at exhibitions. The two planes are owned by the same company and the pilots knew each other. They were returning to their Amador County base after an event in Half Moon Bay Sunday when they collided into one another.  

"It's still surreal, I can't process it really," eyewitness Bonny Dunn told KTVU. "Just as I see the Hawker veering to the right making a banked turn, I see the Cessna spiraling down".

The Coast Guard has turned the operation over to the Contra Costa County Sheriff's department, which has a buoy and boat stationed at the spot, about three miles off shore. With the wreckage located, the National Transportation Safety Board will supervise its retrieval, and look into whether the planes were too close, possibly attempting a formation or photo-shoot.

"You really need to trust the other person you're up in the sky with," observed pilot Brandon McGlone, "because any mistakes you make up there are unforgiving."

The Hawker aircraft flew on to land safely, with two people aboard.

But they left in their wake, waters swarming with would-be rescuers who were hoping for a different outcome.

"You didn't hear anything, you didn't see an explosion, you didn't see debris," recalled harbormaster Johnson of the eerie scene, "it was just all of a sudden the Cessna was spinning down."

So far, neither the victim’s name nor those of the two survivors have been released.

http://www.ktvu.com










(04-27) 19:14 PDT Richmond -- Two planes collided near San Pablo Bay Sunday afternoon, with one apparently crashing into the water and the second flying an hour east to land safely in Ione in Amador County, Coast Guard officials said.  

Rescue teams in boats and helicopters searched the water for the pilot of a Cessna 210 after the 4:05 p.m. crash and found only debris in the first 90 minutes of searching, said Coast Guard Lt. Jeannie Crump.

The other plane, a single-engine Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20, landed 40 minutes later at the Eagle's Nest Airport in Ione, according to Ian Gregor, Federal Aviation Administration public affairs manager.

The pilot and a passenger, a husband and wife, in the Sea Fury were not injured, said Amador County Undersheriff Jim Wegner.

The two planes, which apparently both had flown out of Eagle's Nest Airport, were flying together and had been in Half Moon Bay for a photo shoot earlier in the day, Wegner said.

The planes were at the Pacific Coast Dream Machines event in Half Moon Bay Sunday. The Hawker, called Dreadnought, was reportedly one of the featured war birds at the event, an annual festival that included a variety of planes, motorcycles, cars and other tricked-out vehicles.

The vintage aircraft is now a renowned racing plane, flown by brothers Dennis and Brian Sanders, who operate Sanders Aircraft Inc., which restores classic airplanes. The Hawker is registered to the company and is a top-level competitor in the annual Reno Air Races.

The planes collided about a mile north of the Brother Islands, near the entrance to San Pablo Bay.

Witnesses at Point San Pablo Yacht Harbor said the Cessna spiraled out of control and crashed into water after the collision.

Sailboats and the captain of the East Brother Light Station boat were the first to arrive at the scene of the crash, said Roslynn Johnson, the harbormaster, who called 911.

The boats found only small bits of debris in the water.

Four Coast Guard boats and a helicopter were searching the choppy Bay waters along with five boats from local law enforcement agencies, including Marin County Sheriff's Office and Sausalito Police Department, as well as a local helicopter. Divers from the San Francisco Police Department also were on the scene.

Amador County firefighters and medics were dispatched to the Ione airport, but were not needed. There was no immediate information on the plane.

The Hawker Sea Fury is a Korean War-era British fighter and ground attack plane. A woman answering the phone at the company declined comment.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the incident.



Story, photo gallery, video and comments/reaction:   http://www.sfgate.com
 
Dream Machines planes collide over San Pablo Bay

 Two airplanes that had been at Pacific Coast Dream Machines at Half Moon Bay Airport have collided over San Pablo Bay. One landed safely later Sunday afternoon, according to an Federal Aviation Administration spokesman who said authorities have found wreckage in the bay that may belong to the other plane.

The crash occurred at 4:05 p.m., according to FAA spokesman Ian Gregor. He said a single-engine Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20 landed 40 minutes later at a small airport in Amador County. The pilot of that plane was not injured, Gregor said.

Coast Guard and other rescue crews were searching for the pilot of a Cessna 210 in San Pablo Bay, but at 7 p.m. had only found wreckage from an airplane. Calls to the Coast Guard spokesman were not immediately returned on Sunday evening.

"My understanding is that the Hawker had a chase plane with him," said Tim Beeman, director of Miramar Events, which put on Dream Machines. "Chase planes typically follow to take photographs." Beeman said he didn't know who was piloting either plane. The Hawker was a registered feature of Sunday's event, but there was no immediate information on the Cessna.

"It's a fly-in, so we don't keep track of every plane that comes," Beeman said.

While the FAA had the Hawker’s tail number – to an airplane registered to Sanders Aircraft Inc. – Gregor did not have any information about the Cessna.

The National Transportation Safety Board is taking the lead on the investigation.


 http://www.hmbreview.com
>BAY AREA — The Coast Guard is working with CHP to locate the pilot of the plane that crashed in San Pablo Bay after colliding mid-air with another small plane Saturday.

Officials say a single engine Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20 collided with a single-engine Cessna 210 just after 4 p.m. near the Bay. The Cessna plane subsequently crashed into the water, while the Hawker landed safely in Amador County about 40 minutes later.

The Hawker was a registered participant in the Pacific Coast Dream Machines event taking place Saturday at Half Moon Bay Airport. Event organizers confirm to KTVU that the Hawker had a chase plane that arrived and left with it.  However, they add that the chase plane was not a registered participant of the event and cannot officially confirm if that chase plane was the Cessna.

That event ended at 4 p.m. and the crash was reported around 4:10 p.m.

Each aircraft had one person on board, according to spokesman Ian Gregor. The Hawker pilot was reportedly uninjured but the condition of the Cessna pilot isn't known at this time.

U.S. Coast Guard Petty Officer Loumania Stewart said four Coast Guard boats and one Coast Guard helicopter are trying to locate the pilot who crashed into San Pablo Bay but so thus far authorities have only found debris, not any people.

Other agencies are assisting the Coast Guard in the search and rescue operation, Stewart said.

Gregor said the FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the collision and the NTSB is the lead investigative agency.

Source:    http://www.ktvu.com
 
The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for survivors after two planes collided over San Pablo Bay this afternoon. 

The planes crashed at about 4 p.m., sending one of the planes, a Cessna 210, into the San Pablo Bay waters about 1 mile north of Brother Island near the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, Coast Guard Lt. Jeannie Crump said.

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said each aircraft in the collision off the city of Richmond had one person on board.

The other plane, a Hawker Sea Fury TMK 20, continued flying for about an hour before landing in Ione, Calif., according to Crump. According to Gregor, the pilot of the Hawker was uninjured.

As of 5:30 p.m. the Coast Guard was searching the waters with four boats and a helicopter. Boats from five other local agencies had also responded, as well as two other agencies’ helicopters. It wasn’t immediately known if the pilot of the Cessna survived.
click to enlarge Richmond Bridge

“We’ve seen lots of debris but no persons yet,” Crump said. 


http://www.sfexaminer.com

Coast Guard vessels and other boats searched an area about 2 miles off Point San Pablo in Richmond, Calif. Two planes collided over San Pablo Bay Sunday April 27, 2014 causing a Cessna aircraft to break up and land in the bay.


A Hawker Sea Fury was one of the planes involved in a plane crash in San Pablo Bay after departing from the Half Moon Bay Airport just after 4 p.m. on Sunday. Photo Miramar Events.


Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N4615Y: Incident occurred April 27, 2014 at Woodbine Municipal Airport (KOBI), New Jersey

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, FLIPPED OVER, WOODBINE MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, WOODBINE, NJ 

http://www.asias.faa.gov

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N4615Y, HIGH EXPOSURE INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N4615Y


A small plane crash occurred at Woodbine Municipal Airport Sunday afternoon.

The plane flipped after landing on the runway, according to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). All occupants made it out of the plane and no serious injuries were reported. The airport is located at 660 Henry Decinque Boulevard in Woodbine, Cape May County.

The fire department was requested to manage a fuel spill. The FAA is investigating the accident. 


Story and photo gallery:    http://www.nbcphiladelphia.com

WOODBINE – State Police are investigating an accident at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Woodbine Municipal Airport in which a small plane apparently overturned upon landing. 

A witness at the scene, Harry Scheeler Jr., of Woodbine, said nobody was seriously injured.

Police in the Woodbine barracks said troopers were on the scene, but they had no immediate details about the accident. Scheeler said rescue crews found the single-engine plane resting upside down on one of the airport’s two runways.

The Belleplain Rescue Squad also responded.


Source:    http://www.pressofatlanticcity.com


Alon A2 Aircoupe, N6364V: Accident occurred April 27, 2014 near Deck Airpark (NC11), Apex, North Carolina

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA208 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 27, 2014 in Apex, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/04/2015
Aircraft: ALON A2, registration: N6364V
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that, before the accident flight, the airplane had about 15 gallons of automotive gasoline in the fuel tanks. The taxi and initial takeoff were “normal”; however, when the airplane was about 100 ft above the trees that bordered the airport, the engine experienced a sudden total loss of power. The pilot then reduced the throttle and reapplied full throttle. Although the engine momentarily restarted, it then immediately lost power. The airplane subsequently impacted trees and came to rest inverted. Local authorities reported a strong fuel smell at the accident location, but the exact amount of spilled fuel could not be determined. Examination of the airframe and a subsequent test run of the engine revealed no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Federal Aviation Administration guidance indicates that vapor lock is a problem that mostly affects gasoline-fueled internal combustion engines and can result in a transient or complete loss of power. The guidance further states that restarting the engine from this state may be difficult because fuel can be vaporized by engine heat. Given that the ambient air temperature, the fuel flow condition (takeoff), and the likely engine temperature were conducive to the occurrence of vapor lock, it is possible that the loss of engine power was due to vapor lock; however, insufficient evidence existed to determine whether vapor lock occurred during the accident flight. The weather conditions about the time of the accident were conducive to the accumulation of carburetor icing at cruise and glide power; however, given the pilot’s statement that the engine operated “normally” until the sudden loss of power and that the airplane was climbing at a high power setting, it is not likely that the carburetor accumulated ice. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A total loss of engine power during initial climb for reasons that could not be determined during postaccident examination and testing.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 27, 2014, about 1700 eastern daylight time, an Alon A2, N6364V, experienced a total loss of engine power shortly after takeoff from Deck Airpark (NC11), Apex, North Carolina. The pilot subsequently made an off-airport forced landing into a forest. The private pilot sustained minor injuries, and the passenger was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. 

The pilot reported that the taxi and initial takeoff were "normal;" however, when the airplane was about 100 feet above the trees that bordered the airport, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot retarded the throttle and immediately reapplied full throttle. The engine subsequently restarted, but immediately lost power again. He then performed a forced landing into the trees, about 500 feet past the departure end of the runway. The pilot reported that he had about 15 gallons of autogas in the fuel tanks prior to departure.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to pilot provided information and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. He held a third-class medical certificate, which was issued on August 20, 2013. The pilot reported 1471.6 total flight hours, with 38.3 of those hours in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, an Alon A2 (serial number A-40), was manufactured in 1965. It was registered with the FAA on a standard airworthiness certificate for normal operations. The airplane had a total time of 1,872.36 hours as of the last annual inspection, which was completed on January 4, 2014. The airplane was powered by a Continental C90 series engine. As of the last annual inspection, the engine had accumulated a total of 1,661 hours, with 287 hours since last major overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1651 recorded weather observation at Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU), Raleigh, North Carolina, located approximately 10 miles to the northeast of the accident location, included wind from 210 degrees at 6 knots, 10 miles visibility, scattered clouds 25,000 feet above ground level, temperature 28.3 degrees C, dew point 8.9 degrees C; altimeter setting 29.92 inches of mercury

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Initial examination of the aircraft by an FAA inspector revealed that the airplane impacted several trees and came to rest inverted between two trees, resulting in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. Local authorities reported to the inspector that there was a strong fuel smell at the accident scene; however, the fuel tank selected at takeoff was not noted or provided to the NTSB.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

A subsequent examination, of the engine at a storage facility, under NTSB oversight, revealed minimal external damage. The throttle, mixture, and carburetor heat controls remained attached to the engine and operated without anomalies. The engine remained attached to the airframe and was fitted with a 5 gallon fuel container, between the wing root and the carburetor, to facilitate an engine run. The wings were removed at the wing root to facilitate transport, and continuity was not confirmed from fuel tank to the separation point. The engine started and operated through various power settings with no abnormalities noted. No anomalies were noted from the 5 gallon fuel container through the fuel system.

FAA Guidance

According to an NTSB accident report (ERA12LA131), testing conducted at the FAA Technical Center revealed that vapor pressure of autogas can vary widely as formulations are changed seasonally, and according to local requirements. High vapor pressure can promote vapor lock in aircraft fuel systems causing engine power to be reduced or the engine to completely fail and testing by the FAA William J. Hughes Technical Center concluded that autogas with high vapor pressure can accelerate the formation of carburetor ice.

The Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25A) defines vapor lock as "A problem that mostly affects gasoline-fuelled internal combustion engines. It occurs when liquid fuel changes state from liquid to gas while still in the fuel delivery system. This disrupts the operation of the fuel pump, causing loss of feed pressure to the carburetor or fuel injection system, resulting in transient loss of power or complete stalling. Restarting the engine from this state may be difficult. The fuel can vaporize due to being heated by the engine, by the local climate, or due to a lower boiling point at high altitude."

DOT/FAA/CT-87/05 "Autogas in General Aviation Aircraft," states in part "The conditions which define the worst case for vapor lock testing (i.e., most likely to result in vapor lock) are as follows.
1. Takeoff fuel flow
2. Initial fuel temperature between 38 and 43 degrees Celsius (100 to 110 degrees Fahrenheit)
3. Ambient air temperature of 29 degrees Celsius or higher (85 degrees Fahrenheit).
4. Engine at operating temperatures typically found after a prolonged idling or a hot soak.
5. ASTM class E (winter grade) fuel if the testing is for autogas"

An FAA chart, titled "Conditions Favoring Carb Ice Formation," indicated that with the ambient temperature and dew point, "Icing at glide and cruise power" was probable.

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA208
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 27, 2014 in Apex, NC
Aircraft: ALON A2, registration: N6364V
Injuries: 1 Minor,1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 27, 2014, about 1900 eastern daylight time, an Alon A2, N6364V, experienced a total loss of engine power shortly after takeoff from Deck Airpark (NC11), Apex, North Carolina. The pilot subsequently made an off-airport forced landing into a forest. The certificated private pilot sustained minor injuries, and the passenger was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight.

The pilot reported that the taxi and initial takeoff were "normal;" however, when the airplane was about 100 feet above the trees that bordered the airport, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot retarded the throttle and immediately reapplied full throttle. The engine subsequently restarted, but immediately lost power again. He then performed a forced landing into the trees, about 500 feet past the departure end of the runway.

Initial examination of the aircraft by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane impacted several trees and came to rest inverted between two trees, resulting in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. Local authorities reported to the inspector that there was a strong fuel smell at the accident scene.

The engine was retained for further examination.


http://registry.faa.gov/N6364V


 

APEX, N.C. (WTVD) -- 74-year-old Bryan Esterly suffered minor injuries when a two-person plane crashed Sunday in Apex.

 The passenger, his 15-year-old grandson, is fine.

Just after 5 p.m. Sunday, the plane went up with Esterly and his grandson on board.

Eyewitnesses said the plane then came crashing down into trees. Exclusive video from Chopper 11 showed the scene: a single engine aircraft buried deep in the trees.

Esterly is listed as an owner of the plane. He suffered minor injuries and was taken to Wake Med in Apex.

"Don't really know much, expect that he was attempting to take off from the runway," said Sgt. Travis Ingold, with the N.C. Highway Patrol.

The FAA reports the plane lost power on takeoff from Deck Airport, at 1617 Air Park Drive in Apex. It all happened hundreds of yards away from Highway 64.

Esterly is listed as the owner of a private landing strip right beside that highway.

The Wake County Sheriff confirms that Esterly was the pilot in a plane crash in August on that same landing strip.

A different passenger was with him.

The Sheriff says Esterly came in too fast and overshot the runway.

The Highway Patrol is handling this case. The FAA will begin its ground investigation Monday.

"I think considering the circumstances, I think they're pretty fortunate," Ingold said.

Story and comments/reaction:    http://abclocal.go.com


2 injured in Apex plane crash, pilot involved in previous crash


APEX, N.C. -   Two people suffered minor injuries Sunday when the Alon A-2 plane they were in crashed into a wooded area near Deck Airpark Airport in Apex.

The Wake County Sheriff's Office said the plane went down in the area of 1617 Air Park Drive, and the pilot suffered non-life threatening injuries.

The sheriff's office said the pilot of the plane, 74-year-old Bryan Henry Esterly, is the same man who piloted a plane that crashed at the same airport in August 2013.  Esterly's 15-year-old grandson was also in the plane, but was not injured, according to the North Carolina Highway Patrol.

In August, the Cessna 172E Skyhawk that Esterly was piloting flipped when it overshot the runway and hit an embankment. No one was seriously injured in that crash either.

The Federal Aviation Administration plans to start an investigation in what happened on Monday.



Two people suffered minor injuries when the plane they were in crashed into a wooded area near Deck Airpark Airport in Apex. Credit: Jason Thompson Two people suffered minor injuries when the plane they were in crashed into a wooded area near Deck Airpark Airport in Apex. 
Credit: Jason Thompson


NTSB Identification: ERA13CA393 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 30, 2013 in Apex, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/21/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 172E, registration: N3513S
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Immediately after the accident, the pilot reported to the responding police officer that he landed “hot,” and “overshot” the 1,950-foot-long turf runway. The airplane overran the departure end of the runway, struck a ditch, nosed over, and came to rest inverted with substantial damage to the wings, empennage, and tail section of the airplane. Interpolation of the airplane manufacturer’s landing distance chart revealed that the required landing distance over a 50-foot obstacle was approximately 1,300 feet. The pilot stated that there were no mechanical deficiencies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to attain the proper touchdown point on the runway, which resulted in a runway overrun and subsequent aircraft noseover. 


http://www.ntsb.gov













APEX, N.C. -  Wake County Emergency Services said a small plane crashed near U.S. Highway 64 in Apex Friday afternoon.

Wake County Sheriff Donnie Harrison said 73-year-old Bryan Henry Esterlyt and his grandson were flying back from Fayetteville when they overshot the runway around 4:45 p.m. The plane hit and embankment and flipped.

The plane came to a rest in the pilots driveway, located about 100 feet from U.S. 64, authorities said.

No one was injured in the incident, according to the sheriff's office.


Source:   http://www.wncn.com