Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Piper J5A Cub Cruiser, N30313: Accident occurred August 10, 2016 at Sandusky City Airport (Y83), Sanilac County, Michigan

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA322
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 10, 2016 in Sandusky, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: PIPER J5C, registration: N30313
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After completing one full-stop landing on the grass runway in calm wind conditions, the private pilot decided to complete another landing in the opposite direction. During the landing, the tailwheel-equipped airplane bounced multiple times and became airborne again. The airplane then veered to the right and impacted a ditch next to the runway. The pilot stated that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. It is likely that the pilot failed to control the airplane's descent rate and landing flare, which led to the bounced landing. He was then unable to recover and exited the side of the runway.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a bounced landing, and a subsequent loss of control followed by a runway excursion.

http://registry.faa.gov/30313 

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA322
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 10, 2016 in Sandusky, MI
Aircraft: PIPER J5C, registration: N30313
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 10, 2016, about 0730 eastern daylight time, a Piper J5C airplane, N30313, impacted a ditch after landing at Sandusky City Airport (Y83), Sandusky, Michigan. The private rated pilot sustained minor injuries and the pilot rated passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight departed from Dupont-Lapeer Airport (D95), Lapeer, Michigan, about 0630.

The pilot stated that they arrived at Y83 and completed one full stop landing on runway 18. They departed runway 18, entered the traffic pattern, and intended to land on runway 36. The pilot noted that the touchdown was normal, but the airplane veered to the right and impacted a ditch. The pilot noted that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot had no other memory of the accident sequence. 

The pilot rated passenger, seated in the rear seat, stated that the approach was stable, but during the landing the airplane "bounced pretty good," enough for the airplane became airborne again. The airplane bounced 2 to 3 times and veered right. The airplane began to gain altitude and then dropped into the ditch. He did not recall the right wing contacting anything prior to the impact with the ditch. The passenger had no other memory of the accident sequence.

The responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector conducted a postaccident examination of the airplane and found no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. He reported that the left wing and fuselage sustained substantial damage during the impact sequence.



SANDUSKY, MI – At approximately 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, August 10th, 2016, the Sanilac County Sheriff’s Office was notified of an airplane accident at the Sandusky Airport.plane photo

Sanilac County Sheriff’s Deputies and Sandusky Police responded to the airport. The pilot and passenger were out of the airplane and were located in the airport terminal.

According to Sgt. Ron DuBois, the initial investigation indicates that the pilot, a 65-year-old Metamora man and his passenger, a 61-year-old man also from Metamora, were flying in from Lapeer in the Pilot’s 1940 Piper J5A airplane. At approximately 7:30 a.m. the pilot attempted to land on the grass runway at Sandusky Airport.

The airplane touched down without issue and after the touchdown and traveling a short distance, an unknown issue caused the aircraft to veer off the runway into a large drainage ditch. The wing struck the opposite bank of the ditch and turned the nose of the airplane straight into the ditch bank. The impact caused significant damage to the aircraft.

The pilot and passenger were able to get themselves out of the airplane. They were both taken to McKenzie Hospital in Sandusky for treatment of their injuries.

The Federal Aviation Administration was contacted and will be conducting an investigation in conjunction with the Sheriff’s Office. The name of the occupants of the airplane are being withheld pending an investigative determination.

Restoration of World War II-era hangar at Katama Airfield ready for take off



After years of complicated legal wrangling between the state, The Nature Conservancy, and the town of Edgartown, plans to replace the dilapidated World War II-era hangar at the Katama Airfield finally got the go-ahead on Monday when Edgartown selectmen Michael Donaroma and Margaret Serpa approved amendments to the conservation restriction at the airfield. Selectman Arthur Smadbeck did not attend the meeting.

The 90-acre grass airfield purchased by the town in the 1980s is in an area governed by conservation restrictions held by the Nature Conservancy, the town, and the state. Any amendments to the conservation restriction had to be approved by the state legislature. Town voters approved the hangar expansion at a special town meeting in 2010.

“So this allows the commission to put up a new hangar,” Mr. Donaroma said as he contemplated the stack of papers waiting for the selectmen’s signatures.

“A replacement of the old hangar that will fit in real nicely,” replied Edward (Peter) Vincent Jr., chairman of the Edgartown conservation commission, who also sits on the airfield commission.

The final documents allow the renovation and expansion of the existing hangar at the airfield, from a “50 foot by 53 foot structure to a 60 foot by 100 foot structure.” The agreement comes with conservation restrictions on additional acreage.

The amended conservation restrictions call for an additional 62.5 acres of land (the Nickerson parcel and Atwood realty trust parcel) to be placed under the conservation restriction; 2 acres will be returned to a natural state; and a town-owned 21.2 acre parcel off Pennywise Path will be turned over to “the care and control” of the conservation commission. Use of that acreage is spelled out in the agreement: “5 acres shall be restricted for conservation purposes; and the remaining 16.2 acres shall be restricted for conservation, parks and recreation, water supply, installation of a solar array not to exceed 6 acres …”

For plans that took years to come to fruition, signing off on the restrictions seemed anticlimactic at the brief but significant weekly selectmen’s meeting.

In conclusion, Mr. Vincent said: “Now all we have to do is get it built.”

In other business, building inspector Leonard Jason sailed through his annual review. Mr. Jason said he’s currently dealing with a “few issues” that include evicting a tenant.

“It’s never-ending,” said town administrator Pam Dolby.

Selectman Margaret Serpa gave her stamp of approval on Mr. Jason’s work: “Lenny does his job and that’s what we want him to do.”

The selectmen went into executive session with town counsel to “consider the purchase, exchange, lease or value of real property.”

Source:   http://www.mvtimes.com

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N738PC: Incident occurred August 10, 2016 at Reid-Hillview Airport (KRHV), San Jose, Santa Clara County, California























AIRCRAFT: 1977 Cessna 172N N738PC 

ENGINE: Lycoming 0-360-A4M, serial number: L-39012-36E

PROPELLER:  Sensenich 76RM8$14-0-60, Hun SN: 102720K

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

Tachometer: 8747.87

ENGINE:   Total time since new: 3,907.22 hours,

Total time since MEOH: 1,019.77 hours

PROPELLER:    Total Time since new: 1019.77           

AIRFRAME:    Total Time: 15,028.31 hours                  

OTHER EQUIPMENT:     
Rosen Sunvisor’s
Skybolt Engine Cowling Fasteners;
King KMA 24 Audion Panel;
Garmin GNS 430W GPS Nav Comm;
King KX 155 Nav Comm;
Instrumentation for VOR and Precision GPS approaches.
Bendix King KN 64 DME;
King ADF (inoperative);
Garmin GTX 327 Transponder;
Davtron M800 Chronometer
  
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Runway overrun

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:
Propeller strike;
Spinner crushed;
Lower RH Cowling set in;
Exhaust partially crushed;
Left wing outboard of strut leading edge small bend.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:   Reid Hillview Airport, KRHV    

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N738PC.htm

http://registry.faa.gov/N738PC

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA San Jose FSDO-15

Date: 10-AUG-16
Time: 17:37:00Z
Regis#: N738PC
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SAN JOSE
State: California

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING WENT OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY, THROUGH A FENCE AND ONTO A ROAD, REID-HILLVIEW AIRPORT, SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA.




SAN JOSE (KRON) — Emergency crews are responding to a small plane crash in San Jose Wednesday morning.

The plane rolled off the runway at the Reid-Hillview Airport near Tully Road and South King Road at around 11:20 a.m., according to authorities.

The plane went through a fence and was blocking traffic on westbound Tully Road between Capitol Expressway and Eastridge Way.

No injuries were reported in the incident, fire officials said.

Story and video:  http://kron4.com






A flight instructor and his student escaped injury Wednesday when their small private plane crashed through a fence at a San Jose airport and ended up on a busy road, fire officials said.

The Cessna aircraft ran off the end of a runway at Reid-Hillview Airport at 10:38 a.m., crashed through a fence and went onto Tully Road, said Capt. Christopher Salcido of the San Jose Fire Department.

Two men, a flight instructor and student pilot, were on board. It was not immediately known who was piloting the plane, Salcido said.

Fire personnel arrived at 10:42 a.m., finding the occupants unharmed and already out of the blue and white aircraft.

“Not a scratch on them,” Salcido said. “In light of the accident itself, the silver lining is obviously the passenger and pilot weren’t injured.”

Source:   http://www.sfgate.com



SAN JOSE -- A student pilot flying with an instructor overshot the runway at Reid-Hillview Airport during an exercise Wednesday morning, crashed into a fence and came to a stop on Tully Road, according to the San Jose Fire Department.

The student pilot and instructor walked away without any injuries. The plane also pushed a large portion of the fence onto the slow lane of Tully Road, resulting in a temporary road closure, according to San Jose Fire Capt. Chris Salcido.

Source:  http://www.mercurynews.com

Aero Commander 112, Environmental Equalizers Inc., N112RC: Incident occurred August 09, 2016 at Reno-Stead Airport (KRTS), Washoe County, Nevada

ENVIRONMENTAL EQUALIZERS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N112RC

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Reno FSDO-11

Date: 09-AUG-16
Time: 01:25:00Z
Regis#: N112RC
Aircraft Make: AERO COMMANDER
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: RENO
State: Nevada

AIRCRAFT, AERO COMMANDER 112, LANDED GEAR UP, RENO-STEAD AIRPORT, RENO, NEVADA.

Cessna TR182 Turbo Skylane RG, N736RG: Incident occurred August 09, 2016 in Sallisaw, Sequoyah County, Oklahoma

http://registry.faa.gov/N736RG

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Oklahoma City FSDO-15

Date: 09-AUG-16
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N736RG
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Other
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SALLISAW
State: Oklahoma

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, SALLISAW, OKLAHOMA.

Acro Sport II, N6214C: Accident occurred August 09, 2016 at Winterset Municipal Airport (3Y3), Madison County, Iowa

http://registry.faa.gov/N6214C

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Des Moines FSDO-61

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA316
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 09, 2016 in Winterset, IA
Aircraft: SCHABACKER KONRAD J ACRO SPORT II, registration: N6214C
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2016, at 1600 central daylight time, an amateur-built Schabacker Konrad J Acro Sport II, N6214C, collided with two parked airplanes following a loss of control while landing at the Winterset Municipal Airport (3Y3), Winterset, Iowa. Neither the airline transport rated pilot nor the private pilot on board were injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to the private pilot and it was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The flight originated from the Mason City Municipal Airport (MCW), Mason City, Iowa.

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, Skymates Inc., N544SP: Accident occurred August 09, 2016 in Arlington, Tarrant County, Texas

SKYMATES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N544SP

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Fort Worth AFW FSDO-19


NTSB Identification: CEN16CA319

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 09, 2016 in Arlington, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N544SP
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

During a full-stop landing to the 100 foot wide paved runway the airplane hit "very hard and bounced to a very high level". The student pilot did not execute a go-around and reported that on the second touchdown "he tried to hold it off again", but the operating propeller struck the runway surface and the airplane bounced a second time. On the third touchdown the nose gear collapsed, directional control was lost, and the airplane exited the left side of the runway. After digging into the grass the nose gear completely separated resulting in substantial damage to the firewall and the forward fuselage. The student pilot and the operator reported that there were no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's improper recovery from a bounced landing.

Northern Explorer, N907BT: Accident occurred August 07, 2016 in Chickaloon, Alaska

NTSB Identification: ANC16CA056 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 07, 2016 in Chickaloon, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: BRIAN TURNER NORTHERN EXPLORER, registration: N907BT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was conducting a low reconnaissance in his tailwheel-equipped airplane of a potential grass landing site in remote mountainous terrain during the late evening hours. While conducting the low reconnaissance, he engaged the carburetor heat, descended over the landing site, disengaged the carburetor heat, applied full throttle, and then departed from the landing site. As the airplane departed from the landing site, he reported that the engine revolutions per minute (rpm) were “very low” due to carburetor ice. He stated that due to the loss of power the airplane was capable of level flight, but unable to climb. As the airplane approached rising terrain, he turned about 180 degrees, and landed in an area of thick vegetation about 20 miles per hour. During the landing sequence, the propeller and left wing impacted terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

The pilot further reported that the airplane did not have a carburetor temperature gauge installed.

The pilot verified that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

In the recommendation section of the National Transportation Safety Board Accident/Incident Reporting Form 6120.1, the pilot stated that the accident may have been avoided if he did not utilize the landing site at that time of the day. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has published Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention (2009). This document discusses carburetor icing and states in part:

Pilots should be aware that carburetor icing doesn’t just occur in freezing conditions, it can occur at temperatures well above freezing temperatures when there is visible moisture or high humidity. Icing can occur in the carburetor at temperatures above freezing because vaporization of fuel, combined with the expansion of air as it flows through the carburetor, (Venturi Effect) causes sudden cooling, sometimes by a significant amount within a fraction of a second. Carburetor ice can be detected by a drop in rpm in fixed pitch propeller airplanes and a drop in manifold pressure in constant speed propeller airplanes. In both types, usually there will be a roughness in engine operation.

The pilot should respond to carburetor icing by applying full carburetor heat immediately. The engine may run rough initially for a short time while ice melts.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A partial loss of engine power due to carburetor icing, which resulted from the pilot’s failure to use carburetor heat.

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N907BT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: ANC16CA056
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, August 07, 2016 in Chickaloon, AK
Aircraft: BRIAN TURNER NORTHERN EXPLORER, registration: N907BT
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was conducting a low reconnaissance in his tailwheel-equipped airplane of a potential grass landing site in remote mountainous terrain during the late evening hours. While conducting the low reconnaissance, he engaged the carburetor heat, descended over the landing site, disengaged the carburetor heat, applied full throttle, and then departed from the landing site. As the airplane departed from the landing site, he reported that the engine revolutions per minute (rpm) were "very low" due to carburetor ice. He stated that due to the loss of power the airplane was capable of level flight, but unable to climb. As the airplane approached rising terrain, he turned about 180 degrees, and landed in an area of thick vegetation about 20 miles per hour. During the landing sequence, the propeller and left wing impacted terrain. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage.

The pilot further reported that the airplane did not have a carburetor temperature gauge installed.

The pilot verified that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

In the recommendation section of the National Transportation Safety Board Accident/Incident Reporting Form 6120.1, the pilot stated that the accident may have been avoided if he did not utilize the landing site at that time of the day. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has published Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention (2009). This document discusses carburetor icing and states in part:

Pilots should be aware that carburetor icing doesn't just occur in freezing conditions, it can occur at temperatures well above freezing temperatures when there is visible moisture or high humidity. Icing can occur in the carburetor at temperatures above freezing because vaporization of fuel, combined with the expansion of air as it flows through the carburetor, (Venturi Effect) causes sudden cooling, sometimes by a significant amount within a fraction of a second. Carburetor ice can be detected by a drop in rpm in fixed pitch propeller airplanes and a drop in manifold pressure in constant speed propeller airplanes. In both types, usually there will be a roughness in engine operation.
The pilot should respond to carburetor icing by applying full carburetor heat immediately. The engine may run rough initially for a short time while ice melts.

Hughes 269C, N9277R: Fatal accident occurred August 09, 2016 in Howe, Grayson County, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N9277R

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Dallas FSDO-05


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA315
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 09, 2016 in Howe, TX
Aircraft: HUGHES 269C, registration: N9277R
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 9, 2016, at 2035 central daylight time, a Hughes 269C single-engine helicopter, N9277R, impacted terrain following an autorotation near Howe, Texas. The flight instructor sustained fatal injuries, the student pilot sustained serious injuries, and the helicopter sustained substantial damage. The helicopter was registered to and operated by a private individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed an unknown location at an unknown time.

According to law enforcement personnel who interviewed the student pilot following the accident, the flight instructor and student pilot were flying about 1,100 feet above ground level when they attempted a practice autorotation which included a simulated engine failure, or reducing the throttle to idle power. When the engine power was reduced, the engine lost total power. The flight instructor attempted to restart the engine; however, was unsuccessful. The student pilot stated the autorotation was initially controlled, but then the helicopter impacted the terrain in a high speed descent. During the impact, the tailboom partially separated, and the helicopter rolled over coming to rest on its right side.

Examination of the accident site showed the helicopter impacted down sloping grassy terrain. The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, a portion of the tailboom, and the main rotor system. The landing gear skids were bent up into the fuselage. The instrument panel was partially separated from the fuselage. The right seat anti-torque pedals were separated from the pedal supports. Both the left and right seat bottom panels were crushed downward approximately 4 inches.

At 2035, the North Texas Regional Airport (GYI), Sherman, Texas, located approximately 12 miles northwest of the accident site, reported the wind from 130 degrees at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, sky clear, temperature 34 degrees Celsius, dew point 18 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.90 inches of mercury.



Federal agencies began their investigation Wednesday into what caused a helicopter to crash Tuesday night in Howe, resulting in the death of one occupant and injuring the second.

The two-person helicopter went down at about 8:30 p.m. in a field near 264 Bennett Road. Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration said in an email the helicopter experienced engine failure, which caused the aircraft to crash. Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board started looking into why the engine failure happened on Wednesday.

“NTSB is investigating and typically we will be working with the FAA, who may be on scene to collect data for us and provide that to us,” Keith Holloway, an NTSB spokesperson, said.

Emergency responders arrived quickly to the scene Tuesday night and transported two men to the Wilson N. Jones Regional Medical Center. Texas Highway Patrol Staff Sgt. Mark Tackett said one man was a student flyer and the second was instructing. The helicopter was a Hughes 269C, and manufactured in 1979, FAA records indicate.

“The pilot and the instructor were up doing maneuvers and for some reason the helicopter lost power,” Tackett said Tuesday night. “While they were coming down, they were unable to get the power turned back on and the helicopter did crash.”

On Wednesday morning, Tackett identified the instructor as 58-year-old Daniel Katen of Lewisville, who died at the hospital at 6:44 a.m. Matt Cavender, the owner of the aircraft and the second occupant, was transferred to Parkland Hospital in Dallas and was reported in stable condition as of Wednesday morning.

Jeff Leake, who owns the property where the helicopter crashed, said Cavender walked uphill about 200 yards to Leake’s residence and banged on the door. Leake said he never heard the crash, but he saw Cavender was injured and seemed to be in shock. He said Cavender was walking with a limp, and he told Leake that Mr. Katen was pinned underneath the crashed chopper.

“Me and that other pilot we pulled him out from underneath there and we did CPR on him,” Leake said Wednesday afternoon. “I wish he would have made it.”

Leake called 911, and several area emergency responders arrived to the scene.

About two miles away, Kery Burns said he heard the crash, but he didn’t know it was a helicopter until later that night. Burns lives in Howe near U.S. Highway 75.

“I got up off the couch and my dog was barking; she even heard it,” Burns said. “I went outside to look, and I didn’t see it. I thought it was a highway crash.”

Burns said he didn’t see a fire or smoke, and there wasn’t anything too distinct about the sound. A little while later, he said his wife informed him it was a helicopter crash.

“It sounded like a boom,” Burns said. “Almost like a metal boom, like a car crash. It was distant; it wasn’t real obvious.”

Holloway said the goal of the investigation is to find what caused the crash by looking for possible mechanical failures, weather conditions, communications with air traffic control, witness accounts and any structure damage or failures to the aircraft itself. The investigation will also examine the pilots history and flight log books. He said the answer to why the helicopter crashed won’t come right away.

“It usually takes about a couple of days for the on-scene documentation to take place depending on the aircraft and the condition that the aircraft is in,” Holloway said. “Once that has been completed, a preliminary report will be available on our website in about five to 10 days.”

FAA officials said the FAA might examine the wreckage at the crash site, but the NTSB personnel will be present for any further analysis once the aircraft is taken to a secure facility.

Source:   http://heralddemocrat.com




HOWE, Texas -- One person has died from injuries sustained in Tuesday's helicopter crash near Howe.

Both were taken to Wilson N. Jones Medical Center in Sherman after the helicopter crashed around 8:35 p.m.

Texas DPS Trooper Mark Tackett said the instructor, Daniel Katen of Lewisville, died at 6:45 a.m. Wednesday due to injuries sustained in the crash.

Troopers said Matt Cavender, 44, of Howe, was flying his 1979 Hughes 269C helicopter when it crashed near Bennet Road. Cavender's passenger and flight trainer was Katen, 58.

Investigators said the men took off from Cavender's home nearby, and cut power at 1,000 feet as part of the training -- but could not restart the aircraft.

"The pilot and the instructor were up doing maneuvers, and for some reason the helicopter lost power and crashed," Tackett said.

Jeff Leake said he lives up the street, about the distance of three football fields from where the accident happened.

"I was up there at my house and all of a sudden someone was knocking on the door," Leake said. "It was the pilot saying, 'Help me, help me, I crashed my helicopter and my friend is stuck down there.' "

Leake said he immediately called 911 and drove down to the crash with the pilot, who he said was injured and bruised.

"I saw his buddy still trapped underneath and the machine was on his arms," Leake said. "I lifted it up, flipped him over, prayed and started doing CPR with the help of the pilot until crews showed up."

The National Transportation Safety Board will take over the investigation when they arrive Wednesday afternoon. Tackett said the cause will not be confirmed until the FAA investigates.

Story and video:   http://www.kxii.com

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, JPEMR Enterprises Inc., N24447: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 in Oak Island, Brunswick County, North Carolina

JPEMR ENTERPRISES INC:   http://registry.faa.gov/N24447

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA421
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Oak Island, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/31/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N24447
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that after touching down during landing, he pulled back on the yoke "too far too fast" and the airplane ballooned. During the balloon, the pilot reported that he "failed to push the power to full" and conduct proper aborted landing procedures. The airplane landed hard on the runway and the pilot taxied back to the ramp without further incident.

During a postaccident examination, substantial damage to the firewall was discovered.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain pitch control during the landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing and substantial damage to the firewall.

Cessna 172K Skyhawk, N84371: Accident occurred August 03, 2016 at Cross Keys Airport (17N), Williamstown, Monroe Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

http://registry.faa.gov/N84371

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA413
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 03, 2016 in Cross Keys, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N84371
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during the final approach to land, about 200 feet prior to the runway threshold, he turned his attention to the airspeed indicator and "must have turned the yoke to the left". Subsequently, the airplane drifted to the left and impacted a tree with the left wing about 10-12 feet off the ground. The airplane spun to the left and impacted terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left and right wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain lateral bank control during final approach, which resulted with an impact with a tree and substantial damage to the left and right wings.