Monday, April 24, 2017

GLO grounded; Shreveport flights to end

Corporate Flight Management, Inc. (CFM) response: 

"FlyGlo’s statements about CFM are nothing more than a calculated distraction from their own bankruptcy filing. Their comments are entirely inconsistent with the motion filed in court today to compel our continued service. The court documents make clear that CFM is only one of many creditors to which FlyGlo is indebted. We have attempted to resolve the dispute with FlyGlo for some time and continue to welcome any satisfactory resolution."


GLO Airlines will stop operations – including its two daily flights from Shreveport to New Orleans – after filing for bankruptcy, a Shreveport Regional Airport spokesman said.

The company announced its bankruptcy filing in a press release but did not address the end of flight operations. It described the bankruptcy as a way to reorganize and thus "to better provide its strong and rapidly growing customer base with high-quality service."

But Mark Crawford, marketing and public relations manager for Shreveport Airport Authority, said that GLO will end all flights after Thursday.

Crawford said the flights are to be halted under to a court order issued following GLO filed its petition in court seeking bankruptcy protection. The Advocate reported that a bankruptcy court judge rejected GLO's request to continue operating after Thursday.

"From what we've been told, they plan to resume flight hopefully by the end of next week," Crawford said.

In a news release, GLO blamed its difficulties on a dispute with the company, Corporate Flight Management, it had hired to operate airplanes under the GLO name.

GLO alleged that Corporate Flight Management had "failed on its contractual obligations to deliver quality performance and solid management of GLO’s program to provide air service to chosen markets." GLO said it raised concerns with Corporate Flight Management about "performance and business practices," but did not specify what prompted its concerns.

Corporate Flight Management responded by unilaterally ending its contract with GLO, according to the release. GLO said it then had no choice but to seek bankruptcy protection to continue operations.

CFM countered that GLO's statements about performance were intended as "a calculated distraction" from the bankruptcy filing.

"The court documents make clear that CFM is only one of many creditors to which FlyGlo is indebted," Corporate Flight Management said in a statement, using GLO airline's legal name. "We have attempted to resolve the dispute with FlyGlo for some time and continue to welcome any satisfactory resolution."

Trey Fayard, GLO's founder and CEO, said in a statement that filing for bankruptcy was a difficult but necessary decision.

"We look forward to promptly and successfully emerging from reorganization in the near future,” he said.

GLO operates two flights per day Monday through Friday and one flight on Saturday and Sunday. Crawford said between 1,000 and 1,200 people fly GLO in a month. The New Orleans-based company began flying about 18 months ago.


Original article can be found here: http://www.shreveporttimes.com



HUNTSVILLE, Ala. – GLO Airlines hasn’t celebrated its first anniversary in Huntsville yet, but the company is already facing financial issues. 

Our news partners at Al.com report GLO is seeking bankruptcy protection. We checked this morning about changes to the schedule on the flight to New Orleans, and you can’t select flights out of Huntsville International Airport after Wednesday, April 26.

We expect to hear more from GLO Airlines today about the future of its flight schedule.

The company says its direct air carrier/aircraft operator has “failed on its contractual obligations to deliver quality performance and solid management of GLO’s program to provide air service to chosen markets.”

The company says rather than finding solutions, the air carrier terminated its contract to operate GLO’s program and fly passengers.  It added this move put GLO’s operations and finances at risk.  GLO Airlines provides nonstop flights between regional markets in the Gulf South.

The first GLO Airlines flight from Huntsville took off on September 30, 2016.  It was sold out.

Do you have a flight booked with GLO Airlines out of Huntsville in the near future? WHNT News 19 has contacted the airline for answers to help you.

Original article can be found here:   http://whnt.com





New Orleans-based GLO Airlines, which has operated regional charter flights from Louis Armstrong International Airport since late 2015, has filed for bankruptcy protection and must stop operating after Thursday, federal bankruptcy court records show.

GLO has asked the court to allow it to keep flying past Thursday, saying that otherwise it will lose "its principal source of revenue."

Looking to attract business travelers and others eager for an alternative to driving or multiple-stop flights, GLO has offered nonstop service from New Orleans to Shreveport; Little Rock, Arkansas; Memphis, Tennessee; and Huntsville, Alabama.

On Sunday, FlyGLO LLC filed a voluntary petition for bankruptcy in federal court in New Orleans, listing assets and liabilities of between $10 million and $50 million, with up to 49 creditors.

According to court papers, GLO's largest unsecured creditor is GE Engine Services, of Ohio, which is owed nearly $980,000.

GLO leases three 30-passenger Saab 340B aircraft, which are operated by a third-party company, Corporate Flight Management Inc.

According to court papers, Corporate Flight Management notified GLO this month that the airline had breached its contract because it fell behind on payments dating back to March.

As a result, Corporate Flight Management notified GLO and the Department of Transportation that the contract was terminated, with a 10-day window for taking effect. 

GLO disputes that it was in default on its contract. 

The company moved more than 32,300 passengers through the New Orleans airport in 2016 and was on track to serve about 40,000 in 2017, according to its federal court filings, which claim the service is "essential to bringing visitors and business people in and out of New Orleans and the Gulf South."

In a statement Monday, Jordan Mitchell, a GLO spokesman, blamed the reorganization on the airline's dispute with Corporate Flight Management. He said GLO was working toward "a solution that will get us back flying a full schedule."

"After raising serious concerns over its performance and business practices, rather than find solutions, the air carrier unilaterally terminated its contract to operate GLO’s program," the company said. "This entirely unjustified action has put GLO’s operations and the financial health of many of GLO’s partners at risk."

GLO founder and CEO Trey Fayard did not return a message Monday. In the statement, he called the bankruptcy filing "a difficult decision, but a necessary one to protect everyone involved."

GLO "directly and indirectly" supports 79 jobs and has a payroll of more than $2.8 million, records show.

When the service was announced in 2015, many local officials hailed the startup as one that would improve connections throughout the Gulf Coast and in turn boost New Orleans' standing in the business community.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.theadvocate.com

Cessna T210N Turbo Centurion, MVMT Consulting LLC, N6218Y: Accident occurred April 24, 2017 at Banning Municipal Airport (KBNG), Riverside County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

MVMT Consulting LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6218Y

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA090
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 24, 2017 in Banning, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA T210N, registration: N6218Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 24, 2017, about 1345 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T-210N, N6218Y, was substantially damaged when it touched down short of the runway at Banning Municipal Airport (BNG), Banning, California, following an engine power loss. The private pilot received minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight.

According to the BNG airport attendant, he was in his office at BNG when he heard the pilot announce on the BNG common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) that he had experienced a "massive power failure" and that he "was coming in hot for runway 26" via a right traffic pattern. The attendant looked out his office window and saw the airplane on a right downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 26; he thought the airplane was appropriately situated to make a normal landing. The attendant was aware that a helicopter was planning to depart BNG at that time, and radioed an advisory to the airplane, but did not hear any response from the airplane.

From his office, the attendant then watched the airplane descend on the final approach leg for runway 26. The airplane's approach appeared normal until the attendant observed a large "cloud of dust," and the attendant realized that there was a problem with the landing. The attendant exited his office, and drove out to the airplane. The pilot emerged from the airplane with some facial injuries, and the attendant suggested that he take the pilot to the hospital, to which the pilot agreed. Enroute to the hospital in the attendant's truck, the pilot requested that he be dropped at a rental car facility instead; the attendant then drove them to a local car rental facility, where the pilot obtained a rental car. The pilot told the attendant that he had left some personal items in the airplane, and needed to retrieve them prior to obtaining medical care. He then followed the attendant back to BNG.

The two vehicles arrived back at BNG about 1420, where they were stopped by Banning Police Department officers. The officers prevented the airport attendant from returning to the airplane, but allowed the pilot to drive to the airplane. Shortly after that, the pilot was detained by personnel from other law enforcement agencies who had responded to the scene, for reasons unrelated to the accident.

Sometime thereafter, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector from the Riverside Flight Standards District Office arrived on scene. He was allowed a brief opportunity by the law enforcement personnel to question the pilot, and to examine the airplane. The airplane was moved to a hangar, and examined in more detail a few weeks later.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

FAA records indicated that the pilot obtained his private pilot certificate in July 2011, and that his most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued in September 2015. FAA records indicated that the pilot had purchased the airplane in March 2017, and that he also owned a Mooney M20 series airplane, N231GV.

A partially-completed "Pilot Logbook" was recovered from the airplane. Although it did not bear any ownership or identification information, the airplane registration numbers in the entries matched the two airplanes registered to the pilot. No endorsements were present in the logbook.

The first logbook entry was dated 12/14/16, and the first page of the logbook indicated that the pilot had 1,183 hours of flight experience. The final, partially completed page of the logbook indicated that the pilot had about 1,458 hours of flight experience.

The first 39 logbook entries were for the pilot's Mooney. The accident Cessna was first noted in this logbook on 1/25/17. With the exception of two flights in the Mooney, the remaining 76 flights were in the Cessna, for a total flight time in the Cessna of about 185 hours.

The logbook contained two entries for 4/23/17, the day prior to the accident. The first entry indicated a flight from ALN (St. Louis Regional Airport, Alton/St Louis, Illinois) to HQZ (Mesquite Metro Airport, Mesquite, Texas), with a flight duration of 2.5 hours. The second flight was from HQZ to SGR (Sugar Land Regional Airport, Houston, Texas), with a duration of 1.2 hours.

The final entries in the logbook were dated 4/24/17, the day of the accident. The first leg for that day was listed as being from SGR (to DMN, with a duration of 4.3 hours. The second and final entry indicated a departure airport of DMN, but no destination or flight duration.

Within a few hours of the accident, for reasons unrelated to the accident, the pilot was incarcerated by law enforcement agents, and thereby rendered unavailable for any further NTSB or FAA communications regarding this accident investigation.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was manufactured in 1981, and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520 series engine. According to the FAA inspector, the airplane hour meter indicated that it had a total time in service of about 2,635 hours. No maintenance records were able to be obtained for the investigation.

Fuel System

The airplane was equipped with two wing (main) fuel tanks, for a total usable fuel capacity of 89 gallons. Two small reservoir tanks, one per side, were situated between their respective main fuel tanks and the fuel selector valve (FSV). Each of the four tanks was equipped with its own sump drain valve. The FSV had three settings, LEFT, OFF, and RIGHT.

An electric auxiliary fuel pump was located just downstream of the FSV. Beyond the auxiliary fuel pump, in the direction of fuel flow, were the fuel strainer and then the engine driven fuel pump (EDP). The EDP fed fuel to the fuel/air control unit, which in turn provided metered, pressurized fuel to the fuel manifold valve.

The fuel manifold valve was mounted on top of the engine, and its installation included one inlet line and six outlet lines, one per cylinder. Normal valve function closes off flow to the cylinders when the inlet fuel pressure falls below a value of about 4 pounds per square inch (psi). When the valve closes, fuel will typically be retained in the valve body.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The airport was equipped with an automated weather observation system (AWOS), but the AWOS data was not obtained by the investigation. The National Weather Service weather observations for the city of Cabazon, located about 2 miles east of BNG, indicated that the winds were from the west to west-northwest at 17 mph, with gusts to 28 mph. Sky condition was clear, and the temperature was about 15° C, with a dew point of 9° C.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The airport was equipped with a single paved runway, designated 8/26. The runway measured 4,955 feet by 100 feet, and airport elevation was 2,222 feet msl. Runway 26 had a displaced threshold of about 300 feet, and was equipped with a two-light pulsating precision approach path indicator (PAPI). It was not equipped with an air traffic control tower; BNG air traffic communications and coordination were accomplished via the CTAF. The CTAF communications were not recorded.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Ground scars indicated that the airplane touched down about 180 feet short of the paved beginning of runway 26. The airplane came to rest a few feet beyond the beginning of the pavement, after it penetrated a wire fence just east of the runway. The nose gear had collapsed sometime during the event, and the tailcone, right wing, right horizontal stabilizer, and right elevator exhibited crumpling, crush, and tearing damage.

As a result of his examination on the day of the accident, the FAA inspector reported that the left fuel tank was devoid of fuel, and that the right fuel tank was between one-eighth and one-quarter full. Neither wing fuel tank was breached. The FAA inspector found the fuel selector valve in the "OFF" position, but was unable to determine when it was placed in that position, or by whom. The airplane was placed in a secure hangar for further, examination at a later date.

The airplane was examined in greater detail about a month after the accident by an NTSB investigator and a certificated mechanic with an Inspection Authorization rating. The examination and results are described in the sequence that the examination was conducted. The airplane was resting on its main gear, in an approximately level pitch attitude, its nose supported by hangar equipment. The engine remained attached to the airframe, and the propeller remained attached to the engine. The three propeller blades displayed limited but varying amounts of aft bending. 

The FSV handle was found in the OFF position. Actuation of the fuel strainer drain handle in the engine compartment did not result in any liquid being drained from the fuel strainer. The fuel line from the fuel/air control unit to the fuel manifold valve was then disconnected at the fuel manifold valve; no fuel was present in that line.

The left fuel tank was visually observed to be empty, and no fuel was obtained from the left wing sump drain when it was activated. The FSV handle was placed in the LEFT wing tank position, and less than an ounce of clear fuel was obtained from the open end of the line that was previously disconnected at the fuel manifold valve. The auxiliary fuel pump was then turned on, and about 12 ounces of fuel were collected from that disconnected line end before the flow ceased.

The right tank fuel depth measured about 4.5 inches. The tank was then drained, which yielded a total of about 27 gallons of fuel. Fuel was obtained from the left and right reservoir tank sump drains.

The fuel manifold valve was partly disassembled, and fuel was present in the valve body. The diaphragm was pliable and intact, and the screen was clean. The spark plug electrodes appeared normal, and the engine was able to be rotated easily by hand. Thumb compressions and magneto-produced sparks were observed at all cylinders, in proper firing order sequence.

No evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction was noted during the examination of the recovered airframe and engine.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Previous Fuel Purchases

According to an airport attendant at Deming Municipal Airport (DMN), Deming, New Mexico, the airplane was fueled with 74.9 gallons about 1000 local time on the morning of the accident. No records of any other fuel purchases were obtained.

Investigation Uncertainties or Unknowns

Several details of the flight and accident events were unable to be determined with certainty, as noted below.

The pilot's recounts of the sequence of events varied, but most information indicated that he had departed DMN earlier that day, and was destined for Corona Municipal Airport (AJO), Corona, California. However, it was unclear whether he made any interim stops after he departed DMN.

According to verbal reports from the US Customs and Border Patrol Air and Marine Operations Center (AMOC), shortly before the accident, the AMOC radar tracked the airplane departing from Jacquelin Cochran Airport (TRM), Thermal, California. However, multiple NTSB requests to the AMOC for more specific or comprehensive tracking or flight data did not result in the provision of any additional information. For reference and orientation purposes, TRM is situated between the pilot's stated departure and destination airports (DMN and AJO), and also between the departure airport and the accident airport (DMN and BNG). TRM is about 433 nm west of DMN, and about 39 nm east of BNG. AJO is about 34 nm west of BNG.

The pilot did not specify his altitude or location when he experienced the power loss, or any details regarding his flight path, altitude, or configuration as he maneuvered towards BNG. The pilot provided unclear and conflicting reports about whether the power loss was partial, complete, or initially a partial power loss that subsequently degraded to a complete power loss. Finally, he did not provide any information regarding his post power loss or post accident actions. Investigation attempts to communicate with the pilot after the day of the accident were unsuccessful.

The investigation was unable to determine when, or by whom, the fuel selector valve was placed in the OFF position. The investigation was unable to determine whether that occurred inadvertently in flight, intentionally in flight in preparation for the emergency landing, or after the accident by either the pilot or first responders.

No air traffic control communications or radar tracking data regarding the flight were able to be obtained, and no airport communications were recorded.


Precautionary & Forced Landings

Due to the lack of information provided by the pilot, the investigation was unable to determine the pilot's options, or his decisions and actions, after he detected the engine problem. According to the Airplane Flying Handbook ("AFH", FAA-H-8083), two types of emergency landings are 'Forced landings' and 'Precautionary landings.' A forced landing is defined as an "immediate landing, on or off an airport, necessitated by the inability to continue further flight," and the typical initiator is a complete loss of engine power in a single engine airplane. A precautionary landing is a "premeditated landing, on or off an airport, when further flight is possible but inadvisable." The AFH continued with "A precautionary landing, generally, is less hazardous than a forced landing because the pilot has more time for terrain selection and the planning of the approach. In addition, the pilot can use power to compensate for errors in judgment or technique."

The AFH then stated that "When the pilot has time to maneuver, the planning of the approach should be governed by" wind direction and velocity, dimensions and slope of the selected landing area, and obstacles in the final approach path. The AFH continued with "when compromises have to be made, the pilot should aim for a wind/obstacle/terrain combination that permits a final approach with some margin for error in judgment or technique."

Neither the AFH nor any other FAA guidance elaborated on principles or techniques to provide the "margin" advocated above. However, an internet search yielded multiple relevant articles from sources including AOPA (Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association), Aviation Safety magazine, and Skybrary. These articles concerned the topic of "energy management" as it related to powered and unpowered flight.

Energy is a primary parameter for the alteration of a flight path. With limited or no engine power, the primary energy sources are airplane speed and altitude; a pilot's manipulation of these will determine the rate of energy loss. The control of energy dissipation, referred to as "energy management," determines the range capability of the unpowered (gliding) airplane. During a low-powered or unpowered approach, selection of the ground track towards the intended landing location is a key component of energy management. Appropriate track selection and energy management will help ensure that sufficient altitude and/or airspeed is available to provide the corrective-action "margin" advocated above by the AFH. Generally, the most direct path to a point close to the landing area threshold, conducted at best glide speed, and combined with delayed deployment of flaps and landing gear, will be the most conservative energy management strategy.

Finally, the AFH noted that "experience shows that a collision with obstacles at the end of a ground roll…is much less hazardous than striking an obstacle at flying speed before the touchdown point is reached."

Alex Michael Furman, 24, was charged with multiple drug counts after marijuana oil and cash were found on his plane (Courtesy of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department). 




Corona, California,  man whose plane made a hard landing at Banning Municipal Airport last week had about a half-million dollars in cash and 32 jars of concentrated cannabis oil on board, according to court documents.

Alex Michael Furman, 24, is charged with a felony count of possessing more than $100,000 worth of money obtained from the sale, transportation or manufacture of a controlled substance. He also is charged with two misdemeanors: possessing and transporting marijuana for sale, according to a complaint filed by the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office. He has pleaded not guilty.

Furman’s bail was initially set at $1 million, but because authorities said they don’t know how much money he may have, they asked a judge to order him held without bail until his case is transferred; the U.S. Attorney’s Office will be taking over prosecution of the case from the Riverside County District Attorney’s Office.

Riverside County Superior Court Judge Steven G. Counelis approved the no-bail request, court documents show. Another bail-review hearing is scheduled for Friday and a preliminary hearing could be held next week, records show.

On the afternoon of April 24, Furman’s Cessna 210 landed hard. It hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, but Furman was not seriously injured, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

A declaration filed for the bail-review hearing says that after Furman “crashed his airplane,” he was found to be carrying both the $500,000 in cash and “honey oil.” Local sheriff’s investigators and the federal Drug Enforcement Administration were summoned and Furman was arrested. He declined to make a statement at the time, the declaration says.

Cannabis oil, sometimes called honey oil, wax or other nicknames, is an extract of marijuana that concentrates the plant’s high-inducing chemical compounds.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.pe.com The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


MVMT Consulting LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N6218Y

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA090 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 24, 2017 in Banning, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA T210N, registration: N6218Y
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 24, 2017, about 1345 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T-210N, N6218Y, was substantially damaged when it landed short of the runway during a precautionary landing attempt at Banning Municipal Airport (BNG), Banning, California. The private pilot received minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. 

According to the BNG airport attendant, he was in his office at BNG when he heard the pilot announce on the BNG common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) that he had experienced a "massive power failure" and that he "was coming in hot for runway 26" via a right traffic pattern. The attendant looked out his office window and saw the airplane on a right downwind for runway 26; he thought the airplane appeared to be appropriately situated to make a normal landing. The attendant was aware that a helicopter was planning to depart BNG at that time, and radioed an advisory to the Cessna pilot, but the pilot never responded. 

Still from his office, the attendant then watched the airplane descend on final for landing; again it appeared normal. However, he then observed a large "cloud of dust" and realized that the airplane did not make the runway. He hurried to his truck and drove out to the airplane. The pilot emerged with a profusely bleeding nose or face, and the attendant suggested that he take the pilot to the hospital, to which the pilot agreed. Enroute to the hospital in the attendant's truck, the pilot requested that he be dropped at a rental car facility instead; the attendant then drove them to a local car rental facility, where the pilot successfully obtained a rental car. The pilot told the attendant that he had left some personal items in the airplane, and needed to retrieve them prior to obtaining medical care. He then followed the attendant back to BNG.

The two vehicles arrived back at BNG about 1420, where they were stopped by Banning Police officers. The police prevented the airport attendant from returning to the airplane, but did allow the pilot to drive to the airplane. Shortly after that, the pilot was detained by law enforcement personnel, for reasons unrelated to the accident. 

Sometime thereafter, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector from the Riverside Flight Standards District Office arrived at the scene. He was given a brief opportunity to question the pilot, and to examine the airplane. The pilot's recitation of the sequence of events varied, but it was eventually determined that he had departed Deming Municipal Airport (DMN), Deming, New Mexico, and was destined for Corona Municipal Airport (AJO), Corona, California. Somewhere near BNG, he experienced a partial power loss. Air traffic controllers advised the pilot that BNG was the nearest airport, and he diverted there for a precautionary landing. 

Ground scars indicated that the airplane touched down about 180 feet short of the threshold of runway 26. The airplane came to rest a few feet beyond the beginning of the runway, and its nose gear had collapsed sometime during the rollout. The FAA inspector reported that the left fuel tank was completely empty, and the right fuel tank was between one eighth and one quarter full. Neither tank was breached. The FAA inspector found the fuel selector valve in the "OFF" position, but was unable to determine when it was placed in that position, or by whom. The airplane was placed in a secure hangar for further, subsequent examination.

According to the airport attendant at DMN, the airplane was fueled with 74.9 gallons about 1000 local time on the day of the accident. Radar tracking data indicated that prior to the accident at BNG, the airplane had landed at Jacquelin Cochran Airport (TRM), Thermal, California. TRM is about 433 nm west of DMN, and about 39 nm east of BNG. AJO is about 34 nm west of BNG. 

Alex Michael Furman, 24, was arrested on multiple drug related counts after a plane crash at the Banning Municipal Airport on Monday.
 (Courtesy of the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department). 


 


FAA records indicated that the pilot obtained his private pilot certificate in July 2011, and that he owned a Mooney M20 series airplane. Information provided by the FAA inspector indicated that the pilot had purchased the Cessna within a few weeks of the accident. The airplane was manufactured in 1981, and was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520 series engine.

A plane’s hard landing at the Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, was only the beginning.

The case eventually involved federal agents and ended with the arrest of a 24-year-old Corona man who authorities say had drugs and a large amount of currency derived from drug sales.

After the hard landing at 1:40 p.m. Monday, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department’s Special Investigations Unit were called to the Banning Municipal Airport and a 24-year-old Corona man was arrested.

Alex Michael Furman was arrested at 2:30 p.m. Monday on suspicion of several drug-related counts that included possessing more than $100,000-worth of sales-related currency and possessing, selling and transporting marijuana, according to online jail records.

He was taken into custody on Hathaway Street near the airport, jail records show and later booked at Larry D. Smith Correctional Facility in Banning with bail set at $1 million; he remained there Thursday, according to the records.

On Monday afternoon, a Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, had a hard landing at the airport, said Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor.

The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.

It was not immediately clear whether the drugs or currency Furman was arrested in connection with were on the plane itself. No other information about the incident was available.


Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com






BANNING, CA - An investigation into a small plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport resulted in the arrest of a Corona man for alleged marijuana possession and transportation for sale, sheriff's deputies said Thursday.

Alex Furman, 24, was arrested following the Monday crash, in which a Cessna 210 struck into a small fence at the airport at about 1:40 p.m. The plane also tipped onto its nose during the hard landing, but the pilot was not seriously hurt during the incident, according to the FAA.

According to Lt. Paul Bennett, the sheriff's department, along with the Drug Enforcement Administration and Banning Police Department began looking into the crash, though investigators did not specify what exactly led to the drug charges. Deputies also did not confirm if Furman was the Cessna's pilot.

Prosecutors charged Furman Wednesday with possession of more than $100,000 obtained from a transaction involving a controlled substance, possession of marijuana for sale, and transportation of marijuana for sale.

Furman pleaded not guilty to all charges and will return to court in Banning Monday for a felony settlement conference, according to court records.

He was being held in lieu of $1 million bail.

Original article can be found here: https://patch.com

Banning police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, a city spokesman said.

A Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, landed hard at Banning Municipal Airport about 1:40 p.m., said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.

The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.

In an emailed statement, city spokesman Philip Southard said the incident was reported to Banning police as a distress call and possible plane crash.

Southard did not answer why police were involved. He said the FAA and other agencies are assisting with the investigation.

Airport attendant Michael Lopez said the pilot of a Cessna had a hard landing when the nose gear collapsed. There were no passengers, Lopez said.

Law enforcement was on scene at the east end of the runway, Lopez said.


Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com

Banning police and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating a plane crash at Banning Municipal Airport on Monday, April 24, a city spokesman said.

A Cessna 210, tail number N6218Y, landed hard at Banning Municipal Airport about 1:40 p.m., said Ian Gregor, a spokesman with the Federal Aviation Administration.


The plane hit a fence and tipped up on its nose, Gregor said. The pilot was not seriously injured, he added.


Banning police officers responded to a report of a distress call and possible plane crash at the airport, said city spokesman Philip Southard.


In an emailed statement, Southard said the incident was reported to Banning police as a distress call and possible plane crash.


Southard did not answer why police were involved. He said the FAA and other agencies are assisting with the investigation.


Airport attendant Michael Lopez said the pilot of a Cessna had a hard landing when the nose gear collapsed. There were no passengers, Lopez said.


Law enforcement was on scene at the east end of the runway, Lopez said.


Original article can be found here: http://www.pe.com

Incident occurred April 24, 2017 at Spirit of St Louis Airport (KSUS), St. Louis, Missouri





CHESTERFIELD, MO (KTVI)-A single-engine aircraft crashed Monday afternoon at Spirit of St. Louis Airport in Chesterfield, MO. 

The Monarch Fire Protection District confirms that the pilot was able to get safely out of the plane and was not injured.

The plane could be seen sitting sideways on the north runway with a wingtip on the ground. It appeared to have lost a wheel.

Original article can be found here: http://fox2now.com 





CHESTERFIELD, Mo. (KMOV.com) -- Multiple agencies are responding to the scene of a single-engine plane crash at the Spirit of St. Louis Airport.

The call came into Monarch police at around 3:30 p.m. Monday, but there was no distress call made, leading authorities to believe the plane suffered a hard landing. 

The plane is currently tipped up on one wing, but the pilot was not harmed. 

Story and video:  http://www.kmov.com

Aeronca 7AC, N1478E: Aircraft broke loose from tie down and struck two (2) other aircraft














AIRCRAFT:    1946 Aeronca 7AC, N1478E s/n 7AC 5041                           

ENGINE -      Continental A65-8  s/n  1119918        

PROPELLER –  Sensinich Wood Prop  s/n  AH4029   

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   TT   UNKNOWN  SMOH 323.9   as of 11/4/2016     
Last Overhauled in 1993

AIRFRAME:     2404.1 TT   as of 11/142016
Times are estimated from log entries

OTHER EQUIPMENT:   No Avionics               

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  Aircraft broke loose from tie down and struck two other aircraft       

 DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Left/right wings and wing tips damaged, elevators damage  See attached photos  Hidden damage unknown.

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:   Brookhaven Airport,  Brookhaven NY

REMARKS:     Sold AS IS/WHERE IS.  Suggest visual inspection,  Log books prior to 1974 not available.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N1478E.htm

Arnold Gerald Leto III: Pilot sentenced to prison for flying without a license




An Orange County man has been sentenced to ten months in prison for flying a plane out of the Santa Monica Airport without a license. 

Last October, Arnold Gerald Leto III pleaded guilty to the charges, admitting to flying a Cessna Citation aircraft from Santa Monica Airport to Phoenix in 2015. In April, 2016, Leto piloted a Falcone 10 turbo-jet aircraft from Van Nuys Airport to Las Vegas, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office. On both occasions, Leto had passengers onboard.

The FAA has revoked Leto’s remaining airman certificates after finding various violations of Federal aviation regulations. Leto could have faced a statutory maximum sentence of six years in federal prison.

“Federal regulations governing the operation of aircraft and other common carriers are designed to protect the traveling public,” United States Attorney Eileen M. Decker said. “The investigation into Mr. Leto shows that he flagrantly violated these rules – and continued to do so after the FAA took action to take him out of the air. A swift and thorough investigation by the Department of Transportation has now improved the safety of all air travelers.”

The Department of Transportation Office of Inspector General investigated the case with assistance from the FAA. A Line Service Technician at the Van Nuys airport told the FAA inspector he saw Leto take off with seven or eight passengers without a second pilot April 8 last year, according to court documents. The FAA requires a pilot and co-pilot as minimum crew for the Cessna Model involved in the incident.

In court documents, Leto’s attorney argued for leniency, saying Leto cooperated with the FAA and provided information about his own conduct as well as several other people possibly engaged in criminal activity. According to the documents, Leto attempted to organize a sting that “got out of hand” when drug traffickers came to his “home with guns and demanded that he transport 500 pounds of Marijuana.” Leto was arrested during the incident.

Original article can be found here:   http://smdp.com

An Irvine man who flew private jets without a valid license was sentenced Monday to 10 months in prison.

Arnold Gerald Leto III last year pleaded guilty to illegally flying aircraft on two separate occasions, despite not having a required “airman certificate,” according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

Along with the prison time, Leto, 36, was ordered to serve a year of supervised release after he is released, and to pay a $5,500 fine.

Leto, president of Irvine-based Aviation Financial Services, lost his pilot’s license after “various violations of federal aviation regulations,” according to the U.S. Attorney’s office.

In his plea deal, Leto admitted to piloting a Cessna Citation from Santa Monica to Phoenix in January 2015, and a Falcon 10 turbo jet from Van Nuys Airport to Las Vegas in April 2016. During both trips, there were paid passengers.

Had the case gone to trial, Leto could have faced up to six years in prison.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ocregister.com

May 19, 2016 -   An Irvine man was indicted Thursday for flying private jets without being certified to do so.

Arnold Gerald Leto III, 36, was indicted by a federal grand jury on two counts of piloting a plane without a license, according to court documents.

Leto piloted a twin engine Falcon 10 turbojet from Van Nuys Airport to Las Vegas on April 8 and a Cessna Citation turbojet on Jan. 30, 2015 from Santa Monica to Phoenix, the indictment said.

Prosecutors believe Leto piloted the Falcon 10 aircraft with about 8 people on board without the required co-pilot and had not been certified to operate the plane.

Leto, president of Irvine-based Aviation Financial Services Inc., had his pilot’s license revoked in January. It was unclear why.

Furthermore, he did not have a turbo-jet rating required to fly the planes.

“The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) requires pilots to be rated and trained for that plane (Falcon 10),” Federal prosecutor Mark Williams said when Leto was charged in April. “He was taking a large amount of passengers and charging significant amounts of money to do so.”

Calls and email to Leto’s attorney were not immediately returned.

He faces up to six years in federal prison. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ocregister.com

Orange County Pilot Charged with Flying Private Jet with Passengers Onboard without Having Proper License Issued by Federal Aviation Administration 

Department of Justice
U.S. Attorney’s Office
Central District of California
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Wednesday, April 27, 2016

LOS ANGELES – An Irvine man was arrested this morning on federal charges of illegally flying a twin-engine Falcon 10 turbojet airplane with passengers onboard without having a valid pilot’s license.

Arnold Gerald Leto III, 36, was charged in a criminal complaint filed yesterday in United States District court with operating an aircraft in air transportation without a valid airman’s certificate.

The affidavit in support of the criminal complaint alleges that Leto’s pilot’s license was revoked earlier this year, he operated the Falcon without having the required co-pilot, and he was never certified to fly this type of aircraft.

Leto is scheduled to be arraigned on the felony offense this afternoon in United States District Court.

Leto is charged will illegally flying the Falcon 10 from Van Nuys Airport to Las Vegas, Nevada, on April 8. Leto allegedly operated the aircraft with approximately eight passengers on board.

“Federal regulations governing the operation of aircraft and other common carriers are designed to protect the traveling public,” said United States Attorney Eileen M. Decker. “The investigation into Mr. Leto shows that he flagrantly violated these rules – and continued to do so after the FAA took action to take him out of the air. A swift and thorough investigation by the Department of Transportation has now improved the safety of all air travelers.”

According to the complaint, the aircraft that Leo piloted alone is a complex aircraft that requires two pilots to operate. Furthermore, Leto’s defendant’s pilot certificate – which he failed to surrender after it was revoked by the Federal Aviation Administration in January – did not have a turbojet-type rating that would authorize him to fly that airplane.

A criminal complaint contains allegations that a defendant has committed a crime. Every defendant is presumed to be innocent until and unless proven guilty in court.

The charge alleged in the complaint carries a statutory maximum penalty of three years federal prison.

This case was investigated by the Department of Transportation – Office of Inspector General, with assistance by the Federal Aviation Administration.

“This case that alleges operating an aircraft without a valid airman’s certificate is a clear signal that those who would seek to circumvent or disregard transportation-related laws and regulations will face serious repercussions,” said William Swallow, regional Special Agent-In-Charge, U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of Inspector General. “Our agents will continue to work with federal, state, and local authorities to ensure safety for the traveling public.”

Original article can be found here:  https://www.justice.gov

Federal authorities have arrested and charged an Irvine man who flew a private jet with eight passengers after his pilot’s license had been revoked.

On April 8, Arnold Gerald Leto III, 36, flew a twin-engine Falcon 10 turbojet from Van Nuys Airport to Las Vegas, said federal prosecutor Mark Williams.

His pilot’s license was revoked in January for unknown reasons and was not certified to fly the turbojet.

“Even if he had his license, it still did not authorize him to operate the twin turbojet plane,” he said.

“The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) requires pilots to be rated and trained for that plane (Falcon 10),” Williams said. “He was taking a large amount of passengers and charging significant amounts of money to do so.”

Prosecutors believe Leto also flew the plane without a co-pilot, as required under FAA regulations.

Leto is the president of Irvine-based Aviation Financial Services Inc. and flies private jets for a living, Williams said.

He could not be reached Wednesday afternoon.

Authorities believe Leto has operated other flights since having his license revoked, Williams said.

“We have evidence of him flying more than once without a valid license,” Williams said.

He faces up to three years in federal prison.

A former Newport Beach pilot was charged in January of flying two Alaska Airlines flights in 2014 while intoxicated.

On June, 20, 2014, David Arntson, 60, was randomly tested minutes after his flight from Portland, Ore., to John Wayne Airport. His blood alcohol concentration level read 0.142 percent.

He quit his job before he could be fired. His case is still pending.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ocregister.com

Abnormal Runway Contact: Cirrus SR22, N94LP; fatal accident occurred April 24, 2017 at Meriden Markham Municipal Airport (KMMK), Meriden, New Haven County, Connecticut

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Enfield, Connecticut
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N94LP

Location: Wallingford, CT
Accident Number: ERA17FA167
Date & Time: 04/24/2017, 1825 EDT
Registration: N94LP
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On April 24, 2017, about 1825 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, N94LP, impacted terrain in Wallingford, Connecticut, following a loss of control during an aborted landing at Meriden Markham Municipal Airport (MMK), Meriden, Connecticut. The private pilot was fatally injured and the passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and a postcrash fire. The airplane was privately owned and was being operated by the pilot as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

According to witness statements and security camera video, about 1740, the airplane departed the airport to the east and returned to the airport around 1817. Witnesses described that the airplane was "fast and high" as it approached runway 18. The airplane then flared about 10 ft above the runway before it abruptly descended and touched down about halfway down the runway. The airplane bounced two or three times and became airborne again, then banked about 30° to the left and climbed to airport traffic pattern altitude.

The pilot's second landing approach appeared to be slower, but the airplane was again high. The airplane flared about 10 ft above the runway, abruptly descended, and touched down about halfway down the runway. It bounced two or three times; the pilot then initiated a go-around. One witness described that, during the subsequent climb, the airplane entered a 40° nose-up attitude and it sounded as if the airplane was "hanging on its prop." About 75 ft above the ground, the airplane rolled into a steep left descending turn. It then impacted the ground, cartwheeled, impacted the airport perimeter (security) fence, slid across the ground while continuing to turn to the left, came to rest, and caught fire.

According to the passenger, who was the pilot's son, the accident flight was his father's first flight in the airplane without an instructor and was a proficiency flight in preparation for an upcoming trip to North Carolina. The passenger stated that he did not handle the flight controls during the accident flight and that there were no unusual noises or issues with the airplane. During the pilot's first landing attempt, which was supposed to have been a full-stop landing, the pilot said "oops," commenced a go-around, then said, "let's try it again." During the second landing attempt, the airplane bounced "a couple of times" and the bounces were "pretty high."

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and pilot records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 1, 2017. On that date, he reported about 1,200 total hours of flight experience.

The pilot had flown out of MMK for several years. He previously owned a Piper PA-28-180, which he recently sold, and had purchased the accident airplane about 3 weeks before the accident. After the purchase of the airplane, he had taken transition training from a local flight instructor who also owned an SR22. The pilot received ground instruction from the flight instructor as well as 2 hours of dual instruction in the flight instructor's SR22, and 8.5 hours of dual instruction in the accident airplane. During that time, the pilot performed 12 landings.

The flight instructor stated that he used the Cirrus Transition Training Manual as a guide for the accident pilot's training, instructed him in the use of the airplane's avionics, and had taught him to use more right rudder input during climb. He endorsed the pilot for operation of high-performance airplanes (airplanes equipped with engines producing 200 horsepower or greater) on April 23, 2017, the day before the accident. Review of pilot records revealed that the pilot's most recent flight review occurred on October 30, 2014.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a low-wing, fully cantilevered, single-engine monoplane of composite construction. It was equipped with fixed tricycle configuration landing gear, with a castering nose wheel, and steering was accomplished via differential braking on the main wheels. It was also equipped with a ballistic recovery system known as the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS), which could, under certain conditions, lower the entire airplane to the ground in an emergency. It was powered by a fuel-injected, horizontally opposed, air-cooled, 310-horsepower, Continental IO-550-N27B engine, driving a constant-speed, variable pitch Hartzell three-bladed propeller.

According to FAA and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 2005. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on March 13, 2017. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued about 1,229 total hours of operation.

The four-seat cabin included a composite roll cage within the fuselage structure to provide roll protection for the cabin occupants and was accessed through doors on either side of the fuselage. The seats were equipped with 4-point, integrated seat belt and shoulder harness assemblies with inertia reels, and seat bottoms with an integral aluminum honeycomb core designed to crush under impact to absorb downward loads. The Avidyne Entegra integrated aircraft instrumentation system comprised a primary flight display (PFD) and multi-function display (MFD).

The flight controls for ailerons, elevator, and rudder were conventional in design. The control surfaces were pilot-controlled through either of two single-handed side-control yokes mounted beneath the instrument panel. Roll and pitch trim were available through an electric button on the top of each side-control yoke. The yaw trim system employed a ground-adjustable trim tab. Neutral rudder position was held by a ground-adjustable spring cartridge that was bolted to the left rudder pedal torque tube and center console assembly, which provided a centering force regardless of the direction of control surface deflection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The recorded weather conditions at MMK at 1833 included wind from 180° at 5 knots, 10 statute miles visibility, few clouds at 300 ft, an overcast ceiling at 12,000 ft, temperature 16°C, dew point 2°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

According to FAA Chart Supplements, MMK was owned by the City of Meriden, Connecticut, and was classified by the FAA as a non-towered, public use airport. The airport elevation was 103 ft mean sea level and there was one runway oriented in a 18/36 configuration. Runway 18 was asphalt and was in good condition; it measured 3,100 ft long by 75 ft wide.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Runway Examination

Examination of runway 18 revealed black tire marks in an S-shaped (sinusoidal) pattern co-located with white paint transfer marks on the surface of the runway pavement. The tire marks and paint transfer marks were discovered in two locations about 1,350 ft from the beginning of runway 18. Both the tire marks and paint transfer marks were consistent with nose wheel shimmy and nose wheel pant contact.

Accident Site Examination

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane first made ground contact with the left wingtip. After cartwheeling and subsequently impacting and breaching a 30-ft section of the 8-ft-tall airport security fence, the airplane slid along a public roadway on an approximate 078° magnetic heading. About 115 ft from the initial impact point, the airplane came to rest in the northbound travel lane against an earthen berm. Most of the airplane was then consumed by a postcrash fire.

A 115-ft-long and 62-ft-wide debris path extended from the initial impact point to the main wreckage. It contained the propeller, which was found buried beneath the shoulder of the southbound travel lane about 37 ft from the initial impact point; the engine cowling, which came to rest about 52 ft from the initial impact point; the left wing tip and a portion of the outer left wing panel, which came to rest about 81 ft from the initial impact point; and the top rail of the breached section of airport security fence, which came to rest about 92 ft from the initial impact point. It also contained smaller components of the airplane and portions of the airplane structure.

Airplane Examination

Examination of the airplane revealed no evidence of any preimpact failure or malfunction of the airplane or flight controls.

The fuselage came to rest upright and was mostly consumed by fire. The empennage was separated from the aft fuselage, inverted, and displayed impact and fire damage.

The outboard section of the left wing and the left wing tip separated during the impact sequence. The remaining portion of the left wing remained in its mounting location and exhibited impact and fire damage. The left aileron was almost completely consumed by fire. Pooled aluminum was located on the ground aft of the wing at the mounting location of the left wing flap along with the remains of a flap hinge.

The right wing exhibited impact and fire damage. The inboard third of the right aileron was consumed by fire. Pooled aluminum was located on the ground aft of the wing at the mounting location of the right wing flap along with the remains of a flap hinge.

Aileron control cable continuity was verified from the remains of the cabin to the ailerons. The flap actuator was fully extended, consistent with the wing flaps in the retracted position.

The horizontal stabilizer remained attached to the empennage and exhibited impact and fire damage. The right elevator was mostly consumed by fire, with the outboard portion and elevator tip still present. The left elevator was mostly consumed by fire, with the leading edge and tip still present. Elevator control cable continuity was verified from the remains of the cabin to the elevators.

The vertical stabilizer was impact and fire damaged and remained attached to the empennage. The rudder also exhibited impact and fire damage. Rudder control cable continuity was verified from the remains of the cabin to the rudder. The pitch trim motor position could not be determined due to fire damage.

Propeller Examination

Examination of the three-bladed propeller revealed no evidence of any preimpact malfunction or failure.

The propeller remained attached to the propeller flange, but separated from the crankshaft, which fractured just aft of the propeller flange. The crankshaft fracture surface displayed 45° shear angles and a cupped appearance with blue-black discoloration in a smeared area. All three blades remained attached to the propeller hub; however, one propeller blade tip separated during the impact sequence and one propeller blade rotated 180° in the propeller hub. All three propeller blades exhibited chordwise scratching and leading-edge gouging; the gouges matched the spacing of the chain links of the airport security fence. The propeller governor remained secured to the front left side of the engine and the propeller control cable remained secured to the propeller control lever.

Engine Examination

Examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact failure or malfunction of the engine.

The engine had remained attached to the firewall via the engine control cables, the main fuel line, and the electrical wires and cables. There were no pre-accident anomalies noted with the induction system. The exhaust system components remained attached to the engine with no signs of pre-accident anomalies noted. The exhaust mufflers and shrouds sustained deformation damage.

The ignition harness remained secured to each magneto and each terminal remained secured to its respective spark plug. During crankshaft rotation, and audible snap and spark was observed from both magnetos. No pre-accident anomalies were noted with either of the magnetos.

The spark plugs had remained secured to their respective cylinders. The top spark plugs were removed and displayed normal wear with lean operation signatures and no signs of carbon or lead fouling. The bottom spark plugs were observed during the borescope inspection with no signs of lead or carbon fouling noted.

The engine-driven fuel pump remained secured to the backside of the engine Manual rotation of the drive coupling resulted in rotation of the drive shaft. No pre-accident anomalies were noted with the internal components.

The fuel lines to and from the throttle body/fuel metering unit remained secured and fuel was observed in the lines between the fuel flow transducer and the fuel metering unit. Manual rotation of the throttle lever resulted in a coinciding rotation of the drive shaft. No pre-accident anomalies were noted with the unit.

The fuel manifold valve remained secured to the engine. All fuel injection lines remained secured to the manifold valve body and the torque putty was intact. Fuel was noted within the manifold valve. The screen was not obstructed. The diaphragm remained intact and pliable and was still attached to the plunger. No pre-accident anomalies were noted with the unit.

The injector lines remained secured to the nozzles. Each nozzle was removed and inspected and no obstructions were noted. Light was visible through each nozzle jet, except for the No. 1 nozzle jet, due to bending damage.

The oil sump sustained impact deformation and puncture damage. Oil was observed leaking from the oil sump and the oil pump remained secured to the backside of the engine. The oil filter sustained thermal damage and was dented, and the internal components were charred. The oil cooler remained secured on the back left side of the engine. There were no signs of lubrication distress on the observed engine components, and no pre-accident anomalies were noted.

All six cylinders remained attached to the engine and borescope examination of the internal components revealed no preaccident anomalies. All six cylinders also produced thumb compression and suction during rotation of the drivetrain, and valve functionality was confirmed.

The crankcase remained intact with no external signs of operational distress. There were no pre-accident anomalies noted with the crankcase.

The crankshaft was fractured aft of the propeller flange. Crankshaft continuity was confirmed to the front and out to each connecting rod during manual rotation from the accessory end. No pre-accident anomalies were noted.

Camshaft continuity was confirmed during manual rotation of the upper right accessory drive gear. The rockers and valve springs functioned during the continuity test and no pre-accident anomalies were noted. The Nos. 5 and 6 pushrods displayed impact-related deformation damage.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Farmington, Connecticut, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was blunt injuries of head and trunk with fractures and aortic laceration.

The FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory conducted toxicological testing on specimens from the pilot. The toxicological testing results for the pilot were negative for carbon monoxide, and ethanol. Acetaminophen, a common over-the-counter analgesic/antipyretic, was detected in urine; it is not impairing.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Cirrus Aircraft Guidance

According to the Cirrus Design SR22 Pilot Operating Handbook and Airplane Flight Manual (Section 4, Normal Procedures);

Normal landings are made with full flaps with power on or off. Surface winds and air turbulence are usually the primary factors in determining the most comfortable approach speeds. Actual touchdown should be made with power off and on the main wheels first to reduce the landing speed and subsequent need for braking. Gently lower the nose wheel to the runway after airplane speed has diminished. This is especially important for rough or soft field landings.

In a balked landing (go around) climb, disengage autopilot, apply full power, then reduce the flap setting to 50%. If obstacles must be cleared during the go around, climb at 75-80 KIAS with 50% flaps. After clearing any obstacles, retract the flaps and accelerate to the normal flaps up climb speed.

FAA Guidance

According to the Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3B):

A stabilized descent angle is controlled throughout the approach so that the airplane lands in the center of the first third of the runway…The objective of a good, stabilized final approach is to descend at an angle and airspeed that permits the airplane to reach the desired touchdown point at an airspeed that results in minimum floating just before touchdown; in essence, a semi-stalled condition. To accomplish this, it is essential that both the descent angle and the airspeed be accurately controlled.

Regarding bouncing on touchdown, the handbook states:

When a bounce is severe, the safest procedure is to execute a go-around immediately. An attempt should not be made to salvage the landing. Full power should be applied while simultaneously maintaining directional control and lowering the nose to a safe climb attitude.

The handbook also states that, whenever landing conditions are not satisfactory, a go-around is warranted:

The assumption that an aborted landing is invariably the consequence of a poor approach, which in turn is due to insufficient experience or skill, is a fallacy. The go-around is not strictly an emergency procedure. It is a normal maneuver that is also used in an emergency situation….The earlier a condition that warrants a go-around is recognized, the safer the go-round/rejected landing is. The go-around maneuver is not inherently dangerous in itself. It becomes dangerous only when delayed unduly or executed improperly.

Attitude is always critical when close to the ground, and when power is added, a deliberate effort on the part of the pilot is required to keep the nose from pitching up prematurely. The airplane executing a go-around must be maintained in an attitude that permits a buildup of airspeed well beyond the stall point before any effort is made to gain altitude or to execute a turn. Raising the nose too early could result in a stall from which the airplane could not be recovered if the go-around is performed at a low altitude.

A concern for quickly regaining altitude during a go-around produces a natural tendency to pull the nose up. A pilot executing a go-around must accept the fact that an airplane cannot climb until it can fly, and it cannot fly below stall speed. In some circumstances, it is desirable to lower the nose briefly to gain airspeed. As soon as the appropriate climb airspeed and pitch attitude are attained, "rough trim" the airplane to relieve any adverse control pressures. More precise trim adjustments can be made when flight conditions have stabilized. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 56, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/30/2014
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1217.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10.2 hours (Total, this make and model), 1139.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10.2 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N94LP
Model/Series: SR22
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1484
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/13/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1229 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-N27B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MMK, 103 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1833 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 283°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 300 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 12000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 180°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.15 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Wallingford, CT (MMK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:None 
Destination: Wallingford, CT (MMK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1740 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: MERIDEN MARKHAM MUNI (MMK)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 103 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3100 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 41.508333, -72.827222

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA167
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 24, 2017 in Wallingford, CT
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22, registration: N94LP
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 24, 2017, about 1825 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corp. SR22, N94LP, impacted terrain in Wallingford, Connecticut during initial climb from Meriden Markham Municipal Airport (MMK), Meriden, Connecticut. The private pilot was fatally injured. The passenger was seriously injured. The airplane was destroyed. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight conducted in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot had been flying out of MMK for several years. He previously owned a Piper PA-28-180, which he had recently sold, and had purchased the accident airplane about 3 weeks prior to the accident. Since that time, he had transition training from a flight instructor.

On the day of the accident, the pilot had decided to increase his proficiency in preparation for a planned trip to North Carolina. According to witness statements and security camera video, about 1740, the airplane departed the airport to the east. Around 1817, the airplane returned to the airport, and witnesses describe that the airplane was "fast and high" as it approached runway 18. The airplane then flared about 10 feet above the runway before it abruptly descended, and then touched down about half way down the runway. The airplane then bounced about three times and then became airborne once again. The airplane banked about 30° to the left, and climbed to an altitude of about 1,100 feet and joined the traffic pattern.

About 6 minutes later, the airplane was once again on final approach to runway 18. This time the approach appeared to be slower, but the airplane was again high. It again appeared to flare 10 feet above the runway, abruptly descend, and then touch down approximately half way down the runway. The airplane bounced about two times, the engine began to accelerate, and the airplane became airborne. During the climb, the airplane appeared to be at a higher angle of attack, and it sounded as if the airplane was "hanging on its prop." The airplane rolled into an approximately 60° left bank and descended while turning to the left. It then impacted the ground, slide across the ground while continuing to turn to the left, came to rest, and caught fire.

Examination of runway 18, revealed scrapes and S-shaped rubber transfer marks, consistent with an airplane touching down nosewheel first, in two locations that corresponded to the last two bounces that were observed by witnesses, and security camera videos.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane first made ground contact with the left wingtip, and after impacting and breaching a 30-foot section of the 8-foot-tall airport security fence, slid across a public use roadway, on an approximate 078° magnetic heading. About 115 feet later, it came to rest in the north bound travel lane against an earthen berm. Most of the airplane was then consumed by a postcrash fire.

Further examination of the accident site revealed that a 115-foot-long, and 62-foot-wide, debris path existed that began at the initial impact point, and spread out along the ground until reaching the point where the airplane came to rest. It contained the propeller, which was found buried beneath the shoulder of the south bound travel lane about 37 feet from the initial impact point; the engine cowling, which came to rest about 52 feet from the initial impact point; the left wing tip and a portion of the outer left wing panel, which came to rest about 81 feet from the initial impact point; and the top rail of the breached 30 foot section of airport security fence, which came to rest about 92 feet from the initial impact point. It also contained, smaller subcomponents of the airplane and portions of the airplane structure.

Examination of the airplane wreckage revealed no evidence of any inflight structural failure. The wing flaps were up, and control continuity was established from the remains of the cockpit flight controls to the remains of the ailerons, elevator, and rudder.

Examination of the propeller and engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact malfunction or failure. The three-blade propeller exhibited chord wise scratching, and leading edge gouging, with the gouges matching the spacing of the chain links of the airport security fence. Oil was present in the engine, and drive train and valve train continuity was confirmed. Thumb compression and piston movement was also confirmed on all cylinders. The spark plugs displayed normal wear with lean operations signatures, and there were no signs of carbon or lead fouling. The magnetos and ignition harnesses were intact, and both magnetos generated sparks at all the ignition leads. Fuel was observed in the fuel manifold valve, and the lines between the fuel flow transducer and the fuel metering unit.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Chart Supplements, MMK was publicly-owned, and was classified by the FAA as a non-towered public use airport. The airport elevation was 103 feet msl and there was one runway oriented in a 18/36 configuration. Runway 18 was asphalt, and was in good condition. Its total length was 3,100 feet-long by 75 feet-wide.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued on February 1, 2017. On that date, he reported that he had accrued about 1,200 total hours of flight experience.

According to FAA and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 2005. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on March 13, 2017. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued approximately 1,229 total hours of operation.

The recorded weather conditions reported at MMK, at 1833, included wind from 180° at 5 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 300 feet, an overcast ceiling at 12,000 feet, temperature 16° C, dew point 2° C, and altimeter setting of 30.15 inches of mercury.  

The wreckage was retained by the NTSB for further examination.



Todd Gunther, an investigator with the NTSB, speaks during a press conference on Hanover Street in Wallingford near Meriden Markham Airport. 

Todd Gunther 
National Transportation Safety Board