Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-28R-200 Arrow, N2702R; accident occurred February 18, 2017 near Centennial Airport (KAPA), Englewood, Arapahoe County, Colorado

Airplane Wreckage at Accident Site Side View. 

Airplane Wreckage at Accident Site Rear View. 





The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Denver, Colorado
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2702R

Location: Centennial, CO
Accident Number: CEN17LA122
Date & Time: 02/18/2017, 1529 MST
Registration: N2702R
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-200
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries:1 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On February 18, 2017, about 1529 mountain standard time, a Piper PA28R-200 airplane, N2702R, sustained substantial damage after it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from the Centennial Airport (APA), Centennial, Colorado. The flight instructor sustained minor injuries, and the private pilot receiving instruction sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by Centennial Flyers of Englewood, Colorado, and the instructional flight was being conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed.

According to the private pilot who was seated in the left seat, the flight instructor tried to prime the engine several times while pushing the mixture back and forth several times. After the third try, the engine started, and the private pilot proceeded to prepare for takeoff on runway 17L. He stated that the airplane had difficulty obtaining lift during takeoff roll. After liftoff about 75 knots, the engine RPMs remained high and power seemed sufficient, but the airplane was not gaining altitude. Toward the end of the runway, the flight instructor took over the controls and flew the aircraft past the departure end of the 10,000-ft runway, crossed over highway E-470, banked left, and then touched down in grassy area. The private pilot recalled that the airspeed was about 55 knots prior to bracing for impact with trees. He stated that the flight instructor passed out upon impact with a tree and recalled feeling that the left wing sheared off. He recalled pulling himself out of the aircraft and being transported to the hospital.

According to the flight instructor, the engine was run up to 2,000 RPMs, with positive magneto and flight control checks prior to departure. The fuel pump was ON and the mixture was leaned for takeoff. The rotation speed was about 65 knots within about a 1,000-ft ground roll. The airplane gained airspeed to about 75 to 80 knots and had a slow climb. The flight instructor verified that the flap handle was down and the flaps were visually up. Upon reaching about 150 ft altitude, he felt like something was pushing the airplane down. He stated that the engine seemed to have full RPMs and the throttle and mixture were full forward. He stated that he recalled seeing the airspeed at 65 knots and heard a stall warning horn when the airplane contacted the ground.

In an interview after the accident, the private pilot stated that a Falcon Jet took off on runway 17L, about 2 minutes prior to takeoff, and he was concerned about wake turbulence. The flight instructor stated that he was not concerned about the possible wake turbulence because of the wind conditions at takeoff. The flight instructor reported that he thought that the airplane's climbout was affected by a wind shear.

The accident site revealed that aircraft landed in grassy area heading approximately 120°, about 1 mile west of APA. Landing gear track marks showed all three landing gear on the ground with a straight track until impact with a tree. After impact with the tree, the airplane crossed a parking lot driveway, skidded 100 ft, and came to rest inverted.

The airplane wreckage was transported to a secure facility to be examined. During the examination, the throttle, propeller, and mixture controls functioned normally. The engine rotated freely and all cylinders produced compression. The magnetos produced spark at all spark plug terminals. The engine oil screen was found clean. After the visual inspection, the engine was successfully run on the airframe throughout its operating range. The elevator, aileron, and rudder cables were found intact and functional except for impact related damage. 

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 58, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/16/2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 7400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 17 hours (Total, this make and model), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: , Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s):None 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:09/24/2014 
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 166 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1 hours (Total, this make and model), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N2702R
Model/Series: PA 28R-200 200
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28R-35252
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2600 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3436 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: I0360 SER
Registered Owner: Sale Pending
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: Centennial Flyers
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Does Business As:
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: APA, 5793 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1530 MST
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots / 23 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 170°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.64 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Centennial, CO (APA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Centennial, CO (APA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  MST
Type of Airspace:Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: Centennial (APA)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5885 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used:17L 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 39.570000, -104.849444 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Velocity TXL, N916TC; accident occurred July 23, 2016 at Sebastian Municipal Airport (X26), Indian River County, Florida

View of airplane in wooded area and damaged wing area.

View of main airplane wreckage. 


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N916TC

Location: Sebastian, FL
Accident Number: ERA16LA268
Date & Time: 07/23/2016, 0930 EDT
Registration: N916TC
Aircraft: FRANK WARE VELOCITY TXL
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 23, 2016, about 0930 eastern daylight time, an experimental amateur-built Velocity TXL, N916TC, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Sebastian Municipal Airport (X26), Sebastian, Florida. The commercial pilot and passenger were not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from X26, about 0925.

According to the pilot, he noted that the engine did not start right away on the first attempt. He then primed the engine and it started up immediately. Once the engine was started he then noted that the multi-function display (MFD) did not illuminate. As he began to taxi to the runway the MFD began to operate correctly. The pilot checked all the instruments prior to takeoff and all indications were in the green. During the takeoff roll, he noted that he used up more of the runway than usual. Once the airplane rotated, he noticed that it was not climbing and then the engine lost total power. He did not have time to attempt a restart of the engine and performed a forced landing to a field.

A cursory postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed the left canard was separated from the fuselage. The engine remained attached to the airframe and displayed impact damage. Engine control cable continuity was established by moving the engine controls in the cockpit and observing the controls on the engine. The cylinders were inspected using a lighted borescope; all cylinders, piston faces, and valve heads displayed normal operating and combustion signatures. The crankshaft was rotated by hand and it was noted that all cylinders displayed thumb compression and suction.

The fuel pump remained attached to its installation point and was undamaged. All of the fuel lines were secure and the mixture control arm remained secure to the control shaft. The throttle and fuel metering assembly remained attached to its installation point and was undamaged. The throttle control arm remained secure to the shaft and operated normally. The fuel manifold valve remained attached to its installation point and was undamaged; there were no signs of fuel leaks around the manifold valve. All the nozzles remained installed in their cylinders and were undamaged.

Both magnetos remained attached to their installation points and were undamaged. The ignition harness remained secured to both magnetos and to all the spark plugs. The spark plugs were removed and visually inspected, all the spark plugs displayed normal wear signatures. Several of the spark plugs displayed soot on the electrodes and insulator. It was determined that an engine test run could be performed. A new rocker box cover was installed and made a temporary repair to the No. 2 exhaust riser to facilitate the test run. During the test run the engine would run normally until the manifold pressure went above 36"; above 36" of manifold pressure, the engine would stumble then lose power. It was noted that the TSIO-550-C is only certified for a manifold pressure of 35.5", but according to a representative from the airframe kit manufacturer, it is normal for the engine to over-boost in this application and it is the pilot's responsibility to throttle limit the manifold pressure.

Another test run was performed and the engine started normally without hesitation or stumbling. The engine was operated at approximately 1,000 RPM for several minutes to allow the engine to warm up to operating temperature. After the engine had warmed up to operating temperatures the engine was ran at 2,600 RPM with approximately 35.5" of manifold pressure. The engine operated normally at that power setting; however, it was noted that the fuel flow was significantly higher than the specified fuel flow for a TSIO-550-C engine. The observed fuel flow was approximately 43 gallons per hour, the maximum specified fuel flow indicated in the TSIO-550-C maintenance and overhaul manual is 224 lbs. per hour (approximately 37.3 gallons per hour). The engine was manually leaned using the mixture control to approximately 38 gallons per hour. The throttle was then pushed full forward to simulate a pilot not throttle limiting the manifold pressure; the engine ran normally. The mixture was then pushed full forward and the engine immediately began to run rough and witnesses outside the aircraft stated black smoke was coming out of the tailpipe. The fuel flow was noted to go above 50 gallons per hour followed by a complete loss of engine power.

After the engine lost power, the fuel pump high end adjustment was adjusted approximately 2 turns clockwise to lean the mixture at full power. The engine was started and was ran at 1,500 RPM for a brief period to stabilize. The engine was then accelerated to 2,600 RPM and 35.6 manifold pressure; it was noted that the fuel flow indicated 34.2 gallons per hour. The engine ran normally and there was no roughness noted. The throttle was then pushed full forward to simulate a pilot not throttle limited the manifold pressure; the manifold pressure reached 37.7" and the fuel flow was noted to be 39.7 gallons per hour. There was no roughness noted and the engine operated normally.

After the engine test run the National Transportation Safety Board requested for the fuel pump to be shipped to the Continental Motors Inc in Mobile, Alabama for testing under Federal Aviation Administration oversight. During the testing it was noted the fuel pump was previously tested on the engine and during the first test it was discovered that the aneroid adjustment was set for too rich of a mixture. After the aneroid adjustment was readjusted for a leaner mixture the fuel pump operated normally on the test bench without any anomalies.

Review of logbook excerpts revealed the airplane's most recent condition inspection was completed on April 16, 2016, at an airframe time of 161.1 hours. Further review of the work order revealed that on March 7, 2016 the fuel pump was removed, disassemble and inspected. During the inspection the fuel pump aneroids were found inoperative and were reassembled and reinstalled on March 28th. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/07/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1003.6 hours (Total, all aircraft), 65 hours (Total, this make and model), 3.6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FRANK WARE
Registration: N916TC
Model/Series: VELOCITY TXL NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 3RX177
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/18/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 161.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-550-C
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held:None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: VRB, 23 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 11 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0853 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 330°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Sebastian, FL (X26)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sebastian, FL (X26)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0925 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Sebastian Municipal Airport (X26)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 215 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Vegetation
Runway Used: 10
IFR Approach:None 
Runway Length/Width: 3199 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 27.813333, -80.495556 (est)

Piper PA-44-180, N449JA: Incidents occurred January 21, 2020 and June 28, 2018 at Chino Airport (KCNO), San Bernardino County, California



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

January 21, 2020: Aircraft right wing fairing separated and hit stabilizer.

MI Air Corp

https://registry.faa.gov/N449JA

Date: 21-JAN-20
Time: 21:54:00Z
Regis#: N449JA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 91
City: CHINO
State: CALIFORNIA        

June 28, 2018: Landing gear collapsed.

Date: 28-JUN-18

Time: 03:09:00Z
Regis#: N449JA
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA 44 180
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: CHINO
State: CALIFORNIA

Mooney M20J, N1077U: Incident occurred January 21, 2020 at Pompano Beach Airpark (KPMP), Broward County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft landed, gear collapsed and propeller strike.

https://registry.faa.gov/N1077U

Date: 21-JAN-20
Time: 20:22:00Z
Regis#: N1077U
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: POMPANO BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Guimbal Cabri G2, N715RK: Accident occurred January 21, 2020 at Independence Municipal Airport ( KIIB), Buchanan County, Iowa

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Rotorcraft crashed into a hangar and a parked aircraft.

H&H Helicopter

https://registry.faa.gov/N715RK

Date: 21-JAN-20
Time: 22:15:00Z
Regis#: N715RK
Aircraft Make: GUIMBAL
Aircraft Model: CABRI
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: INSTRUCTION
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: INDEPENDENCE
State: IOWA
Update:  1/22/20

Press Release
Today, January 21st, 2020 at 1615 Independence Fire Department was dispatched for a helicopter accident at the Independence Municipal Airport. Units arrived on scene and found a helicopter with significant damage along with some damage to a hanger. Crews assisted area ambulance with patient care along with securing the scene with Law Enforcement. One (1) patient was taken by ambulance to a local hospital with unknown injuries. Federal Aviation Administration has been contacted and will be assisting Independence Police with their investigation. 
City of Independence Iowa, Fire Department



University of Dubuque released the following statement:

"We can confirm that one of our helicopters and a student pilot were involved in an incident on Tuesday, Jan. 21, in Independence, Iowa. The student received non-life-threatening injuries and is being treated for those injuries. Our thoughts are with the student and the student’s family. A counselor will be at the Ed Babka Aviation Learning Center to assist our students, flight instructors, and staff. The safety of our students and flight instructors is at the forefront of our aviation program. We are cooperating with the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board as they review the incident."

UPDATE: Wednesday's snowy weather has created some complications for federal investigators.

Al Roder, Independence City Manager, said the investigation by the FAA has been delayed until Monday. Until their arrival and their start on the investigation, Roder said the city is in a holding pattern and doesn't know any more than they did following the crash Tuesday evening.

The crash scene has now been cordoned off with the wreckage being covered by a tarp and the tail number covered in tape.

P&N Flight and Charter is the Fixed Base Operator (FBO) at the Independence Municipal Airport. Cole Norton, President of P&N, said the crash has little impact on their operations in Independence. Norton added they are cooperating with investigators and helping in what ways they can.

Norton said the airport in Independence sees a lot of flight students. Being a less-busy and non-towered airport, the runway is ideal for training.

AirNav, a pilot information website, lists the Independence Airport as having an average of 25 flights per day. That is a number obtained from the 12 months of 2018, therefore higher numbers in the summer for crop dusting traffic would inflate daily numbers in winter. An estimated 58% of airport traffic is local general aviation. The rest is made up from transient aircraft, military operations and air taxi service.

UPDATE: The City of Independence Fire Department says one of the crash victims was taken to a hospital with undisclosed injuries.

UPDATE: The University of Dubuque has commented on the recent UD helicopter crash:

"The university can confirm that there was an incident involving one of our helicopters and a student pilot. While the incident is under investigation, we can confirm that the student has non-life-threatening injuries and is being treated for his injuries. We will release more information as it becomes available," Stacey Ortman, Director of Public Information, said.

UPDATE: It has been confirmed that one person was on board a helicopter that crashed at the Independence Municipal Airport.

Independence city manager Al Roder says they will review the security camera footage of the crash and the FAA has been informed of the incident but it is unknown when they’ll arrive at the scene.

The helicopter comes from the University of Dubuque, where the school has a pilot training program.

The condition of the victims in the crash is still unknown.

INDEPENDENCE, Iowa (KWWL) - Authorities are on scene of a helicopter crash a the Independence Municipal Airport.

Firefighters were called to the airport around 4:30 p.m.

Two people were inside the helicopter at the time of the crash, both were taken to a hospital.

Right now, there's no word on their conditions.

We do know two hangars were damaged, but no one was inside at the time.

Story and video ➤ https://kwwl.com







INDEPENDENCE, Iowa – A helicopter crash in Independence on Tuesday happened when the copter collided with a hangar and a parked aircraft, according to a Federal Aviation Administration notice.

The crash happened during an instructional flight, according to the notice, and Independence police said only one person was on board.

The University of Dubuque on Tuesday confirmed that a student pilot with its aviation school was treated for non-life-threatening injuries.

The accident happened at about 4:15 p.m. at the Independence Municipal Airport, and crews with the fire department and police department were sent to the scene at 1640 230th St. The helicopter had substantial damage, and the hangar was also damaged, according to the Independence Fire Department. The Independence Police Department is investigating with the help of federal transportation officials.

The Guimbal Cabri G2 is owned by H&H Helicopters LLC of Sauget, Illinois, and was first registered and certified in October, according  to the Federal Aviation Administration registry.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wcfcourier.com

Grumman American AA-5B Tiger, N424WB: Accident occurred January 21, 2020 near Tallahassee International Airport (KTLH), Leon County, Florida



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aircraft crashed under unknown circumstances. 


https://registry.faa.gov/N424WB


Date: 21-JAN-20

Time: 18:29:00Z
Regis#: N424WB
Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN
Aircraft Model: AA5
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 91
City: TALLAHASSEE
State: FLORIDA




TALLAHASSEE, Florida (WCTV) -- WCTV is working to learn more about a small plane crash that happened just south of the Tallahassee International Airport Tuesday afternoon.

The type of plane that crashed was a Grumman American AA-5B Tiger.

The National Transportation Safety Board will be in charge of the investigation into the crash; a team from the FAA was scheduled to be on site Wednesday gathering any evidence.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration website, the owner of the plane is Adam Korinek, who is from Winter Haven, Florida. It is not known if he was on the plane at the time of the crash; the Federal Aviation Administration says it does not release names of people aboard aircraft.

The flight was not scheduled to land in Tallahassee and did not depart from TLH, but the pilot tried to divert to the airport after engine trouble. The Federal Aviation Administration has told WCTV it does not yet know where the plane came from or where it was headed.

Two people were taken to the hospital as a result of the crash.

Edward Kirkland has lived in the area since 1986; he did not hear the plane crash, but told WCTV it's not the first one near his home.

Kirkland said there was another plane crash about 20 years ago that left two people dead.

WCTV was not allowed on scene of the Tuesday's crash, but based on pictures provided by the City of Tallahassee, Kirkland described where he believes it was.

"It looked like it was right in the edge of the woods. There's a big sandpit down here, and it looked like he was trying to make it to the sandpit to me," Kirkland said. "I wouldn't guarantee that, but if I was flying and I seen an opening, I'd be trying to get to it too. Just looking at the pictures it seemed like he just made it into the trees, and he missed a big pine tree."

Kirkland said he hears many small planes, and often worries about them.

"Sometimes they come by, these little small planes, they spit and sputter, I don't know if they're backfiring or what they're doing, but you wonder when you hear it, you think, 'are they going to make it to the airport?' Basically, after seeing two crash, or even just one crash down here," he said.

The Tallahassee International Airport told WCTV the crash has nothing to do with the localizer that was damaged last Monday. That damage is located on the east-west runway, and this plane was attempting to land on the north-south runway. Additionally, the localizer would not have been needed on Tuesday because of the clear weather.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wctv.tv




A small plane crashed Tuesday in a wooded area south of Tallahassee International Airport, injuring the pilot and a passenger.

A Grumman American AA-5B Tiger aircraft reported engine trouble shortly before 5 p.m. and tried to reach the airport for an unscheduled landing.

But the plane dropped below the tree line south of the airport less than 10 minutes later, said Jim Durwin, deputy director of aviation at the airport.

“Emergency responders initiated search protocols and ultimately located the aircraft approximately four miles south of the airport in the National Forest adjacent to L.L. Wallace Road,” Durwin said.

Both occupants were injured but “alert and conscious,” Durwin said. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is expected to arrive and take over the scene, said Deputy Dave Teems, spokesman for the Leon County Sheriff’s Office.

Airport officials did not have the plane’s itinerary.

“They did not take off from Tallahassee,” Durwin said. “They were not destined for Tallahassee. They were diverted to Tallahassee due to their in-flight emergency.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.tallahassee.com

Cessna 750 Citation X, N998CX: Incident occurred January 20, 2020 at Francis S. Gabreski Airport (KFOK), Westhampton Beach, Suffolk County, New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York, New York

Aircraft landed and struck a deer while taxiing.

Ryan Air LLC

Mountain Aviation

https://registry.faa.gov/N998CX

Date: 20-JAN-20
Time: 02:14:00Z
Regis#: N998CX
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 750
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
City: WESTHAMPTON
State: NEW YORK