Saturday, February 16, 2019

Wrongful Death Lawsuit: Piper PA-31T1 Cheyenne I, registered to and operated by T-210 Holdings LLC, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight, N47GW; fatal accident occurred July 13, 2017 near Tyler Pounds Regional Airport (KTYR), Smith County, Texas





TYLER, TEXASX (KLTV) - The plaintiffs in a wrongful death lawsuit are claiming gross negligence caused a Tyler plane crash that killed a pilot and an East Texas pastor.

The lawsuit was filed by Preston Burton on behalf of Pastor Trevor Morris’ estate and surviving family members, including his parents, his widow and five children.

Morris, 39, of Murchison, and pilot William Robert Walls III, 62, of Huntsville, were killed in July 2017 when the plane they were in crashed shortly after takeoff from Tyler Pounds Regional Airport.

The lawsuit names three East Texas companies as defendants: First AV Group of Henderson County, Flare Air of Rusk County, and East Texas H.S.I. of Smith County, as well the Sonja Lynne Walls on behalf of William Walls’ estate.

The lawsuits seeks a jury trial and damages in excess of $1 million.

According to the lawsuit, the plane’s right engine failed during take-off, forcing Walls to take emergency action. “Walls was beyond the point where he could about the takeoff so he needed to proceed with take off, get the aircraft under control, and land so as to assess the situation,” according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit claims that under proper procedures a competent pilot would be able to control the plane through takeoff and landing with one engine. But according to the lawsuit, “Walls failed to properly control the aircraft and crashed into a nearby field.”

The lawsuit shows First AV Group and Flare Air hired Walls to pilot the Piper PA-31. It alleges both companies knew Walls was “inexperienced with this aircraft” and “despite this, they approved Walls to pilot the aircraft.”

The lawsuit also claims First AV Group and Flare Air contracted with East Texas H.S.I to provide maintenance and inspections of the plane that crashed.

The lawsuit claims the defendants failed to control the aircraft, failed to react properly to an emergency, failed to properly operate the plane, failed to retain a competent pilot and failed to properly inspect and maintain the plane.

Burton is president of Burton Oil Service Operations and part owner of the plane. Morris was the Vice President of Burton Oil Services. Morris was flying from Tyler to Midland on business at the time of the crash. Morris was a pastor at Union Hill Baptist Church in Brownsboro.

Walls was a member of The Ark Church in Conroe and a retired Southwest Airlines pilot.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.kltv.com

Bobby Walls

Trevor Morris

Bobby Walls and family


Trevor Morris










Trevor Morris, standing in center, is surrounded by members of his family. Morris died in a plane crash July 13th in Tyler, Texas


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas 

http://registry.faa.gov/N47GW 

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA266
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 13, 2017 in Tyler, TX
Aircraft: PIPER PA 31T1, registration: N47GW
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July13, 2017 about 0810 central daylight time, a Piper Cheyenne, PA-31T airplane, N47GW, impacted terrain near Tyler, Texas. The airline transport rated pilot and sole passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by T-210 Holdings, LLC, Dover, Delaware under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was an instrument flight plan. The cross-country flight was originating at the time of the accident, and was enroute to Midland, Texas.

Preliminary information indicates that shortly after departure, the airplane descended into terrain. 

The on-site examination of the wreckage revealed the airplane impacted an open field surrounded by trees. The wreckage was located on the edge of a small pond about one-half mile from the end of runway 17. There was not a post-crash fire; however, fuel was found at the site.

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane was recovered to a secure facility, for further examination.

"It makes me really proud:" Henry Lowe to receive prominent Georgia aviation award



MACON, Georgia — When Navy Pilot, Jim Lowe, returned from World War II, he took his flight training and launched Lowe Aviation-- now run by his son, Henry.     
Lowe grew up living and breathing aviation, "I guess it's kind of natural I figured everybody knew how to fly. I just didn't know any different."

At age 17, Lowe soloed his first flight, and instantly fell in love with the skies.

"Coming out of the clouds, and being on top is a pretty big excitement."

After college graduation, Lowe worked full-time for the family business, flying power line patrol, U.S Forest Service Patrol, air taxi charter, and eventually became an instructor. 

In 1982, he became the President and CEO of the company.  

"We're like a marina for small airplanes, like a marina would be for boats, we store the airplanes here, we fly airplanes, we work on them," says Lowe. 

During his nearly 50 year stint in aviation, Lowe has served on the Warner Robins Museum of Aviation Board, worked on producing a film called Georgia Airports Mean Business, and chartered planes for celebrities.

"One of my favorite parts is being able to promote aviation."

Now, after years of promoting his passion  for planes, he's being inducted into the Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame. 

"It's just incredible that they have chosen me to be in the hall of fame. It makes me really proud."

In 1996, Lowe's father received the same award. Now both will sit side by side in the Georgia Aviation Hall of fame.

The ceremony will be at Epps Aviation in Atlanta on April 27.

Story and video ➤ https://www.13wmaz.com

Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III, registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N421NS: Fatal accident occurred February 15, 2019 in Canadian, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lubbock, Texas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N421NS

Location: Canadian, TX
Accident Number: CEN19FA082
Date & Time: 02/15/2019, 0957 CST
Registration: N421NS
Aircraft: Cessna 421
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 15, 2019, at 0957 central standard time, a Cessna 421C airplane, N421NS, impacted terrain about 8 miles west of Hemphill County Airport (HHF), Canadian, Texas. The private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The flight originated from the Tradewind Airport (TDW), Amarillo, Texas at 0900 and was en route to HHF.

A witness who was monitoring the common traffic advisory frequency at HHF stated that he heard the pilot over the radio and responded. The pilot reportedly inquired about the cloud heights and the witness responded that the clouds were 800 to 1,000 ft above ground level. The witness did not see the airplane in the air.

The airplane impacted terrain remote terrain in an upright and level attitude. A post impact fire consumed most of the wreckage (figure 1).


Figure 1 – Aerial image of the accident site. A majority of the airplane was consumed by fire

The wreckage was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N421NS
Model/Series: 421 C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHHF, 2396 ft msl
Observation Time: 0955 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -1°C / -2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / , 40°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 800 ft agl
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Amarillo, TX (TDW)
Destination: Canadian, TX (HHF)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  35.906111, -100.573611 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Carmel Azzopardi

Carmel and Paula Azzopardi in Gozo.


A Maltese man and his wife were killed in a plane crash in Texas, the United States, on Friday, February 15th, 2019

The pilot, Carmel Azzopardi, 75, and the passenger, Paula Azzopardi, 49, both of Amarillo, were killed in the crash in Roberts County, just west of the Hemphill County Line, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Investigators said the Cessna 421C Golden Eagle III crashed for reasons still under investigation, according to media reports.

No further details were provided.

Mr. Azzopardi migrated to the US when he was young and his three children live in Malta, Times of Malta is informed. 

An animal lover, Mr. Azzopardi was a regular visitor to Malta, having visited the island just last November.

He held both a light aircraft and helicopter license.

The Foreign Ministry said they were in contact with the US authorities about the incident.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.timesofmalta.com


ROBERTS COUNTY, TX (KFDA) - Officials have identified the pilot and passenger that died after a plane crash in Roberts County on Friday morning.

According to DPS Spokesperson Cindy Barkley, a plane crashed in Roberts County this morning east of Quarter Horse Road and west of Jim Waterfield Lake, 11 miles west of Canadian.


DPS officials confirmed two fatalities related to the crash.


The pilot, 75-year-old Carmel 'Charles’ Azzopardi, and the passenger, 49-year-old Paula Azzopardi, both of Amarillo, died as a result of the crash.


The FAA is set to arrive on scene today to investigate the crash and NTSB will arrive tomorrow morning.


DPS Troopers are securing the scene until FAA and NTSB arrive.


Story and video ➤ http://www.newschannel10.com

Southwest Airlines Just 'Threatened to Fire Some of Its Employees': The Reason Why Is Troubling; few airlines have surely encountered something quite like this before

By Chris Matyszczyk 
Owner, Howard Raucous LLC

Absurdly Driven looks at the world of business with a skeptical eye and a firmly rooted tongue in cheek. 



I tend to think of Southwest Airlines as a company that embraces decency.

Its employees seem (relatively) happy. Its ads claim its employees are deliriously happy.

Which is why last week's events at Southwest are a touch strange.

In what some might see as a Trumpian step, the airline declared an "operational emergency."

As part of that declaration, a company memo obtained by the Chicago Business Journal says Southwest insists all mechanics who have been scheduled to work have to turn up or, if they don't provide a doctor's certification, be in danger of dismissal.

Worse, the memo even uses the phrase "alleging illness" to suggest some mechanics might not want to work, say, overtime as part of this emergency.

That doesn't sound quite like the vocabulary of a harmonious relationship between management and mechanics.

What, though, is officially causing this apparent panic?

A Southwest spokeswoman told me: 

Southwest's maintenance organization issued a call to maximize the number of Mechanics available for work. On an average day, the airline plans for as many as 20 aircraft to be unexpectedly out of service for maintenance items. Each day this week, the percentage of out-of-service aircraft in our available fleet of approximately 750 aircraft, has more than doubled the daily average. 

So an unusual number of Southwest's aircraft are calling in sick. Indeed, 100 flights were canceled on Friday, another 39 on Saturday.

Southwest told me there's "no common theme among the reported items."

The airline's planes, all Boeing 737s, are put under constant pressure. Southwest depends on fast turnarounds and multiple stops. 

The fact, though, that twice as many planes are having maintenance problems will concern many, including passengers.

Recently, a disturbing CBS News report suggested that mechanics at Southwest and American were being pressured by management to overlook certain issues in order to keep planes in service.

One mechanic told CBS: 

I've seen people walked off the job, held on suspension for a month or more because they've reported problems that they supposedly were outside their scope for finding.

That report aired just a couple of weeks ago. 

I asked Southwest whether there was any relationship between that report and its sudden state of emergency. The airline wouldn't be drawn.

Southwest is, though, currently in negotiation with its mechanics and has been since 2012. 

The mechanics' union, the Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association, recently sent out an update to its members in which it said: 

The Company continues to insist on massive offsets of foreign outsourcing and elimination of your paid rest. The Company asks for these 'offsets' while not increasing the money in any significant fashion from the Tentative Agreement (TA) that you, the membership, rejected by a wide margin.

The union added a somber thought: 

Make no mistake -- the Company is not currently engaged in good faith negotiation.

The fact that Southwest is apparently threatening to fire some mechanics may be added to the file entitled: Things That Make You Go Hmmmm.

The airline, however, insists it's all about the customers: 

To take care of our Customers, we are requiring all hands on deck to address maintenance items so that we may promptly return aircraft to service.

Published on February 17th, 2019

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.inc.com



Southwest Airlines told its mechanics on Friday that it is experiencing an "operational emergency" due to an unusually high number of grounded jets -- and demanded they show up for work or risk termination, according to a company memo issued on Friday and seen by CNBC.

On Saturday, 100 Southwest flights were cancelled, more than any other U.S. airline, according to flight-tracking site FlightAware, and more than 1,000 were delayed.The airline usually plans for having as many as 20 aircraft removed from service for unexpected maintenance issues every day.

However, each day this week, the percentage of out-of-service aircraft among its available fleet of about 750 Boeing 737s has been double the daily average, "with no common theme among the reported items," the airline said in statement.

"To take care of our customers, we are requiring all hands on deck to address maintenance items so that we may promptly return aircraft to service," Southwest's statement said. "At the same time, our operational planners have been working in the background to minimize the impact to our Customers."

The airline -- which has been in contract talks with its mechanics since 2012 -- told mechanics that if they are "alleging illness" they must provide a doctor's note when they return to work or risk losing their jobs, according to the memo.

"The uptick in maintenance items we experienced over the last few days have resulted in a slight increase" in cancellations, a Southwest spokeswoman told CNBC, but declined to provide a breakdown between disruptions caused by either maintenance or weather. On Saturday, 23 Southwest flights were canceled.

Southwest told the mechanics it would assign them overtime, and would only honor vacation or shift trade requests that had already been approved, according to the memo.

The document was first reported by the Chicago Business Journal.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.cnbc.com

Embraer EMB-505 Phenom 300, N348QS: Incident occurred February 16, 2019 at San Diego International Airport (KSAN), California

NetJets Sales Inc
Fielding Aviation II LLC
XXIX-XL Direct LLC
Workday Inc

https://registry.faa.gov/N348QS




San Diego International Airport was forced to temporarily suspend takeoffs and landings Saturday morning so that it’s emergency crew could assist a small private jet that landed safely despite failing brakes.

The plane touched down about 10:30 a.m. after radioing ahead to the airport to let the ground crew know that it had lost its brakes, according to City News Service.

Green fire trucks and San Diego police officers quickly surrounded the aircraft and were able to tow it off the runway, allowing takeoffs to resume at 10:45 a.m.

Operating with the tail number N348QS, the plane is an Embraer  EMB-505 Phenom 300 manufactured in 2014 and registered to Net Jets Inc., according to the Federal Aviation Administration’s online aircraft registry. Netjets is a “fractional ownership” operator that allows multiple people or businesses to own a single plane. The FAA lists four “other owners” for the plane that suffered brake failure Saturday morning including: Timothy Horne, Fielding Aviation, the XXIX-XL Direct limited limited liability company and Workday Inc.

Original article ➤ https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

Van’s RV-8, registered to and operated by the private pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight, N737MC: Accident occurred February 15, 2019 near Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport (KDZB), Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N737MC 


Location: Horseshoe Bay, TX
Accident Number: CEN19LA091
Date & Time: 02/15/2019, 1610 CST
Registration: N737MC
Aircraft: Van's Aircraft RV-8
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 15, 2019, about 1610 central standard time, an amateur-built Van's Aircraft RV-8 airplane, N737MC, lost engine power while in flight and impacted trees and terrain while executing a forced landing near Horseshoe Bay, Texas. The pilot and one passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the private pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from the Lakeway Airpark (3R9), Lakeway, Texas, about 0930.

The pilot reported the purpose of the flight was to travel to Northwest Regional Airport (52F), Roanoke, Texas for lunch with friends. The airplane departed from 52F to Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport (DZB), Horseshoe Bay, Texas for a short stop before continuing on to 52F. During the short stop at DZB, the airplane was shut down temporarily, and none of the occupants exited. The airplane was restarted and departed from runway 35. After reaching about 1,800 ft above mean sea level, the pilot adjusted the throttle for climb power. As the pilot reached for the mixture and boost pump switch, the engine stopped making power and the pilot immediately started looking for a place to land. The airplane came to rest near a road, in close proximity to trees and a power line pole.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, and the empennage. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Van's Aircraft
Registration: N737MC
Model/Series: RV-8
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDZB, 1093 ft msl
Observation Time: 1615 CST
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 8°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots / 21 knots, 270°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 28.6 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Horseshoe Bay, TX (DZB)
Destination: Lakeway, TX (3R9) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 30.526944, -98.358889 (est)







Two men are recovering and federal officials investigating following a non-fatal plane crash just north of Austin Friday afternoon, according to Horseshoe Bay police.

Horseshoe Bay emergency personnel responded to the 6800 block of FM 2147 at 4:04 p.m. after receiving a call of a plane crash to discover a Van's RV-8 experimental aircraft that had crashed into a utility pole, according to a news release.

Two men, Charles Scott, 75, of Lakeway, and Stanley Graham, 73, of Austin, were found in the plane.

Both men were "conscious and coherent" as first responders worked to free them from the wreckage and were transported to St. David's South Austin Medical Center, the release stated.

Their condition is unknown at this time. No other injuries were reported.

Witnesses told police they saw the plane attempting to return to Horseshoe Bay Airport just after takeoff. The witnesses say they heard the aircraft having engine problems as it took off and during the attempted return.

Federal Aviation Administration officials are investigating, according to police.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.mysanantonio.com




HORSESHOE BAY, Texas — A single-engine plane crashed in Horseshoe Bay on Friday afternoon.

According to the Horseshoe Bay Police Department, the police and fire departments were notified of a plane crash in the 6800 block of FM 2147 at 4:04 p.m. Friday.

According to HBPD and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a Van's RV-8 crashed into a utility pole on the south side of the highway, near the Horseshoe Bay Resort  Airport.

HBPD said the aircraft was occupied by a pilot, later identified as 75-year-old Charles Scott of Lakeway, and a passenger, identified as 73-year-old Stanley Graham of Austin.

Both Scott and Graham were conscious and coherent while being rescued from the wreckage. They were transported by Marble Falls Area EMS to St. David's South Austin Medical Center for treatment for injuries they sustained in the crash.

According to HBPD, witnesses at the scene reported seeing the plane leave the airport, heard the aircraft experience engine problems and watched as Scott attempted to maneuver a turn back to the airport before the engine completely failed.

The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have been notified of the crash. 

The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kvue.com




HORSESHOE BAY, Texas (KXAN) — A plane crashed in Horseshoe Bay Friday and the pilot and passenger both survived and are now in the hospital, according to Horseshoe Bay police.

The Van's RV-8 crashed under unknown circumstances around 4:04 p.m. near the Horseshoe Bay Resort Airport, in the 6800 block of FM 2147. Both men were conscious and coherent upon rescue and were then transported to St. David's South Medical Center in Austin.

According to HBPD, the pilot tried to turn back to the airport but the engine failed completely. 

The FAA is investigating the crash.

Horseshoe Bay is an area in both Llano and Burnet counties and is northwest of Austin. It's not known exactly why plane crashed.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kxan.com






Two men are being treated in South Austin hospital after their experimental aircraft crashed into a utility pole in Horseshoe Bay, police said Friday, Feb. 15.

At about 4:04 p.m. Friday, the Horseshoe Bay Fire Department and Horseshoe Bay Police Department were notified of a plane crash in the 6800 block of Ranch-to-Market Road 2147, Horseshoe Bay Police Chief Rocky Wardlow said.

Upon arrival, police and fire personnel found a Van's RV-8 had crashed into a utility pole on the south side of the highway. The aircraft was occupied by two men — a pilot later identified as Charles Scott, 75, of Lakeway, and a passenger later identified as Stanley Graham, 73, of Austin, Wardlow said.

“Both individuals were conscious and coherent while being rescued from the wreckage,” Wardlow said. “Both men were transported by Marble Falls Area EMS to St. David’s South Austin Medical Center for treatment of injuries they sustained in the crash.

“Witnesses at the scene reported seeing the plane leave the Horseshoe Bay Airport, heard the aircraft experience engine problems, and watched as the pilot attempt to maneuver a turn back to the airport before the engine completely failed.”

"FAA investigators are on their way to the accident site, and the National Transportation Safety Board has been notified. The NTSB will be in charge of the investigation," said Lynn Lunsford, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesperson.

Original article ➤ https://www.highlandernews.com







HORSESHOE BAY, Texas (FOX 7 Austin) - Police are investigating after a plane crashed in Horseshoe Bay on Friday. 

According to the Horseshoe Bay Police Department, officers were called to the intersection of Horseshoe Bay Boulevard and 2147 after a plane crashed near there. It is unclear at this time how many people were onboard the aircraft at the time of the crash. 

It is also unclear at this time if there were any injuries sustained.

Story and video ➤ http://www.fox7austin.com

Cessna 182T Skylane, operated by Brampton Flight Centre under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a training flight, C-GBFY: Accident occurred July 05, 2017 at Jackson County Airport (KJXN), Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Belleville, Michigan

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Jackson, MI
Accident Number: CEN17LA257
Date & Time: 07/05/2017, 1655 EDT
Registration: CGBFY
Aircraft: CESSNA 182T
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On July 5, 2017, at 1655 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182T, C-GBFY, impacted the runway surface when it porpoised during the takeoff roll of a stop-and-go landing on runway 14 at Jackson County Airport-Reynolds Field (JXN), Jackson, Michigan. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot and pilot-rated passenger were uninjured. The airplane was operated by Brampton Flight Centre under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a training flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was departing at the time of the accident.

The pilot and pilot-rated passenger were both students of a pilot training program by Brampton Flight Centre, located in Caledon, Ontario. The purpose of the flight was for the pilot to accrue flight time toward the issuance of a Transport Canada commercial pilot license. The flight originated from Brampton Flight Center about 1300 and was destined to JXN. After arrival at JXN, the flight was to continue to Gary/Chicago International Airport (GYY), Gary, Indiana.

According to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector from the Detroit (East Michigan) Flight Standards District Office, when the airplane arrived at JXN it touched down near the runway 14 numbers with heavy braking consistent with a short field landing and then took off, for a stop-and-go, on runway 14 (4,000 ft by 100 ft, asphalt), which had 80-foot trees about 2,600 ft from the runway departure end.

The pilot submitted three National Transportation Safety Board Accident Pilot/Operator Accident/Incident Reports, form 6120.1, dated from July 12 – July 14, 2017. Each submission followed a conversation that the pilot had with FAA inspector(s), in which the FAA presented their investigative findings to the pilot.

The pilot stated in his initial submission of form 6120.1, that he began the takeoff roll and called out "full power confirmed, temperature pressure in the green, airspeed alive." After reaching the rotate speed of 55 knots, the airplane attained liftoff and climbed to an altitude of about 50 ft above ground level before it was unable to climb higher and remained level for about a second. The pilot said that there was no change in airplane attitude that would have been indicative of an aerodynamic stall. He noted that there was a "transient failure" of several Primary Flight Display instruments (red X's over instruments that would not be operational with an inoperative engine but with the battery on). The airplane pitched down and landed nose wheel first despite his attempt to flare. He determined that attempting a landing off the runway would have resulted in an incursion with the trees or vehicular traffic. He set engine power to idle after the first porpoise and flared the airplane to touch down as smoothly as possible after the first porpoise. Upon initial touchdown, the airplane porpoised approximately three times before the pilot regained control and stopped the airplane near the end of the runway. The pilot stated that the engine continued to operate throughout the entire accident sequence, and that he taxied the airplane off the runway, and the engine was shut down after requested to do so by air traffic control.

The initial submission of form 6120 had the pilot's recommendation of how the accident could have been prevented. He stated that the Cessna 182T is nose heavy, and that he had witnessed hard landings in the airplane because of landing with the engine at idle power. He stated that if the airplane lands with idle power in normal conditions, the nose will drop first with a more rapid descent in comparison to a Cessna 172. He added that if a Cessna 182T were to lose engine power at a low altitude after takeoff, it would porpoise as the nose would drop aggressively; something he had seen when practicing forced landing approaches or power idle descents in the airplane.

On July 13, 2017, FAA inspectors examined the airplane and found that the Garmin 1000 multi-function display did not have an inserted SD memory card. A review of the available maintenance records did not show the aircraft had been updated for the installation of an SD memory card. The nose pitch trim was found in the full-down position. Inspectors applied airplane's battery power and actuated the nose pitch trim through its travel limits and noted that it functioned without anomaly. When one-half of the pitch trim's split-toggle control switch, which was mounted on the pilot's control yoke, was actuated, the trim would not engage, consistent with proper functioning of the control switch. The elevator and ailerons were moved using the pilots (left seat) yoke, which confirmed proper movement of the controls from stop to stop without any evidence of binding or excessive control force.

After FAA inspector(s) told the pilot that a post-accident examination of the airplane found the nose trim was found in the full nose-down position, the pilot submitted a second form 6120.1 in which he stated that the autopilot was confirmed to be in the off position twice before landing at JXN and was not engaged for the accident takeoff. The pilot's recommendation in his second submission was he would personally recommend that the electric trim and autopilot be removed. He stated that the trim has a history of running away with the autopilot sometimes performing un-commanded maneuvers and by luck it had happened at high altitudes where recovery was possible; it is a hazard to a pilot who may not be able to recognize it quickly. He said the this was pertinent because the airplane is used by student pilots who may not have the same level of situational awareness just yet.

On July 14, 2017, the pilot-rated passenger stated after the airplane came to a full stop, the pilot asked her to retract the wing flaps from 30° to 0°. A full stop was complete, the pilot asked the pilot-rated passenger to retract the flaps to 0°, from 30°. After "deemed all clear for takeoff", full power was applied. The pilot called gauges green, airspeed alive, airspeed in the green, and rotate; the pilot-rated passenger "observed that the calls were correct." During the takeoff roll, the pilot asked for the flaps to be extended to 10°, the pilot-rated passenger was unsure when the flaps locked into place. The pilot-rated passenger had no recollection of the pitch trim being adjusted, after landing and following the accident, from a full nose-down position.

On July 18, 2017, the pilot provided a statement to the FAA stating that he did not know the cause of the accident and that his "previous suggestions of runaway trim and power loss are my perceptions at the time of the accident; not personally substantiated."

On July 19, 2017, a post-accident examination of the airplane was performed by an airframe and power plant mechanic with inspection authorization under the supervision of the FAA. Flight control continuity, tension, and freedom was confirmed. The control surface deflections for the ailerons, elevator, elevator trim tab, and wing flaps were within limits specified in the airplane's type certificate data sheet. The examination of the Auto Pilot Preflight Self Test performed per 182T NAV III Skylane Information Manual, Supplement 3, pages S3-22 to S3-26. No discrepancies were noted with the autopilot system during the examination. Engine compression from all cylinders was confirmed. Ignition timing was within the engine's type certificate data sheet specifications. Fuel samples taken from the fuel sump drains and header tank revealed no fuel contamination. The engine fuel injector flow and volume were tested, and no anomalies were noted. Examination of the propeller governor adjustment revealed no anomalies.

The Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3B) stated, in part:

"Flap extension has a definite effect on the airplane's pitch behavior. The increased camber from flap deflection produces lift primarily on the rear portion of the wing. This produces a nose-down pitching moment; however, the change in tail loads from the downwash deflected by the flaps over the horizontal tail has a significant influence on the pitching moment. …

Flap deflection of up to 15° primarily produces lift with minimal drag. The airplane has a tendency to balloon up with initial flap deflection because of the lift increase. The nose down pitching moment, however, tends to offset the balloon." 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Foreign; Private
Age: 23, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/06/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/19/2017
Flight Time:  278 hours (Total, all aircraft), 37 hours (Total, this make and model), 150 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 77 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate:
Age: , Female
Airplane Rating(s):
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time: 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: CGBFY
Model/Series: 182T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 18281413
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/25/2017, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1490.4 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-540-AB1A5
Registered Owner: Brampton Flying Club
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: Brampton Flight Centre
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: JXN, 1001 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1556 EDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 120°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 11°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point:  Port Huron, MI (PHN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Jackson, MI (JXN)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1655 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information


Airport: Jackson County Airport-Reynold (JXN)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1001 ft
Runway Surface Condition:
Runway Used: 14
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Stop and Go

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.260556, -84.460556 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA257
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, July 05, 2017 in Jackson, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 182T, registration: CGBFY
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 5, 2017, at 1655 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182T, C-GBFY, impacted the runway surface when it porpoised during the takeoff phase of a stop-and-go landing on runway 14 at Jackson County Airport-Reynolds Field (JXN), Jackson, Michigan. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The pilot and a pilot-rated passenger were uninjured. The airplane was operated by Brampton Flight Centre under 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a training flight that was not operating on a flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

Post-accident examination of the airplane revealed that the pitch trim was in the full nose-down position, and there were no mechanical anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The pilot-rated passenger stated that the flaps were selected to 10-degrees during the takeoff roll.