Friday, August 12, 2016

Grumman AA-5A, N26104: Accident occurred August 12, 2016 in Reno, Nevada

http://registry.faa.gov/N26104

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Reno FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA428
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 12, 2016 in Reno, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/27/2016
Aircraft: GRUMMAN AMERICAN AVN. CORP. AA 5A, registration: N26104
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while flying over a lake he developed a severe headache and decided to land on a remote dirt area on the northwest side of the lake to rest. He overflew his intended landing site and did not see any obstructions to landing. However, he further reported that close to touch down he noticed fence posts perpendicular to his landing path and applied full power to climb over them, but was unsuccessful. The airplane impacted the posts, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to see and avoid fence posts during landing, which resulted in substantial damage to the wings.



PYRAMID LAKE, Nev. (KOLO) - The pilot of a small plane is okay after a hard landing at Pyramid Lake Friday.

Early the afternoon of August 12, 2016, 911 dispatch starting getting calls from a man who said his plane had crashed in the area of Needles, along the northwest part of the lake. He walked away from the plane with no serious injuries.

The landing took place off road and no traffic was affected.

Emergency crews from the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe and Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District caught up with the pilot about an hour later. They then found the plane, on its wheels but not able to fly.

The pilot had been trying to land when he clipped the post from a cattle guard. It's not clear why he was trying to land. The incident is under investigation.

The plane is a single-engine prop Grumman American.

Source:  http://www.kolotv.com




A small plane crashed on the northwest side of Pyramid Lake near an area known as the Needles on Friday afternoon, Emergency Manager of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Don Pelt said.

According to Pelt, the pilot of the crash "seems to be fine."

"The pilot said he was attempting to land and he clipped a cattle guard," Pelt said.

Pelt said it is unsure whether the pilot was trying to make an emergency landing.

The pilot was the only person on the plane.

According to Pelt, planes are allowed to fly in the area but not land.

Emergency crew from the Pyramid Lake Paiutes are responding.

Source:  http://www.rgj.com

Beechcraft 95-B55 (T-42A) Baron, Ross & Company PLLC, N128VB: Fatal accident occurred August 12, 2016 near Shannon Airport (KEZF), Spotsylvania County, Virginia

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

ROSS & COMPANY PLLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N128VB

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Washington FSDO-27


NTSB Identification: ERA16FA288
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 12, 2016 in Fredericksburg, VA
Aircraft: BEECH 95 B55 (T42A), registration: N128VB
Injuries: 6 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 12, 2016, at 1222 eastern daylight time, a Beech 95-B55, N128VB, was substantially damaged when it collided with trees and terrain during an aborted landing attempt at Shannon Airport (EZF), Fredericksburg, Virginia. The private pilot/owner, commercial pilot, and four passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to Ross and Company PLL and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed near the accident site at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Shelbyville Municipal Airport (GEX), Shelbyville, Indiana, about 1015.

The owner departed Bowman Field Airport (LOU), Louisville, Kentucky, earlier in the day and flew the approximate 80-nautical-mile flight to GEZ to pick up his friend, who was a commercial pilot, and four passengers. According to Lockheed Martin Flight Service, there were no records of either pilot having obtained a weather briefing through a Flight Service Station.

A lineman at GEZ stated that after landing, the owner parked the airplane next to the fuel pump and requested that the main inboard fuel tanks be "topped off." The lineman stated he topped off the left tank, and as he was walking over to the right tank, the commercial pilot requested that he "…leave the right tank down an inch or two." The lineman obliged, and stated that between the left and right main tanks, he added a total of 40.3 gallons of fuel to the airplane. The lineman also stated that he overheard a conversation between the two pilots, during which the owner stated, "we have 15 gallons in each of the auxiliary tanks."

Several witnesses observed the airplane on final approach for runway 24 at EZF, and stated that the airplane appeared to be high above the threshold and fast. Surveillance videos obtained from the airport and a nearby business captured the airplane floating down the runway before touching down briefly and bouncing several times. The airplane became airborne again near the last third of the runway. As the airplane climbed, it drifted to the right of the runway centerline, and began a gradual, climbing left turn to about 50 feet above ground level. The airplane appeared to level off, then began to descend, before pitching up abruptly and rolling to the left as it descended into trees and terrain.

Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that the airplane struck the ground in a slight nose-low attitude about 300 feet from the departure end of runway 24. Trees surrounding the accident site exhibited gouges, cuts and paint transfers from the top of the tree canopy down towards ground level. The wings and engines separated during the accident sequence but remained within 20 feet of the fuselage in their approximate and respective locations relative to the fuselage. The right propeller separated from the engine and exhibited span-wise gouging and curling in an 'S' pattern. The left propeller remained attached to the engine. The blades were positioned to a flat pitch with little chord-wise damage and minimal curling. The fuselage was consumed by a post-impact fire.

The airplane was recovered from the accident site and retained for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.





Lisa K. Borenstein


Luke Borenstein 

Emma R. Borenstein 

William C. Hamerstadt

Robert Ross


Three people killed when a plane crashed Friday afternoon near Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Virginia were Shelbyville residents.

Lisa Borinstein, 52, Luke Borinstein, 19, and Emma Borinstein, 15, all died in the crash, according to Virginia State Police. Maren Timmermann, 15, of Berlin, Germany, was an exchange student living with the Borinstein family.

The Northwestern Consolidated School District of Shelby County confirmed Saturday afternoon Emma Borinstein and Timmermann were students at Triton Central High School. 

Superintendent Chris Hoke released this statement to The Shelbyville News at 1:30 p.m. Saturday:

“It is with profound sadness and a heavy heart that we announce having received official notification of the victims of the tragic accident in Fredericksburg, Virginia. It has been confirmed that the victims of that fatal plane crash include: Emma Borinstein - TCHS sophomore, Luke Borinstein - Triton Central graduate, their mother, Lisa Borinstein, and Maren Timmermann - TCHS junior.

As we pull together as a community to work through this tragic event, we will be offering grief counseling over the next several days to our students and staff. Triton Central is a close-knit community and we will rally around the families and each other in the wake of this tragedy. The full breadth of our school campus and resources will be made available to the families and our community as we begin the healing process together.”
Luke Borinstein was a student at Wabash College.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

“A 1969 Beech 95-B55 twin-engine, fixed-wing aircraft was attempting to land at the Shannon Airport. Further investigation by the state police, NTSB and FAA have determined that the aircraft touched down midway down the runway and then executed a ‘go-around,’” a Virginia State Police press release states. “As it attempted to turn and climb, it appeared to have stalled as it made it beyond the railroad tracks at the end of the airport property. The plane banked left, crashed in the trees and immediately caught fire. Official time of the crash was 12:24 p.m.”

The plane left Louisville, Kentucky Friday morning and stopped in Shelbyville before continuing to Virginia, according to the press release.

The pilot, William Hamerstadt, 64, was from Carmel.

Allison Baker, a close family friend and also an intern at The Shelbyville News, said the family was on their way to a ceremony for Drew Borinstein, the oldest of the Borinstein kids, at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia.

Baker, who graduated from Triton Central in May, said Beau Borinstein — Emma’s twin brother — was not on the plane because he stayed behind for a football scrimmage Friday night.

Students, teachers and alumni gathered Friday night at the school, she said, and a prayer circle is being planned for Monday.

All school activities were canceled Saturday.

As of 2 p.m. Saturday, no events have been canceled for Monday. The cross country team is scheduled to compete in the Early Bird Invitational meet at Blue River Park with Morristown, Southwestern and Waldron.


Source:   http://www.shelbynews.com



A Wabash man known for his “eagerness to do good” died Friday in a small airplane crash in Fredericksburg, Va. Luke Joseph Borinstein, a 19-year-old sophomore, was among six people who died in the crash.

His mother, Lisa, and younger sister, Emma, were also killed. He is survived by his brothers, Drew and Beau.

Luke was pursuing a pre-health track at Wabash, and had just returned from a two-week immersion trip to Lima, Peru with the Global Health Initiative (GHI), which is directed by Treves Professor of Biology Eric Wetzel.

“Luke was just a great guy — intelligent, easy-going, strong in his faith, and very friendly,” said Dr. Wetzel. “Along with some other students on the trip, he easily and quickly made some great new friends among the Peruvian students with whom we worked and traveled.”

Wetzel said that news of Luke’s death had already reached the Peruvian students. “They are equally distraught and saddened, perhaps a testimony to the impact that Luke could make in a short time.”

“All of us at Wabash are shocked by this tragic news and grieve with Luke’s family and friends,” said Wabash President Gregory Hess. “Wabash is a very special place where deep friendships are formed, and our hearts go out to all of Luke’s Wabash brothers.”

Senior Bilal Jawed, who leads the College’s Public Health Organization (PHO), said, “Luke was an indispensable part of our organization, and I will always remember him by his bright smile and eagerness to do good.”

Borinstein came to Wabash from Fairland, Indiana, and attended Triton Central High School. In addition to his work with the GHI and PHO, he also spent free time tutoring students at Hoover Elementary School. He had spent the first part of his summer working in the lab of biology professor Anne Bost.

Wetzel said he was a natural fit with the goals of the Global Health Initiative.

“My sense from chatting with him is that he ‘got it’ — he understood the disparities in health care and access to it, and was pleased with how we were able to contribute to addressing these problems,” Wetzel said. “He was appreciative of the opportunity.

“He will be sorely missed by the class.”

Police and authorities from the National Transportation Safety Administration are investigating the cause of the crash of the 1969 Beech 95-B55 twin-engine, fixed-wing airplane.


Source:  http://www.thepaper24-7.com



Three teenagers were among the six victims of Friday's fiery plane crash near Shannon Airport in Spotsylvania County.

Virginia State Police released the identifies of the six people on the plane, identified Saturday as a  Beechcraft 95-B55 (T-42A) Baron aircraft. All six were killed in the crash and subsequent fire.

William C. Hamerstadt, 64, of Carmel, Ind., was the pilot of the plane. The passengers were  Robert D. Ross, 73, of Louisville, Ky. who owned the plane; Lisa K. Borinstein, 52, of Shelbyville, Ind.; Luke J. Borinstein, 19, of Shelbyville, Ind.; Emma R. Borinstein, 15, of Shelbyville, Ind.; and Maren Timmermann, 15, of Berlin, Germany.

Chris Hoke, superintendent of the Northwestern Consolidated School District of Shelby Co., Ind. confirmed that the three teenagers were students of Triton Central High School.

Emma Borinstein was a sophomore at the school.

Her older brother Luke Borinstein was a Triton Central graduate and a student at Wabash College.

Maren Timmerman was a junior at Triton Central.

The Borinstein's mother was victim Lisa Borinstein.

"It is with profound sadness and a heavy heart that we announce having received official notification of the victims of the tragic accident," his statement said. "Triton Central is a close knit community and we will rally around the families and each other in the wake of this tragedy."

The bodies were recovered from the burnt wreckage and sent to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Richmond for positive identification, examination and autopsy, according to Virginia State Police.

The aircraft departed Louisville, Ky., on Friday morning and stopped in Shelbyville, Ind., before headed to its final destination of Shannon Airport.

The plane touched down midway down the runway and then executed a "go-around," according to an investigation by state police, the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration.

As the plane attempted to turn and climb, it appeared to have stalled as it made it beyond the railroad tracks at the end of the airport property. The plane banked left, crashed in the trees and immediately caught fire.
The official time of the crash was 12:24 p.m. Police received the report of a plane crash at 12:26 p.m.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by Virginia State Police Trooper T.J. Ferrara and the NTSB and FAA. State police and the NTSB are still at the scene Saturday.

Virginia State Police were assisted at the crash site by the Spotsylvania County Fire, Rescue and Emergency Management; Spotsylvania Volunteer Fire Department; Chancellor Volunteer Fire Department; National Park Service; and the Virginia Department of Emergency Management.

Source:   http://www.fredericksburg.com



FREDERICKSBURG, VA. (WUSA9) - The six people who were killed in a plane crash near an airport in Frederciksburg, Va. were identified on Saturday. 

One of the victims was the pilot of the plane and he has been identified as William C. Hamerstadt, 64, of Carmel, Ind. 

The other victims were passengers on the plane and have been identified as Robert D. Ross, 73, of Louisville, Ky., Lisa K. Borenstein, 52, of Shelbyville, Ind., Luke J. Borenstein, 19, of Shelbyville, Ind., Emma R. Borenstein, 15, of Shelbyville, Ind.and Maren Timmermann, 15, of Berlin, Germany. 

Ross has been identified as the owner of the small, private aircraft that crashed. 

At approximately 12:24 p.m., police say the pilot was attempting to land at Shannon Airport on Friday, when the plane came to the end of the runway, the pilot pulled back up.

The plane got as far as the railroad tracks on the airport's property before it veered left and struck the tree line.

It crashed and caught fire.

The plane had departed from Louisville, Ky., Friday morning. Police say it stopped in Shelbyville, Ind., and continued to its final destination of Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Va.


Source:   http://www.wusa9.com




FREDERICKSBURG, Va.  — Officials say the six people who died in a small plane crash in Virginia were from Indiana, Kentucky and Germany and that three of the six were teenagers.

Virginia State Police identified the victims Saturday. State Police say the pilot of the plane was 64-year-old William C. Hamerstadt of Carmel, Ind. One of the passengers, 73-year-old Robert D. Ross of Louisville was the owner of the plane.

Also onboard were 52-year-old Lisa K. Borinstein; her two children, 19-year-old Luke J. Borinstein and 15-year-old Emma R. Borinstein of Shelbyville, Ind.; and 15-year-old Maren Timmermann of Berlin, Germany.

State police say the plane took off from Louisville on Friday morning and stopped in Shelbyville. It crashed into trees after aborting its landing at Shannon Airport near Fredericksburg, Va.

Shocked witnesses on a train going by the crash site described the plane in flames and said it had been completely destroyed.

The plane came to the end of the runway at the Shannon Airport near Fredericksburg and then pulled back up, flying to the end of the airport property, State Police Spokeswoman Corinne Geller said in an email. It struck the tree line, crashed and immediately caught fire.

Tanya Aquino of Washington was on an Amtrak train to Richmond when the train stopped. A conductor first said there was a fire, then said there had been a plane crash.

The train rode past the crash site and Aquino said she saw flames, smoke, several rescue vehicles and the remains of the plane just beyond the tree line.

"When I heard there was a fire, it was such a hot day, I was hoping it was just a brush fire," Aquino said. "It looked so terrible the way the plane had landed."

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Shari Acree, who was also on the train, said she saw white smoke and the crash.

"The plane was completely decimated and there was still some flame coming from it," Acree said in an email.

The airport has an average of 85 flights per day, mostly local general aviation. Ninety-one aircraft are based there, most of them are single-engine.

Source:  http://www.courier-journal.com



SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, Va. -- Virginia State Police confirms six people were killed when a small plane crashed near Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg Friday afternoon.

"There were no survivors in the crash," said Virginia State Police Public Information Officer Sergeant F.L. Tyler.

Officials said the plane was attempting to land at the airport at 12:26 p.m. when it came to the end of the runway and pulled back up.

"The plane made it beyond the railroad tracks at the end of the airport property, banked left and struck the tree line," Virginia State Police Public Relations Director Corinne N. Geller said. "The plane crashed in the trees and immediately caught fire."

The Spotsylvania Volunteer Fire Department responded to the scene. Additionally, the NTSB and FAA were dispatched to the scene.

Investigators say a total of six bodies were recovered from the burnt wreckage of the plane Friday afternoon.

All the remains will be transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Richmond for positive identification.

State police are still in the process of notifying next of kin and will not release decedent information until all next of kin are notified. All six victims are from out-of-state.

Story and video:   http://wtvr.com




SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY, Va. (WRIC/WAVY) — Virginia State police have confirmed that six bodies were recovered from the wreckage of a plane that crashed in Fredericksburg Friday.

The crash happened around 12:26 p.m. Friday near Shannon Airport, about five miles outside of Fredericksburg.

According to state police, a small, private aircraft was attempting to land at the airport when it came to the end of the runway and pulled back up. The plane made it beyond the railroad tracks at the end of the airport property, banked left and struck the tree line. The plane crashed in the trees and immediately caught fire.

Tanya Aquino of Washington was on an Amtrak train to Richmond when the train stopped. A conductor first said there was a fire, then said there had been a plane crash.

The train rode past the crash site and Aquino said she saw flames, smoke, several rescue vehicles and the remains of the plane just beyond the tree line.

“When I heard there was a fire, it was such a hot day, I was hoping it was just a brush fire,” Aquino said. “It looked so terrible the way the plane had landed.”

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

Story and video:  http://wavy.com





Six people are dead after a plane crashed at an airport near Fredericksburg, Virginia, state police say.

The small plane crashed into the woods near the end of the runway at Shannon Airport Friday afternoon. Shannon Airport is located about five miles from downtown Fredericksburg.

Virginia State Police said the plane was trying to land at the airport when it came to the end of the runway and pulled back up. The plane made it beyond the railroad tracks at the end of the airport property, banked left and struck the tree line.

The plane immediately caught fire when it crashed in the trees and was so badly burned that responders to the crash could hardly see the plane's tail number, making it hard to identify the aircraft.

"It appears the plane was attempting to land and it then attempted to abort the landing and take off again," said Virginia State Police Sgt. Les Tyler.

State police said all the remains recovered from the wreckage will be taken to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner in Richmond for identification.

All six people are from out-of-state, police said, and authorities are still in the process of notifying their families.

Shari Acree, who was riding an Amtrak train near the airport, said she saw white smoke and the crash.

"The plane was completely decimated and there was still some flame coming from it,"  Acree said in an email. She said her train was delayed about 30 minutes due to the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating.

The airport has an average of 85 flights per day, mostly local general aviation. Ninety-one aircraft are based there, most of them are single-engine.

Story and video:   http://www.nbcwashington.com




LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) -- Virginia State Police say a Louisville man was among several people killed in a plane crash that happened Friday afternoon in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

According to a release from Virginia State Police, 73-year-old Robert D. Ross of Louisville, who owned the plane, was one of six people killed in the crash.  

Authorities also say the other people who died were 64-year-old pilot William C. Hamerstadt, of Carmel, Indiana, 52-year-old Lisa K. Borenstein, of Shelbyville, Indiana, 19-year-old Luke J. Borenstein, of Shelbyville, Indiana, 15-year-old Emma R. Borenstein, of Shelbyville, Indiana and 15-year-old Maren Timmermann, of Berlin, Germany.

Virginia State Police say the plane left Louisville on Friday morning. According to officials, the plane stopped in Shelbyville, Indiana. The plane then continued toward its final destination of Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Authorities say the plane was a  Beechcraft 95-B55 (T-42A) Baron aircraft. Officials with Virginia State Police, the NTSB and FAA say the plane "touched down midway down the runway and then executed a "go-around." Officials say as the plane tried to turn and climb, the plane appears to have stalled as it went past railroad tracks at the end of the airport's property.

Police say the plane went left, crashed into some trees and caught fire.


The crash remains under investigation.



The pilot of a private plane that crashed Friday at Shannon Airport in Fredericksburg, Va., killing all six aboard, had aborted a landing and was trying to climb for a second attempt when the engine stalled, investigators said Saturday.

The pilot was identified by Virginia State Police as William C. Hamerstadt, 64, of Carmel, Ind. Three passengers were from Shelbyville, Ind.: Lisa K. Borinstein, 52; her son, Luke J. Borinstein, 19; and her daughter, Emma R. Borinstein, 15.

Another passenger, Maren Timmermann, 15, of Berlin, and the plane’s owner, Robert D. Ross, 73, of Louisville, also were killed.

The crash occurred shortly before 12:30 p.m. State police said the aircraft — a 1969 Beech 95-B55 twin-engine, fixed-wing plane — touched down midway down the runway.

Hamerstadt then pulled up and tried to execute what is known as a “go-around” — to circle the airport and make another landing attempt. But police said the engine stalled as he tried to climb and turn, and the plane crashed into trees just beyond railroad tracks at the edge of the airport property.

The reason for the engine stalling remains under investigation by state police, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Police said the aircraft had left Louisville on Friday morning and stopped in Shelbyville before heading to its destination of Fredericksburg.

Rans Coyote, N910RK: Accident occurred August 12, 2016 near London-Corbin Airport (KLOZ), Laurel County, Kentucky

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: 
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville , Kentucky

http://registry.faa.gov/N910RK

NTSB Identification: ERA16CA290 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 12, 2016 in London, KY
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/15/2017
Aircraft: KESSINGER ROGER L RANS COYOTE, registration: N910RK
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After a 1-hour local flight during which he familiarized himself with the airplane’s stall characteristics, the student pilot/owner of the experimental light sport airplane returned to his home airport to practice touch-and-go landings. The airplane bounced during the final landing attempt, and while recovering, the student applied full power to the engine for a go-around. The student stated that the airplane then banked to the right due to the engine’s counter-clockwise rotation “p factor effect” and began heading toward a hangar located off the right side of the runway. Due to the airplane’s low altitude and airspeed, the student chose to continue the right turn to avoid colliding with the hangar, and once clear of it, tried to climb the airplane to clear an approaching tree line; however, the airplane’s right wing struck one of the trees. The airplane then impacted the ground, which resulted in substantial damage to the airframe and serious injuries to the pilot.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation. He attributed the loss of control during the go-around attempt to his unfamiliarity with the flight characteristics of the counter-clockwise rotation of the airplane’s two-stroke engine and his lack of flight experience in experimental light sport airplanes.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's improper recovery from a bounced landing and his subsequent failure to maintain clearance from trees during an attempted go-around.

After a 1 hour local flight where he explored the airplane's stall characteristics, the student pilot/owner of the experimental light sport airplane returned to his home airport to practice touch-and-go landings. The pilot "bounced" the airplane during the final landing attempt, and while recovering applied full power to the engine for a go around. The pilot stated that the airplane then banked to the right as a result of the counterclockwise rotating-engine's "p factor effect," and began heading toward a hangar located off the right side of the runway. Due to the airplane's low altitude and airspeed, the pilot elected to continue the right turn to avoid colliding with the hangar, and once clear of it, tried to climb the airplane to clear an approaching tree line. The pilot was unsuccessful in this attempt and the airplane's right wing struck one of the trees. The airplane then impacted the ground, resulting in substantial damage to the airframe and seriously injuring the pilot.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures of the airplane or its engine that would have precluded normal operation. He further attributed the loss of control during the go around attempt to his unfamiliarity with the flight characteristics of the counter clockwise rotation of the airplane's two-stroke engine, and his lack of flight experience in experimental light sport airplanes.




LONDON, Ky. (WTVQ) -The London Police Department has released the name of the pilot involved in a plane crash near the London-Corbin airport on Friday.

Police say 79-year-old Everett P. Hathorn was flying the plane, and was airlifted to the University of Kentucky Medical Center.

Officers say they received a call about the crash just before 10:30 a.m., and say witnesses tell them that the plane attempted to land, bounced, and started heading toward the Kentucky National Guard Joint Readiness Center.  The plane then lifted upwards, clipped trees behind the Center avoiding power lines, and turned right to land in a field. Once the plane crashed into the field, Kentucky State Police and Army National Guard members located within the Center responded to the scene to retrieve Hathorn.

The London Police Department is investigating the incident and the Federal Aviation Administration will be continuing the investigation.



12:20 p.m.

Officials at the London-Corbin airport say that a light sport aircraft crashed into a tree outside airport boundaries.

According to a statement from the FAA, the Rans Coyote Light Sport aircraft crashed about 100 feet off of runway 24 while the pilot was conducting a touch-and-go landing. The FAA says in a touch-and-go landing, the pilot lands on a runway and takes off again without coming to a full stop. Usually the pilot then circles the airport in a defined pattern and repeats the maneuver. It is commonly used during pilot training.

The pilot, who was the only person on board, has been flown to UK hospital.  No word on the extent of the injuries in the crash.

FAA will be investigating the incident beginning Monday.

The area surrounding the airport has been blocked off.

United States Parachute Association: Acampo skydive instructor in deadly jump was not certified

Tyler Turner


Tyler Turner and his mom, Francine


The instructor killed Saturday in a tandem sky dive with an 18-year-old student near Lodi was not certified, a violation of federal regulations, according to the national certifying organization.


The United States Parachute Association has no record of certification for Yong Kwon, 25, of South Korea, said Executive Director Ed Scott.


Kwon and first-time jumper Tyler Nicholas Turner of Los Banos died after sky diving from a plane operating out of the Parachute Center in Acampo. Authorities said their parachute did not open and the two hit the ground.


Under federal regulations, the instructor is responsible for packing and maintaining the main parachute used in a tandem jump.


The fatalities have raised new questions about safety at the Parachute Center. While there is no official count of fatalities, a review of news stories shows that at least 17 people have died flying out of the center since owner Bill Dause started there in 1981.


Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor declined to comment about the lack of certification because the agency’s investigation is pending. Gregor confirmed that USPA is the only national organization recognized by the FAA to certify instructors for tandem parachute jumps.


He said it’s unclear whether Kwon had a foreign license or whether the FAA accepts such licenses.


The FAA and USPA are conducting separate investigations of the deaths. The USPA has suspended Dause’s license pending the outcome of its investigation, according to Scott.


The FAA has received a videotape of the jump from Turner’s mother, who paid for it prior to the jump.


Dause said Tuesday of Kwon, “He was certified by an instructor. There’s been some confusion about that.” He then hung up the phone.


During a second phone call, Dause was asked where Kwon received training.


“I’m not sure about that. You’ll have to ask him,” he said before hanging up.


He previously said Kwon was a veteran sky diver with about 700 jumps, according to The Associated Press.


USPA certifies tandem instructors only after they receive training from the association or a parachute manufacturer, Scott said. Neither the association nor the manufacturer has a record of Kwon receiving the training, he said.


Discovery of the unapproved instructor has heightened Scott’s concerns about the Parachute Center, he said.


“We’re unsure of his ability,” Scott said, referring to Kwon. “We want to know if there are others like him.”


Scott said he previously had no reason to question the center’s safety record. Nationwide, the vast majority of fatalities are the result of experienced sky divers making an error, he said.


The Parachute Center does not appear to have had an unusual amount of fatalities by first-time jumpers, especially since it has a busy operation open every day, he said.


In 2014, 24 people died in sky-diving incidents out of an estimated 3.2 million jumps, according to the USPA.


While Dause is licensed by the association, his business is not a member, Scott said. About a dozen of the roughly 240 sky-diving centers in the country are not affiliated with the association.


Dause has said he stopped paying membership dues for the center once the association raised them. But Scott said the association has no record of the Parachute Center ever being a member. He said the most expensive membership is $750 a year.


Sky-diving centers, including several in California, use association membership and certification in their promotional materials as proof of safe operations. “All of our instructors are USPA rated, many with over 2,000 sky dives,” Lincoln-based Skydive Sacramento says on its website.


Ray Ferrell, owner and president of SkyDance SkyDiving in Davis, makes safety a central part of his website, and notes that “high quality costs more. … If people knew what they were sacrificing for a cheaper sky dive at other drop zones, they would not consider it much of a bargain!” He charges $189 for a tandem jump, compared with $100 advertised at the Parachute Center.


Julia Drew, co-owner of Skydive Truckee Tahoe, said, “We use 100 percent USPA certified instructors. … We feel much more comfortable knowing that we are operating under industry standards.”


Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com


Tyler Turner, second from left, is seen with friends Casey Nelson, left, Quinan Munoz, second from right, and Mario Muniz just prior to his fatal skydiving jump Saturday, Aug. 6, 2016, in Lodi, Calif. Salazar Turner said her teenage son was an adventurous spirit who was willing to try just about anything, including the jump that was on his list of things to do in life. 


"CBS This Morning" has learned a skydiving instructor involved in a deadly California accident last weekend was not certified by the United States Parachute Association.

The instructor -- 25-year-old Yong Kwon -- and 18-year-old Tyler Turner were killed during a tandem jump near Lodi, south of Sacramento. The FAA is investigating the case, which raises new questions about how skydiving is regulated, reports CBS News correspondent Mireya Villarreal.

For Tyler Turner, last Saturday was supposed to be a fun outing with friends, just weeks before the honors student was set to head off to college. His mother Francine Turner snapped a photo of him kneeling on the tarmac at the parachute center near Lodi.

"He was just the best kid. He had the neatest personality," said his mother. "He gave me a hug and said, 'I love you mom,' and I said, 'I love you son' and he got on the plane."

Those were his last words. At first, Francine thought her son had backed out of the jump, until she spotted emergency vehicles in an open field.

"The officer had come up and he said, 'the two people on the ground are deceased.' And I lost it," Turner said. "I just remember screaming and screaming, 'It can't be true.'"

It's believed Tyler and his instructor died after their shared parachute didn't open. According to the United States Parachute Association, more than 3 million people skydive in the U.S. every year. In 2015, 21 were killed -- one during a tandem jump.

"Skydiving will never be a perfectly safe thing to do," said Ed Scott, executive director of the USPA, a nonprofit organization which works with state and federal officials to promote skydiving safety.

"If you don't find a location listed on our site, you don't know what you're getting, you don't know what the standards are," Scott said. "The important factor with tandem skydiving is the certification and instructor."

The Parachute Center is not a member of the association and "CBS This Morning" was unable to locate any of the required certifications for the instructor.

"When you hear there may be a possibility he may not have been certified, what goes through your mind?" Villarreal asked.

"Anger, a lot of anger," Turner said.

Turner claims that earlier in the day, the facility sped through preflight procedures.

"It was like a McDonald's. You know, get your order and get out and watch half a video," Turner said.

The owner of the Parachute Center, Bill Dause, declined CBS News' repeated requests for comment, but spoke on the day of the crash.

"It's an unfortunate situation but if you see a car wreck, they don't close the freeway. It's something... unfortunately, in this sport and skiing and scuba diving, there are fatalities," Dause said.

Federal officials are now looking at everything from the parachute to the instructor's qualifications.

Story and video:  http://www.cbsnews.com

Rebecca Kleefisch: Wisconsin positioned for continued success in aviation

Since 2013, Wisconsin exports in that sector are up 30%, and aviation and aerospace parts and supplies have jumped into our top 10 list of commodities for exports.

Wisconsin’s aviation and aerospace industry is soaring like never before.

The state’s exports in the sector hit an all-time high of $475 million in 2015, and so far this year we’re eclipsing that pace by 19% — at time when the national increase in aviation/aerospace exports is less than 1%.

This isn’t just a one-year anomaly. Since 2013, Wisconsin exports in that sector are up 30%, and aviation and aerospace parts and supplies have jumped into our top 10 list of commodities for exports.

That’s great news for the state’s economy because the industry provides highly paid jobs to more than 24,000 Wisconsinites who work for 200-plus companies with ties to the aerospace sector. As is the case with exporting, the number of jobs in aerospace parts and product manufacturing in Wisconsin also has seen dramatic growth — 57% from 2001 to 2011.

That type of success does not happen by accident. Rather, it’s achieved through the joint efforts of state government, the private sector, universities, industry associations and others to develop a cohesive and strategic approach to strengthening the aviation and aerospace industry in the Badger State.

Wisconsin was the epicenter of the aviation world as more than a half-million people descended upon Oshkosh for the annual EAA AirVenture 2016. More than 10,000 aircraft of every style imaginable — from homebuilt airplanes to vintage biplanes to fighter jets — flew into Wittman Regional Airport from all over the world.

Wisconsin’s position as a leader in the industry also was solidified as Milwaukee hosted the annual meeting of the Aerospace States Association, a national bipartisan group that supports state-based aerospace initiatives. Our three days of meetings were so successful that the organization decided to hold all future annual meetings in Wisconsin — in conjunction with the EAA.

The state took another big step in that direction when the Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation unveiled plans for an aviation-aerospace Center of Excellence in Milwaukee that will bring together industry and academic researchers, engineers and programmers in one location to develop and test new aerospace and cybersecurity systems. There is currently no other independent facility of this kind in the nation. That facility, expected to open within one year, is the latest demonstration of the state’s strong commitment to positioning Wisconsin as a leader in aviation and aerospace, and it’s not the first collaborative effort between the state, the private sector and our universities.

We’re also moving to institutionalize all this activity with one central hub called Wisconsin Aerospace Partners to support organizations engaged with the aerospace industry in Wisconsin. By establishing a strong network between companies, scientists and government, we can further the economic vitality of the state and its aerospace industry.

Another way in which Wisconsin’s industry leadership is demonstrated is through AeroInnovate, a nearly decade-old coalition started by the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh and the Wisconsin Entrepreneurs Network that provides assistance to innovators who are starting and growing aero-related businesses and bringing related new technologies to the marketplace. AeroInnovate, Wisconsin Aerospace Partners, and the new Center of Excellence all are part of a comprehensive strategy that will help ensure our continued success in a sector that still has so much potential in Wisconsin.

Those unique efforts to spur more innovation in aerospace and aviation, coupled with the state’s outstanding business climate, world-class university system, excellent workforce and strength in manufacturing, signal a bright future in an industry in which the sky is truly the limit.

Rebecca Kleefisch is the lieutenant governor of Wisconsin.


Source:  http://www.jsonline.com