Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Cessna A188B, N4845R: Aircraft caught fire while unattended and burned








AIRCRAFT:   Cessna A188B N4845R

ENGINE – Continental IO550D22; SN: 680175

PROPELLER – Hartzell HC-C3YF-1RF; SN: E61668B

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE:   1571 TTSN

PROPELLER:    1396.5 TTSN  

AIRFRAME:    8087.9

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  AC caught fire while unattended and burned.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Fuselage and wings.     

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:      Newton, GA

REMARKS: Logbooks with field adjuster.  

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N4845R.htm

Socata TB-20 Trinidad, N28070: Fatal accident occurred April 17, 2017 in Loyalton, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N28070

NTSB Identification: WPR17FAMS3 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, April 17, 2017 in Loyalton, CA
Aircraft: SOCATA TB 20 TRINIDAD, registration: N28070
Injuries: Unavailable

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 17, 2017, about 1600 Pacific daylight time, a Socata TB-20 Trinidad, N28070, departed Truckee-Tahoe Airport (TRK), Truckee, California. Since that time, the private pilot and one passenger have not been located, and the airplane is missing. Radar track data was lost when the airplane was about 16 nautical miles north of TRK, and is presumed to have crashed in remote mountainous terrain. The personal cross-country flight was being operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulator Part 91. There was no record that the pilot had filed a flight plan.

TRK airport operations personnel reported that about the time the airplane departed, lowering cloud bases were observed west of the airport, which would have been the direction of flight en route to O69. However, the pilot elected to depart to the north in an area where higher cloud bases existed.

Search and rescue efforts commenced the morning following the disappearance of the airplane, April 18th, and were subsequently suspended during the evening of April 23rd. To date the airplane has not been located, and an emergency locator signal has not been reported.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should emailassistance@ntsb.gov


Mark and Brenda Richard
~


The bodies of Brenda and Mark Richard, the Santa Rosa couple whose single-engine airplane went missing last month in the Sierra Nevada mountains, have been found, Sierra County Sheriff’s officials said Friday.

Sheriff Tim Standley said a recreational snowmobiler found a piece of the plane’s tail in the snow on Tuesday. Authorities confirmed the discovery early Wednesday and on Thursday found the bodies, in the separated cockpit buried in six to seven feet of snow.

Officials said the couple’s family have been notified of the discovery, in a remote area southeast of Yuba Pass in Sierra County.

“Our hearts go out to the Richards, to their friends who have called for information, to the family that have called in,” Standley said. “It’s a great tragedy.”

Undersheriff Robert Yegge said an autopsy to determine cause of death is underway.

The couple flew out of Truckee Tahoe Airport April 17 headed for Petaluma. At the time of their takeoff around 4 p.m., the temperature was 41 degrees with overcast skies and wind gusts exceeding 20 mph. A friend of the couple last month described Brenda Richard, 53, as a good pilot familiar with flying in the mountains.

The couple were in their white-and-blue single-engine Socata TB-20 Trinidad and were thought to have crashed in a 400-square-mile stretch of rugged backcountry in Sierra County, 18 miles northwest of Truckee. The general location of the plane was determined by radar and cellphone data. On April 23, after six days of unsuccessfully scouring the rough terrain, a search effort was called off.

Standley said it appears the plane struck a tree and split apart. He said he believes centrifugal force caused by the impact flung the cockpit and engine deep into powdery snow. Subsequent snowstorms encased the cockpit in icy, hard-packed snow, he said.

The tail portion of the plane that was found by the snowmobiler was located under a thick tree canopy, he said.

The area had been previously surveyed by rescue aircraft, but the wreckage would not have been visible due to the tree canopy, Standley said.

After the Sheriff’s Office received the report of the wreckage, Standley organized a party to search for the Richards. Standley said the team included those who had previously spent days last month searching for the plane.

The team, which included snowmobiles and specially equipped all-terrain vehicles, went out in snowy weather on Wednesday night. They found the plane by 2:30 a.m. but could not immediately find the cockpit, officials said.

On Thursday morning, a team went out with shovels to dig in the snow. The team found the cockpit and the couple, deceased, inside. Local investigators and federal agencies confirmed the bodies were that of Brenda, 53, and Mark, 54.

The Richards have four adult daughters, Lauren, Madeline, Ashley and Danielle, and a young grandchild, according to neighbors in Santa Rosa.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.pressdemocrat.com







Authorities found a missing airplane, which crashed while carrying a married couple from Truckee to Petaluma, California, in mid-April, after receiving a tip from a citizen.

The plane was found on Tuesday in a remote area southeast of Yuba Pass in Sierra County, according to the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office.

Authorities found two occupants in the plane, later identified as 54-year-old Mark Steven Richard and his 53-year-old wife, Brenda Jane Richard. Both were reported missing on April 18 after they failed to land on schedule.

The couple departed at about 4 p.m. on April 17 from the Truckee Tahoe Airport in a small four-seat Socata TB20 Trinidad with tail No. N28070. They were scheduled to land at the Petaluma Municipal Airport, but they never arrived, Sierra County Sheriff’s deputies said in a previous news release.

Early the next morning, authorities with the Office of Emergency Services in California notified Sierra County deputies that the plane was overdue. 

Investigators with the Civil Air Patrol and the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center conducted radar analysis and traced the couple’s cellphones. They narrowed the search to an area near Yuba Pass Road, between Webber Lake and Jackson Meadow. The area is about 22 miles northwest of Truckee.



Authorities said they extensively searched the area with the help of the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office Search & Rescue Team as well as other agencies in California.

Neighboring agencies from Nevada also helped in the search. But the search was later suspended after authorities failed to find the missing plane.

John Clausen, 58, who works as a sales representative for Granite Chief in Olympic Valley, Calif., often spends his time hiking and skiing in the Tahoe-area.

The former sports photographer said he was enjoying several hours riding around in his snowmobile when he came across torn pieces of the plane. He walked around the area and found that a large portion of the plane was still intact, he said.

“I didn’t look inside to see if there was anyone there,” Clausen said.

He said he felt surprised that a small plane would even survive a crash in the rugged mountainous area. He found the plane between Yuba Pass and Webber Lake—the same general area where authorities believed the plane had crashed.

“There was no way anyone could have found it because of the thick forest and the deep snow,” Clausen said. “My first thought was, ‘Wow!’”

Clausen said the trailhead where he was riding his snowmobile “easily had 2 to 3 feet of snow.” And the area where he found the plane was covered in even more snow.

“It was like finding a needle in the haystack,” he said. “I was not looking for it. I was just enjoying several hours of snowmobiling.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.rgj.com




May 19, 2017 – On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office initiated a search effort based on a report of an overdue aircraft reported as traveling from Truckee to Petaluma California the previous day. The overdue aircraft was reported to have been occupied by Brenda Jane Richard, age 53 (Reported Pilot) and Mark Steven Richard age 54 (Reported Passenger), a married couple both of Santa Rosa California.

An extensive search was performed by members of the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office Search & Rescue Team as well as numerous agencies from throughout the state, in addition to neighboring agencies from Nevada providing mutual aid to the extensive search effort. The search was later suspended with no evidence of the missing aircraft discovered.

On Tuesday, May 16, 2017 the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office responded to a citizen report of an airplane crash in a remote area south/east of Yuba Pass in Sierra County. Upon locating the crash site, the Sierra County Sheriff's Office was able to determine the crashed airplane was that of the missing aircraft from the April 18, 2017 search effort.

A subsequent investigation by the sheriff’s office as well as federal agencies confirmed two occupants on board the aircraft. Both occupants were found deceased and later identified as Brenda Jane Richard and Mark Steven Richard. The family of the couple has been notified. The Sierra County Sheriff's Office extends our deepest condolences to the friends and family of Mark & Brenda Richard.

Original article can be found here: https://yubanet.com

Authorities found a missing airplane, which crashed while carrying a married couple from Truckee to Petaluma, Calif. in mid-April, after receiving a tip from a citizen.

The plane was found on Tuesday in a remote area southeast of Yuba Pass in Sierra County, according to the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office.

Authorities found two occupants in the plane, later identified as 54-year-old Mark Steven Richard and his 53-year-old wife, Brenda Jane Richard. Both were reported missing on April 18 after they failed to land on schedule.

The couple departed at about 4 p.m. on April 17 from the Truckee Tahoe Airport in a small four-seat Socata TB20 Trinidad with tail No. N28070. They were scheduled to land at the Petaluma Municipal Airport, but they never arrived, Sierra County Sheriff’s deputies said in a previous news release.

Early the next morning, authorities with the Office of Emergency Services in California notified Sierra County deputies that the plane was overdue. Investigators with the Civil Air Patrol and the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center conducted radar analysis and traced the couple’s cellphones. They narrowed the search to an area near Yuba Pass Road, between Webber Lake and Jackson Meadow. The area is about 22 miles northwest of Truckee.

Authorities said they extensively searched the area with the help of the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office Search & Rescue Team as well as other agencies in California.

Neighboring agencies from Nevada also helped in the search. But the search was later suspended after authorities failed to find the missing plane.

John Clausen, 58, who works as a sales representative for Granite Chief in Olympic Valley, Calif., often spends his time hiking and skiing in the Tahoe-area.

The former sports photographer said he was enjoying several hours riding around in his snowmobile when he came across torn pieces of the plane. He walked around the area and found that a large portion of the plane was still intact, he said.

“I didn’t look inside to see if there was anyone there,” Clausen said.

He said he felt surprised that a small plane would even survive a crash in the rugged mountainous area. He found the plane between Yuba Pass and Webber Lake—the same general area where authorities believed the plane had crashed.

“There was no way anyone could have found it because of the thick forest and the deep snow,” Clausen said. “My first thought was, ‘Wow!’”

Clausen said the trailhead where he was riding his snowmobile “easily had 2 to 3 feet of snow.” And the area where he found the plane was covered in even more snow.

“It was like finding a needle in the haystack,” he said. “I was not looking for it. I was just enjoying several hours of snowmobiling.”


Original article can be found here: http://www.rgj.com

The Civil Air Patrol ended its search Monday morning for the missing airplane that was carrying a couple from Truckee to Petaluma, California.

Deputies with the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office unsuccessfully searched for the aircraft along the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Authorities decided to suspend the search at about 9 p.m. on Sunday.

“We are extremely disappointed in the outcome of this search,” Incident Commander Maj. Shane Terpstra of the Civil Air Patrol said in news release on Monday.

“We always hope for a fast resolution with missing aircraft searches, but rapidly changing weather compounded with fresh snow worked against us this entire search,” Terpstra said. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the family.”

Mark Richard and his wife, Brenda, departed from the Truckee Tahoe Airport on April 17. Their four-seat Socata TB20 Trinidad was scheduled to land at the Petaluma Municipal Airport, but it never arrived, authorities said.

The Civil Air Patrol was notified shortly after midnight the following day by the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center located at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida.

For six days, authorities from various agencies searched an area 18 miles northwest of Truckee. Civil Air Patrol aircrews from California and Nevada took photos of the search area, which they described as rugged, heavily-wooded and snow-covered.

Crews logged more than 60 flight hours over the area.

Civil Air Patrol volunteers reviewed more than 8,000 digital images of the search area, which was taken by cameras that were mounted on the search planes.

More than 117 volunteers with the Civil Air Patrol helped in the search. That included crews from the California National Guard. The California Highway Patrol also used aircrafts to help with the search.

In total, the Civil Air Patrol used 15 aircraft and 12 vehicles during the search.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.rgj.com

Civil Air Patrol concluded its operations Monday morning in the search for a missing aircraft with two persons on board in the Sierra Nevada mountain range after the

search was suspended by the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office at 9 p.m. Sunday night. The aircraft has not been found.

The Socata TB-20 Trinidad took off April 17 from the Truckee-Tahoe Airport in Truckee and never arrived at its intended destination of Petaluma Municipal Airport. Civil Air Patrol was activated for the search shortly after midnight Tuesday by the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida.

Aerial assets from the California Highway Patrol and California National Guard also participated in the multi-agency search, as did CAP ground teams and those from multiple agencies. The search was conducted in a unified command in support of the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office.

Throughout the six-day search, CAP aircrews from California and Nevada conducted visual and photographic searches while logging more than 60 flight hours over the rugged, heavily-wooded and snow-covered search area located 18 miles northwest of Truckee. 

CAP volunteers on the ground reviewed more than 8,000 high resolution digital images of the search area, which were captured by wing-mounted cameras on the CAP search planes. 

“We are extremely disappointed in the outcome of this search,” said CAP Incident Commander Maj. Shane Terpstra. “We always hope for a fast resolution with missing aircraft searches, but rapidly changing weather compounded with fresh snow worked against us this entire search. Our thoughts and prayers are with the family.”

More than 117 CAP volunteers, 15 CAP aircraft and 12 CAP vehicles participated in the search.


Story and video:   http://www.ktvn.com

Authorities resumed their search Sunday morning for a Santa Rosa couple whose Petaluma-bound plane went missing on April 17 after taking off from Truckee.

Two Civil Air Patrol planes took off around 10 a.m. to search for Mark and Brenda Richard’s white-and-blue Socata TB-20 Trinidad, said Maj. Kathy Johnson, spokeswoman for the Civil Air Patrol. A third plane left in the afternoon to assist.

The patrol suspended its search Saturday afternoon because of strong winds above an area of the Sierra Nevada mountain range where the plane had last been tracked by radar and cellphone information.

The Civil Air Patrol, along with the California National Guard, the CHP and local authorities are focusing on a 270-square-mile area located 18 miles northwest of the Truckee-Tahoe Airport, Johnson said.

Fresh snow on the mountain range has made it difficult to spot the aircraft, especially because the plane’s bottom is white, Johnson said.

“Everything is covered in snow,” she said. “They had fresh snow just after they went missing.”

Flight crews have taken more than 8,000 high-resolution images within the past week to try to pinpoint where the aircraft might have landed, Johnson said.


“It takes about five minutes a photo to go through,” she said. “As you can imagine, it’s a huge undertaking.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.pressdemocrat.com

A Civil Air Patrol aircrew from California Wing is briefed Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Sacramento, during a search for a missing aircraft near the Sierra Nevada mountain range with two persons on board. The Civil Air Patrol was activated for the search early Tuesday morning by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida.



Rescue crews continued to scour the Sierra Nevada on Sunday as the search for a Santa Rosa couple and the single-engine plane they were piloting stretched into its sixth day.

The Civil Air Patrol launched three planes Sunday morning to conduct visual and photographic searches of an area about 18 miles northwest of Truckee.

The California Highway Patrol and the Air National Guard also have planes in the air to complement a ground search being led by the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office.

The plane, a four-seat Socata TB-20 Trinidad, took off from Truckee-Tahoe Airport just before 4 p.m. last Monday, the CAP said. The plane was being piloted by Brenda and Mark Richards of Santa Rosa.

Family members reported the aircraft as overdue when it failed to arrive at its intended destination at Petaluma Municipal Airport, about 180 miles away.




An aerial photo taken by a Civil Air Patrol aircrew Wednesday afternoon, April 19, 2017, shows snow, tree covering, and rugged terrain in an area of the Sierra Nevada mountain range being searched for a missing aircraft with two people on board. The Civil Air Patrol was activated for the search early Tuesday morning by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Air and ground teams from multiple agencies are participating in the search. 


Weather hampered Thursday’s search efforts for a Santa Rosa couple not heard from since taking off in their single-engine plane Monday afternoon from the Truckee-Tahoe Airport en route to Petaluma.

One surveillance flight was able to take off Thursday morning in the search for Mark and Brenda Richard’s Socata TB-20, which officials estimate disappeared five minutes after leaving the 5,900-foot elevation airport about 4 p.m. Monday.

In a statement released Thursday morning, the Richards’ family, which includes daughters Lauren, Madeline, Ashley and Danielle, remained hopeful.

“We have confidence in the search and rescue team and are grateful for the support and efforts of everyone involved,” the statement said.

“We are staying positive and would appreciate privacy at this time.”

When the Richards took off Monday in Truckee, the National Weather Service said it was 45 degrees, with a 6-mph southerly wind and 10-miles visibility.

But about 18 miles northwest of the airport where the Richards’ plane disappeared, the weather can be “drastically different,” said Hardy Bullock, director of aviation and community services for the airport. Because of the high altitude and rugged terrain, flying in and out of the mountain airport can be tricky..

It implemented a “Fly Aware” campaign posting signs at the airport and on its website to educate pilots about the unique circumstances.

“We have a pilot and passenger coordinator who walks around the airport, trying to catch passengers before they depart,” Bullock said, “to talk to them about the challenges that they’re going to face flying into and out of Truckee.”

Altitude, air density, changing weather and wind shear — the abrupt changes in wind speed and direction that can occur over the Sierra Nevada peaks — are among the hazards pilots face flying in and out of the mountain airport, Bullock said.

He said no airport staffers made contact Monday with the Richards and security footage shows they didn’t visit the terminal.

Robert Bousquet, board member of the Tahoe Flying Club based at the Truckee-Tahoe Airport, said a pilot flying a single-engine plane should consider the temperature drops 3 degrees for every thousand feet climbed.

“If you don’t have a plane that can climb through the weather with de-icing equipment, and get above it, then you don’t have a lot of other options other than to fly through it,” Bosquet said.

“So, if you’re at the freezing level, and it was pretty close on Monday ... and it was misting and kind of wet and rainy, those aren’t great plane conditions.”

With no de-icing equipment, a single-engine plane would have two options: Fly above the weather, or drop down to a low enough altitude for the ice to melt.

“The problem with flying a single-engine piston aircraft in the mountains is that you cannot descend to get rid of ice because you have the terrain beneath, and you can’t climb because ice disrupts the airflow over the wings, and produces less lift,” Bousquet said.

Because of the terrain and “desolate wilderness” surrounding the Truckee-Tahoe Airport, Bousquet creates his own flight plans that give him as many landing options as possible in an emergency. In eastern Sierra County, there aren’t many landing options, he said.

When flying to Petaluma, he said, there are two typical routes pilots take.

The most direct path is to Blue Canyon-Nyack Airport, just west of Truckee, and then Interstate 80 southwest before heading west to the Petaluma Airport.

Bousquet said the flight takes about an hour.

Neighbors of the Richards’ said Brenda Richards, the pilot, had been flying for several years.

“She was out flying quite a bit,” Don Jereb said.

Neighbor Tom Torgeson said a pilot friend relayed that Brenda Richards is known as a good pilot who “knows mountain flying.”

So far, search efforts have included the Civil Air Patrol and multiple other agencies, including more than 60 volunteers, nine aircraft and seven vehicles.

Nine sorties had been flown by midday Thursday, with more than 3,100 aerial photographs taken of the heavily wooded snow-covered area, where the snowpack can reach about 10  feet.

“This is truly a team effort and everyone is dedicated to the same goal of finding the aircraft,” said Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Crystal Housman.

Original article can be found here:   
http://www.petaluma360.com

Authorities expanded their search Saturday across the snow-covered northern Sierra Nevada for a single-engine plane flown by a Santa Rosa couple that went missing five days ago after taking off from Truckee.

Five search planes were criss-crossing a nearly 400 square mile area about 18 miles northwest of the Truckee-Tahoe Airport for any signs of Mark and Brenda Richard’s white and blue  Socata TB-20 Trinidad. The couple departed the airport Monday afternoon, bound for Petaluma.

“We’re flying grid patterns,” said Maj. Kathy Johnson, spokeswoman for the Civil Air Patrol. “It’s all divided up. Every plane has its own area. You search it methodically.”

Johnson said the search area has grown slightly from earlier in the week and is now 28 miles by 14 miles wide. The couple was tracked there by radar and cellphone information.

Searchers had clear weather Saturday morning but clouds were expected to close in by the afternoon. Snow on the ground coupled with the plane’s color have hampered search efforts so far, she said.

“When you’ve got a white plane it just blends in,” Johnson said.

Other aircraft from the CHP and state Air National Guard joined in the search Friday while numerous other agencies led by Sierra and Nevada county law enforcement conducted ground searches.

Original article can be found here: http://www.pressdemocrat.com

Members of Civil Air Patrol’s California Wing are helping the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office search for a missing Socata aircraft with two people on board.

Officials say the Socata TB-20 Trinidad left the Truckee-Tahoe Airport in Truckee, California, just before 4 pm on Monday and family members reported the aircraft was overdue Monday night it failed to arrive at Petaluma Municipal Airport.

The Socata is described as  a four-seat low wing aircraft that is blue and white with gold trim. It is equipped with a 406 MHz emergency locator transmitter (ELT), but officials say no satellite hits have come in from the beacon.

Civil Air Patrol was activated for the search shortly after midnight on Tuesday by the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida.

AFRCC say radar analysis and cell phone forensics were conducted overnight and they are narrowing the search to a rugged area of the Sierra Nevada mountain range northwest of Truckee.

Bad weather in the area prevented CAP aircrews from launching overnight and Tuesday morning, but three crews and aircraft are standing by for launch.

“Our hope is that the weather will clear and we can fly a visual search Tuesday afternoon,” said Civil Air Patrol incident commander Maj. Steven DeFord.

A California-based CAP aircrew from Auburn, and two Nevada Wing aircrews from Minden and Carson City are prepared to fly and do visual searches over the mountainous terrain once the weather clears.

A CAP ground team consisting of four search and rescue volunteers from Palo Alto and Sacramento say they are en route to assist Sierra County Sheriff’s Office search teams near Little Truckee Summit in the Tahoe National Forest.

Officials say there are 22 CAP volunteers, three CAP aircraft and one CAP vehicle being used in the search mission.

Tuesday evening there was a shift change at incident command and Civil Air Patrol incident commander Maj. David Boehm said, "We will be flying until sundown. If the aircraft is not located this evening, we plan to resume aerial search operations at sunrise, so long as the weather cooperates."

Boehm continued, "We want to find them, and we will search as long as we are needed."

Story and video:   http://www.ktvn.com

An airplane that departed from the Tahoe-Truckee Airport (KTRK) on Monday, April 17 has been reported missing.

According to a press release issued by the Civil Air Patrol, the plane departed the Truckee Airport yesterday around 4 p.m. The two people on board were heading for the Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), but family members say they never arrived.

The Civil Air Patrol, which is an all-volunteer U.S. Air Force Auxiliary, is assisting the Sierra County Sheriff's Department with the search near Little Truckee Summit in Tahoe National Forest, northwest of the town of Truckee.

Civil Air Patrol Incident Commander Major David Boehm said Tuesday afternoon, "We will be flying until sundown. If the aircraft is not located this evening, we plan to resume aerial search operations at sunrise, so long as the weather permits."

The missing aircraft is equipped with an emergency location transmitter, though as of Tuesday afternoon no signal had been sent. The airplane is a four-seat low wing aircraft, known as a Socata TB-20 Trinidad. It is blue and white with gold trim.

“We want to find them, and we will search as long as we are needed,” he said.

The California Highway Patrol is also assisting in the search, according to Civil Air Patrol spokesperson Lt. Col. Crystal Housman.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.sierrasun.com

Waco Regional Airport (KACT) makes progress with infrastructure projects



A public information workshop last week updated the Waco community on the progress and direction of the Waco Regional Airport master plan.

“The master plan is literally a plan to help us identify what we need,” said Joel Martinez, director of aviation at Waco Regional Airport. “As the funds become available, that’s when we act on those project lists. So, we’ll start as early as next year, but again the master plan is just mapping out the next 15 years worth of projects for how our facility will progress. It will be an ongoing thing.”

The meeting was held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Thursday at the airport terminal building. Martinez said the meeting focused on recommendations in terms of infrastructure for the airport. Martinez reviewed a list of about 30 various projects to consider for construction, as well as budgeting for the projects. Martinez said a major focus and the next project was to relocate runway 1432 by moving it to the north to eliminate a safety area concern.

“I’m currently identifying projects and securing funds to complete those projects, whether that is acquisition of properties or drainage plans and implementing that,” Martinez said. “Implementation is what my focus will be once the plan is complete.”

Martinez also said there has not been any imposing feedback that he is aware of up to this point. There has been a lot of public interest, he said. The meeting last Thursday had about 15 members of the general public present to participate, review and discuss sketches and recommendations, Martinez said. The target for finishing the master plan is still set for June.

“A big part of the master plan was to bring the community in on the planning aspect of the airport,” Martinez said. “I hope the community and those involved recognize going forward that this project was discussed and they remember why we need that. So, that type of support, not to say we don’t have support, but sometimes we have to re-justify why we have projects going forward.”

A representative from the Federal Aviation Administration was also present at the meeting and had no glaring feedback, so Martinez believes they are moving in the right direction.

“With upcoming construction and hopeful improvements, I’d definitely consider traveling via the Waco airport because I don’t have a car and getting a ride there would be a lot easier than commuting to Dallas,” Columbia, Tenn., freshman Micaela Freeman said. “Disregarding connecting flights, I’d be one to try out the Waco airport. I’ve heard nothing but positives about it in the past.”

In October, the airport announced the creation of the master plan in order to implement changes over the next 20 years. The master plan considers various ideas for construction, relocation and generating income from expanding the runway and parking area. Walker Partners, Coffman Associates, Martinez Geospatial and DKMG Consulting are all working on the project.

Jacob Bell, client manager for Walker Partners told the Lariat in October about the creation of the master plan, a 20-year road map that looks at alternatives for the construction of the airport. Engineers working on the project plan to work with the Federal Aviation Administration to keep the Waco Regional Airport up to standard, in addition to related renovations.The master plan is done in five year increments, with the next five years already planned. The project will move forward after the next five years focusing first on safety, then expansion.

“As an out of state student, the Waco airport tends to be my first reunion with Baylor and Waco,” Peoria, Ill., freshman Lindsay Walton said. “It is currently very small and kind of dated. I am excited for it to be refurbished so that when my friends and family fly down to visit, the good impression of Baylor begins when they touch down.”

Original article can be found here: http://baylorlariat.com

Luscombe 8A, N8554Y: Fatal accident occurred April 18, 2017 near Skylark Airpark (7B6), Warehouse Point, Hartford County, Connecticut

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hartford, Connecticut
Continental Motors Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Robert J. Plourde: http://registry.faa.gov/N8554Y

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA156
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, April 18, 2017 in East Windsor, CT
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8, registration: N8554Y
Injuries: 2 Fatalities.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 18, 2017, about 1840 eastern daylight time, a Luscombe 8A, N8554Y, was substantially damaged when it collided with trees and terrain during the initial climb after takeoff from Skylark Airport (7B6), East Windsor, Connecticut. The private pilot seated in the left seat, and the private pilot seated in the right seat were fatally injured. The privately-owned airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight.

A witness was standing at the departure end of runway 10 and observed the airplane take off. He reported that the airplane seemed to be lower and slower than most airplanes that he had observed as it passed overhead. He then saw the airplane shaking and tipping left and right, barely clearing the tree line past the end of the runway. He observed the airplane make a "drastic, sharp, and abrupt" turn to the north. He stopped hearing the engine, and the airplane "dropped like a stone." He then called the local authorities to report the accident.

The airplane came to rest against trees in a wooded area, about 1/2 mile northeast of 7B6. The wreckage was found in an inverted, nose-low attitude. All structure and components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site. There was no fire. The airplane was equipped with a fuel tank in each wing. Both fuel caps were found detached from the tanks and on the ground, adjacent to the wreckage. A small amount of residual fuel, which could not be quantified was observed in the tanks. Numerous tree branches were found adjacent to the wreckage; some exhibited smooth, angular cuts and black paint transfer on the cut surfaces.

The pilot seated in the left cockpit seat held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. He reported 600 hours of total flight time on his most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) third class medical certificate, dated March 24, 2017.

The pilot seated in the right cockpit seat held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single engine land rating. He also held a remote pilot certificate for small, unmanned aircraft systems. He was the registered owner of the airplane. He reported 292 hours of total flight time on his most recent FAA third class medical certificate, dated March 4, 2016.

The single-engine, high-wing, two-seat airplane was manufactured in 1946 and incorporated fixed, tailwheel landing gear. It was equipped with a Continental A65-8 reciprocating engine rated at 65 horsepower. The airplane was not equipped with wing flaps or a stall warning system. The cockpit featured dual flight controls.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov

Obituary: George Janssen II, 51

George R. Janssen, II, 51, of Vernon, beloved husband of Jennifer and father of two children George Thomas and Grace, passed away on Tuesday April 18, 2017 from injuries sustained in an aircraft accident.

Born April 13, 1966 in Hackensack, NJ to the late George R. and Irmgard Janssen and raised in Boca Raton, Florida. George was an engineer at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft in East Hartford and best known for his love of spending time with his family enjoying the outdoors.

His passion for flying began when he was 16 learning to fly at an airport near his childhood home in Boca Raton, Florida. In addition to flying, George loved to restore cars, boats, and anything with an engine!

Besides his wife and children, he is survived by his sisters; Janet Michael and her husband Elliot, Jeanne Johnson and her husband John; his in-laws, Mark and Connie Himelberger; his brothers-in-law, Cory Himelberger, Jeremy Himelberger and his wife Katie; his sister-in-law, Aimee Lewis and her husband Charles and several nieces and nephews.

In lieu of flowers please send donations to Unitarian Universalist Society East in Manchester.   Memorial services will be held at a later date.


Obituary: Robert J. Plourde

ELLINGTON — Robert J. Plourde, 61, of Ellington, died unexpectedly on Tuesday, April 18, 2017 in East Windsor.
Robert was born Nov. 22, 1955 in Spokane, Wash. He grew up in Naugatuck and spent the last 23 years as a resident of Ellington. He served in the United States Air Force as a sergeant specializing in electronic mechanics. Throughout the course of his life he worked at many technology companies as a sales executive, and most recently was involved with an aerial video and photography agency.

Bob, the son of the late Norman (Bob) Plourde and Anita Plourde, is survived by his beloved wife of 25 years, Jacqueline O’Brien Plourde; his children, Robert Plourde Jr., Nicole Barry, Mitchell Plourde, Spencer Plourde; his beloved grandchildren, Bobby Plourde III, Benjamin Barry, Brielle Plourde, Makena Barry; his siblings, Joe and wife, Lori, Steven, Gary, Bill and wife, Nancy, Plourde, Anita McCowan and husband, James. He was predeceased by his brother, Patrick. He also leaves behind numerous aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews and a wonderful network of friends and neighbors.

Bob was a loving father and husband who touched the lives of all those who knew him. Some of his most precious times were spent making homemade pizzas out of his wood fired oven, and playing guitar around the campfire with his family and friends. He followed his desire to become a pilot, and mentored others who shared his love of flying. Most importantly, he will be remembered by all as kind, loving and wonderful man.

The funeral was held on Saturday, April 22, 2017 at the Ellington Congregational Church.  In lieu of flowers, contributions in memory of Robert may be made to the EAA Skylark Chapter 1310, 54 Wells Road, Broad Brook, CT 06016.





EAST WINDSOR, CT (WFSB) -  Investigators continue to look into what caused a small plane to crash and kill two people in East Windsor on Tuesday night.

The National Transportation Safety Board was said to have arrived on the scene just before noon on Wednesday.

A Luscombe 8A aircraft, which is a 1946 model, departed from Runway 10 at the Skylark Airport around 6:45 p.m. and crashed, about a half a mile from Skylark Airport, a short time later. 

"The indication is the airplane struck trees about 100 feet up and came to rest straight down," NTSB Sr. Air Safety Investigator Ralph Hicks said.  

An official with Skylark Airport called the two men who died "experienced pilots" and that the airport was "devastated." He called the one who was flying extremely careful. He said they didn't understand what went wrong.

The official with Skylark Airport said they had been up flying for between 30 and 45 minutes while performing landings and takeoffs. He said everything appeared fine.

On Wednesday, federal officials launched their own investigation. Both the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were called to the scene. 

Wednesday evening, family members confirmed that the pilot who died was Bob Plourde, of Ellington.

The NTSB said the plane took a nose dive and landed in ground. The propeller was stuck in the ground and they were working with a local company to remove it.  

"Basically the aircraft is inverted and embedded in the ground and below ground level and we see one propeller blade out of the ground. We are unable to move it right now," Hicks said. 

The plane never caught on fire, Hicks added. 

Eyewitnesses said they heard the single-engine aircraft stall in the air then plunge into the woods.

“It's terrible. I don't know who they are or anything,” East Windsor resident Flo Hall said. "It's so quiet here. It's unexpected."  

Hall lives a few houses down from where the plane crashed down on private property near Rolocut Road.

“I'm not worried,” Hall said. “It's just something freaky that happened."

It's unclear where the Luscombe 8A aircraft was headed.

NTSB officials said if these planes are maintained, they will last. 

"We have plenty of airplanes like this flying," Hick said. "As long as they're maintained properly and maintained annually with their inspections, they can fly for a long time." 

Federal investigators were expected to be on the scene for at least two days to sift through evidence and try to figure out what led to the crash. NTSB officials said they still don't know why it happened and don't comment on occupants. NTSB officials added they will take it to Delaware to analyze and were trying to get maintenance reports.

There are no towers at Skylark Airport, so NTSB officials said there were no communications. 

Story and video:  http://www.wfsb.com

EAST WINDSOR —  An investigation continues after two people were killed in a plane crash near Skylark Airport Tuesday evening.

Fire officials from Broad Brook confirmed that both died in the crash. Det. Sgt. Matthew Carl said the plane came down in the woods near the airport. There was no fire at the crash scene about 1,000 feet off Rolocut Rd.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the aircraft crashed in the woods shortly after taking off from privately owned airport. It happened around 6:45 p.m. Tuesday.

The names of the two people who died have not been released.

The FAA is investigating the crash of the Luscombe 8A aircraft and will determine its cause.

He said it was a single engine plane that witnesses said stalled and went down. The plane is nose down according to Carl.

Police said witnesses describe that the plane looked like it stalled before it went down.

“It just sounded like it was dead, the motor just killed, just shut off, that was it,” neighbor Justin Griswold said. “It’s heartbreaking.”

The airport is located on Wells Road in East Windsor and typically handles small, private aircraft. The call came in around 6:30 p.m.

Broad Brook Fire Chief Tom Arcari said he’s been with the department about 40 years and recalls about four plane crashes in the area.

“The last bad crash was probably 35-40 years ago,” he said. “Three or four were killed.”

The identity of the victims in Tuesday’s crash have not been released.

Lifestar medical helicopters were called to the scene but later canceled.

Story and video:  http://fox61.com


EAST WINDSOR, Conn. (CBS Connecticut) – East Windsor police have identified the two men killed when a small plane crashed in a wooded area near Skylark Airport Tuesday evening.

Police say autopsies will be performed on the bodies of Robert J. Plourde, 61, of Ellington and George R. Janssen II, 51, of Vernon.

The plane, a 1946 Luscombe Silvaire A8, was found nose down into the ground in an area of Wells Road.

The crash remains under investigation by the East Windsor Police Department, the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.





























Two people are dead following a plane crash in East Windsor, according to the Broad Brook Fire Department. 

Tolland County Dispatch said a small plane crashed on Rolocut Road by Wells Road in Broad Brook in East Windsor.

According to the Skylark Airpark manager, the plane had just taken off before the crash. The airport is located on 54 Wells Road, within the area of the crash. 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said they are investigating crash of a Luscombe 8A in Connecticut, according to a tweet. 

Officials said NTSB will be in charge of the investigation in the morning. 

During a press conference on Tuesday night, officials said the plane had stalled.

Two LifeStar helicopters were called to the scene before being cancelled. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has been requested to the scene. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcconnecticut.com