Tuesday, April 18, 2017

New airport hangar on the Treasure Coast will bring more jobs: Airport Maintenance repair workers starting at $48,000 a year



FORT PIERCE, Fla. —  A major expansion project is underway at the Treasure Coast International Airport and Business Park.

A new 30,000 square foot aviation maintenance hangar will be located on four acres of airport property next to the air traffic control tower.

The Treasure Coast International Airport formally known as the St. Lucie County International Airport is located at located at 3000 Curtis King Blvd. in Fort Pierce.

Airport Manager John Wiatrak believes the project will provide so-call workable and livable jobs.

"We're looking at over a 100 permanent jobs at this hanger and the best part of it is these jobs these airport hangar jobs they start at about 48-thousand dollars," said Wiatrak.

The Hangar project is not the only major undertaking in the works at the airport.

Construction crews are already finalizing a $2.1-million renovation project to the airport's U.S Customs and Border Protection Facility.

St. Lucie County officials will be unveiling the conceptual plans for the new 30,000-square-foot hanger to be built inside the Treasure Coast International Airport and Business Park at the MRO Americas trade show on Tuesday, April 25 at 3 p.m. Islamorada Beer Company's North Brewery, which is located next to the Fort Pierce airport, will be part of the event, offering a chance to win a "Brewery Tour for Six."

Story and video:   http://www.wpbf.com

Socata TB-20 Trinidad, N28070: Crews resume search for missing plane

http://registry.faa.gov/N28070




Mark and Brenda Richard. 


Authorities resumed their search Sunday morning for a Santa Rosa couple whose Petaluma-bound plane went missing on April 17 after taking off from Truckee.

Two Civil Air Patrol planes took off around 10 a.m. to search for Mark and Brenda Richard’s white-and-blue Socata TB-20 Trinidad, said Maj. Kathy Johnson, spokeswoman for the Civil Air Patrol. A third plane left in the afternoon to assist.

The patrol suspended its search Saturday afternoon because of strong winds above an area of the Sierra Nevada mountain range where the plane had last been tracked by radar and cellphone information.

The Civil Air Patrol, along with the California National Guard, the CHP and local authorities are focusing on a 270-square-mile area located 18 miles northwest of the Truckee-Tahoe Airport, Johnson said.

Fresh snow on the mountain range has made it difficult to spot the aircraft, especially because the plane’s bottom is white, Johnson said.

“Everything is covered in snow,” she said. “They had fresh snow just after they went missing.”

Flight crews have taken more than 8,000 high-resolution images within the past week to try to pinpoint where the aircraft might have landed, Johnson said.


“It takes about five minutes a photo to go through,” she said. “As you can imagine, it’s a huge undertaking.”

Original article can be found here: http://www.pressdemocrat.com

A Civil Air Patrol aircrew from California Wing is briefed Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Sacramento, during a search for a missing aircraft near the Sierra Nevada mountain range with two persons on board. The Civil Air Patrol was activated for the search early Tuesday morning by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida.



Rescue crews continued to scour the Sierra Nevada on Sunday as the search for a Santa Rosa couple and the single-engine plane they were piloting stretched into its sixth day.

The Civil Air Patrol launched three planes Sunday morning to conduct visual and photographic searches of an area about 18 miles northwest of Truckee.

The California Highway Patrol and the Air National Guard also have planes in the air to complement a ground search being led by the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office.

The plane, a four-seat Socata TB-20 Trinidad, took off from Truckee-Tahoe Airport just before 4 p.m. last Monday, the CAP said. The plane was being piloted by Brenda and Mark Richards of Santa Rosa.

Family members reported the aircraft as overdue when it failed to arrive at its intended destination at Petaluma Municipal Airport, about 180 miles away.



An aerial photo taken by a Civil Air Patrol aircrew Wednesday afternoon, April 19, 2017, shows snow, tree covering, and rugged terrain in an area of the Sierra Nevada mountain range being searched for a missing aircraft with two people on board. The Civil Air Patrol was activated for the search early Tuesday morning by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida. Air and ground teams from multiple agencies are participating in the search. 


Photo courtesy of Civil Air Patrol



Weather hampered Thursday’s search efforts for a Santa Rosa couple not heard from since taking off in their single-engine plane Monday afternoon from the Truckee-Tahoe Airport en route to Petaluma.

One surveillance flight was able to take off Thursday morning in the search for Mark and Brenda Richard’s Socata TB-20, which officials estimate disappeared five minutes after leaving the 5,900-foot elevation airport about 4 p.m. Monday.

In a statement released Thursday morning, the Richards’ family, which includes daughters Lauren, Madeline, Ashley and Danielle, remained hopeful.

“We have confidence in the search and rescue team and are grateful for the support and efforts of everyone involved,” the statement said.

“We are staying positive and would appreciate privacy at this time.”

When the Richards took off Monday in Truckee, the National Weather Service said it was 45 degrees, with a 6-mph southerly wind and 10-miles visibility.

But about 18 miles northwest of the airport where the Richards’ plane disappeared, the weather can be “drastically different,” said Hardy Bullock, director of aviation and community services for the airport. Because of the high altitude and rugged terrain, flying in and out of the mountain airport can be tricky..

It implemented a “Fly Aware” campaign posting signs at the airport and on its website to educate pilots about the unique circumstances.

“We have a pilot and passenger coordinator who walks around the airport, trying to catch passengers before they depart,” Bullock said, “to talk to them about the challenges that they’re going to face flying into and out of Truckee.”

Altitude, air density, changing weather and wind shear — the abrupt changes in wind speed and direction that can occur over the Sierra Nevada peaks — are among the hazards pilots face flying in and out of the mountain airport, Bullock said.

He said no airport staffers made contact Monday with the Richards and security footage shows they didn’t visit the terminal.

Robert Bousquet, board member of the Tahoe Flying Club based at the Truckee-Tahoe Airport, said a pilot flying a single-engine plane should consider the temperature drops 3 degrees for every thousand feet climbed.

“If you don’t have a plane that can climb through the weather with de-icing equipment, and get above it, then you don’t have a lot of other options other than to fly through it,” Bosquet said.

“So, if you’re at the freezing level, and it was pretty close on Monday ... and it was misting and kind of wet and rainy, those aren’t great plane conditions.”

With no de-icing equipment, a single-engine plane would have two options: Fly above the weather, or drop down to a low enough altitude for the ice to melt.

“The problem with flying a single-engine piston aircraft in the mountains is that you cannot descend to get rid of ice because you have the terrain beneath, and you can’t climb because ice disrupts the airflow over the wings, and produces less lift,” Bousquet said.

Because of the terrain and “desolate wilderness” surrounding the Truckee-Tahoe Airport, Bousquet creates his own flight plans that give him as many landing options as possible in an emergency. In eastern Sierra County, there aren’t many landing options, he said.

When flying to Petaluma, he said, there are two typical routes pilots take.

The most direct path is to Blue Canyon-Nyack Airport, just west of Truckee, and then Interstate 80 southwest before heading west to the Petaluma Airport.

Bousquet said the flight takes about an hour.

Neighbors of the Richards’ said Brenda Richards, the pilot, had been flying for several years.

“She was out flying quite a bit,” Don Jereb said.

Neighbor Tom Torgeson said a pilot friend relayed that Brenda Richards is known as a good pilot who “knows mountain flying.”

So far, search efforts have included the Civil Air Patrol and multiple other agencies, including more than 60 volunteers, nine aircraft and seven vehicles.

Nine sorties had been flown by midday Thursday, with more than 3,100 aerial photographs taken of the heavily wooded snow-covered area, where the snowpack can reach about 10  feet.

“This is truly a team effort and everyone is dedicated to the same goal of finding the aircraft,” said Civil Air Patrol Lt. Col. Crystal Housman.

Original article can be found here:   
http://www.petaluma360.com

Authorities expanded their search Saturday across the snow-covered northern Sierra Nevada for a single-engine plane flown by a Santa Rosa couple that went missing five days ago after taking off from Truckee.

Five search planes were criss-crossing a nearly 400 square mile area about 18 miles northwest of the Truckee-Tahoe Airport for any signs of Mark and Brenda Richard’s white and blue  Socata TB-20 Trinidad. The couple departed the airport Monday afternoon, bound for Petaluma.

“We’re flying grid patterns,” said Maj. Kathy Johnson, spokeswoman for the Civil Air Patrol. “It’s all divided up. Every plane has its own area. You search it methodically.”

Johnson said the search area has grown slightly from earlier in the week and is now 28 miles by 14 miles wide. The couple was tracked there by radar and cellphone information.

Searchers had clear weather Saturday morning but clouds were expected to close in by the afternoon. Snow on the ground coupled with the plane’s color have hampered search efforts so far, she said.

“When you’ve got a white plane it just blends in,” Johnson said.

Other aircraft from the CHP and state Air National Guard joined in the search Friday while numerous other agencies led by Sierra and Nevada county law enforcement conducted ground searches.

Original article can be found here: http://www.pressdemocrat.com

Members of Civil Air Patrol’s California Wing are helping the Sierra County Sheriff’s Office search for a missing Socata aircraft with two people on board.

Officials say the Socata TB-20 Trinidad left the Truckee-Tahoe Airport in Truckee, California, just before 4 pm on Monday and family members reported the aircraft was overdue Monday night it failed to arrive at Petaluma Municipal Airport.

The Socata is described as  a four-seat low wing aircraft that is blue and white with gold trim. It is equipped with a 406 MHz emergency locator transmitter (ELT), but officials say no satellite hits have come in from the beacon.

Civil Air Patrol was activated for the search shortly after midnight on Tuesday by the U.S. Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC) at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida.

AFRCC say radar analysis and cell phone forensics were conducted overnight and they are narrowing the search to a rugged area of the Sierra Nevada mountain range northwest of Truckee.

Bad weather in the area prevented CAP aircrews from launching overnight and Tuesday morning, but three crews and aircraft are standing by for launch.

“Our hope is that the weather will clear and we can fly a visual search Tuesday afternoon,” said Civil Air Patrol incident commander Maj. Steven DeFord.

A California-based CAP aircrew from Auburn, and two Nevada Wing aircrews from Minden and Carson City are prepared to fly and do visual searches over the mountainous terrain once the weather clears.

A CAP ground team consisting of four search and rescue volunteers from Palo Alto and Sacramento say they are en route to assist Sierra County Sheriff’s Office search teams near Little Truckee Summit in the Tahoe National Forest.

Officials say there are 22 CAP volunteers, three CAP aircraft and one CAP vehicle being used in the search mission.

Tuesday evening there was a shift change at incident command and Civil Air Patrol incident commander Maj. David Boehm said, "We will be flying until sundown. If the aircraft is not located this evening, we plan to resume aerial search operations at sunrise, so long as the weather cooperates."

Boehm continued, "We want to find them, and we will search as long as we are needed."

Story and video:   http://www.ktvn.com

An airplane that departed from the Tahoe-Truckee Airport (KTRK) on Monday, April 17 has been reported missing.

According to a press release issued by the Civil Air Patrol, the plane departed the Truckee Airport yesterday around 4 p.m. The two people on board were heading for the Petaluma Municipal Airport (O69), but family members say they never arrived.

The Civil Air Patrol, which is an all-volunteer U.S. Air Force Auxiliary, is assisting the Sierra County Sheriff's Department with the search near Little Truckee Summit in Tahoe National Forest, northwest of the town of Truckee.

Civil Air Patrol Incident Commander Major David Boehm said Tuesday afternoon, "We will be flying until sundown. If the aircraft is not located this evening, we plan to resume aerial search operations at sunrise, so long as the weather permits."

The missing aircraft is equipped with an emergency location transmitter, though as of Tuesday afternoon no signal had been sent. The airplane is a four-seat low wing aircraft, known as a Socata TB-20 Trinidad. It is blue and white with gold trim.

“We want to find them, and we will search as long as we are needed,” he said.

The California Highway Patrol is also assisting in the search, according to Civil Air Patrol spokesperson Lt. Col. Crystal Housman.

Original article can be found here:   http://www.sierrasun.com

Waco Regional Airport (KACT) makes progress with infrastructure projects



A public information workshop last week updated the Waco community on the progress and direction of the Waco Regional Airport master plan.

“The master plan is literally a plan to help us identify what we need,” said Joel Martinez, director of aviation at Waco Regional Airport. “As the funds become available, that’s when we act on those project lists. So, we’ll start as early as next year, but again the master plan is just mapping out the next 15 years worth of projects for how our facility will progress. It will be an ongoing thing.”

The meeting was held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Thursday at the airport terminal building. Martinez said the meeting focused on recommendations in terms of infrastructure for the airport. Martinez reviewed a list of about 30 various projects to consider for construction, as well as budgeting for the projects. Martinez said a major focus and the next project was to relocate runway 1432 by moving it to the north to eliminate a safety area concern.

“I’m currently identifying projects and securing funds to complete those projects, whether that is acquisition of properties or drainage plans and implementing that,” Martinez said. “Implementation is what my focus will be once the plan is complete.”

Martinez also said there has not been any imposing feedback that he is aware of up to this point. There has been a lot of public interest, he said. The meeting last Thursday had about 15 members of the general public present to participate, review and discuss sketches and recommendations, Martinez said. The target for finishing the master plan is still set for June.

“A big part of the master plan was to bring the community in on the planning aspect of the airport,” Martinez said. “I hope the community and those involved recognize going forward that this project was discussed and they remember why we need that. So, that type of support, not to say we don’t have support, but sometimes we have to re-justify why we have projects going forward.”

A representative from the Federal Aviation Administration was also present at the meeting and had no glaring feedback, so Martinez believes they are moving in the right direction.

“With upcoming construction and hopeful improvements, I’d definitely consider traveling via the Waco airport because I don’t have a car and getting a ride there would be a lot easier than commuting to Dallas,” Columbia, Tenn., freshman Micaela Freeman said. “Disregarding connecting flights, I’d be one to try out the Waco airport. I’ve heard nothing but positives about it in the past.”

In October, the airport announced the creation of the master plan in order to implement changes over the next 20 years. The master plan considers various ideas for construction, relocation and generating income from expanding the runway and parking area. Walker Partners, Coffman Associates, Martinez Geospatial and DKMG Consulting are all working on the project.

Jacob Bell, client manager for Walker Partners told the Lariat in October about the creation of the master plan, a 20-year road map that looks at alternatives for the construction of the airport. Engineers working on the project plan to work with the Federal Aviation Administration to keep the Waco Regional Airport up to standard, in addition to related renovations.The master plan is done in five year increments, with the next five years already planned. The project will move forward after the next five years focusing first on safety, then expansion.

“As an out of state student, the Waco airport tends to be my first reunion with Baylor and Waco,” Peoria, Ill., freshman Lindsay Walton said. “It is currently very small and kind of dated. I am excited for it to be refurbished so that when my friends and family fly down to visit, the good impression of Baylor begins when they touch down.”

Original article can be found here: http://baylorlariat.com

Luscombe 8A, N8554Y: Fatal accident occurred April 18, 2017 near Skylark Airpark (7B6), Warehouse Point, Hartford County, Connecticut

EAST WINDSOR, Conn. (CBS Connecticut) – East Windsor police have identified the two men killed when a small plane crashed in a wooded area near Skylark Airport Tuesday evening.

Police say autopsies will be performed on the bodies of Robert J. Plourde, 61, of Ellington and George R. Janssen II, 51, of Vernon.

The plane, a 1946 Luscombe Silvaire A8, was found nose down into the ground in an area of Wells Road.

The crash remains under investigation by the East Windsor Police Department, the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Bob Plourde



Robert J. Plourde: http://registry.faa.gov/N8554Y

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Windsor Locks 

Aircraft crashed into a wooded area near Skylark Airpark. The two (2) souls on board were fatally injured.  

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 22:45:00Z
Regis#: N8554Y
Aircraft Make: LUSCOMBE
Aircraft Model: 8A
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: WAREHOUSE POINT
State: CONNECTICUT

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov




EAST WINDSOR, CT (WFSB) -  Investigators continue to look into what caused a small plane to crash and kill two people in East Windsor on Tuesday night.

The National Transportation Safety Board was said to have arrived on the scene just before noon on Wednesday.

A Luscombe 8A aircraft, which is a 1946 model, departed from Runway 10 at the Skylark Airport around 6:45 p.m. and crashed, about a half a mile from Skylark Airport, a short time later. 

"The indication is the airplane struck trees about 100 feet up and came to rest straight down," NTSB Sr. Air Safety Investigator Ralph Hicks said.  

An official with Skylark Airport called the two men who died "experienced pilots" and that the airport was "devastated." He called the one who was flying extremely careful. He said they didn't understand what went wrong.

The official with Skylark Airport said they had been up flying for between 30 and 45 minutes while performing landings and takeoffs. He said everything appeared fine.

On Wednesday, federal officials launched their own investigation. Both the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were called to the scene. 

Wednesday evening, family members confirmed that the pilot who died was Bob Plourde, of Ellington.

The NTSB said the plane took a nose dive and landed in ground. The propeller was stuck in the ground and they were working with a local company to remove it.  

"Basically the aircraft is inverted and embedded in the ground and below ground level and we see one propeller blade out of the ground. We are unable to move it right now," Hicks said. 

The plane never caught on fire, Hicks added. 

Eyewitnesses said they heard the single-engine aircraft stall in the air then plunge into the woods.

“It's terrible. I don't know who they are or anything,” East Windsor resident Flo Hall said. "It's so quiet here. It's unexpected."  

Hall lives a few houses down from where the plane crashed down on private property near Rolocut Road.

“I'm not worried,” Hall said. “It's just something freaky that happened."

It's unclear where the Luscombe 8A aircraft was headed.

NTSB officials said if these planes are maintained, they will last. 

"We have plenty of airplanes like this flying," Hick said. "As long as they're maintained properly and maintained annually with their inspections, they can fly for a long time." 

Federal investigators were expected to be on the scene for at least two days to sift through evidence and try to figure out what led to the crash. NTSB officials said they still don't know why it happened and don't comment on occupants. NTSB officials added they will take it to Delaware to analyze and were trying to get maintenance reports.

There are no towers at Skylark Airport, so NTSB officials said there were no communications. 

Story and video:  http://www.wfsb.com

EAST WINDSOR —  An investigation continues after two people were killed in a plane crash near Skylark Airport Tuesday evening.

Fire officials from Broad Brook confirmed that both died in the crash. Det. Sgt. Matthew Carl said the plane came down in the woods near the airport. There was no fire at the crash scene about 1,000 feet off Rolocut Rd.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the aircraft crashed in the woods shortly after taking off from privately owned airport. It happened around 6:45 p.m. Tuesday.

The names of the two people who died have not been released.

The FAA is investigating the crash of the Luscombe 8A aircraft and will determine its cause.

He said it was a single engine plane that witnesses said stalled and went down. The plane is nose down according to Carl.

Police said witnesses describe that the plane looked like it stalled before it went down.

“It just sounded like it was dead, the motor just killed, just shut off, that was it,” neighbor Justin Griswold said. “It’s heartbreaking.”

The airport is located on Wells Road in East Windsor and typically handles small, private aircraft. The call came in around 6:30 p.m.

Broad Brook Fire Chief Tom Arcari said he’s been with the department about 40 years and recalls about four plane crashes in the area.

“The last bad crash was probably 35-40 years ago,” he said. “Three or four were killed.”

The identity of the victims in Tuesday’s crash have not been released.

Lifestar medical helicopters were called to the scene but later canceled.

Story and video:  http://fox61.com





























Two people are dead following a plane crash in East Windsor, according to the Broad Brook Fire Department. 

Tolland County Dispatch said a small plane crashed on Rolocut Road by Wells Road in Broad Brook in East Windsor.

According to the Skylark Airpark manager, the plane had just taken off before the crash. The airport is located on 54 Wells Road, within the area of the crash. 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said they are investigating crash of a Luscombe 8A in Connecticut, according to a tweet. 

Officials said NTSB will be in charge of the investigation in the morning. 

During a press conference on Tuesday night, officials said the plane had stalled.

Two LifeStar helicopters were called to the scene before being cancelled. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has been requested to the scene. 

Original article can be found here: http://www.nbcconnecticut.com

Cessna 172, PMG Project Management Group LLC, N8368B: Accident occurred April 18, 2017 in Euharlee, Bartow County, Georgia

PMG Project Management Group LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N8368B

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft crashed into a residential area under unknown circumstances. 

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 17:50:00Z
Regis#: N8368B
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C172
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: SERIOUS
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
City: EUHARLEE
State: GEORGIA


BARTOW COUNTY, Ga. - Two people are injured after a small plane crash in a subdivision, according to officials. 


Kathleen Bergen, with FAA Communications, said a Cessna 172 aircraft with two people on board crashed into a subdivision in Euharlee at about 1:50 p.m.
on Milam Bridge Road.

The first male patient was found to have numerous trauma injuries and the crew began trauma protocol treatment. The patient was flown to Grady Memorial Hospital.


The second male patient was conscious, but also had numerous trauma injuries. The second patient was transported to Floyd Hospital.


The cause of the crash is under investigation.


Original article can be found here:  http://www.wsbtv.com





EUHARLEE, Ga. -- A team from the FAA and the NTSB are on the way to a plane crash in a Euharlee neighborhood. 


A spokesperson for the FAA said the crash happened around 1:50 Tuesday afternoon. 


The Cessna 172 aircraft was carrying two people at the time of the crash. The plane hit utility poles on the way down, but did not hit any homes. 


Two people were in the plane when it crashed Tuesday afternoon.   


Dep. Chief Dwayne Jamison with the Bartow County Fire Department said two men were trapped inside the heavily damaged plane when they first arrived. Firefighters were able to free the two men.


One was airlifted to Grady Memorial Hospital. The other was transported by ambulance to Floyd Medical Center. 


Story and video:  http://www.11alive.com




EUHARLEE, Ga. - Two men were injured when a small plane crashed in Bartow County Tuesday afternoon.

Bartow County Deputy Fire Chief Dwayne Jameson said the plane crashed around 2:10 p.m. near Milam Bridge and Euharlee roads in Euharlee.
  
FAA officials say two people were aboard the small Cessna 172 aircraft when it went down. Jameson said the victims were temporarily trapped when the two-seater plane crashed. 

Officials tell FOX 5 one victim was flown to Grady Memorial Hospital with numerous trauma injuries. The other was  conscious when he was transported by ground to Floyd Medical Center with numerous trauma injuries. The identities and the conditions of the victims have not been released.

No other injuries were reported.

Officials say the wreck caused damage to nearby utility poles and a fuel spill. Fire officials are working to clear the fuel spill at the scene.

The cause of the crash is under investigation.

Story and photo gallery: http://www.fox5atlanta.com






















EUHARLEE, GA (CBS46) - A small plane has crashed into a neighborhood in Bartow County Tuesday afternoon, the sheriff there said.

The aircraft crashed onto Milam Bridge Road in Euharlee, leaving two men injured. One victim was transported to Grady Memorial Hospital and the other victim was transported to Floyd Medical Center. There injuries are considered non-life threatening.

Police said the pilot and passenger informed emergency units they were on their way to Houston, Texas from South Carolina.

Crews are on the scene awaiting the fuel company, FAA, and dealing with a fuel leak from the plane. Bartow County Fire are asking people to avoid the area of Milam Bridge Road at this time.

Original article can be found here: http://www.cbs46.com

Vans RV-6A, N822DC: Accident occurred April 17, 2017 in Indianola, Warren County, Iowa (and) Incident occurred July 08, 2016 in Santa Fe, New Mexico

http://registry.faa.gov/N822DC

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aircraft on landing,  went off the end of the runway and into a ditch.

Date: 17-APR-17
Time: 15:47:00Z
Regis#: N822DC
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6A
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: INDIANOLA
State: IOWA

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aircraft on taxi, struck a taxiway light. 

Date: 08-JUL-16
Time: 19:40:00Z
Regis#: N822DC
Aircraft Make: VANS
Aircraft Model: RV6
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
City: SANTA FE
State: New Mexico

Grumman Schweizer G-164A, N9533: Accident occurred April 17, 2017 in Palmer, Washington County, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N9533

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas 

Aircraft force landed in a field and flipped over.  

Date: 17-APR-17
Time: 16:45:00Z
Regis#: N9533
Aircraft Make: GRUMMAN SCHWEIZER
Aircraft Model: G164A
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: AERIAL APPLICATION
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PALMER
State: KANSAS

Bombardier CL-600-2D24, Delta, N805SK: Incident occurred April 17, 2017 at Chicago O'Hare International Airport (KORD), Illinois

http://registry.faa.gov/N805SK

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Chicago, Illinois  

N805SK, Bombardier CL600, Delta.  Aircraft, while parked at the gate, wingtip was struck by a truck.  No injuries. Unknown damage.  

Date: 17-APR-17
Time: 10:15:00Z
Regis#: N805SK
Aircraft Make: BOMBARDIER
Aircraft Model: CL600
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
Aircraft Operator: DELTA
City: CHICAGO
State: ILLINOIS

Beech BE99, Ameriflight: Incident occurred April 17, 2017 at Boeing Field - King County International Airport (KBFI), Seattle, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington 

AMF1951  Ameriflight,  Beech BE99.  Aircraft, registration unknown, landed and nose wheel collapsed.

Date: 18-APR-17
Time: 03:05:00Z
Regis#: UNKN
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: BE99
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: AMERIFLIGHT
Flight Number: AMF1951
City: SEATTLE
State: WASHINGTON

Cessna 150L, Gryder Networks LLC, N10859: Incident occurred April 16, 2017 in Athens, Clarke County, Georgia

Gryder Networks LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N10859

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

Aircraft force landed in a field. 

Date: 16-APR-17
Time: 21:00:00Z
Regis#: N10859
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C150
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: ATHENS
State: GEORGIA