Thursday, December 31, 2020

Kathryn's Report: 2020

Wednesday, December 30, 2020

Cessna 182F Skylane, N6327F: Accident occurred December 29, 2020 at Pottstown Municipal Airport (N47), Montgomery County, Pennsylvania

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania 
 
Baldrick Aviation Partnership LLC


Location: Stowe, PA
Accident Number: ERA21LA094
Date & Time: December 29, 2020, 11:30 Local
Registration: N6327F
Aircraft: Cessna 182P
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information
  
Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N6327F
Model/Series: 182P 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:
  
Meteorological Information and Flight Plan
  
Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPTW,288 ft msl
Observation Time: 11:54 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C /-11°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / 23 knots, 310°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.46 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:
  
Wreckage and Impact Information
  
Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.258777,-75.673808

Hughes 369D, N103SU: Fatal accident occurred December 29, 2020 in Laurel, Jones County, Mississippi

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Rotorcraft crashed in wooded area due to mechanical issue while trimming trees. 

Signature Property Holdings LLC

Signature Utility Services LLC


Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 14:00:00Z
Regis#: N103SU
Aircraft Make: HUGHES
Aircraft Model: 369D
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Total Fatal: 1
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: DESTROYED
Activity: OTHER
Flight Phase: MANEUVERING (MNV)
Operation: 91
City: LAUREL
State: MISSISSIPPI

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Jason Krakowiak

The Krakowiak's are one of the most phenomenal families that you will ever meet.  They are a spiritual, fun-loving, easy-going, adventurous family, whose personalities and smiles light up people's lives.  They share their love with everyone they come across, friends, family, or strangers. 

Jason's profession was a helicopter pilot, where he was a flight instructor, performed aerial firefighting, oil and gas support, government and private charters, and most recently, he was an aerial saw pilot.  Jason tragically lost his life a week after his 40th birthday, on December 29, 2020, attempting an emergency landing while flying for work.  Jyl is a full-time mom and teacher for their two boys, Parker (6 yo) and August (4 yo).

Jyl, Parker, and August have been devastated by the loss of their husband, father, and hero.  In these poignant times, Jyl is still trying to process the loss of her soulmate, while being the anchor for her children.  She has to provide for her and her family, manage bills, finances, and plan for their altered future.

Due to the nature of this tragedy, the Nation Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are involved in an investigation of the helicopter accident, as is standard protocol for aviation disasters.  This investigation currently lasts, on average, 2+ years for a final report to be generated that could begin to provide closure to the family.

Read more here:  https://www.gofundme.com

Jason Krakowiak

A Florida pilot died Tuesday morning in Glade after his helicopter crashed and burst into flames.

Just before 9 a.m. emergency teams lined Highway 15 South as a plume of smoke could be seen emerging from the property of pastor Dan Atkinson, at Tuckers Crossing. Ronny Cooley, the sole witness, said he heard an explosion before rescue personnel raced in. Jason Krakowiak, 40, of Ormond Beach, Florida, was pronounced dead on the scene.

At the time of the crash the Hughes 369D burst into flames, said Jones County Fire Council spokeswoman Dana Bumgardner. Krakowiak, the sole occupant, had been clearing tree limbs along power-line rights-of-way under the employ of Signature Utility Services, believed to be under contract with Mississippi Power. Krakowiak had declared an emergency landing before the helicopter crashed in a wooded area, a source close to the investigation said, and the location was difficult for vehicles to access.

Standing near a pond on his neighbor’s property, Cooley said he’d seen the helicopter in the area.

“It was loud,” he said. “I heard an explosion. I turned to my wife and said, ‘I think that helicopter just went down.’”

The fire that ensued was a magnesium fire, Bumgardner said, which is difficult to extinguish. A series of popping noises could be heard coming from the wreckage after the fire was put out, so the immediate area wasn’t safe for non-emergency personnel for a time.

Messages to those who knew Krakowiak weren’t immediately returned.

Bumgardner said the pilot was on his first flight of the day, as the company had been sawing limbs in the area the two previous days. The helicopters that do the trimming fly low and have a long series of blades protruding from under it that trim branches they come in contact with.

The Jones County Sheriff’s Department assisted Glade, Powers, Calhoun, M & M and Sandersville fire departments. The Jones County Coroner’s Office, EMServ, Mississippi Power, International Fire & Safety, MEMA and the Jones County Emergency Operations Center also responded. 

The Federal Aviation Administration is taking over the investigation, said EOC director Paul Sheffield.

Ernest Hollingsworth of the coroner’s office said Krakowiak died of blunt-force trauma.

Cessna P210R Pressurized Centurion, N210LA: Incident occurred December 29, 2020 at Atlanta Regional Airport (KFFC), Fayette County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aircraft landed with landing gear retracted. 

Joyo LLC


Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 18:48:00Z
Regis#: N210LA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 210
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Cessna 172K, N78112: Incident occurred December 29, 2020 at Stennis International Airport (KHSA), Bay St. Louis, Hancock County, Mississippi

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi 

Aircraft struck runway end light while landing. 

Cool Breeze Aviation LLC 


Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N78112
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BAY ST LOUIS
State: MISSISSIPPI

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, N106GT: Incident occurred December 29, 2020 in Dania Beach, Broward County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft made forced landing in field due to rough running engine. 

Andros Marketing LLC


Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 19:11:00Z
Regis#: N106GT
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
City: DANIA BEACH
State: FLORIDA

Beechcraft 95-B55 Baron, N916MT: Accident occurred December 29, 2020 at Westfield-Barnes Airport (KBAF), Hampden County, Massachusetts

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Bradley


Location: Westfield, MA
Accident Number: ERA21LA093
Date & Time: December 29, 2020, 15:00 Local 
Registration: N916MT
Aircraft: Beech 95-B55 (T42A)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted
Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N916MT
Model/Series: 95-B55 (T42A)
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBAF,271 ft msl
Observation Time: 14:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 0°C /-14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 19 knots / 29 knots, 300°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.36 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 42.158288,-72.716048 (est)

Boeing 757-200, N686DA: Incident occurred December 28, 2020 at John F. Kennedy International Airport (KJFK), New York

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; New York, New York

December 28, 2020:  Aircraft  #1 engine was on fire after landing. 

Delta Air Lines Inc

Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 01:12:00Z
Regis#: N686DA
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: 757-200
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAXI (TXI)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA
Flight Number: DAL1886
City: NEW YORK
State: NEW YORK

Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron, N9417Q: Incident occurred December 29, 2020 at Tri-Cities Airport (KTRI), Sullivan County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aircraft reported electrical failure, hand cranked landing gear but upon landing gear collapsed.


Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 17:54:00Z
Regis#: N9417Q
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 55
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TRI-CITY
State: TENNESSEE

Airbus A330-941, N403DX: Incident occurred December 29, 2020 at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (KSEA), Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Seattle, Washington

Aircraft (N403DX) clipped wings with another aircraft (N405DX) while on pushback.

Delta Air Lines Inc


Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 23:23:00Z
Regis#: N403DX
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: 330
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: PUSHBACK/TOWING (PBT)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA
Flight Number: DAL142
City: SEATTLE
State: WASHINGTON

Colt Balloon 240A, N647CB: Incident occurred December 29, 2020 in Gilbert, Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Balloon encountered gust of wind while tethered, breaking cable and sending it through fence. 

Aerogelic Ballooning LLC


Date: 29-DEC-20
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N647CB
Aircraft Make: COLT
Aircraft Model: BALLOON
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: PUSHBACK/TOWING (PBT)
Operation: 91
City: GILBERT
State: ARIZONA







Mooney M20K, N57785: Incident occurred December 27, 2020 at Pullman/Moscow Regional Airport (KPUW), Whitman County, Washington

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington

Aircraft experienced power loss on takeoff and landed long striking runway lights. 

Flying Falcon PLLC


Date: 27-DEC-20
Time: 15:30:00Z
Regis#: N57785
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20K
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: PULLMAN/MOSCOW
State: WASHINGTON

Hawker 800XP, N348AJ: Incident occurred December 28, 2020 at Laurence G. Hanscom Field Airport (KBED), Bedford, Middlesex County, Massachusetts

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Boston, Massachusetts

Aircraft experienced blown nose wheel after takeoff, returned to runway where gear door was found separated.


Date: 28-DEC-20
Time: 18:09:00Z
Regis#: N348AJ
Aircraft Make: RAYTHEON-HAWKER
Aircraft Model: 800
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: BEDFORD
State: MASSACHUSETTS

Beechcraft 65-B80 Queen Air Excalibur, N134BA: Incident occurred December 28, 2020 at Chandler Field Airport (KAXN), Douglas County, Minnesota

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Aircraft gear collapsed and it skidded off runway after aborting attempted takeoff.

Bemidji Aviation SVC Inc
Time: 01:45:00Z
Regis#: N134BA
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 65
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 135
City: ALEXANDRIA
State: MINNESOTA

Tuesday, December 29, 2020

Beech 95-C55 Baron, N377J: Incident occurred December 28, 2020 at Tahlequah Municipal Airport (KTQH), Cherokee County, Oklahoma

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft left main landing gear collapsed incurring propeller strike while landing. 

Cagle Holdings LLC


Date: 28-DEC-20
Time: 16:00:00Z
Regis#: N377J
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 55
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: TAHLEQUAH
State: OKLAHOMA

Cessna 172H Skyhawk, N3702R: Accident occurred December 28, 2020 in Cypress, Harris County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Aerograce Inc


Location: Cypress, TX
Accident Number: CEN21LA103
Date & Time: December 28, 2020, 20:00 Local 
Registration: N3702R
Aircraft: Cessna 172H 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N3702R
Model/Series: 172H NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDWH,152 ft msl
Observation Time: 19:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C /13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 120°
Lowest Ceiling: None Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Llano, TX (AQO)
Destination: Spring, TX (DWH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 30.047197,-95.667653 (est)

Monday, December 28, 2020

Federal Aviation Administration Issues Long-Anticipated Rules for Commercial Drones

Regulations are expected to accelerate the rollout of package delivery, other uses



The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor
Updated December 28, 2020 9:25 pm ET

U.S. regulators established industry-wide requirements for remote identification of drones, along with new safeguards for flights over populated areas and at night, in a long-awaited effort to expand commercial use of the craft.

The pair of final rules issued Monday is intended to promote eventual widespread home delivery of small packages and a multitude of other applications for pilotless vehicles that are currently sharply restricted. But with a single announcement, the Federal Aviation Administration is formally pivoting from approving case-by-case exemptions to setting broad safety standards the industry has long sought.

The new approach, replacing stringent protections that currently bar practically all home-delivery options, go into effect in two months, but some requirements are likely to take years to implement.

The detailed regulations, which total more than 700 pages and parts of which had been in the works since the Obama administration, also aim to address concerns related to law enforcement, national security and privacy protection.

“They get us closer to the day when we will more routinely see drone operations such as the delivery of packages,” FAA chief Steve Dickson said in a written statement accompanying the rules. Mr. Dickson has told colleagues he intends to stay on under the Biden administration, according to people involved in the conversations, to fill out the remainder of his five-year term ending in 2024. The rules are unlikely to be affected by other personnel changes.

Since some of the important details differ from those contained in earlier draft proposals, initial industry reaction was positive but muted. Some aspects of the rules “will have additional untold benefits for American society,” according to Brian Wynne, chief executive of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, the largest drone-industry trade association. “We look forward to reviewing these rules and working with the FAA on implementation.”

The rules won’t immediately end restrictions on drones operating in higher-altitude airspace or in the vicinity of airports. They also don’t spell out safety requirements for large autonomous or remotely piloted craft capable of carrying passengers, often called urban aerial vehicles. Flights of such airborne taxis remain years away from becoming a reality in U.S. skies.

Major changes from the FAA’s previous strategy include eliminating requirements that drones transmit identifying information and their position over the internet. Instead, newly manufactured drones covered by the rules, typically weighing less than 55 pounds, will be manufactured with onboard radio transmitters for such purposes. Existing models will have to be retrofitted with the technology. That process could take years, for new and existing drones alike.

In addition, the FAA decided that in most cases even the smallest drones, weighing less than half a pound, must be designed to avoid exposed rotating parts that could cause injuries to people below. The rules also lay out a complex series of technical measures to gauge acceptable risks in the event malfunctioning drones crash to the ground.

The smallest drones also are mandated to have functioning remote identification systems if they fly over crowds, stadiums or open-air concerts.

The FAA has a history of fits and starts devising some of the standards, particularly as technology advanced rapidly and the industry pushed for new rules. At the same time, federal, state and local law-enforcement agencies wanted enhanced protections against the dangers posed by the possibility of rogue, hostile or terrorist drones.

Roughly one million recreational drones are registered in the U.S., and the FAA projects nearly that many commercial craft will be registered by 2024. Pilotless systems already are commonly employed for inspecting pipelines and railroad tracks; monitoring warehouse and industrial facilities; and assisting emergency responders.

Four years ago senior FAA officials were poised to propose an initial package of remote identification rules, a step industry leaders have said is essential to expanding operations. But barely days before those regulations were prepared for publication, leaders of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and national-security agencies wanted changes. The upshot, according to industry and government officials, was extensive discussion that helped shape the document released Monday.

The final rules also are supported by groups representing model aircraft hobbyists, which in the past said they were unfairly treated by FAA regulations.

Since late 2018, the FAA has joined with industry and academic researchers to create pilot projects testing various airborne identification technologies. But according to some industry officials, the rules in the short term will impede rather than promote development of separate, low-altitude traffic control networks geared specifically for drone operations. The FAA and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have indicated such networks eventually will be based on internet connections. But for now, according to the FAA’s own document, the agency dropped the web-based concept in the face of significant public opposition and comments about technical challenges.

The rules also appear out of step with international efforts to develop web-based networks spanning regions or countries. The aviation arm of the United Nations has been deliberating on ways to promote such potential entities to identify and track drones across national boundaries. Web-based solutions still are in the early stages, though in some ways they can be better secured from hackers than public radio signals.

Without remote identification equipment, drones will be permitted to fly only in limited areas designated by the FAA. For night operations, drones will need anti-collision lights and operators will need special training. The FAA also agreed to create a new regulatory path for the smallest category of drones to fly over populated areas. Their reliability and safety will have to be vetted by the agency before it authorizes those flights.

Hard Landing: Tecnam P2004 Bravo, N639BV; accident occurred October 24, 2019 at Orlando Apopka Airport (X04), Orange County, Florida


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Apopka, Florida
Accident Number: GAA20CA091
Date & Time: October 24, 2019, 09:30 Local 
Registration: N639BV
Aircraft: COSTRUZIONI AERONAUTICHE TECNAM P2004 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The solo student pilot reported that, while conducting a touch-and-go landing, the airplane was 5 to 10 knots faster than normal during the landing and had little to no flare. The airplane touched down hard on the runway, bounced, and nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and vertical stabilizer. The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard, bounced landing and subsequent nose-over.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Aircraft Landing flare - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown Hard landing (Defining event)
Landing-flare/touchdown Abnormal runway contact
Landing-flare/touchdown Nose over/nose down

Student pilot Information

Certificate: Student 
Age: 24, Female
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 14, 2019
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: COSTRUZIONI AERONAUTICHE TECNAM
Registration: N639BV
Model/Series: P2004 BRAVO 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental light sport (Special)
Serial Number: 115
Landing Gear Type: 
Tricycle Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 
Engine Manufacturer:
ELT: 
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner:
Rated Power:
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLEE,77 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 14 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 13:53 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 300°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Apopka, FL (X04)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Apopka, FL (X04)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 08:45 Local
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Orlando Apopka X04
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 150 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 33 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3987 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and go;Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 28.7075,-81.581947(est)

Loss of Control in Flight: Aero Adventure Aventura II, N170AV; accident occurred October 26, 2019 in Tavares, Lake County, Florida


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Sport Flying USA Inc


Location: Tavares, Florida 
Accident Number: GAA20CA051
Date & Time: October 26, 2019, 12:10 Local 
Registration: N170AV
Aircraft: Pereyra Aventura
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot reported that he was at a seaplane event and participating in a landing contest on a lake. During landing with a 14-knot crosswind, the airplane was slightly fast, and shortly after touchdown, the airplane hit a wake and bounced. When the airplane was about 2 to 3 ft above the water, he initiated a go-around and applied right aileron control, but the left wing descended and impacted the water, and the airplane nosed over. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions with the airplane or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a bounced landing on water, and his failure to maintain airplane control during a go-around, which resulted in the airplane nosing over.

Findings

Aircraft Landing flare - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-flare/touchdown Abnormal runway contact
Approach-VFR go-around Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Landing-flare/touchdown Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor 
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: November 1, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: November 3, 2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 7080 hours (Total, all aircraft), 30 hours (Total, this make and model), 7000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Pereyra 
Registration: N170AV
Model/Series: Aventura II 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2018 
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental (Special)
Serial Number: AA2AS1701
Landing Gear Type: N/A; Amphibian
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: July 1, 2019 
Condition Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 75 Hrs
Engine Manufacturer: Aero Momentum
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series:
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 117 Horsepower
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LEE, 75 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 15:53 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 4 knots 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 240°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 25°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Deland, FL 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Lake Dora, FL
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 09:00 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 28.800556,-81.727775(est)

Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche, N1236: Accident occurred December 28, 2020 at Navasota Municipal Airport (60R), Grimes County, Texas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas

Location: Navasota, TX 
Accident Number: CEN21LA105
Date & Time: December 28, 2020, 16:23 Local 
Registration: N1236
Aircraft: Piper PA-30
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper 
Registration: N1236
Model/Series: PA-30 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: K11R,308 ft msl
Observation Time: 16:35 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 16 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C /14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 6 knots / , 130°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 8000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Navasota, TX
Destination: Navasota, TX

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 30.37323,-96.1145 

NAVASOTA, Texas (KBTX) - Nobody was injured Monday evening after a small airplane made an emergency landing at the Navasota Municipal Airport.

Authorities said there was a mechanical issue with the plane as it landed, but it’s unclear what caused it to happen. 

The FAA has given local authorities the okay to remove the aircraft from the runway, said a DPS spokesman.

According to Flightaware.com, the plane left the airport at 3:07 p.m. and traveled northeast before making a U-turn and returning to Navasota.

The Piper PA-30 Twin Comanche is owned by Russell Miller, according to flight records.

On the front line: Carlsbad air ambulance crew battles COVID-19 from the skies


Marnie Hill, Air Methods helicopter pilot works in her office, December 23, 2020 at the Carlsbad Air Terminal.

Patrick Allis, pilot of Air Methods' medical plane is pictured in his office, December 23, 2020 at the Carlsbad Air Terminal.


Paramedic with Air Methods Ronel Sizer inspects a medical helicopter before beginning his shift December 23, 2020 on base at the Carlsbad Air Terminal.





For Ronel Sizer, the front line of the COVID-19 health crisis is thousands of feet above ground.

He’s a paramedic with Air Methods in Carlsbad and has flown patients out of rural Carlsbad in southeast New Mexico to major hospitals in Lubbock or other nearby cities about every day since the pandemic hit the state in March.

With only a small medical center in town, patients experiencing the worst of COVID-19 must be transported from the small city to a major hospital often across state lines to receive the treatment of an intensive care unit (ICU).

That often means flight in either Air Method’s helicopter which can hold patients weighing up to 200 to 250 pounds, or on a small airplane which has up to 400 pounds available.

The helicopter can take patients to the closer hospitals such as in Lubbock or El Paso, but the plane has traveled as far as Denver, Phoenix or Houston or San Antonio in Texas.

Before the pandemic, the crew averaged about 40 flights per month, or about five to seven in a week.

With COVID-19, that number grew to more than 60 flights a month, at least two per day.

Air travel high above the surface where oxygen in thinner presents a challenge for patients already struggling to breathe.

Sizer said the pandemic made oxygen supplies aboard the aircraft even more important, with patients frequently hooked up to ventilators while on route to an ICU to provide adequate air to the body and avoid hypoxia which occurs when the body has too little oxygen to property function.

“With COVID-19, we pay a lot of attention to our oxygen and ventilation,” he said. “Those patients need high oxygen levels. The last thing you want is for them to get hypoxic. It’s challenging.”

Medical flights up statewide during COVID-19 crisis

Air method’s Carlsbad base is a rarity in the southeast in that it boasts both a helicopter for short travel and a plane for longer trips.

Artesia’s and Hobbs’ bases have just a helicopter, while Roswell has both.

Area manager Julie Lewis said patients are being sent longer distances as hospitals are overwhelmed by the health crisis.

She said Air Methods is flying more patients out of El Paso to other hospitals than into the city near the U.S.-Mexico border in Texas as medical resources dwindled in the major city often a destination for southeast New Mexico patients.

Since March when the pandemic began its first major spread in the state, Lewis said Air Methods transported 384 COVID-19 patients throughout New Mexico with bases in most major areas from Las Cruces to Taos.

“The COVID patients are going further and further away,” she said. “We’ve been taking patients a long distance. They’re not so much running out of space. They’re running out of staff.”

Liquid oxygen allows for the longer flights, providing oxygen for up to 10 hours.

Flight nurse Kim Parker said the aircraft were well-outfitted to handle the health crisis, while the crew usually works 24-hour shifts for medical staff and 12 hours at a time for pilots.

“We treat them the same way we treat any patient that has to go on a ventilator,” she said. “We just need more pressure for the oxygen. We have the equipment we need.”

‘People are suffering’

The advantage of using the helicopter allows patients to be landed at a helipad usually on the roof of hospitals.

Transports via plane must disembark at a nearby airport and are then driven to a hospital by ambulance.

In high winds and storms, the helicopter can be kept grounded and use of the plane becomes necessary.

Helicopter pilot Marnie Hill said the constantly changing weather in the desert region of southern New Mexico can present a challenge, but her team is dedicated to saving lives during the health crisis.

Before coming to Air Methods, Hill flew helicopter tours in the Grand Canyon, but she said her focus was unchanged while in the pilot’s chair.

“People are suffering. It’s our job to get them the best care possible,” she said. “Sometimes the weather gets in the way, but we do the best we can for them. It’s our job. We put ourselves at risk. It’s as controlled a risk as we can make it.

“These are human beings, so we need to make sure they get home to their loved ones, and that I bring my crew back to their families as well.”

Pat Allis who pilots the plane said since the pandemic hit, he’s seen small towns like Carlsbad suffering more with each month of the crisis.

“You pick little towns like this and you become part of the community,” he said. “You feel for this place. You see the weakest in the community taken out.”

About 80 percent of Air Methods’ staff were infected with COVID-19 at some point during the pandemic, meaning paramedics and pilots from other states had to be brought in to cover until the local crew members tested negative.

Combined with the stress of a potential infection, Allis said the workload has increased dramatically.

Sleep and a good meal are rare while the crew is working.

“It’s busy. You’re guaranteed to fly every day,” he said. “Eating and sleeping is a challenge. We get in early and we stay late.”

But that’s just part of the job for Ronel Sizer, who said a 35 year career as a paramedic meant learning to function with little rest or sustenance as with the rest of the crew who mostly boast decades in the profession before of taking to the skies.

“My body is used to not having much sleep,” he said. “You can train your body to just get up and go. It’s all about knowing what you limit is. The stakes are very high, the standards are very high, and we’re used to it.”

Piper PA-31-350 Navajo Chieftain, N3588C: Incident occurred December 28, 2020 at Vero Beach Regional Airport (KVRB), Indian River County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida 

Aircraft indicated gear trouble and landed with gear retracted. 

Paris Air Inc


Date: 28-DEC-20
Time: 20:50:00Z
Regis#: N3588C
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: 31
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: VERO BEACH
State: FLORIDA

VERO BEACH, Florida — A pilot crash-landed a plane on a runway after its landing gear malfunctioned while flying into Vero Beach Regional Airport, officials said.

An Indian River County Fire Rescue official said the pilot was the only person on the plane and was uninjured.

Battalion Chief Kyle Kofke said the eight-passenger, twin-engine plane "basically slid on its belly" into Runway 4 of the airport.

Firefighters gathered at the runway around 3:30 p.m. ahead of the landing after the pilot notified the air traffic control tower of the problem with the landing gear roughly seven (7) miles out from the airport.

Kofke said there were no flames or smoke caused from the landing, and that it was a "great job by the pilot."

He said information about the pilot was not available and that the Federal Aviation Administration was looking into the malfunction.

Airport officials were unable to be reached by phone Monday evening.

Sonex, N84WG: Incidents occurred December 28, 2020 and July 26, 2019 in Loudoun County, Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia

December 28, 2020:  Aircraft experienced insufficient engine power and had to land in field. 


Date: 28-DEC-20
Time: 16:15:00Z
Regis#: N84WG
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: SONEX
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EMERGENCY DESCENT (EMG)
Operation: 91
Activity: PERSONAL
City: HAMILTON
State: VIRGINIA



December 28, 2020 -  An experimental aircraft made an emergency landing Monday afternoon near Purcellville, according to the Virginia State Police.

At 12:07 p.m. Monday, the state police were notified of an aircraft making an emergency landing. About 10 minutes later, the Loudoun County Sheriff's Office located the privately owned experimental aircraft in a field in the 38,000 block of Piggott Bottom Road north of Purcellville.

The pilot, a 51-year-old man from Purcellville, and a 24-year-old male passenger from Fairfax were not injured in the incident. The aircraft was not damaged. The pilot made the cautionary landing when the engine began acting up, according to police.

The two men were on a recreational flight and had taken off from the Leesburg Executive Airport before the emergency landing. 

The police contacted the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board about the incident.


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Washington, District of Columbia

July 26, 2019:  Aircraft lost propeller in flight.

Date: 26-JUL-19
Time: 12:20:00Z
Regis#: N84WG
Aircraft Make: SONEX
Aircraft Model: SONEX
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: LEESBURG
State: VIRGINIA

Beechcraft H35 Bonanza, N5474D: Accident occurred December 27, 2020 near Santa Ynez Airport (KIZA), Santa Barbara County, California

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California   


Location: Santa Ynez, CA
Accident Number: WPR21LA075
Date & Time: December 27, 2020, 18:12 Local 
Registration: N5474D
Aircraft: Beech 35 
Injuries: 3 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On December 27, 2020, at 1812 Pacific standard time, a Beech 35 airplane, N5474D, sustained substantial damage when it was involved in an accident near Santa Ynez, California. The pilot and three passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot estimated that he departed with about 32 gallons of useable fuel. While en route to Lompoc, California, the pilot altered his course slightly to avoid inclement weather. The airplane passed one mile north of the Santa Ynez airport and when about 17 miles from Lompoc the pilot switched the fuel selector from the right main tank (which was indicating close to empty) to the left main tank (indicating slightly less than half full). As he manipulated the selector handle, the engine rpm decreased to what appeared to be idle power. Concerned that he was not able to get the handle into the detent, the pilot placed the selector back on the right tank.

The pilot elected to perform a 180-turn and land at Santa Ynez because it was closer in proximity. He attempted to troubleshoot the reduced rpm and despite his efforts, was unable to restore the engine power. The airplane could not maintain altitude and the pilot performed a forced landing short of runway 08.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech 
Registration: N5474D
Model/Series: 35 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIZA,671 ft msl
Observation Time: 18:15 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 10°C /5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 170°
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lake Havasu City, AZ (LPC) 
Destination: Santa Ynez, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 34.6079,-120.0843 (est)





Three people and a dog aboard a small aircraft are uninjured after their plane crashed Sunday night.

Federal agencies are investigating a plane that crashed west of the Santa Ynez Airport and south of the Chumash Casino.

The Santa Barbara County Fire Department received reports of an airplane that crashed in a field just after 6 p.m.

Investigators say the plane had mechanical issues before hitting the ground.

Three people and one dog were inside when the plane crashed.

Everyone, including the dog, were able to get out uninjured.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the crash.