Saturday, July 16, 2016

Incident occurred July 16, 2016 in Ellington, Tolland County, Connecticut

ELLINGTON — Connecticut State Police say a skydiver was injured after striking a tree in Ellington.

Police say it happened just before 9:30 a.m. Saturday.

The skydiver, who was attending the nearby parachuting and helicopter training facility at the time, attempted to land in a grassy field by Meadow Brook Road. However, the man instead struck a patch of trees and careened to the ground from approximately 40 to 50 feet.

The man suffered non-life threatening injuries. He was taken to Hartford Hospital for further evaluation.

The incident remains under investigation.

No further details were released on the skydiver’s identity or what specific circumstances might have led to the accident.

Ellington is located about 20 miles northeast of downtown Hartford.

FOX 61 has reached out to the skydiving business for comment and are awaiting a response regarding its safety practices.

Source:  http://fox61.com

Hawker Hunter MK-58A, N58MX; fatal accident occurred July 16, 2006 in Hillsboro, Washington County, Oregon

Neighbors remember air show crash 10 years later: The July 16, 2006 crash killed the pilot and destroyed a Hillsboro, Oregon, home.

Robert Guilford with his Hawker Hunter MK-58A airplane in 2004, two years before the airshow crash.


Carl Calkins creates pieces out of recovered plane parts. This one honors the dog who safety got out of the house. 

Donna Reynolds rebuilt her home on the same property after the crash.

Carl Calkins creates pieces out of recovered plane parts.



HILLSBORO, Ore. (KOIN) — On July 16, 2006, a 1951 Hawker Hunter Jet crashed during the Oregon International Air show at the Hillsboro Airport.

The jet crashed into a house, killing the pilot. The house belonged to Donna Reynolds and although she has since rebuilt her home on the same property, she still occasionally finds scarps of the jet in her soil.

“It brings me right back to that day. I was very fortunate. My dog that was in the home was able to get out,” Reynolds said. “We’re not quite sure how, but she was covered in jet fuel and ash, but she got out and ran to her neighbors.”

Reynolds herself was at a garden show that day.

“I was saved by a garden show and in honor of that I’m going to a garden show tomorrow too,” Reynolds said.

Neighbor Carl Calkins, a self-professed treasure hunter, has gathered some elements of the jet and created memorabilia. He created a piece with bits a Reynold’s home and a model of her dog.

“I do this all the time, all around Washington County,” he said.

“When the plane hit the house, it just shattered everything like a slingshot,” Calkins said.

The Portland Tribune reported on a federal investigation into the crash, and many neighbors questioned whether the popular annual air show should end.

Source:   http://koin.com





NTSB Identification: SEA06FA142
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2006 in Hillsboro, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/29/2007
Aircraft: Hawker Siddeley MK-58A Hunter, registration: N58MX
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The accident occurred during an air show event. The airplane was a static display at the air show and, with the exception of the accident flight, the airplane did not fly during the show. Event coordinators reported that the pilot planned to make three non-aerobatic low passes over runway 30, and subsequent to completion of the maneuvers, he intended to continue the flight to his home airport in Southern California. Several eyewitnesses, both in attendance at the show, and others located in the residential community where the airplane crashed reported that following the takeoff, the airplane entered a right downwind for runway 30. One witness, who was located near midfield, reported that the pilot's takeoff was "conservative" and the engine sounded "normal." A second witness, also located near midfield, reported that the takeoff was "consistent" with what you would expect from a vintage jet. Another witness reported that the airplane appeared to "wallow" nose high before it descended beyond his vantage point behind a tree line. The witnesses observed heavy black smoke in the area shortly after the airplane descended below the tree line. Numerous witnesses reported similar observations. FAA inspectors reported that the airplane impacted terrain in a residential neighborhood near the departure airport. One home was destroyed and two others were damaged by the post crash fire. Impact forces and post impact fire destroyed a majority of the airframe and associated components. The airframe, to include cockpit controls, instrumentation and flight controls, were destroyed by impact forces and post crash fire. Extensive thermal and impact related deformation was noted to the entire engine assembly and associated accessories. The forward air intake casing and forward section of the compressor casing were completely destroyed. The turbine assembly, to include the rotor blades and stators, were intact and with the exception of the surrounding case, sustained minimal damage. Silver/gray colored splatter type deposits were noted along the leading edges, pressure surface and shrouds of the turbine airfoils. Examination of the material, utilizing a scanning electron microscope (SEM), indicated the silver/gray material was mostly composed of aluminum alloy. No evidence of pre impact case deformation was noted during the engine exam. No open maintenance discrepancies were noted during a post accident review of the airplane's maintenance records.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
Loss of aircraft control for undetermined reasons during the takeoff sequence.

HISTORY OF THE FLIGHT

On July 16, 2006, at 1628 Pacific daylight time, an experimental/exhibition Hawker-Siddeley, MK-58A Hunter, N58MX, was destroyed after colliding with terrain while maneuvering at an air show approximately 0.5 miles east of the Portland-Hillsboro Airport (HIO), Hillsboro, Oregon. The commercial pilot, the registered owner and operator of the airplane, was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight conducted under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. The airplane departed from the Portland-Hillsboro Airport at about 1627. An instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan was on file for the pilot's return flight to Van Nuys Airport, Van Nuys, California.

The accident occurred during the Oregon International Air Show. Event coordinators reported that the pilot planned to make 3 non-aerobatic low passes over the runway after departing from runway 30. Subsequent to completing the maneuvers, the pilot intended to continue the flight to his home airport in Van Nuys, California. 

The airplane was a static display at the air show and, with the exception of the accident flight, the airplane did not fly during the event. 

Several eyewitnesses, both in attendance at the show, and others located in the residential community where the airplane crashed, submitted written statements to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) detailing their observations during the accident sequence. One witness, who was located near midfield, reported that the pilot's takeoff was "conservative" and the engine sounded "normal." A second witness, also located near midfield, reported that the takeoff was "consistent" with what you would expect from a vintage jet. Both witnesses reported that following the takeoff; the airplane entered a right downwind for runway 30. The first witness reported that the airplane was "lower and slower" than what he would have expected. He also reported that the gear appeared to be in the "extended" position. The witness reported that the airplane appeared to "wallow" nose high before it descended beyond his vantage point behind a tree line. The witnesses observed heavy black smoke in the area shortly after the airplane descended below the tree line. Numerous witnesses reported similar observations.

A video recording (recorded by a spectator) of the accident airplane's takeoff roll and initial climb was obtained by NTSB and reviewed by both the investigator-in-charge (IIC) and parties to the investigation. A small piece of unidentified debris could be seen flying through the air in the general vicinity of the airplane during the departure roll. The origin or type of debris was not determined. 

Further viewing of the video recording showed that the airplane oscillated left and right (about the longitudinal axis) immediately after takeoff. The oscillations continued as the airplane turned to the crosswind leg. The video ended approximately 7 seconds after liftoff. No visible smoke or uncharacteristic exhaust emissions were observed in the video. 

The weather conditions at the time of the accident were clear skies, 10 miles visibility, winds variable at 6 knots, temperature 86 degrees Fahrenheit (F), dew point temperature 54 degrees F, and an altimeter of 30.11 inches. The density altitude was calculated at 1,861 feet.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument ratings. The pilot also held FAA authorizations to operate, and provide flight instruction in, a Hawker-Siddeley Hunter. 

The pilot held a FAA special issuance third class medical certificate. The certificate was issued on April 21, 2006, and contained a limitation that required the pilot to wear corrective lenses. On the application for the airman medical certificate (Form 8500-8), the pilot listed 4,500 hours total flight time, of which 25 hours were accrued during the six months preceding the medical application.

Pilot logbook records indicated the pilot completed a Flight Review (FAR 61.56) on January 29, 2005, in a Cessna 172. Hand written notes in the logbook indicated that the pilot's total flying experience in the accident airplane (make and model) was approximately 161 hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION 

The accident airplane, a MK-58A Hunter (s/n XE-49), was manufactured by Hawker-Siddeley in 1958-1959. The airplane was originally designed as a single engine, swept-wing, tactical military aircraft, powered by a Rolls-Royce Avon turbojet engine and equipped with a full functioning emergency ejection seat. The airplane was an asset of the Swiss Air Force from the date of manufacture through 1995, after which it was retired from military service. The airplane was imported to the United States in 1995 and, at the time of the accident, carried an experimental category airworthiness certificate. The airworthiness certificate was issued on April 15, 2003, by the Boise, Idaho, Flight Standards District Office (FSDO).

In addition to the internal fuel tanks (approximate capacity of 392 gallons), the airplane was equipped with four (two inboard and two outboard) external drop tanks. The capacity of the inboard drop tanks was approximately 150 gallons each; the capacity of the outboard fuel tanks was approximately 100 gallons each.

Fueling records obtained by the NTSB IIC indicated that the airplane was topped off with 588.6 gallons of Jet A fuel on July 16, 2006. 

Engine maintenance records began on February 10, 1998, and documented the start of an FAA approved maintenance program. A corresponding logbook entry showed that the engine total time was 1,359 hours. 

The airframe maintenance records began on February 10, 1998, and documented the start of an FAA approved maintenance program. A corresponding logbook entry showed that the airframe total time was 2,816 hours.

The maintenance records showed that the most recent airframe and engine inspection, in accordance with the approved inspection program, was completed on March 4, 2006. The airframe total time at inspection was 2,907 hours.

No open maintenance discrepancies were noted during a post accident review of the airplane's maintenance records. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Inspectors from the FAA's Portland, Oregon, Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), conducted the onsite investigation. The inspectors were in attendance at the air show, and arrived at the accident site immediately after the accident. 

The inspectors reported that the airplane impacted terrain in a residential neighborhood approximately .5 miles from the airport. One home was destroyed and two others were damaged by the post crash fire. Impact forces and post impact fire destroyed a majority of the airframe and associated components. The engine came to rest approximately 14 feet south of the main wreckage and a section of the aircraft's tail was located approximately 40 feet southeast of the primary impact location. Both sustained fire and impact related damage. The wreckage debris field, as measured by FAA personnel, was approximately 150 feet in length and 65 feet wide.

At the conclusion of the onsite investigation, the wreckage was transported to a storage facility in Independence, Oregon. 

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The Office of The State Medical Examiner, Clackamas, Oregon, conducted a postmortem examination of the pilot on July 17, 2006. According to the postmortem report, the pilot's cause of death was attributed to "head and chest injuries."

The FAA Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted a toxicological examination subsequent to the accident. The postmortem toxicology testing yielded negative results for controlled substances and alcohol.

See attached toxicological report for specific test parameters and results.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Representatives from the NTSB, FAA and Rolls-Royce (Bristol, United Kingdom) examined the wreckage at a hangar facility in Independence, Oregon, on August 24-25, 2006. 

The airframe, to include cockpit controls, instrumentation and flight controls, were destroyed by impact forces and post crash fire. 

Thermal and impact related deformation was noted to the entire engine assembly and associated accessories. The forward air intake casing and forward section of the compressor casing were completely destroyed. Extensive thermal and impact related damage was noted to compressor stages 1 through 4, and a large percentage of the compressor blades (composed of aluminum alloy) and stators were destroyed. Extensive damage was noted to compressor stages 5 through 7; and the associated compressor blades were sheared from the disk assembly near the blade roots. Thermal related damage was observed. The aft section of the compressor assembly, stages 8 through 15 were intact. Bending deformation, opposite the direction of rotation, and thermal deformation was noted. Compressor blade tip erosion was noted to disks 8 through 13. The compressor disks throughout the compressor assembly were intact. The compressor outlet casing, flame tubes, combustion chamber casing, nozzle box and cooling air manifold remained intact. 

The turbine assembly, to include the rotor blades and stators, were intact and with the exception of the surrounding case, sustained minimal damage. Silver/gray colored splatter type deposits were noted along the leading edges, pressure surface and shrouds of the turbine airfoils.

Examination of the material, utilizing a scanning electron microscope (SEM), indicated the silver/gray material was mostly composed of aluminum alloy.

No evidence of pre impact case deformation was noted during the engine exam. 

ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION

The wreckage was released to CTC Services Aviation LAD, Renton, Washington, on July 19, 2007.

Zenith CH-801, N801G: Accident occurred July 16, 2016 at Beaumont Hotel Airport (07S), Butler County, Kansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N801G

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Wichita FSDO-64


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA379
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Beaumont, KS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: JESSE SAINT/TROY TOWNSEND/ETHA CH-801, registration: N801G
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of an experimental amateur-built airplane reported that during the landing flare he encountered a wind shift and gust that resulted in a direct crosswind. The pilot further reported that he applied additional rudder to compensate for the wind shift, but the airspeed decayed and the airplane bounced hard on the grass runway. After the bounce, the pilot reported that he continued to apply left rudder to compensate for the wind, but the airplane would not respond. Subsequently, the airplane touched down in a crab configuration, the nose landing gear collapsed, and the airplane nosed over.

The vertical stabilizer, firewall, and right wing sustained substantial damage.

During a postaccident examination, the pilot reported that the nose landing gear "support bungee" had failed and the nose landing gear strut jammed upward during the hard landing. He further reported that oil residue was found on the inner strands of the bungee. The pilot reported that this bungee had been in service for 21 months with 195 hours and about 400 landings on the part.

According to the airplane kit manufacturer, the rudder should still be controllable, even with a failed bungee. However, the manufacturer further reported that if the nose landing gear strut were to become stuck or lodged into place due to a hard landing, the rudder would also become stuck and uncontrollable. The airplane kit manufacturer does not publish service life limitations for bungees. 

Because the pilot reported not having rudder authority after the first touchdown, it is likely that the nose landing gear support bungee failed during the first hard touchdown, which resulted in the nose landing gear becoming jammed upward at the upper strut limit resulting in the loss of rudder authority.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's incorrect pitch control during the landing flare in gusty crosswind conditions, which resulted in a hard bounced landing and a nose over.



BEAUMONT, Kan. (KSNW) – The mystery of a plane crash in Beaumont, Kan. Saturday appears to have been solved. For now.

KSN received a photo of a plane upside down that apparently had crashed near the small Butler County town sometime Saturday. 

We contacted Butler County dispatchers to find out more about the crash and were told they hadn’t received a report of a plane crash.

When emergency crews were subsequently dispatched to the scene the found the plane abandoned upside down at the end of the runway but no one around.

A check with staff at the Beaumont Hotel revealed the pilot and a passenger had left the scene, apparently uninjured.

The Beaumont Hotel is a popular destination for pilots of small planes.

Source:  http://ksn.com

Piper PA-24-260, N11MT: Fatal accident occurred July 16, 2016 near Norwood Memorial Airport (KOWD), Norfolk County, Massachusetts

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Burlington, Massachusetts 
Piper Aircraft; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N11MT

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA258
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Westwood, MA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/06/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA24, registration: N11MT
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot/co-owner of the airplane departed on a roundtrip flight with the right main fuel tank full and the left main fuel tank "down about three gallons." He stated that, based on his preflight performance planning and visual inspection of the fuel supply, the fuel in the main tanks would be sufficient for the flight. The outbound leg was conducted with the fuel selector on the right main tank, and the return leg was flown with the fuel selector on the left main tank. Shortly after being cleared for landing near the end of the return leg, the airplane experienced a total loss of engine power, and descended into wooded terrain about 1 mile from the airport.

Postaccident examination of the wreckage revealed that the right main fuel tank contained 2 gallons of fuel, that the left main tank was empty, and that both 15-gallon auxiliary fuel tanks were full. The engine was subsequently placed in a test cell where it started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously at all power settings. The co-owner of the airplane stated that the left fuel tank leaked when the tank was full and that they mitigated the problem by not completely filling the left main fuel tank. The pilot likely mis-estimated the fuel available in the tanks during his preflight visual inspection, and it is likely that fuel leaked from the left tank during the flight, further reducing the available fuel quantity. These factors resulted in a loss of engine power consistent with fuel starvation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's improper fuel management, which resulted in exhaustion of the fuel in the selected fuel tank and a total loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

On July 16, 2016, at 1517 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-24-260, N11MT, was substantially damaged during a forced landing in Westwood, Massachusetts, during approach to Norwood Memorial Airport (OWD), Norwood, Massachusetts. The private pilot/co-owner was seriously injured, and the passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which departed from Knox County Regional Airport (RKD), Rockland, Maine, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot was not available for interview due to his injuries. He was interviewed by his attorney, who provided a written statement on his behalf.

According to the statement, the pilot and passenger planned a round-trip flight from OWD to RKD to attend a fly-in event. The pilot estimated his outbound and return legs each took 1 hour and 20 minutes, and that the airplane consumed 22 gallons of fuel on each leg. According to his statement, the pilot "…reasonably assumed that he had sufficient fuel with approximately 5 gallons of reserves to safely arrive back at Norwood without the need to switch to the auxiliary tanks during his return flight."

Prior to departure, the pilot performed a preflight inspection of the airplane "generally consistent" with the manufacturer's pilot's operating handbook. His visual inspection of the main fuel tanks "confirmed" that the right wing tank was full, the left wing tank was "down about 3 gallons," and that both right and left auxiliary tanks were full.

The pilot stated that the flight to RKD was completed with the fuel selector on the right main fuel tank, and the return flight to OWD was completed with the fuel selector on the left main fuel tank. After being cleared for landing at OWD, the engine "abruptly" lost power, and the pilot conducted a forced landing to wooded terrain.

Information from the OWD local controller revealed the airplane was about 3 miles north of the airport when it was cleared to land on runway 28. Shortly thereafter, the pilot reported a loss of engine power and the controller watched as the airplane descended into wooded terrain about 1 mile from the airport.

In an interview with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspectors, a witness close to the accident site said he watched the airplane overfly the woods at low altitude before it flew out of sight and he heard the sounds of impact. He said the airplane made a "funny noise" but that he could not associate the sound with the engine.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He was issued an FAA third-class medical certificate on April 21, 2016. The pilot reported 4,550 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1968, and was equipped with a Lycoming IO-540, 310-horsepower engine. There was a 30-gallon main fuel tank (28 gallons useable) and a 15-gallon auxiliary fuel tank mounted in each wing.

The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed July 28, 2015. It had accrued 4,239 total aircraft hours as of that date.

The co-owner of the airplane reported to his mechanic prior to the accident, and later to the FAA inspector who responded to the accident site, that the airplane's left main fuel tank leaked. The mechanic reported to an FAA inspector that one of the owners of the airplane had contacted him a few weeks before the accident and requested that he order replacement bladders for both the left and right main fuel tanks so they could be replaced at the next annual inspection. According to the mechanic, the owners mitigated the leak by not filling the left main tank completely.

Examination of the wreckage by the FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to the airplane's wings and fuselage. Control continuity was confirmed, and examination of the fuel tanks revealed that the left main fuel tank was empty, the right main fuel tank contained about 2 gallons of fuel, and both auxiliary fuel tanks were full. Disassembly of the airplane by recovery specialists confirmed continuity of the fuel system, and the fuel quantities previously observed in each tank. The fuel selector was found between the "Left Main" and "Off" positions. The pilot reported to first responders that he had "turned the fuel off" prior to their arrival on scene.

At 1453, the weather reported at OWD included clear skies and wind from 290 degrees at 10 knots gusting to 16 knots. The temperature was 34 degrees C, dew point was 16 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 30.00 inches of mercury.

Examination of the airplane's flight log and fuel receipts revealed that prior to the accident, the airplane was last fueled on July 12, 2016, at which time the right main and left auxiliary tanks were "topped off." The airplane had accrued an estimated 2.6 total hours of flight time (hobbs meter) since its last fuel service. Fueling instructions over the month previous to the accident specified servicing the right main and right auxiliary tanks only, or right main and left auxiliary tanks only.


The engine was removed from the airframe and subsequently placed in a test cell at the manufacturer's facility under the supervision of an NTSB investigator. The engine started immediately, accelerated smoothly, and ran continuously without interruption at all power settings.

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA258
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Westwood, MA
Aircraft: PIPER PA24, registration: N11MT
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2016, at 1517 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-24-260, N11MT, was substantially damaged during a forced landing while on approach to Norwood Memorial Airport (OWD), Westwood, Massachusetts. The private pilot/owner was seriously injured and the passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight that originated at Knox County Regional Airport (RKD), Rockland, Maine, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

Preliminary information from the OWD local air traffic controller revealed the airplane was about 3 nautical miles to the north of the airport when it was cleared to land on runway 17. Shortly thereafter, the controller watched as the airplane descended into wooded terrain about 1 nautical mile from the airport after the pilot reported a loss of engine power.

In an interview with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspectors, a witness close to the accident site said he watched the airplane overfly the woods at low altitude before it flew from sight and he heard the sounds of impact. He said the airplane made a "funny noise" but that he couldn't associate the sound with the engine.

The pilot was not available for interview due to his injuries.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He was issued an FAA third-class medical certificate on April 21, 2016. The pilot reported 4,550 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1968, and was equipped with a Lycoming IO-540, 310-horsepower engine. There was a 30-gallon main fuel tank (28 gallons useable) and a 15-gallon auxiliary fuel tank mounted in each wing.

The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed July 28, 2015. It had accrued 4,239 total aircraft hours as of that date.

Examination of the airplane by an FAA inspector revealed substantial damage to the airplane's wings and fuselage. Control continuity was confirmed, and examination of the fuel tanks revealed that the left main fuel tank was empty, the right main fuel tank contained about 2 gallons of fuel, and both auxiliary fuel tanks were full. Disassembly of the airplane by recovery specialists confirmed continuity of the fuel system, and the fuel quantities previously observed in each tank. The pilot reported to first responders that he had "turned the fuel off" prior to their arrival on scene.

At 1453, the weather reported at OWD included clear skies and wind from 290 at 10 knots gusting to 16 knots. The temperature was 34 degrees Celsius (C), dewpoint was 16 degrees C, and the altimeter setting was 30.00 inches of mercury.

The airplane was retained for further examination.








WESTWOOD, Mass. —  Two people were pulled from the wreckage of a small plane crash in Westwood Saturday afternoon. 

The Piper PA-24 aircraft was headed to Norwood Airport when it crashed in the woods at 40 Peartree Drive.

Air Traffic Control audio reveals what happened before the plan went down:

(interrupting traffic controllers) Pilot: I'm losing power
Traffic Controller 1: Lost that traffic, where is he?
Traffic Controller 2: I'm not seeing him either. 
Traffic Controller 1: Lost contact, now not answering

Police said the four person plane had two men on board, both suffering serious injuries. The pilot, a 65-year-old man from Newton, was flown via medical helicopter to Boston Medical Center. The 77-year-old passenger from Norwood was taken to Norwood Hospital for treatment of serious injuries and was subsequently flown by medical helicopter to Boston Medical Center.

After the crash, firefighters emerged from the forested area with chainsaws and metal cutting tools. 

Witnesses told FOX25 the plane appeared to be heading for the nearby Norwood Airport, and before it went down it was acting funny and flying low. 

"I look up and I saw the plane over the top of the house and it just looked like it wasn't flying well, it was kind of wobbly and it looked like the propeller wasn't turning very well…and a few seconds later we heard the crash," said Ded Murphy. 
  
The FAA will be on scene to investigate the crash. Police said the plane is mostly intact. 

Story and video:   http://www.fox25boston.com




WESTWOOD, Mass. —Two men suffered serious injuries Saturday afternoon when the small plane they were in crashed near a residential neighborhood in Westwood.

The single-engine, fixed-wing plane was attempting to land at Norwood Airport when, for unknown reasons, the plane crashed into the woods off Peartree Drive around 3:30 p.m., state police said.

Emergency crews from Westwood and several surrounding communities rushed to the scene and were able to extricate the pilot and his passenger.

The pilot, a 65-year-old Newton man, was flown by medical helicopter to Boston Medical Center to be treated. The passenger, a 77-year-old Norwood man, was taken to Norwood Hospital and then flown to Boston Medical Center.

The cause of the plane crash is under investigation by local and state police, as well as the National Transportation Safety Board.

Story and video:  http://www.wcvb.com

Westwood Police Chief Jeff Silva addresses the media following a plane crash on July 16, 2016.







Two men were seriously injured when a small plane crashed into a wooded area of Westwood Saturday afternoon, according state and federal authorities.

The pilot, who was not identified, was taken by helicopter to a “Boston area hospital for treatment,” said State Police spokesman Sgt. Tom Ryan.

The passenger, who was also not identified, was first taken by ambulance to Norwood Hospital, and then transported by helicopter to a Boston area hospital, Ryan said.

The crash occurred at about 3:15 p.m. three miles north of Norwood Memorial Airport, said Kathleen Bergen, a spokeswoman for the FAA.

Investigators from the FAA were enroute to the crash site late Saturday afternoon, Bergen said. The National Transportation Safety Board will ultimately determine the cause of the crash, she added.

The pilot appeared to be attempting to land at the time of the crash, Ryan said.

Dedham and Westwood public safety also responded to the scene.

The Dedham Fire Department posted on its Twitter page that it had responded to 40 Peartree Drive in Westwood “to assist in the extrication of victims.”

A medical helicopter landed near the scene of a Westwood, Massachusetts plane crash on Saturday, July 16, 2016 to transport a victim. 









A small plane crashed in a Westwood, Massachusetts neighborhood on Saturday afternoon.

Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration said the Piper PA-24 crashed at about 3:15 p.m. in a wooded area off Peartree Drive.

The plane was headed to Norwood Memorial Airport when it crashed.

Two medical helicopters were called in to transport the pilot and passenger to an area hospital. Their identities and conditions are unknown at this time.

The exact cause of the crash is under investigation by the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board.

Source: http://www.necn.com

Aeronca 7BCM Champion, 2576E LLC, N2576E: Accident occurred July 16, 2016 near Vance Airport (KLMO), Longmont, Boulder County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

2576E LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N2576E

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA267
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Longmont, CO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: AERONCA 7BCM, registration: N2576E
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was taking off in the light sport aircraft for a local personal flight. The pilot reported that, while attempting to take off from the 4,799-ft-long runway, he noticed a lower-than-normal engine rpm and that the takeoff roll was significantly longer. Despite the extended takeoff roll and low engine rpm, the pilot chose to continue the takeoff. The airplane lifted off and slowly climbed to about 200 ft above ground level. Due to concerns about rising terrain, the pilot chose to make a forced landing, during which the airplane hit power lines. The airplane then skipped across a road and nosed over. 

Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures. Carburetor icing was likely not a factor given the environmental conditions at the time of the accident and the pilot’s report of a short taxi time.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to continue the takeoff after observing a partial loss of engine power, the reason for which could not be determined because postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures.

On July 16, 2016, about 1020 mountain daylight time, an Aeronca 7BCM airplane, N2576E, impacted terrain while departing from Vance Brand Airport (LMO), Longmont, Colorado. The pilot sustained minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by 2576E LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident and no flight plan had been filed. The local flight was departing at the time of the accident. 

On the day prior to the accident, the pilot serviced the airplane with 10 gallons of aviation fuel for a total fuel onboard of 13 gallons. The pilot stated that the elapsed time from engine start to takeoff roll was less than 5 minutes. While performing an engine runup at 1,700 rpm, he checked the carburetor heat and magnetos, which he reported as normal. He recalled the wind conditions as calm.

During takeoff roll from Runway 29, the pilot observed the engine was only producing about 2,000 rpm, versus the 2,200 rpm he typically noticed. He continued the takeoff and observed a significantly longer takeoff roll. After liftoff, the airplane was unable to climb normally and after reaching about 200 ft agl, the pilot executed a forced landing due to concerns with terrain. During the forced landing, the airplane hit power lines, skipped across a road and nosed over, which damaged both wings. 

A pilot witness near the departure end of the runway noticed the airplane liftoff much later than he expected, about 3,000 ft down the 4,799 ft long runway. After liftoff, he noticed the airplane climb slowly to about 200 ft and then bank left and descend out of sight. During the takeoff, the witness observed the windsock indicating a tailwind of 3 or 4 knots. 

At 1014, the weather observation station at LMO reported the following conditions: wind calm, visibility 7 miles, clear skies, temperature 24 degrees C, dew point 14 degrees C, and altimeter setting 29.98 inches of mercury. At 1034, the conditions were wind 100 degrees at 4 knots. Density altitude was calculated to be 7,388 ft. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) icing probability chart indicated there was potential for serious carburetor icing at glide power at the time of the accident.

FAA inspectors examined the airplane and determined the fuel from the main tank had leaked out while the airplane was inverted after the accident. The gascolator contained about 2 ounces of fuel, which was clear and bright, with no water or debris. No anomalies were noted with the ignition or carburetor systems. Compression testing of the cylinders was accomplished, with normal results. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA267
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 16, 2016 in Longmont, CO
Aircraft: AERONCA 7BCM, registration: N2576E
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2016, about 1020 mountain daylight time, an Aeronca 7CBM airplane, N2576E, impacted terrain while departing from Vance Brand Airport (LMO), Longmont, Colorado. The pilot suffered minor injuries and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by 2576E LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident. The local flight departed without a flight plan. 

Shortly after departing from Runway 29, the pilot noticed the engine was only producing 2,000 rpm, versus the 2,200 rpm he typically noticed. The pilot was unable to climb normally and executed a forced landing, during which the airplane hit power lines, skipped across a road, and nosed over.



On Saturday morning, July 16, a small plane crashed in west Longmont after taking off from Vance Brand Airport. As the red and yellow single-engine airplane took off, it failed to gain enough power to climb. Pilot David Shenk of Longmont said the engine did not have enough power to gain altitude but he wasn't scared when he realized he was going to crash. 

"We're trained to fly the airplane to the site of the crash," Shenk said. As the plane started going down, Shenk was able to maneuver it over traffic and under power lines before crashing west of 75th street in a ditch between two open fields. Shenk was the only person in the plane and walked away from the crash with only a few minor scratches on his wrists. 

The Longmont Police Department, along with the Longmont Fire Department, responded to the scene to treat and release Shenk after he was evaluated. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are continuing to investigate the cause of the crash.

The pilot of the crashed plane talks on the phone along 75th Street. A small plane went down just west of Vance Brand Airport in Longmont today. The pilot was able to walk away.




LONGMONT, Colo. — A pilot suffered minor injuries after his single-engine plane crashed shortly after takeoff Saturday morning near Longmont.

The 1946 Aeronca Champ piloted by 75-year-old David Shenk of Longmont suddenly lost power around 10:51 a.m., the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office said.

Shenk maneuvered the plane between cars and power lines on N. 75th Street, coming to rest nose-down in a field.

Shenk was able to get out of the plane on his own. He was treated for his injuries at the scene and released.

The NTSB and FAA will investigate the crash. The plane will remain in the field until the investigation is complete.

Source: http://kwgn.com 





A Longmont pilot crashed his single-engine airplane in a field west of N. 75th Street this morning, though he managed to escape the wreck with only minor injuries.

The pilot was the only person aboard the plane at the time of the 10:15 a.m. crash, according to a news release from the Boulder County Sheriff's Office. The cause of the crash is unknown.

David Shenk, 74, was taking off from Longmont's Vance Brand Airport, when the engine of his 1946 Aeronca Champ lost power. Unable to climb, Shenk was forced to navigate the aircraft through traffic on N. 75th Street, passing between nearby power lines before crashing in a field some 20 yards west of the roadway.

Sheriff's deputies, as well as Longmont Police and Fire, responded to the crash. Shenk had been able to exit the plane, and was waiting for emergency personnel when they arrived. He suffered only minor injuries to his lower arms, and was released after an evaluation, Boulder Sheriff's Cmdr. Mike Wagner said.

The plane, based out of Vance Brand, came to rest on its nose and was slightly inverted. The crash ended its first flight of the day. Shenk intended to fly locally, ending at Erie Municipal Airport.

The crash is being investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration. The plane will remain at the scene of the crash until the on-site investigation is complete.

Source:  http://www.dailycamera.com

Beech E-90 King Air, Mile Hi Skydivers Inc., N92DV: Incident occurred August 12, 2016 -and- accident occurred June 27, 2016 in Longmont, Colorado

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Mile Hi Skydivers Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N92DV

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Denver FSDO-03 

Date: 12-AUG-16
Time: 22:39:00Z
Regis#: N92DV
Aircraft Make: BEECH
Aircraft Model: 90
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: LONGMONT
State: Colorado

AIRCRAFT ON LANDING GEAR COLLAPSED, LONGMONT, COLORADO
 
NTSB Identification: CEN16LA247
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 27, 2016 in Longmont, CO
Aircraft: BEECH E 90, registration: N92DV
Injuries: 1 Serious, 15 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 27, 2016, about 1400 mountain daylight time, a Beech E-90 King Air airplane, N92DV, was struck by a skydiver exiting the airplane near Longmont, Colorado. The commercial rated pilot and fourteen skydivers were not injured and one skydiver sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by Mile Hi Skydivers Inc., Longmont, Colorado, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a skydiving flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed, but the flight was receiving visual flight rules (VFR) flight following. The flight originated from Vance Airport (LMO), Longmont, Colorado, about 1345. 

The pilot reported that the loading and takeoff portion of the flight were normal with no anomalies. The flight contained fifteen total skydivers, one of which was a student and the rest were licensed skydivers with varied levels of experience. Two skydivers safely exited the airplane at 5,000 ft above ground level (agl). He did not recall any jump indication lights being illuminated in the cabin and no one notified him of any illuminated lights. He continued the climb to 16,000 ft mean sea level (msl), which was 1,500 ft below normal exit altitude. At 12.2 nautical miles (nm) from the intended GPS waypoint, the pilot maintained a full power setting and continued the climb for 17,500 ft msl. The pilot activated the amber light, which indicated that the skydivers could open the door and spot check the area. Prior to reaching the jump location, which was 11.2 nm from the waypoint, he was in the process of configuring the airplane for the jump when he felt the flight controls shake, but the flight instruments and gauges appeared normal. He then felt a jolt in the flight controls and heard a "thud' sound. He noticed that three skydivers had exited the airplane and three more were in the process of exiting. He switched the jump lights to red and instructed the remaining skydivers to remain in the airplane. The remaining skydivers told the pilot that someone had hit the tail. The pilot descended and landed the airplane at LMO. 

The left horizontal sustained substantial damage to the leading edge.

Rans S12XL, N2534Q: Accident occurred August 07, 2016 - Aircraft flipped during high speed taxi test









AIRCRAFT:   2007 Rans S12XL SN# 07990885    N2534Q

ENGINE:       Rotax 582 65HP SN# 5307058

PROPELLER:  Warp Drive 3 Blade - Damaged

APPROXIMATE TOTAL HOURS (estimated TT & TSMO from logbooks or other information):

ENGINE(S):            20 Hours

PROPELLER(S):    20 Hours since new

AIRFRAME:          450 Hours                   

OTHER EQUIPMENT:      Custom Seats recently installed

DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:  On 8/7/2016 aircraft flipped during high speed taxi test

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES:    Airframe badly damaged.  Cockpit and instruments intact.  Propeller struck ground and broke.                       

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  Lynd, MN       

Read more here:        http://www.avclaims.com/N2534Q.htm