Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Sonex Limited Waiex, N12YX, registered to and operated by Sonex Ltd: Accident occurred August 03, 2016 near Fond Du Lac County Airport (KFLD), Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Sonex Aircraft LLC; Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Sonex Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N12YX

Location: Fond du Lac, WI
Accident Number: CEN16LA302
Date & Time: 08/03/2016, 1155 CDT
Registration: N12YX
Aircraft: SONEX LIMITED WAIEX
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 2 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On August 3, 2016, about 1155 central daylight time, a Sonex Limited Waiex airplane, N12YX, impacted terrain following a partial loss of engine power near the Fond du Lac County Airport (FLD), Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The private rated pilot and flight instructor were both seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by Sonex Ltd under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the light, which operated without a flight plan. The airplane was departing FLD at the time of the accident.
According to information provided by the flight instructor, the pilots were performing takeoffs and landing on runway 27 at FLD. Shortly after takeoff, when the airplane was between 200 to 300 ft above ground level, they heard a sudden change in the engine noise. The instructor observed that the engine rpm was between 2,500 to 2,600 rpm, when the engine was previously performing about 3,100 rpm. The instructor took control of the airplane and began an immediate left turn for runway 15. The airplane would not maintain altitude, so he momentarily leaned the mixture which did not improve engine performance, so he returned the mixture to full rich, and performed a forced landing to a field. The airplane collided with an unseen transmission line and impacted terrain. A postaccident examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings.

An examination of the engine was conducted at Sonex under the auspices of the Federal Aviation Administration. A compression check of the engine found low compression of the number 1 and 2 cylinders. Examination of the exhaust valves found they displayed excessive wear. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider; Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/04/2016
Occupational Pilot: 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 05/14/2016
Flight Time:  29114 hours (Total, all aircraft), 35 hours (Total, this make and model), 24019 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 92 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: 
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: 
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/26/2014
Occupational Pilot: 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: SONEX LIMITED
Registration: N12YX
Model/Series: WAIEX NO SERIES
Aircraft Category:Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2003
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 0001
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/07/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 304.3 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: AMA/EXPR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: AeroVee
Registered Owner: SONEX LTD
Rated Power: 80 hp
Operator: SONEX LTD
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFLD, 807 ft msl
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 100°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 22°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3100 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 270°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):  
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: FOND DU LAC, WI (FLD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: OSHKOSH, WI (OSH)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: FOND DU LAC COUNTY (FLD)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3602 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  43.770278, -88.501389 (est)

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA302
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 03, 2016 in Fond du Lac, WI
Aircraft: SONEX LIMITED WAIEX, registration: N12YX
Injuries: 2 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 3, 2016, about 1155 central daylight time, a Sonex Limited Waiex airplane, N12YX, impacted terrain following a partial loss of engine power near the Fond du Lac County Airport (KFLD), Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The private rated pilot and flight instructor were both seriously injured. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by Sonex Ltd under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated without a flight plan.

According to preliminary information obtained by investigators, the pilots were performing touch-and-go landings at KFLD. Shortly after takeoff, the pilots reported a loss of engine power. During the forced landing, the airplane collided with a transmission line and impacted terrain. An inspection of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings.

The airplane was retained for further examination.



A pilot and passenger practicing landings and takeoffs at the Fond du Lac County Airport Wednesday experienced engine failure when their plane lost altitude, hit a guide wire and crashed, the Fond du Lac County Sheriff's Office said Thursday.

A complete investigation into the crash of the single-engine plane is being conducted by the National Transportation and Safety Board. The official findings could take months to complete, said airport manager John Wehner.

The passenger, David Plathe, 60, of Dedham, Massachusetts, was flown from the scene by Flight for Life to ThedaCare Regional Medical Center in Neenah. He was released Thursday, according to a hospital spokesperson.

St. Agnes Hospital could not release information on the condition of the 73-year-old pilot, Thomas Helm from Neenah, the spokesperson said.

The plane, owned by Sonex Aircraft LLC in Oshkosh, took off from the airport shortly before 12:30 p.m. Helm, who was training Plathe how to fly the aircraft, attempted to return to the airport but did not have enough altitude and struck a power line before crashing into the edge of a corn field southwest of the airport property along Esterbrook Road.

This was the second plane crash in Fond du Lac within a week's time. On July 30, a time when the Fond du Lac County Airport was busy due to EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, a single-engine airplane crashed in the northwest corner of the airport. David Spencer and Rafael Chavez from Santa Fe, New Mexico, were critically injured.

Wehner said the two crashes in one week are not related to airport operations. The crashes represent a streak of bad luck, he said. The July 30 crash was the first at the airport since the 1990s.

Wisconsin State Patrol, Fond du Lac Fire/Rescue and the Fond du Lac Fire Department and First Responders aided at the scene.


Source:   http://www.fdlreporter.com








FOND DU LAC - Fond du Lac was the scene Wednesday of a second plane crash within a week's span.

A single-engine Sonex airplane that took off from Fond du Lac County Airport shortly before 12:30 p.m. clipped a power line and dropped almost instantly about 40 feet to the ground, injuring both the pilot and passenger.

Alisha Adams, who lives at N6311 Esterbrook Road, was about to go swimming with her kids for the day when she heard what she thought was a tractor crash.

“All of the sudden I heard a (sound) and a loud explosion,” Adams said. Looking out her side window, she saw the downed aircraft and people nearby, who had rushed to the scene to give aid.

The pilot, a man in his 70s from the Neenah area, was transported by ambulance to St. Agnes Hospital in Fond du Lac. The passenger, a man in his 50s, was transported by Flight for Life to ThedaCare Regional Medical Center in Neenah, according to Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Capt. Rick Olig.

Apparently the plane, owned by SONEX Aircraft LLC out of Oshkosh, was practicing takeoffs and landings and had taken off heading west when it banked and the wing caught a guide wire of an electrical power line, spinning the plane backward.

It came down on its belly at the edge of a cornfield skirting Esterbrook Road, the first major street west of the airport, near Grove Street. Both men were conscious and able to answer questions, Olig said.

Mark Schaible, general manager at Sonex, said the pilot was on contract with the company providing transition training to a customer who had purchased a Sonex aircraft kit to build his own plane.

Customers often train with one of Sonex’s certified flight instructors to gain familiarity with the aircraft before flying it on their own, Schaible said.

“Right now our concern is with the occupants (of the plane) and have learned both are in stable condition,” Schaible said Wednesday afternoon.

The same type of company-owned Sonex plane crashed in Oshkosh on June 2, 2015, killing Sonex CEO Jeremy Monnett and assembly mechanic Mike Clark, a new employee with the company. Schaible said he couldn’t speak as to whether the accidents were similar.

Last week, on July 30, as Fond du Lac County Airport was busy with flyers arriving for EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, a single-engine airplane crashed in the northwest corner of the airport. David Spencer and Rafael Chavez from Santa Fe, New Mexico, were critically injured.

Esterbrook Road was closed Wednesday between Forest Avenue Road and Rogersville Road while emergency and power crews from Alliant Energy work at the scene.

Story and video: http://www.fdlreporter.com
















TOWN OF FOND DU LAC (WLUK) -- Two people were hospitalized following a plane crash in the Town of Fond du Lac Wednesday afternoon.

The Fond du Lac County Sheriff's Office says the crash happened around 12:15 p.m. just south of the intersection of Esterbrook Road and Grove Street in the Town of Fond du Lac. That's just west of the Fond du Lac County Airport.

The pilot, a Neenah man believed to be in his 70s, was taken by ambulance to St. Agnes Hospital in Fond du Lac. The passenger, a man believed to be in his 50s, was airlifted to ThedaCare Regional Medical Center-Neenah. He was listed in good condition Wednesday afternoon.

According to the sheriff's office, the pilot was practicing taking off and landing at the airport. The plane had just taken off, headed west, when the wing tip clipped a power line, causing the plane to slingshot into the ground.

The two-seat experimental aircraft is owned by Sonex Aircraft of Oshkosh.

Authorities are recommending drivers avoid the area as utility crews repair the power lines.

Story and video:  http://fox11online.com

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, N9318B: Accident occurred June 30, 2016 in Stamford, Texas

http://registry.faa.gov/N9318B

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA365
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, June 30, 2016 in Stamford, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172RG, registration: N9318B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that he was taxiing the airplane parallel to the airport hangars. He reported that he planned to taxi to the run-up area for a planned departure, but the airplane's left wing struck the hangar door casing and spun the nose of the airplane counterclockwise into the hangar door. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and spar carry through.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airplane that would have prevented normal flight operations.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's failure to maintain clearance from a hangar during taxi for departure.

Aeronca 11AC Chief, Gig Harbor Light Sport Flying Club, N9791E: Accident occurred July 26, 2016 in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington

GIG HARBOR LIGHT SPORT FLYING CLUB:   http://registry.faa.gov/N9791E

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA410
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 26, 2016 in Gig Harbor, WA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/12/2016
Aircraft: AERONCA 11AC, registration: N9791E
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that while on his fourth landing in the tailwheel equipped airplane, after touchdown the airplane was "a little out of alignment" and he "started to lose control". The student pilot further reported that he advanced the throttle to attempt an aborted landing but was unable to regain control of the airplane, the airplane veered off the runway to the left, he then decreased the throttle and the airplane rolled back onto the runway. 

A post-accident examination of the airplane revealed that the right wing tip struck the ground, which caused substantial damage to the right wing rear spar. 

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing, and subsequent wing tip strike, which resulted in substantial damage to the rear spar.

Cessna 150J, N50945: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 in New Albany, Union County, Mississippi

http://registry.faa.gov/N50945

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Jackson FSDO-31


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA414 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in New Albany, MS
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/27/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 150, registration: N50945
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that during landing the airplane's nose wheel impacted the runway first and the axle broke. The pilot further reported that the airplane continued to slide on the runway bending the nose wheel strut, which resulted in substantial damage to the airplane's firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no pre impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain an appropriate pitch attitude during landing, which resulted in an initial nose wheel contact, followed by a nose gear collapse, and the airplane came to rest in a nose down position.

Wings An Things Avid Flyer, N430WT: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 in Bluffton, Wells County, Indiana

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N430WT

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA South Bend FSDO-17


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA300 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Bluffton, IN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: WINGS AN THINGS INC AVID FLYER, registration: N430WT
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot was operating a personal, local flight in the nonregistered, experimental amateur-built airplane with one passenger onboard. The student stated that, while the airplane was climbing through 500 ft above ground level after takeoff, there was an uncommanded left roll. He reported that the airspeed was 60 knots (which is above the stall speed of 40 mph listed in the airplane’s specifications). He applied right control input to the control stick, which did not counter the left roll. The airplane entered a left spiral descent, and the pilot pulled back on the control stick and applied right rudder until the airplane impacted terrain. He reported that the airplane’s engine was at full throttle during the flight and that it did not experience a loss of engine power. 

A postaccident examination of the airframe, including the flight controls, revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The investigation could not determine the reason for the loss of roll control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of roll control during climb for reasons that could not be determined because postaccident examination of the airframe revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

On August 2, 2016, about 2045 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Wings An Things Avid Flyer airplane, N430WT, sustained substantial damage when it impacted a cornfield after takeoff from Miller Airport (C40), Bluffton, Indiana. The student pilot and passenger received serious injuries. The student pilot owned and operated the non-registered airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight departed from C40 about 1945 on a local flight. 

The student pilot reported that he had flown for about an hour and then returned to land at C40. He decided to make one more takeoff and landing before completing the flight. He departed to the west and at approximately 500 ft, the left wing "dipped on its own without input from the stick." He countered with opposite right stick but without effect. The left wing continued to dip further to the left. He reported the airspeed was 60 kts (which is above the stall speed of 40 mph listed in the Avid Flyer specifications). He attempted to put in right rudder and right stick, but again without effect. He then tried turning into the left dip, but the airplane continued losing altitude. Before impact, he pulled back on the stick with hard right rudder, and the nose came up "some" before the airplane hit the tall corn. After ground impact, he exited the airplane, and then immediately worked to get the passenger unbuckled and evacuated out of the airplane. He reported that the airplane's engine was at full throttle during the flight and it did not experience a loss of engine power. He reported the loss of airplane control was due to a separated left aileron. 

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector examined the airplane wreckage and reported that there was no preexisting anomaly in the flight controls. He reported that there was flight control continuity from the cockpit controls to the flight control surfaces. The examination revealed that the damage to the four broken left wing flaperon attach points was consistent with impact damage. 

The 42-year-old pilot held a student pilot certificate and was authorized to fly solo in a Cessna 172, but there was no endorsement in his logbook to fly the accident airplane. The pilot's logbook indicated he had a total of 46 hours of flight time. There was no record in his logbook concerning any flights in the accident airplane. He held a third class medical certificate issued on December 17, 2015.

The airplane was manufactured in 1985. The airplane's maintenance logbook indicated that the last conditional maintenance inspection was conducted on January 23, 1995. At the time of the inspection, the airframe had a total time of 249.7 hours and the engine had 107.9 hours. On May 15, 2015, the FAA cancelled the airplane's registration and the airplane was considered as a non-registered aircraft. 


Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) 61.89 (a) states that "A student pilot may not act as a pilot in command of an aircraft: (1) That is carrying a passenger."

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA300
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Bluffton, IN
Aircraft: WINGS AN THINGS INC AVID FLYER, registration: N430WT
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 2, 2016, about 2055 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Avid Flyer, N430WT, sustained substantial damage when it impacted a cornfield after takeoff from Miller Airport (C40), Bluffton, Indiana. The student pilot and passenger received serious injuries. The airplane was registered to a private individual and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight departed from C40 about 1935 on a local flight. 

At 2054, the surface weather observation at Fort Wayne International Airport (FWA), Fort Wayne, Indiana, located about 14 nm north of the accident site, was wind calm, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 6,000 ft, temperature 26 degrees C, dew point 19 degrees C, altimeter 30.05 inches of mercury.

Cessna 172N Skyhawk, Wheels Down LLC, N734GM: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 at Smithfield Airport (MT65), Lewistown, Fergus County, Montana

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

WHEELS DOWN LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N734GM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Helena FSDO-05


Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA419
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Lewiston, MT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N734GM
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the pilot, during the takeoff roll about 30 knots indicated airspeed, his seat slid back a few inches. He reported that, "The slight movement of the pilot seat aft during takeoff roll was inconvenient. Had I done nothing at this point, it most likely would have been a manageable situation." However, the pilot reported that, "My reaction to move the seat forward using the adjustment bar during takeoff roll acceleration is what caused the pilot seat to move to the full aft position." He reported that the full aft seat movement caused him to pull back on the yoke, the nose landing gear came off the ground, and the airplane veered left and exited the runway to the left, and struck a fence before coming to a halt. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings, horizontal stabilizer, and elevator.

The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airplane during the takeoff roll that would have prevented normal flight operations.

Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspector's examined the pilot's seat, track and adjustment assembly and found that there were no failures or anomalies.

According to the manufacturer's Pilot Operating Handbook, item number three of the Before Start Checklist states: Seats/Belts –Adjusted and locked

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to ensure that his seat was adjusted and locked, which resulted in his seat sliding aft during the takeoff roll, and the subsequent loss of directional control and runway excursion.

Cessna 152, C & G Aircraft Parts Inc., N48810: Incident occurred August 02, 2016 in Miami-Dade County, Florida

C & G AIRCRAFT PARTS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N48810

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Miami FSDO-19

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED IN A FIELD, 1 MILE FROM TAMIAMI AIRPORT, MIAMI, FLORIDA.

Date: 02-AUG-16
Time: 19:28:00Z
Regis#: N48810
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 152
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: MIAMI
State: Florida

Horizon Airlines, Bombardier DHC-8-402 Dash, N434MK: Incident occurred August 02, 2016 in Portland, Oregon

HORIZON AIR INDUSTRIES INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N434MK

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09

Date: 02-AUG-16
Time: 20:51:00Z
Regis#: N434MK
Aircraft Make: DE HAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DHC8
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Minor
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Aircraft Operator: QXE-Horizon Air
Flight Number: QXE150
City: PORTLAND
State: Oregon

N434MK HORIZON AIRLINES FLIGHT QXE150 BOMBARDIER DHC-8 AIRCRAFT, DURING TAKEOFF BLEW OUT A TIRE, INSPECTION REVEALED MINOR DAMAGE TO GEAR, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT AT PORTLAND, OREGON.

Robinson R22, Universal Helicopters, N22UH: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 at Ernest A. Love Field Airport (KPRC), Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona

ALBA LEASING SERVICES: http://registry.faa.gov/N22UH

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Scottsdale FSDO-07


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA156
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Prescott, AZ
Aircraft: ROBINSON R22, registration: N22UH
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 2, 2016, about 1035 mountain standard time (MST), a Robinson R22, N22UH, made a hard landing at Ernest A Love Field Airport, Prescott, Arizona. The helicopter was being operated by Universal Helicopters under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The student pilot received minor injuries and the flight instructor (CFI) was seriously injured. The helicopter sustained substantial damage during the accident sequence. The local instructional flight departed Prescott, Arizona, about 1000. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan had been filed.

The pre-solo student pilot and the flight instructor were practicing straight in auto-rotations. The flight instructor stated during the descent he noticed the rotor RPM was low and then the student pilot increased the collective pitch which resulted in the rotor RPM to decay further. The helicopter hit the ground hard and the landing skids collapsed, the main rotor blades connected with the tail boom and severed the tail boom. The helicopter came to rest on its left side.

The flight instructor reported no pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The accident site was documented and photographed. The wreckage was recovered for further examination.



PRESCOTT – A light helicopter crashed near the end of a runway at Prescott Municipal Airport on Tuesday, Aug, 2, sending the pilot and a passenger to the hospital with injuries.

It happened about 10:30 a.m. The Robinson R-22 came to rest between the ends of runways 21 left and right.

A Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said the helicopter “rolled over onto its side under unknown circumstances.”

The two people on board, both men in their 20s to 30s, were flown to Flagstaff Medical Center in critical condition, according to Prescott Fire Division Chief Don Devendorf, and the first arriving fire crew reported that they were “laying in the grass” between two runways.

“The majority of the fuselage is intact, but the other parts of the helicopter were spread around the area,” Devendorf said.

“Witnesses reported seeing the helicopter fall from the sky at an estimated height of 50 feet,” he added.

The two injured were to be released from the hospital Tuesday evening, a spokesperson with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University said. Their injuries were not as serious as reported.

The pilot was a student from a different school who was practicing on his own time, ERAU stated.

The helicopter was leased and reportedly owned by Universal Helicopters, a flight training company. A call to Universal Helicopters Tuesday was not returned.

Source:   http://www.dcourier.com



Two people were sent to the hospital with unknown injuries Tuesday morning after the helicopter they were flying in rolled over at Prescott Municipal Airport, officials said.

About 10:28 a.m., an FAA tower at the Prescott Municipal Airport alerted first responders to a helicopter that had tipped on the airfield.

When first responders arrived, they found the helicopter flipped on its side with severe damage and the helicopter passengers — two men in their 20s to 30s —  lying on the grass just beyond the wreckage, authorities said.

Witnesses said the helicopter fell out of the sky from an estimated 50 feet off the ground.

Both passengers were considered by first responders to be Level 1 trauma victims because of the nature of the crash and their conditions. The men were transported by air to the Flagstaff Medical Center.

The men’s status has not been made public.

The helicopter’s operator was a flight training company based out of the Prescott airport.

Source:  http://www.azcentral.com

Spad VII, Rhinebeck Aerodome Museum, N8096L: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 in Honesdale, Wayne County, Pennsylvania

RHINEBECK AERODROME MUSEUM: http://registry.faa.gov/N8096L

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Allentown FSDO-05

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA418
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Honesdale, PA
Aircraft: SWANSON CARL SPAD VII, registration: N8096L

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Date: 01-AUG-16
Time: 00:00:00Z
Regis#: N8096L
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: HONESDALE
State: Pennsylvania

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL SPAD VII, FORCE LANDED IN A GOLF COURSE FAIRWAY, NEAR HONESDALE, PENNSYLVANIA.

Antares, N8512Q: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 in North Pole, Alaska

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8512Q

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Fairbanks FSDO-01

NTSB Identification: ANC16CA050
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in North Pole, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: HOLLEY CAROL L ANTARES, registration: N8512Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that while practicing stop-and-go landings with a crosswind condition, the tricycle-geared weight-shift control (WSC) airplane "weathervaned" to the right upon touchdown. In an attempt to correct for the weathervane, the pilot applied right pedal, the airplane departed the runway to the right, and tipped over coming to rest on the right leading edge of the wing. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wing keel.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector who responded to the accident site reported that he observed no mechanical malfunctions or failures with airframe and engine that would have precluded normal operation and none was reported to him by the pilot.

In the recommendation section of the National Transportation Safety Board Accident/Incident Reporting Form 6120.1, the pilot stated that the accident may have been avoided if he had additional training that concentrated on ground handling and crosswind condition operations. 

The FAA has published the Weight-Shift Control Aircraft Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-5 (2008). This handbook discusses crosswind landing procedures for WSC airplanes and states in part:

When in final approach, the wind correction angle (crab angle) is established by heading toward the wind with the wings level so that the aircraft's ground track remains aligned with the centerline of the runway. This crab angle is maintained all the way to touchdown, when the rear wheels hit first and rotate the carriage and wing around so the front wheel touches the ground with the carriage going straight. However, if in turbulent air or pitched forward during the touchdown, with the front wheel touching the ground first, the pilot should lightly control the steering of the front wheel to be headed in the direction the carriage is going. WSC carriage front landing gear typically has camber that tends to steer the front wheel naturally in the direction of travel, so a light touch on the front wheel as it touches the ground allows it to find its own direction of travel. Once the front wheel is on the ground, lower the nose to keep the WSC on the ground and steer as required down the center of the runway. 

The procedure for the wing during the roundout is the same as that for normal and turbulent roundout and touchdowns. The exception is that after touchdown the windward wing should be lowered slightly so the wind cannot get under it to flip the WSC aircraft during later landing roll and taxi.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control of the weight-shift control airplane during the landing in a crosswind condition, which resulted in a runway excursion, a tip over of the wing, and a collision with terrain.

Cessna 172RG Cutlass, N4800V: Incident occurred August 01, 2016 on Hog Island, Exmore, Northampton County, Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N4800V

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Richmond FSDO-21

Date: 01-AUG-16
Time: 10:00:00Z
Regis#: N4800V
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172RG
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: EXMORE
State: Virginia

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A BEACH AND THE NOSE GEAR COLLAPSED, HOG ISLAND, NEAR EXMORE, VIRGINIA.

Peninsula Airways, Fairchild Metroliner SW4: Incident occurred August 02, 2016 in Anchorage, Alaska

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Anchorage FSDO-03

Date: 03-AUG-16
Time: 00:04:00Z
Regis#: PEN246
Event Type: Incident
Damage: Unknown
Activity: Commercial
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Aircraft Operator: PEN-Peninsula Airways
Flight Number: PEN246
City: ANCHORAGE
State: Alaska

PENINSULA AIRLINES FLIGHT PEN246, SW4 AIRCRAFT, REGISTRATION NOT REPORTED, ON LANDING SUSTAINED NOSE GEAR DAMAGE, ANCHORAGE, ALASKA.

Cessna 172K Skyhawk, N46459: Accident occurred August 02, 2016 in Neenah, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:    http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N46459

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA309
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 02, 2016 in Neenah, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172K, registration: N46459
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was conducting the first flight in the airplane after having removed a failed vacuum pump from the engine; the pilot was not a certified airframe and powerplant mechanic. During the flight, the engine lost power, and the pilot subsequently landed the airplane on a highway, and the left wing contacted a road sign, which resulted in substantial damage. 

The pilot reported that he had recently had a mechanic remove a failed vacuum pump on a different airplane that he owned and that he was able to fly that airplane without the pump. As a result, he thought he could also fly the accident airplane without a vacuum pump. However, the vacuum pumps were mounted on each airplane differently, and the pilot’s removal of the vacuum pump on the accident airplane allowed oil to exit the engine through the drive gear opening on the accessory case, which resulted in oil starvation. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A loss of engine power due to oil starvation, which resulted from the pilot, who was not a certified airframe and powerplant mechanic, removing the vacuum pump from the engine, and his misconception that he could operate the airplane without the pump. 

On August 2, 2016, at 1830 central daylight time, a Cessna 172K, N46459, collided with a road sign during an off airport forced landing on Highway 10 in Neenah, Wisconsin, following a loss of engine power. The private pilot and two passengers were not injured. The airplane received substantial damage to the left wing. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the Brennand Airport (79C), Neenah, Wisconsin, at 1815.

The pilot reported that he owned another airplane, an RV7 that was equipped with a Jabiru 5100 engine. The vacuum pump on that engine recently failed so a mechanic removed it until a new one was received. The vacuum pump on the Jabiru 5100 is fitted to the alternator mounting flange and the drive pad is dry. The pilot was told that he could fly the airplane without the vacuum pump installed which he did uneventfully for about 6 hours.

While flying the accident airplane, a Cessna 172, three days prior to the accident, the pilot noted the directional gyro and attitude indicator where not working. Because of the past experience with a vacuum pump failure on the RV7, he identified the problem as being a vacuum pump failure. The pilot held a Repairman Experimental Aircraft Builder certificate for the RV7, and stated that because he was comfortable working on that airplane, he decided to remove the vacuum pump from the accident airplane himself. He did not install a cover plate over the vacuum pump mounting pad. In addition, since he was able to fly the RV7 without a vacuum pump, he believed he could also fly the accident airplane without a vacuum pump installed. 

During the first flight after removing the vacuum pump, the airplane sustained a loss of engine power. The pilot landed the airplane on a highway, and while traveling up an exit ramp, the left wing contacted a road sign. The airplane spun around and came to rest in a ditch.

A postaccident examination of the engine revealed the engine suffered oil exhaustion when the oil exited the engine through the vacuum pump mount in the accessory case. 





CLAYTON - Mechanical issues prompted a Cessna pilot to land his plane on U.S. 10 Tuesday night.

The plane is registered to Jerry Sherwood of Little Chute, according to the FAA Registry.

The Winnebago County Sheriff's Office said the plane took off from Brennand Airport in Neenah but experienced engine issues.

The pilot was unable to return the aircraft to Neenah and subsequently performed an emergency landing in the eastbound lane of U.S. 10 about 6:30 p.m. He then maneuvered the plane off the roadway between U.S. 10 and the off-ramp to State 76.

The department said the pilot and his two passengers were not hurt, and the Cessna was later taken back to the Neenah airport. FAA spokesperson Tony Molinaro said the pilot struck a sign after landing, the Cessna 172 then rolled into a ditch. The plane experienced "substantial damage," he said.

The FAA and NTSB are assisting with the investigation.