Thursday, March 24, 2016

Bell B-206B Jet Ranger: Fatal accident occurred March 25, 2016 in Cane field off Carmila West Road, Carmila West, Queensland, Australia

UPDATE, 5.42pm:

A police spokeswoman said the pilot who died in a helicopter crash at Carmila this morning was a 50-year-old man from Emerald.

Police have not released the man's name.

UPDATE, 3.06pm:

BLAKE Lawn was working outside his property on Carmila West Rd when he heard the helicopter crash this morning.

"I was out in the yard working on my car and the chopper just went quiet, then the power went out. I thought something had happened," he said.

Blake, 16, who lives with his family on the 40ha (100-acre) farm, was just 1.5km from the cane paddock where the chopper crashed.

"I called my ex-girlfriend's father, who lives down the road a bit, he works for RACQ, and he told me about the helicopter that had crashed into the powerline," he said.

Blake and his father drove to the crash scene about 10.30am.

"There was a fire out here, over where it was," he said.

Blake said he had not personally known the pilot who died in the helicopter crash, but said he had worked in the area for a cane harvesting company.

UPDATE, 12.34pm:

A POLICE media spokesman says investigators have established the crash occurred at around 10.20am today.

He said the crash happened at a property on Jackson's Crossing Rd, off Carmila West Rd, and the victim was the sole occupant of the helicopter.

The spokesman said police are attempting to contact the man's family, but are not yet publicly releasing his age.

Police continue to investigate at the scene.

Blake, 16, who lives with his family on the 40ha (100-acre) farm, was just 1.5km from the cane paddock where the chopper crashed.

"I called my ex-girlfriend's father, who lives down the road a bit, he works for RACQ, and he told me about the helicopter that had crashed into the powerline," he said.

Blake and his father drove to the crash scene about 10.30am.

"There was a fire out here, over where it was," he said.

Blake said he had not personally known the pilot who died in the helicopter crash, but said he had worked in the area for a cane harvesting company.

INITIAL:

A MAN has died in a helicopter crash at a cane farm near Carmila West Rd, about one hours drive south of Mackay. 

A QAS spokesman said the man had been spraying a cane paddock when the Jet Ranger helicopter he was piloting clipped a powerline and crashed.

Emergency services received the 000 call at 10.28am today.

When emergency crews arrived at the scene the cane field was in flames, and Queensland Fire and Emergency Services personnel had to clear the scene before paramedics could access the helicopter.

The spokesman said the man had died by the time QAS  reached him. 

Original article can be found here:  http://www.dailymercury.com.au

A pilot has died after his helicopter crashed and burst into flames in a central Queensland cane field.

The aircraft came down after clipping power lines while spraying a paddock at Carmila, south of Mackay, on Friday morning.

Paramedics and fire crews rushed to the paddock on Carmila West Road after a triple-zero call was made just before 10.30am (AEST).

An ambulance service spokesman said a fire hampered efforts to get to the Jet Ranger helicopter.

"Initially we couldn't access the patient due to the safety and the cane paddock being on fire," he told AAP.

The pilot was found dead inside the chopper.

Police said residents only became aware of the crash when they heard a loud explosion followed by a power outage.

Blake Lawn, 16, was working outside at a nearby farm when he realised something had happened.

"I was out in the yard working on my car and the chopper just went quiet, then the power went out," he told the Mackay Daily Mercury.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau is investigating the crash remotely.

"We are not attending the site based on the initial reports from the Queensland Police that it was a wire strike," a spokesman told AAP.

Original article can be found here: http://www.sbs.com.au

Police continue to investigate a helicopter crash near Carmilla, south of Mackay, which killed an Emerald man. 

It is understood the 50-year-old was spraying canefields when his helicopter clipped the powerlines, sending the aircraft crashing into the field and bursting into flames. 

Paramedics received a call at 10.27am but arrived to find the cane paddock, about six kilometres from the township of Carmilla, was alight.

When they were able to access the helicopter a short time later they found the man deceased.

It is not believed anyone else was injured in the accident.

Police and Queensland Fire and Rescue are on the scene dealing with the fire and the downed powerlines.

The forensic crash unit, CIB and scenes of crime are all on route to the scene of the accident.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au

One person dead after helicopter crashes in cane field south of Mackay 

Authorities are investigating a helicopter crash in central Queensland that has left one person dead.

Around 10:30am, the Jet Ranger helicopter is believed to have clipped powerlines and crashed into a sugarcane farm on Jackson Crossing Road near Carmila, about 100 kilometres south of Mackay.

The helicopter burst into flames when it crashed.

The Queensland Fire and Emergency Service had to extinguish the flames before paramedics could get to the wreckage.

The male pilot and sole occupant was pronounced dead at the scene.

Police said there were no witnesses and that residents only became aware of the accident when they heard a loud explosion, followed by a power outage and then a fire the cane field.

A spokesman for the Australian Transport Safety Bureau said the crash was being investigated remotely.

"We are working in conjunction with the Queensland police," he said.

"They will be providing photos and information about various other things that may have occurred.

"If the helicopter is found to have not suffered a wire strike we will go to the location."

Original article can be found here: http://www.abc.net.au




A man has died after his helicopter crashed and sparked a fire in a canefield in central Queensland.


The aircraft came down after clipping power lines while spraying a paddock in Carmila West Road at Carmila, south of Mackay, on Friday morning.


A triple-zero call about the Jet Ranger helicopter was made at 10.27am (AEST).


'Initially we couldn't access the patient due to the safety and the cane paddock being on fire,' an ambulance service spokesman told AAP.


The pilot was found dead inside the chopper.


Fire crews were able to get the blaze under control and specialist police were en route.


Story and video: http://www.skynews.com.au

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, Air Tindi: Accident occurred November 20, 2014 in Northwest Territories

An Air Tindi Cessna Caravan made an emergency landing on Great Slave Lake in the early morning of November 20, 2014, due to icing. Five passengers and the pilot escaped unharmed.

A Transportation Safety Board photo shows ice buildup on the Cessna Caravan.

An aerial view, looking south, of the site where an Air Tindi Cessna Caravan landed on the North Arm of Great Slave Lake on November 20, 2014. (Transportation Safety Board)


An Air Tindi plane that was forced to land on Great Slave Lake in November 2014 took off overweight for the icy weather conditions that day, according to the Transportation Safety Board.

The Cessna 208B Caravan carrying five passengers was on its way to Fort Simpson from Yellowknife on Nov. 20, 2014, when the pilot was unable to maintain altitude due to icing and was forced to land on ice in the North Arm of the lake.

No one was injured but the airplane was damaged when it struck a rock outcropping. The pilot and passengers were rescued four hours later.

The report says inadequate awareness of the aircraft's limitations in icing conditions and incomplete weight and balance calculations led to the plane being dispatched overweight for the forecast icing conditions. The aircraft was 155 kilograms above its certified maximum weight for flight into known icing conditions, and its centre of gravity was also not within limits.

It also says the pilot underestimated the icing conditions that would be encountered during the flight and didn't use all the weather information available.

Plane landed 500 metres north of open water

The flight that left Yellowknife at about 6:45 a.m. that morning had been rescheduled from the night before due to freezing drizzle at Fort Simpson. As it climbed, the plane encountered icing conditions and about 30 minutes into the flight, the pilot headed back toward Yellowknife.

Fred Burow, a senior operations investigator with TSB's regional office in Edmonton, says that by that point in the flight, ice had "accumulated to the point where the aircraft was almost not flyable."

Unable to maintain altitude, the plane first touched down on the ice about 500 metres north of open water. After bouncing about 700 metres along the ice, the plane hit a rocky outcropping, losing its nose and the left landing gear. It finally came to rest 200 metres farther on.

Investigators say the pilot's skill in keeping the plane under control during the descent and level when it landed helped minimize damage and potential injury.

"With the amount of ice that was on it, the pilot did manage to keep a certain level of control which, I believe, saved everybody on board that aircraft," said Burow.

Survival kit stored with cargo

The report says that although passengers had been briefed on how to open the cabin door in the event of an emergency, they weren't able to, and had to exit through one of the cockpit doors.

The plane's survival kit had been stored in the belly of the plane and damage sustained in the landing made it hard to access. Not all of its contents could be recovered. Passengers' baggage and winter clothing had also been stored in the belly of the plane and were not accessible.

They used foil blankets from the survival kit for warmth and started a fire on a nearby island while waiting for the weather to clear enough for rescue aircraft to be dispatched.

Investigators say the survival skills of the pilot and passengers "were indispensable" given the limited access to the plane's survival equipment.

After the forced landing, Air Tindi temporarily suspended its Cessna Caravan flights. 

Al Martin, president of Air Tindi, says the airline's policy is now more black and white when it comes to the Caravans and potential icing conditions.

"If there's a potential for icing we just don't fly the aircraft," he said.

He said the airline cancelled more than 100 Caravan flights last fall, and used alternate aircraft.

Another big change the company has made is to have an extra staff member on hand 24/7 in Yellowknife to help pilots cross check weather forecasts and loads.

Original article can be found here: http://www.cbc.ca



EDMONTON -- A report says pilot errors were a factor in the crash landing of a small passenger plane onto the frozen surface of Great Slave Lake in the Northwest Territories.

No one onboard the Air Tindi Cessna 208 Caravan was hurt in the Nov. 20, 2014, crash in which the pilot and five passengers had to wait for hours in sub-zero temperatures to be rescued.

Transportation Safety Board investigators say the pilot misjudged icing conditions, the aircraft was too heavy and its load wasn't correctly balanced. The report says these factors reduced the plane's ability to climb and increased its stall speed.

"The pilot's inaccurate situational awareness led to his decision to continue operation of the aircraft in icing conditions that exceeded the aircraft's performance capabilities," says the report released Thursday.

"The severity of the icing conditions encountered and the duration of the exposure resulted in reductions in aerodynamic performance, making it impossible to prevent descent of the aircraft."

Investigators also found shortcomings with passenger briefing procedures and that survival equipment was not accessible.

The board says since the crash Air Tindi has improved its pilot training and safety procedures.

The report says the survival skills of the crew and passengers, who managed to light a fire on a nearby island, were indispensable in a situation in which they couldn't get to the plane's survival gear.

Air Tindi President Al Martin said it was a good, factual report and noted the company has been working to improve since the crash, including temporarily grounding its aircraft fleet for a safety review.

"Our focus has been on providing more support for the pilots and making our systems and procedures more robust," he said.

Martin also praised the pilot, who managed to bring the aircraft down safely, and the passengers who worked together to survive following the crash.

"He did an incredible job given the circumstances," he said. "They did an incredible job to look after each other and stay safe. It was brilliant."

After they were rescued, the five passengers issued a statement in which they called the crash "horrific" and "traumatic."

The plane was en route to Fort Simpson from Yellowknife. Poor weather delayed other aircraft from immediately responding to the crash.

RCMP were the first to reach the plane in an all-terrain vehicle.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.ctvnews.ca

Piper PA-28R-201, N3700Q, Gorge Winds Aviation Inc: Incident occurred March 23, 2016 in Troutdale, Multnomah County, Oregon

Date: 23-MAR-16
Time: 20:05:00Z
Regis#: N3700Q
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Minor
Activity: Instruction
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09
City: TROUTDALE
State: Oregon

AIRCRAFT ON DEPARTURE STRUCK A BIRD, LANDED WITHOUT INCIDENT, TROUTDALE, OR

GORGE WINDS AVIATION INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N3700Q

Cessna 182F Skylane, N5738F: Fatal accident occurred August 06, 2015 in Montecito, Santa Barbara County, California

The children of 56-year-old Birger Greg Bacino, a San Diego resident who died last summer in a Los Padres forest plane crash, are suing the deceased pilot, David Martz; the airplane’s owner, Poddoubnyi Alexandrovich; and Pacific Coast Flyers — the club that rented out the Cessna 182F — for negligence that led to their father’s death.

Bacino was a trial lawyer turned business owner. His company Premier Medical Management Systems was charged in 2007 in a multimillion-dollar workers’ compensation scam. Bacino previously pled guilty to “capping,” illegally soliciting business for a law firm. In 2014, he lost a $14 million personal bankruptcy case to La Jolla Bank. Most recently, he worked at Ftlb LLC, a medical management company he cofounded. On August 6, Bacino hired Martz to fly him from San Diego to an August 6 business meeting in San Luis Obispo.

One of the last people to see Martz alive that night at the San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport, a pilot in training, told The Santa Barbara Independent she noticed Martz because “he wasn’t drinking.” “It’s really bizarre they would just crash,” she added in a phone interview.

Around 10:10 p.m. August 6, Martz sent out a “mayday” radio call seconds before the Cessna went down in a remote area of Los Padres National Forest. The next morning, authorities found Martz and Bacino dead inside the plane, which crashed on rugged terrain near Don Victor Trail.

The complaint, filed March 23 in San Diego County Superior Court, alleges the Carsbald flying club known as Pacific Coast Flyers “negligently and carelessly maintained, repaired, rebuilt, prepared, fueled, inspected, and rented the Cessna 182F, which was a substantial factor in causing the [plane] to experience mid-flight failures causing the crash” that killed Bacino.

The complaint further charges that Martz’s “carelessness and negligence” in flying the plane — which he did with a suspended pilot’s license — contributed to Bacino’s death, and that Alexandrovich and the club knew or should’ve known Martz was unlicensed to fly.

Brody and Siena Bacino seek damages, lawsuit fees, and “loss of emotional support” (which would be determined by a jury). Because they are minors, Dann Shuetz acts as their guardian in the case. Representing the Bacino children is San Diego-based law firm CaseyGerry.

According to prosecuting attorney David Casey Jr., “[O]nce we file, we can get subpoenaed records to get maintenance reports on the plane” from Alexandrovich and the flying club. He anticipates Amanda Bacino, another claimant and heir to Birger Greg Bacino, will join the lawsuit. Pacific Coast Flyers declined to comment on pending litigation.


http://www.independent.com

SAN DIEGO — The family of a Rancho Santa Fe businessman has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the airplane pilot, owner and rental company they blame for a fatal air crash in Santa Barbara County last fall.

The suit, filed in San Diego Superior Court, alleged that the defendants should have known the Cessna 182F was not in good repair and that the pilot, David K. Martz, also killed in the crash, was known to be reckless and not properly licensed to fly the rental plane.

The bodies of Martz and his passenger, Birger Greg Bacino, 56, were found amid the wreckage of the Cessna on Aug. 7, the day after they crashed into a mountain in Los Padres National Forest.

The lawsuit said Martz issued a mayday call to Point Magu Naval Air Station about 10:10 p.m. on Aug. 6, saying the plane was leaking oil that spread across the windscreen, and that the cabin and cockpit were smoking. Radio contact then broke off.

Crash investigators found oil on the outside of the Cessna from nose to tail, the lawsuit said.

The legal action was filed Wednesday on behalf of two of Bacino’s three children, Brody and Siena Bacino. It names Martz’s estate, Pacific Coast Flyers, Inc., a Vista-based flying club that rents planes, and Cessna owner Alexandrovich Poddoubnyi of Vista as defendants.

Efforts to reach Poddoubnyi and representatives of Pacific Coast Flyers for comment on Friday were not successful.

Bacino had hired Martz and the plane to fly him home from a business trip in San Luis Obispo back to San Diego County, to McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad, the suit said.

According to the lawsuit, Martz’s pilot’s license was revoked or suspended twice and he was cited for flight violations twice since 1986. He made headlines for stunts including landing a helicopter in front of rocker Tommy Lee’s home in the Hollywood Hills in 2006, and filming himself engaging in a sex act with a woman in a helicopter over San Diego in 2009.

The suit alleges the flying company and the owner should not have trusted Martz and didn’t properly maintain the Cessna, causing the fatal mid-flight failures.

The family seeks unspecified damages for wrongful death, loss of emotional support, care, and companionship. The suit noted that Bacino was not married at the time of his death.


Original article can be found here: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

http://registry.faa.gov/N5738F

NTSB Identification: WPR15FA236
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 06, 2015 in Montecito, CA
Aircraft: CESSNA 182F, registration: N5738F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 6, 2015, about 2210 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 182F, N5738F, impacted mountainous terrain about 15 miles northeast of Montecito, California. The pilot operated the rental airplane from Pacific Coast Flyers, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as a business cross-country flight. The pilot and one passenger were fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The flight had departed from the San Luis County Regional Airport (SBP), San Luis Obispo, California, at an undetermined time. The flight was destined for Mc Clellan-Palomar Airport (CRQ), Carlsbad, California. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the cross-country flight, and no flight plan had been filed. 

The pilot radioed a mayday call to an air traffic controller at Point Magu Naval Air Station, and indicated that he had oil on his windscreen and smoke in the cockpit. Subsequently radio and radar contact was lost. An Alert Notification (ALNOT) was issued at 2212. The airplane was located the following morning at 0430 in mountainous terrain by the Ventura County Sheriff's Department.

Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department and a Search and Rescue crew accessed the site, and reported that the airplane came to rest inverted about 300 feet from the top of the ridgeline. 

The National Transportation Safety Board, Federal Aviation Administration, and Cessna Aircraft responded to the site. The airplane had impacted the mountain about 50 feet above its final resting spot. Oil was observed from the nose of the airplane to the tail cone.

A further inspection of the airplane will take place following its recovery.
  
FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Van Nuys FSDO-01





SAN DIEGO - More than six years after David Martz lost his license for in-flight sex acts with a porn star, the local pilot died in a fatal crash that also killed a San Diego father.

Now the passenger's family is hoping a lawsuit will help provide some answers.

“I’m sorry for this event,” said Martz.

Those were the words of an apologetic Martz – known as “Helicopter Dave” back in 2009.

The local pilot told 10News he filmed sex acts with a porn star in a helicopter above San Diego.

The scandal cost him his pilot's license. A year later, he got it back.

Then last August, while flying a Cessna 182 bound for Carlsbad, he crashed in a remote area outside of Santa Barbara, killing himself and Greg Bacino, owner of healthcare company Mutual Alliance.

“It's been very devastating for them to lose their dad,” said lawyer David Casey.

Casey represents two of Bacino's three children.

He says the mayday call from the doomed plane warned of smoke in the cockpit and oil on the windshield, which could point to a mechanical issue, but Casey also calls the pilot's past a giant red flag.

“Given the history that he had, the previous revocations, we think that put the owner of the plane should have been on notice, that he (Martz) should not have been flying,” said Casey.

Casey says Martz's license had been revoked two other times before the infamous flight was made public, including once for landing on a road to pick up rocker Tommy Lee.

But Martz’s problems weren’t over. Casey says Martz was facing yet another revocation hearing before he died for reasons that haven't been released.          

Casey has filed suit against the pilot's estate, the plane’s owner and Pacific Coast Flyers, the flying club that rented the plane.

“For someone to trust him to fly that plane, it's questionable,” said Casey.

Casey says he filed the suit so he can start getting engine records, and find out why he was close to losing his license again.

The final NTSB report on the crash is due out in a few months.

Pacific Coast Flyers declined to comment on the lawsuit.


Story and video:  http://www.10news.com


David Keith Martz

A wrongful death lawsuit was filed Thursday against a Carlsbad-based aircraft owner and its pilot in the death of San Diego resident Birger Greg Bacino last August in a plane crash near Montecito.

San Diego-based law firm CaseyGerry filed the suit in San Diego Superior Court on behalf of the two minor children of 56-year-old Bacino, a health-care executive who was traveling home from a business trip when he, along with the pilot, died in the crash, according to a news release from the firm.

The suit is against those allegedly responsible for the crash: the plane’s owner, Poddoubnvi Alexandrovich, Carlsbad-based flying club Pacific Coast Flyers Inc., which rented out the aircraft, and the estate of deceased pilot David Martz of San Diego.

David Casey, Jr., the lead attorney on the case, alleges that Martz, a longtime commercial pilot, had a history of suspension and revocation of his pilot’s license.

Bacino was the only passenger in a single-engine Cessna 182F airplane flown by Martz, which took off about 9 p.m. Aug. 6, 2015 from San Luis Obispo Regional Airport and was headed for McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad.

“The pilot radioed a mayday call to an air traffic controller at Point Magu Naval Air Station stating there was oil on the windscreen of the aircraft and smoke in the cockpit,” Casey Jr. said. “Shortly thereafter, all radio and radar contact was lost.”

The aircraft and the deceased passenger and pilot were discovered the following day in a remote area of Los Padres National Forest.

Original article can be found here: http://www.seasidecourier.com



Birger Greg Bacino

A wrongful death lawsuit was filed on behalf of the two minor children of a San Diego resident killed in a plane crash last summer in Santa Barbara County, the family’s lawyer said Thursday.

Birger Greg Bacino died last August in a remote area of Los Padres National Forest, according to the suit filed in San Diego Superior Court on Wednesday.

The suit names the aircraft’s owner, Poddoubnvi Alexandrovich, Carlsbad- based flying club Pacific Coast Flyers Inc. — which rented out the plane — and the estate of deceased pilot David K. Martz.

Martz, a longtime commercial pilot, had a history of suspension and revocation of his pilot’s license, according to plaintiffs’ attorney David S. Casey Jr.

Bacino, 56, was the only passenger in the single-engine Cessna 182F flown by San Diego-based Martz, which took off from San Luis Obispo Regional Airport and was headed for McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad.

Bacino, a healthcare executive, was headed home to San Diego following a business trip.

“The pilot radioed a mayday call to an air traffic controller at Point Magu Naval Air Station stating there was oil on the windscreen of the aircraft and smoke in the cockpit,” Casey said. “Shortly thereafter, all radio and radar contact was lost. The aircraft was discovered the following day … both the passenger and pilot were killed.”

Original article can be found here: http://timesofsandiego.com




The pilot of a small plane that crashed earlier this month in Santa Barbara County, killing him and his passenger, had a long history of discipline by the Federal Aviation Administration and lacked the medical clearances required to fly.

Government records show that David K. Martz, 58, of San Diego lost his pilot's license three times over the years — the latest revocation occurring in 2009 after he had oral sex with an adult film actress while flying a helicopter.

Before the crash Aug. 6, Martz was facing a fourth revocation proceeding on allegations that he falsified his Federal Aviation Administration medical certificate related to two drunken driving convictions in 2013 and 2014. He surrendered the document in June during the agency's investigation.

The Federal Aviation Administration issues medical certifications to pilots after doctors determine they are healthy enough to operate aircraft.

"A person needs a pilot certificate and a current medical certificate to fly legally," said Ian Gregor, an Federal Aviation Administration spokesman in Los Angeles. "Mr. Martz did not have a valid medical certificate when last week's crash occurred."

Martz was at the controls of a Cessna 182F Skylane when it crashed into a steep hillside in a remote area of Los Padres National Forest north of Ojai. He reported engine trouble about 9:45 p.m., authorities said.

The plane was headed from Lompoc to McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad in north San Diego County. Also killed in the crash was Greg Bacino, 56, of San Diego.

Though Martz had a lengthy disciplinary record, it can be difficult for the Federal Aviation Administration to keep reckless, incompetent or rogue pilots out of the cockpit permanently. Under federal regulations, pilots can lose their licenses for a year and get them back by successfully re-testing after the revocation period expires.

There are exceptions, however. Air transport, commercial and private pilot licenses as well as medical certificates can be revoked permanently because of drug or alcohol dependencies, serious health issues, psychological problems, lack of good moral character, criminal convictions for narcotics trafficking or knowingly installing parts in aircraft that are not Federal Aviation Administration-certified.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, Martz first lost his commercial pilot's license for a year in 1986 for flying an aircraft without a valid registration and possessing a false medical certificate — the same charge he was facing before the Santa Barbara crash.

His flight privileges were revoked again in 2004 for operating an aircraft while his pilot's license was suspended and flying within 50 feet of people and property at the Miramar Marine Corps Air Station in San Diego.

The third revocation occurred in 2009 for recklessly operating a four-passenger Bell helicopter Martz had lent to an adult film company. While at the controls and hovering over San Diego, he was captured on videotape receiving oral sex from a Swedish porn star.

The Federal Aviation Administration also has suspended Martz's license several times starting in 2002, when he lost his flight privileges for 30 days for performing aerobatics below an altitude of 1,500 feet over a populated area. A 230-day suspension followed in 2005 after he flew passengers in a helicopter he knew was damaged.

The Federal Aviation Administration also investigated Martz in 2006 for landing a helicopter on Wattles Drive in the Hollywood Hills to pick up Motley Crue drummer Tommy Lee, who wanted to go to a Nine Inch Nails concert.

No disciplinary action resulted, but the Los Angeles city attorney's office charged Martz with reckless operation of an aircraft, landing an aircraft on a public road and landing an aircraft without a permit, all misdemeanors. Frank Mateljan, a city attorney spokesman, said Martz was placed on 36 months' probation and fined $1,000 after pleading guilty to a lesser charge.

Three years later while transporting Lee again, Martz was forced to land his helicopter at Van Nuys Airport after he reportedly flew very close to a Los Angeles police chopper. Authorities said Martz took a Breathalyzer test to determine if he was intoxicated, but it was inconclusive.

Original article can be found here: http://www.latimes.com


David Keith Martz


SANTA BARBARA — The bodies of two San Diego men were found Friday in a plane that crashed in a remote area of the Los Padres National Forest in Santa Barbara County en route to Carlsbad.

Santa Barbara County authorities identified the pilot as David Keith Martz, 58, with passenger Birger Greg Bacino, 56. Martz, a long-time fixed wing and helicopter pilot in San Diego, has a record of having his pilot's license revoked or suspended.

Bacino had hired Martz, a commercial pilot, to fly him to a business meeting in San Luis Obispo and they were in a plane rented in San Diego, authorities said.

They were flying from Lompoc to McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad when they ran into trouble, authorities said.

The single-engine Cessna 182 reported losing engine power about 18 miles northeast of Santa Barbara about 9:45 p.m. Thursday, said Ian Gregor, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

A Mayday call was received, Hoover said.

The Civil Air Patrol reported in a statement that the plane left San Luis Obispo County Regional Airport at 8:30 p.m. Thursday.

The wreckage was spotted from the air about 4:30 a.m. Friday, said Kelly Hoover, spokeswoman for the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office. Because of the rugged terrain, search and rescue crews could not reach the plane until about 7 a.m., she said.

Initially, only the pilot’s body was found in the plane. The second victim was located in the wreckage later Friday, she said.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the crash.

According to public records, Martz had his pilot’s license either revoked or suspended at least four times since 1986. He made headlines for stunts that included landing a helicopter in front of rocker Tommy Lee’s home in the Hollywood Hills, and filming himself engaging in a sex act with a woman while flying a helicopter over San Diego.

Original article can be found here: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com

Plane crash victims’ questionable pasts:


Cal Coast News
By KAREN VELIE
August 9, 2015

The two men identified in a plane crash in the backcountry of Santa Barbara have been identified as a San Diego pilot and a businessman, both of whom have questionable backgrounds.

The pilot, David Keith Martz, 58, and his passenger, 56-year-old Birger Greg Bacino died in the Thursday night crash. Officials said Bacino had hired Martz, a commercial pilot, to fly him to a business meeting in San Luis Obispo in a plane rented in San Diego.

Since 1986, Martz license has been revoked or suspended four times, once for having sex while piloting a helicopter. Martz made headlines in 2009 for filming porn star Puma Swede performing oral sex on him as they flew over San Diego.

In 2010, Bacino plead guilty to workers compensation fraud, according to the Claims Journal.

According to court records, Bacino had been a successful trial lawyer when he decided to change occupations and became a real estate developer heavily involved in health care management. After several years, Bacino plead guilty to a criminal charge of capping (capping is illegal ambulance chasing).

In 2014, La Jolla Bank contested Bacino’s bankruptcy filing seeking relief of more than $14 million owed to the bank. The bank claimed Bacino’s bankruptcy filing should not result in discharging his debt because of Bacino’s false statements or fraud, according to a 2014 court decision in which a judge ruled in favor of the bank.

In 2015, Bacino started Ftlb LLC, a medical management company.

Last week, Martz flew Bacino to San Luis Obispo for a business meeting. On their return flight, Martz left the San Luis Obispo airport at about 9 p.m. and reported engine trouble shortly before their plane crashed in the Los Padres National Forest.

Story and comments:   http://calcoastnews.com

UPDATE 5:00 p.m.: The Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office says two men were killed in the plane crash in rural Santa Barbara County on Thursday night.

The second victim was found with the help of Sheriff's Search and Rescue team members and County Air Support personnel in a remote area near Don Victor Trail. 

Both men are believed to be in their 50s or 60s. Their names have not yet been released.

UPDATE 10:30 a.m.: The Federal Aviation Administration has released preliminary information about the plane crash north of Ojai Thursday night.

The pilot of a single-engine Cessna 182 was flying from Lompoc to McClellan-Palomar Airport in Carlsbad. At approximately 9:45 p.m. Thursday, the pilot reported a loss of engine power about 18 miles northeast of Santa Barbara, according to the FAA's Lynn Lunsford.

The Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office confirmed the pilot, who was the only person on board, was killed earlier this morning. Ventura County Fire says the crash site is in a remote area north of Jameson Lake, which is 30-40 miles north of Ojai.

As of now the identity of the pilot is still unknown as crews are dealing with steep, rugged terrain and working to retrieve the deceased to make a positive identification, according to the Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Office. A name will be released as soon as next of kin is notified.

The FAA and NTSB will investigate the crash.

UPDATE 8:30 a.m.: More information is being released about a plane crash in Santa Barbara County Thursday night.

The Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office confirms a pilot was killed when a small aircraft, which Ventura County Fire says is a Cessna 182, crashed north of Jameson Lake, which is 30-40 miles north of Ojai.

Multiple agencies were initially called out to assist in the search after the Mayday report came in at around 10:00 p.m. of the plane experiencing engine trouble. It was unknown for hours what county the plane was in or if it had crashed into the ocean.

The Sheriff’s Office says emergency locator transmissions were used to locate the plane on land in a remote area near the Don Victor Trail. The wreckage was spotted at around 4:30 a.m. Friday.

Crews were unable to access the crash site until close to 7:00 a.m. due to the rugged terrain, officials say. Once they were on scene, they say the pilot’s body was discovered.

The identity of the pilot was unknown as of 8:00 a.m. and the NTSB is being called out to handle the crash investigation.

UPDATE: 6:45 a.m.: Emergency crews responded to a report of a small plane that went down in Santa Barbara County late Thursday night. Officials said at least one person was on the Cessna 182 when it crashed.

The plane was found Friday morning by Ventura County Fire near the Don Victor campground just north of Jameson Lake. This area is about 30 to 40 miles north of Ojai.

Capt. Mike Lindbery with Ventura County Fire said the plane is a Cessna 182.

According to air traffic control, the plane was en route to San Diego.

Search crews from both Santa Barbara and Ventura counties combed the area surrounding Mono Creek in the Los Padres National Forest all night. It's a rugged area, so Santa Barbara County Fire said it searched from New Cuyama to Summerland.

The U.S. Coast Guard is no longer involved in the search.

Original article can be found here: http://www.ksby.com

Robinson R44 II Raven, Jaybird Air LLC, N843JB: Accident occurred March 23, 2016 at Cape Fear Regional Jetport/Howie Franklin Field Airport (KSUT), Oak Island, Brunswick County, North Carolina

JAYBIRD AIR LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N843JB

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Greensboro FSDO-39


NTSB Identification: GAA16CA160
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, March 23, 2016 in Oak Island, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/01/2016
Aircraft: ROBINSON R44, registration: N843JB
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The flight instructor reported that the student pilot was asked to conduct several solo "pickups and set downs" on a grass area at the airport. The flight instructor exited the helicopter and observed the student pilot pick the helicopter up to a hover and set the helicopter back on the ground without incident. During the second iteration, the flight instructor observed the helicopter achieve a hover at 5 to 8 feet above ground level for several seconds. She reported that the helicopter then slowly yawed to the right and continued turning to the right until it was 270 degrees from its original heading.

The helicopter began to lose altitude, move forward, and the skids impacted the ground. She reported that the helicopter bounced back into the air after impacting the ground and rolled slightly to the left. The helicopter then abruptly rolled to the right, the nose came down, the main rotor blades impacted the ground, and the helicopter came to rest on its right side. After the impact, the flight instructor reported that she crawled inside of the cockpit to turn off the engine. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, main rotor system, tailboom, and horizontal stabilizer. 

The student pilot reported that he did not recall the accident sequence of events. The flight instructor reported that after the accident, while at the hospital with the student pilot, he reported to her that "I should have been able to control it [the helicopter]." 

The flight instructor verified that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector who responded to the accident site, reported that he did not notice any mechanical control issues with the helicopter. He also reported that the engine had no signs of any issues and that witnesses stated that after the helicopter impacted the ground, the engine was still running.

As a safety recommendation, the flight instructor reported that her organization will increase the time allotment in their training syllabus to allow more emphasis to be placed on the importance of light control inputs and the catastrophic results that can occur from over controlling and abrupt inputs, particularly at a hover. 

The FAA has published the Helicopter Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-21 (2012). This handbook discusses techniques for hovering and states in part:

To maintain the helicopter in a stabilized hover, make small, smooth, coordinated corrections.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's failure to maintain a stabilized hover, resulting in a loss of control and an impact with terrain.




BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC (WECT) -  The Federal Aviation Administration has released a report following a helicopter crash in Oak Island back in March.

According to airport officials, Wayne Page, 65, was operating a Robinson R-44 helicopter when it crashed in a field at the Cape Fear Regional Jetport on March 23.

The FAA’s investigation report states the student pilot was asked to conduct several solo “pickups and set downs” on a grassy area at the airport. The first attempt was successful. However, during the second attempt, the instructor observed the helicopter as it “slowly yawed” to the right while hovering about five to eight feet above ground level. The chopper continued turning to the right until it was 270 degrees from its original heading.

The report states the helicopter started to lose altitude. It moved forward and the aircraft’s skids impacted the ground.

The instructor told FAA investigators it bounced back into the air after hitting the ground and rolled slightly to the left. The helicopter then rolled to the right and the nose came down causing the main rotor blades to hit the ground.

The helicopter eventually landed on its right side.

Page walked away from the accident with minor injuries.

According to witnesses at the scene, the engine was still running after the helicopter crashed. The report states the instructor was able to crawl inside the helicopter to turn off the engine.

The helicopter had “substantial” damage to the fuselage, main rotor system, tailboom and horizontal stabilizer.

Page reportedly could not remember the sequence of events from the accident, but he told the instructor at the hospital that he “should have been able to control it.”

There were no reported pre-impact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have affected the normal operation of the helicopter.

As a safety recommendation, the flight instructor has increased the time allotment in the training syllabus. More emphasis will be put on the light control inputs and catastrophic results that can happen from over controlling and abrupt moves, particularly when the helicopter is hovering.

According to the FAA’s Helicopter Flying Handbook, pilots should make “small, smooth and coordinated corrections” so they can maintain the helicopter in a stabilized hover.


A helicopter crash reported in Brunswick County sent one man to the hospital on Wednesday morning.

According to Kathleen Bergan, spokeswoman with the Federal Aviation Administration, a Robinson R44 helicopter crashed in a grassy area at Cape Fear Regional Jetport/Howie Franklin Field, 4109 Long Beach Road, near Oak Island at about 11:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Along with emergency personnel, Oak Island Police, N.C. State Highway Patrol and Brunswick County Sheriff’s Office, were among the local agencies that responded to the scene. According to John Clary, assistant manager at Cape Fear Regional Jetport, the pilot was training and is in the airport’s training school.

The pilot was taking off from the ground when it crashed from about 20 feet, Clary said. The pilot, whose identity has not been released, was taken to New Hanover Regional Medical Center and was later released from the hospital on Wednesday with “scratches and bruises,” Clary said.

Local authorities will release the name and condition of the pilot, Bergan said. The pilot was the only person on board the helicopter. The FAA is investigating and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine probable cause, which according to Bergan could take months. 

Original article can be found here:  http://portcitydaily.com