Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Pilots: Firing of Allegiant Air pilot for St. Pete-Clearwater emergency landing endangers public

Allegiant Air's termination of a pilot who ordered the evacuation of an aircraft last year at St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport endangers the public because other pilots might hesitate in an emergency for fear of being second-guessed.

That is according to pre-trial testimony of Allegiant pilots, made public late Monday, in the lawsuit against Allegiant filed by the fired pilot, Jason Kinzer, in Nevada state court. Pilots also said they would have done the same as Kinzer presented with the same circumstances — evacuate the airplane.

Pilot Cameron Graff testified that Kinzer's dismissal was a warning by the Las Vegas-based airline to its pilots, who were then engaged through their union in bitter contract negotiations with Allegiant.

"It's my opinion that Capt. Kinzer was terminated to quell the pilot group, to silence the pilot group, to ... keep the pilots from reporting safety events, emergencies, those type of events," said Graff, a pilots' union leader.

"That type of message I would say is dangerous to the public safety because it puts pilots in a position where they don't report safety issues, they don't report mechanical issues. They may even hesitate at a time they need to evacuate ... and having more on their minds that, 'Am I going to be second-guessed for getting these people off the airplane safely? And will I be terminated?' "

That had real world implications last August, according to testimony, when an Allegiant aircraft's elevator — a critical control surface on the plane's tail — jammed during a flight's take-off roll, causing the aircraft's nose to rise prematurely at a speed of more than 130 mph.

The pilot successfully aborted takeoff, later reporting that the aircraft probably would have crashed if it had become airborne.

Allegiant pilot Michael Bastianelli testified in the Kinzer case that he spoke to the pilot who aborted that takeoff.

"He told us his first thought (was) ... 'If I initiate this abort, I'm going to get called in for another meeting,'" Bastianelli said. "And he said — he's very upset about that because he lost three to four seconds of time as that thought went through his head, and that ate up an extra thousand foot of runway or so."

Excerpts of testimony by Graff and several other Allegiant pilots are attached as exhibits in a motion filed by Kinzer's attorneys opposing Allegiant's motion to dismiss the case. No trial date is yet set in the lawsuit that argues Kinzer was unjustly fired. Allegiant says Kinzer displayed poor judgment and did not need to evacuate the plane.

Allegiant officials did not respond Tuesday to a request for comment by the Tampa Bay Times.

Kinzer, then 43, was flying Flight 864 that departed the Pinellas County airport with 141 passengers on June 8, 2015 bound for Hagerstown, Md., when flight attendants reported acrid smoke in the cabin. The pilot declared an emergency and returned to the airport.

Evacuation chutes were deployed upon landing. Eight people suffered minor injuries in the evacuation. The most-serious injury was a broken wrist.

The motion said pilots were told by someone in airport Fire Rescue upon landing, "I'm showing smoke on the No. 1 engine."

Allegiant's operating manual for pilots mandates an evacuation even with just the "possibility of a fire," the motion said. The motion said confusion among Fire Rescue personnel also contributed to the decision to evacuate. An unidentified person with Fire Rescue told the crew not to evacuate, but then Fire Rescue failed to respond when Kinzer tried repeatedly to contact them, the motion said.

The pilots worried they did not respond because they were too busy fighting a fire, the motion said.

Greg Baden, a pilot who was Allegiant's vice president of operations when Kinzer was fired, acknowledged that he believed Kinzer's motivation in evacuating the aircraft was passenger safety.

Referring to the older, MD-80 Kinzer was flying, Baden said, "It's a 40-year-old airplane and the tolerances aren't as tight as they should be."

Several Allegiant pilots deposed in the case said they would have evacuated the aircraft just as Kinzer had.

"Given the same information he had at the time, I probably would have made the exact same decision," said pilot Gary Hasterok, he attended an Allegiant review board meeting investigating the emergency landing.

He said that during Allegiant's formal review of the case that its "agenda was to transfer blame from the company to the pilot, and they weren't really interested in what Capt. Kinzer had to say. It seemed they already made up their mind" to fire him.

Original article can be found here:  http://www.tampabay.com

Piper PA-32R-301T Saratoga II TC, Ostrans LLC, N269Z: Incident occurred July 19, 2016 at Buffalo Niagara International Airport (KBUF), Buffalo, Erie County, New York

OSTRANS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N269Z

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Rochester FSDO-23

Date: 19-JUL-16
Time: 18:34:00Z
Regis#: N269Z
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA32R
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: BUFFALO
State: New York

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, BUFFALO, NEW YORK.



CHEEKTOWAGA, N.Y. (WKBW) - Crews are currently responding to an emergency at the Buffalo Niagara International Airport.

It appears a small aircraft had problems landing.

According to the NFTA, the plane was being used for a training flight and was occupied by a student pilot and a trainer.

The landing gear failed to deploy and the plane made a "belly landing."

There are no injuries reported at this time.

Story and video:  http://www.wkbw.com



CHEEKTOWAGA, NY-A flight instructor and student pilot were not hurt after their single engine plane made a hard landing Tuesday afternoon at the Buffalo Niagara International Airport.

NFTA spokesperson Doug Hartmayer says the aircraft's wheels failed to deploy during landing, causing the plane to land on its belly and skid to a stop.

The identities of the two people involved were not available.

Hartmayer says the airport operations were not affected by the incident.

Story and video:  http://www.wgrz.com

Cessna 182J Skylane, N2644F: Accident occurred July 19, 2016 near Parker County Airport (KWEA), Weatherford, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fort Worth, Texas 
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket  - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N2644F

Location: Weatherford, TX
Accident Number: CEN16LA270
Date & Time: 07/19/2016, 0903 CDT
Registration: N2644F
Aircraft: CESSNA 182J
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (partial)
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 19, 2016, at 0903 central daylight time, a Cessna 182J airplane, N2644F, experienced a loss of engine power after departure and the pilot conducted a forced landing to a field near Weatherford, Texas. The private pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries and the second passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which was operated without a flight plan. The flight was departing from Parker County Airport (WEA), Weatherford, TX, and was en route to Pecos Municipal Airport (PEQ), Pecos, Texas.

The pilot reported that he had departed from Denton Enterprise Airport (DTO), Denton, Texas, which was about 36 miles northeast of WEA. He landed at WEA and two passengers boarded the airplane while the engine continued to operate. He then taxied to the runway and noted that all the instruments showed normal operations, including the JPI engine data monitor (EDM) 700. He extended the flaps 10° for takeoff, increased the engine power to 29 inches of engine manifold pressure and 2,600 rpm, and lifted off at 60 to 65 mph. After takeoff, he retracted the flaps and noticed that the avionics turned off. He cycled the avionics master switch, but the avionics did not turn on again. About 40 seconds after takeoff while 300 to 500 ft above ground level, the engine experienced a loss of power. He attempted to troubleshoot the loss of power and to restart the engine; the engine restarted for about two seconds and then lost power again. The pilot did not remember if the engine ever experienced a total loss of power since he was concentrating on flying the airplane. He also did not remember if he ever pulled the boost cutoff control. He did not continue to troubleshoot the issue since his altitude was low and made a shallow bank towards a field for an emergency landing. During the landing, the airplane collided with a barbed wire fence, continued into a field, impacted several trees and came to rest on a road. When the airplane came to rest, the pilot noted that fuel was pouring out of the fuel tanks all over the occupants. The pilot and two passengers exited the airplane.

A witness, who was working in a field north of the accident site, stated that he heard an airplane engine overhead. He observed the accident airplane in a descent, apparently attempting to land in a pasture when it hit a fence in the middle of the pasture (figure 1). He called 911 and drove to the accident site. He observed three occupants who were already out of the airplane and noticed that fuel was pouring out of the wings onto the ground.

The pilot stated to a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, that one of the passengers recalled hearing the engine regain power just before touching down in the field.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 49, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/27/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/27/2015
Flight Time: 139 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N2644F
Model/Series: 182J -
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1966
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18256744
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/20/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6336.5 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R25A
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

A Forced Aeromotive Technologies (FAT) supercharger was installed on the airplane in May 2004 under supplemental type certificate (STC) SE10233SC and STC SA10232SC.

On June 20, 2016, an annual inspection was completed at a tachometer time of 2,245.3 hours. During the inspection the maintenance personnel "checked and adjusted supercharger belt as per Force Air Tech service instructions." 

The pilot stated he was not trained of the operation of the supercharger by the manufacturer or the previous airplane owner after he purchased the airplane, nor was he required to do so. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KNFW, 608 ft msl
Observation Time: 0852 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 78°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 25000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 22°C
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 130°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Weatherford, TX (WEA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: PECOS, TX (PEQ)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0901 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: PARKER COUNTY (WEA)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 991 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2892 ft / 40 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 32.727222, -97.682222 (est) 

The responding FAA inspector reported that the left wing was folded over the top of the fuselage and the right wing was bent aft. The top of the cabin area had been opened and displaced aft. The fuselage was bent upward near the front seats. 

Accident airplane

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine was conducted by the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge (IIC), with technical representatives from Textron Aviation and Continental Motors, after recovery from the accident site. The engine was intact with no noticeable external damage. It was equipped with a FAT belt driven supercharger system that included two fuel boost pumps between the airframe fuel line and the engine carburetor. The top spark plugs and cylinder rocker covers were removed and the crankshaft was manually rotated with continuity confirmed to all cylinders and to the rear of the engine. The chromed cylinders were examined using a lighted borescope; all cylinder domes and pistons exhibited normal combustion deposits. All intake and exhaust valves were in place and free to move; suction and compression was confirmed in each cylinder. The magneto timing was checked and both magnetos were found to be timed at 22° before top dead center, which was normal timing. The top spark plugs exhibited normal wear signatures and dark deposits in the electrode areas. The air intake filter was clean and clear. The oil filter was in place and not damaged. The filter was opened and contained no debris or metal deposits in the filter element. The propeller remained attached to the crankshaft. Both propeller blades were bent and twisted aft and exhibited chordwise scratches and polishing. The cowl flap lever was positioned to OPEN. The carburetor heat control knob was full forward. The boost cutoff control knob was full forward and was not labeled on the instrument panel. The rudder and elevator flight control cables were continuous and undamaged. The left and right wings had been removed during the recovery process. The aileron flight control cables exhibited multiple overload separations. One portion of the left aileron control cable had been cut during the recovery process.

The flap motor was energized with an external battery and operated the flaps normally. The flaps were found extended 10°. Due to impact damage and the displacement of the airplane during recovery the entire electrical system could not be functionally tested.

An engine test run was conducted by the NTSB IIC and technical representatives from Textron Aviation, Continental Motors, and FAT. Prior to the test run procedures, the engine was examined. The gascolator screen was removed and was clean and clear of contaminants. The fuel inlet screen was removed from the carburetor and contained a small amount of multicolor organic material similar to tree leaves. The airplane had been stored outdoors at the storage facility.

An external fuel source was connected to the airframe fuel line and the engine was started and test run several times. The engine operated at full power performance according to the STC operating specifications. The alternator inoperative and low fuel pressure lights were pressed and illuminated as expected. The lights did not illuminate during the engine test runs. The ammeter remained near zero and did not show a discharge.

After the test runs were completed the carburetor was removed and examined. The carburetor was in place and not damaged. The throttle and mixture controls remained connected appropriately and were free to move. The unit was disassembled and the bowl was clean and clear. The floats and needle valve were attached and were free to move. The needle valve seat was clean and clear.

Also following the test runs, the engine cowling was opened to facilitate further examination of the engine compartment. The supercharger drive belt was installed on the idler gear inside out.

Additional Information

FAT Supercharger Information

The Airplane Flight Manual Supplement (AFMS) states that the supercharger supplies boosted engine induction air (figure 3) so it is necessary to boost fuel pressure to ensure an unimpeded flow of fuel through the carburetor. The two fuel pumps supply fuel to the carburetor at the required pressure. Either pump will independently supply sufficient fuel pressure for engine operation, but two are installed to provide backup in case of a pump failure. According to the STC manufacturer, as the fuel level in the carburetor changes, air flows in and out of the fuel bowl through a passage inside the mouth of the carburetor. When the supercharger is installed, this air passage becomes pressurized and at power levels above 1,700 rpm, the pressurized air in the fuel bowl pushes the fuel out and back to the fuel tank. The electric fuel boost pumps counter the air pressure so that the fuel enters the float chamber correctly.

FAT Supercharger Diagram

The AFMS further states that in the event of a complete electrical failure (alternator or battery), the engine can be operated using gravity-fed fuel at un-boosted manifold pressure using the boost cutoff control. When the boost cutoff control is pulled, pressurized air from the supercharger is dumped into the engine compartment before reaching the carburetor. This lowers the carburetor's requirement for pressurized fuel and allows operation as a normally-aspirated engine. The STC owner added that, during a complete electrical system failure, the effect would be the same as turning off the fuel boost pumps. With the fuel boost pumps off and engine power above 1,700 rpm, the carburetor fuel bowl would empty in 5 to 10 seconds. With the fuel bowl empty, the engine would begin to lose power; as the engine rpm decreases the supercharger boost also decreases and fuel begins to enter the fuel bowl again. The engine power would surge back and the cycle would repeat. The whole cycle would take less than 10 seconds and would continue as long as fuel was available in the fuel system. The cycle could be stopped by pulling the boost cutoff control. If the engine cannot be restarted during an engine failure the boost cutoff control should be pulled.

According to the AFMS, the maximum manifold pressure is 28 inches of mercury. The boost cutoff control is used only in emergency situations whenever both fuel boost pumps become inoperative.

Engine Failure Procedures

If the engine failure in-flight procedures are unsuccessful in restarting the engine, and the low fuel pressure light is illuminated, the AFMS states the following:

Boost Cutoff – Pull Fully
Mixture – Full Rich
Propeller – Full
Throttle – Full
Power – See Warning Below
Follow in-flight low fuel pressure procedures to land as soon as practical

WARNING: To increase power, use the throttle first. When full throttle is reached and more power is needed, slowly push in the boost cutoff control, but no not exceed boost cutoff manifold pressure limitations. To decrease power, pull the boost cutoff control first. When boost cutoff control is out fully and a further reduction in power is needed, use the throttle control to reduce power. If this is not followed, engine power fluctuations may occur. If power fluctuations do occur, pull boost cutoff control out fully and apply full throttle, then continue making power changes as described above.

Excerpts from the AFMS can be found in the public docket associated with this accident report.

JPI Engine Data Monitor (EDM) 700

The EDM was downloaded by the NTSB Recorders Laboratory. The recorded data revealed that the engine parameters were all normal. There were several noticeable voids in the data indicative of electrical power interruptions to the device. The final electrical power interruption occurred from 09:01:47 to 09:04:37, which was during the time of the accident.

The EMD was downloaded again after the engine test runs. The data did not reveal any anomalies and the battery voltage was 13 to 15 volts, which is a normal voltage.

Garmin Aera 796 GPS

The GPS was downloaded by the NTSB Recorders Laboratory. The recorded data revealed 12 sessions, which included the two flights on the accident day. The accident flight data was plotted for geographical representation.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA270
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, July 19, 2016 in Weatherford, TX
Aircraft: CESSNA 182J, registration: N2644F
Injuries: Unavailable

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 19, 2016, about 0900 central daylight time, a Cessna 182J, N2644F, experienced a loss of engine power after departure and the pilot conducted a forced landing to a field near Weatherford, Texas. The private rated pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries, another passenger sustained serious injuries. The airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a flight plan. The flight was departing from Parker County Airport (WEA), Weatherford, TX and was en route to Pecos Municipal Airport (PEQ), Pecos, Texas. 

The pilot reported that he previously departed from Denton Enterprise Airport (DTO), Denton, Texas, which was about 36 miles northeast of WEA. He landed at WEA and his two passengers boarded airplane on the right side while the engine continued to run. He then taxied to the runway and noted that all the instruments showed normal operations, including the engine data monitor (EDM) 700. He applied 10 degrees of flaps for takeoff, noted 29 inches of engine manifold pressure and 2,600 RPM, and lifted off at 60 to 65 mph. After takeoff he retracted the flaps and noticed that the avionics turned off. He cycled the avionics master switch, but the avionics did not turn on again. Seconds later, about 300 to 400 ft above ground level, the engine experienced a total loss of power. He attempted to troubleshoot the loss of power and to restart the engine; the engine restarted for about two seconds and then lost power again. The pilot made a shallow bank towards a field for an emergency landing. During the landing, the airplane collided with a fence and redirected the airplane to the right. The airplane continued into a group of trees and came to rest on a road. When the airplane came to rest, the pilot noted that fuel was pouring all over the occupants. The pilot and two passengers egressed from the airplane. 

A witness to the accident stated he was working in a field north of the accident site when he heard the sound of an airplane engine overhead. He observed the airplane in a descent and it attempted to land in a pasture when it hit a fence in the middle of the pasture. He called 911 and drove to the accident site. He observed three occupants who were already out of the airplane and noticed that fuel was pouring out of the wings onto the ground. 

The photos from the responding Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the left wing was folded over the top of the fuselage and the right wing was bent aft. The top of the cabin area had been opened and displaced aft. The fuselage was bent upward near the front seats. 

The airplane has been retained for further examination.





Three men were transported to the hospital Tuesday morning following a plane crash south of the Parker County Airport. 

The Texas Department of Public Safety responded to the report of a downed plane around 9 a.m.

The three plane occupants, ages 51, 49 and 25, were transported to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Wort with undisclosed injuries, according to DPS. 

Their names were not released. 

The plane, a fixed-wing, single-engine Cessna 182J Skylane, appeared to have come to rest in the middle of Tackett Lane underneath several trees, with a bent wing and other obvious damage. 

The Federal Aviation Administration investigator was en route to the scene, according to DPS. 

David Byrom, of Aubrey, along with Lynn Singletary, were listed as the owners of the plane. 

Source:   http://www.weatherforddemocrat.com





Officials with the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) troopers were notified at 9 a. m. Tuesday of a downed aircraft on Tackett Lane, south of the Parker County Airport, just off of Bankhead Highway.

There were three occupants on board at the time of the incident. All three males, ages 51, 49, and 25, were transported to John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth with undisclosed injuries.

The aircraft is a Cessna 182J Skylane, fixed wing, single engine.

The Federal Aviation Administration has an investigator en route to the scene to conduct an investigation. DPS troopers will remain at the location to secure the scene.

Source: http://www.star-telegram.com




WEATHERFORD — Three people were transported to a Fort Worth hospital after a Cessna 182J Skylane plane crashed on Tackett Lane, just south of the Parker County Airport.

According to Lonny Haschel, a spokesman with the Texas Department of Public Safety, all three were men, ages 51, 49, and 25. Authorities haven't released their identities or their conditions. 

The FAA is investigating the crash.

Nelson Woody, N525AG: Accident occurred July 18, 2016 at Hope Municipal Airport (M18), Hempstead County, Arkansas

http://registry.faa.gov/N525AG

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Little Rock FSDO-11


NTSB Identification: CEN16LA271
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 18, 2016 in Hope, AR
Aircraft: GERALD NELSON NELSON WOODY, registration: N525AG
Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 18, 2016, about 0930 central standard time, a Nelson Woody homebuilt experimental airplane, N525AG, registered to the pilot, sustained substantial damage after veering off the runway during landing rollout at the Hope Municipal Airport (M18), Hope, Arkansas. The private pilot sustained serious injuries and one passenger sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was being conducted under the provisions of Federal Code of Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed throughout the vicinity and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from M18 about 0900.

According to local responders, the airplane was conducting touch and go landings at M18 on runway 16. Upon a normal touchdown, the aircraft veered to the left off the runway surface. There were ground impressions of the left wingtip striking the ground and propeller marks on the ground. Evidence showed that the airplane bounced after it departed the runway and impacted the ground resulting in substantial damage to the wings and fuselage. Both occupants exited the aircraft and the pilot was transported to a local hospital for his injuries.

AIRCRAFT, EXPERIMENTAL WOODY, ON LANDING WENT OFF THE RUNWAY AND BROKE APART, HOPE, ARKANSAS. 


UPDATE - Both men remain hospitalized with broken bones and lacerations.


HOPE – A small aircraft crash just before noon Monday, injured two men with non-life threatening injuries.


Details on what caused the crash are unavailable as of now; whether a FAA or NTSB investigation will be required is unknown at this time.


Both men were transported to local hospitals.

Stinson 108-2 Voyager, N343C, Eagles Nest Motel and Car Rental: Accident occurred July 18, 2016 at Haines Airport (PAHN), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Eagles Nest Motel and Car Rental: http://registry.faa.gov/N343C

NTSB Identification: ANC16LA048
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 18, 2016 in Haines, AK
Aircraft: STINSON 108 2, registration: N343C
Injuries: 4 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 18, 2016, about 1230 Alaska daylight time, a tailwheel-equipped Stinson 108 airplane, N343C, sustained substantial damage following a structural failure of the left main landing gear during the landing rollout at Haines Airport, Haines, Alaska. The certificated private pilot, and three passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed. The flight had departed Skagway, Alaska about 1200, destined for Haines.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on July 18, 2016, the pilot stated that he was flying three of his family members home to Haines from Skagway. Wind at the Haines Airport was reported to be a left quartering tailwind of less than 4 knots. The pilot performed a normal landing on runway 26 with the intent of exiting the runway via a right turn onto taxiway "B". About 100 feet prior to the taxiway, while at an estimated speed of 20 mph, the airplane turned unexpectedly to the right and made a rapid 180 degree turn. The pilot applied left brake pressure but the right turn continued. About halfway through the turn, the pilot felt two lurching events in succession and then felt the left main landing gear fold up under the aircraft. The left wing and propeller struck the runway surface and the airplane collapsed onto the left side of fuselage. The pilot stated that there were no environmental or performance issues that should have precipitated a ground loop. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing, left lift strut and lower fuselage. 

A postaccident examination by the pilot revealed that the left landing gear leg separated in two places with the first near the axle and the second near the upper shock strut attachment points. The left wheel separated from the assembly and both the wheel assembly and axle were located about 10 feet in front of the propeller. Photographic evidence revealed extensive corrosion on the inner sleeve of the fractured axle. 

A subsequent inspection of runway 26 revealed 2 lines of black tire marks that were consistent with a right turn during braking action. An estimated 25-foot-long ground scar was consistent with bare metal scraping that trailed from about 110 degrees magnetic, prior to the final airplane resting location.

The axle and hub assembly have been retained and a detailed examination is pending. 


The closest weather reporting facility is Haines Airport, Haines, Alaska. At 1154, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) from the Haines Airport was reporting in part: wind from 150 degrees at 3 knots; sky condition, clear; visibility, 10 statute miles; temperature 70 degrees F; dew point 57 degrees F; barometric pressure 29.90inHG.
======

HAINES, Alaska (KTUU) A non-injury plane crash caused the Haines Airfield to close for about an hour and a half Monday, according to Alaska State Troopers.

Troopers observed the small, apparently damaged plane 12:25 p.m. and contacted the pilot and passengers, according to a dispatch posted online. While no one was hurt, pilot Shane Horton told troopers that the landing gear had buckled during landing. The wing and prop struck the ground.


The FAA, National Transportation Safety Board and state Transportation Department were notified, and the plane was photographed before removal from the runway, troopers wrote. The plane is a Stinson 108-2, according to FAA records.


http://www.ktuu.com

Piper PA-28-161, Silver Express Co. dba, N143ND: Incident occurred July 18, 2016 in Orlando, Orange County, Florida

SILVER EXPRESS CO DBA:   http://registry.faa.gov/aN143ND

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Orlando FSDO-15

AIRCRAFT ON RAMP, ON START UP ENGINE CAUGHT FIRE, ORLANDO, FLORIDA


Date: 19-JUL-16
Time: 02:22:00Z
Regis#: N143ND
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA28
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: STANDING (STD)
City: ORLANDO
State: Florida

Cessna 172S, TMC Aviation LLC, N128RM: Accident occurred July 18, 2016 in Chesterfield, Missouri

TMC AVIATION LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N128RM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA St. Louis FSDO-62


Aviation Accident Final Report  -   National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary -   National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA16CA386
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 18, 2016 in Chesterfield, MO
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/05/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N128RM
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The student pilot reported that on the second landing during her first solo flight, the airplane porpoised. On the second bounce the nose wheel impacted first, which resulted in substantial damage to the firewall. The student pilot reported that she taxied the airplane to the tie down area without further incident. 

According to the student pilot there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

The Federal Aviation Administration has published the Airplane Flying Handbook FAA-H-8083-3A (2004). This handbook discusses porpoising and states in part:

In a bounced landing that is improperly recovered, the airplane comes in nose first setting off a series of motions that imitate the jumps and dives of a porpoise—hence the name. The problem is improper airplane attitude at touchdown, sometimes caused by inattention, not knowing where the ground is, mistrimming or forcing the airplane onto the runway.

Ground effect decreases elevator control effectiveness and increases the effort required to raise the nose. Not enough elevator or stabilator trim can result in a nose low contact with the runway and a porpoise develops.

Porpoising can also be caused by improper airspeed control. Usually, if an approach is too fast, the airplane floats and the pilot tries to force it on the runway when the airplane still wants to fly. A gust of wind, a bump in the runway, or even a slight tug on the control wheel will send the air plane aloft again. 

The corrective action for a porpoise is the same as for a bounce and similarly depends on its severity. When it is very slight and there is no extreme change in the airplane's pitch attitude, a follow-up landing may be executed by applying sufficient power to cushion the subsequent touchdown, and smoothly adjusting the pitch to the proper touchdown attitude.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The student pilot's improper pitch control during the landing flare, which resulted in a porpoise and substantial damage to the firewall.

Cessna 172, N8184B: Accident occurred July 17, 2016 in Emmett, Gem County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8184B

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Boise FSDO-11

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8184B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146B
14 CFR operation of Unknown
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/12/2016
Aircraft: UNKNOWN UNKNOWN, registration: unknown
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot of a red and white Cessna was conducting a personal local flight. The pilot reported that, about 10 minutes into the flight, the pilot of an unknown aircraft contacted him over the airport’s common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) and stated “we almost got you.” However, the pilot later reported that he had not heard any previous communications from other aircraft in the local area on the CTAF, that he did not observe any aircraft nearby at the time of the radio call, and that he did not feel any sudden movement of the airplane, so he chose to continue the flight. He landed about 40 minutes later at his originating airport. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the rudder, which displayed a lateral tear and a blue paint mark at the trailing edge of the control surface. Although the pilot did not feel any sudden movement of the airplane, the blue paint mark and rudder damage indicates that his airplane’s rudder was contacted by another object during the flight.

The unknown pilot’s statement, “we almost got you,” suggests that the unknown pilot also might not have been aware that the two aircraft actually collided; however, this could not be confirmed because the pilot and other aircraft were never identified.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of both pilots to see and avoid each other during cruise flight, which resulted in a midair collision.

On July 17, 2016, about 0930 mountain daylight time, a red and white colored Cessna 172 airplane, N8184B, was substantially damaged during a mid-air collision near Emmett, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Emmett Municipal Airport (S78), Emmett, Idaho, at approximately 0920. 

According to the pilot, he departed runway 28, and flew the left hand traffic pattern during his ascent to 3,500 feet mean sea level. After he exited the traffic pattern on the downwind leg, the pilot flew east for approximately 2 miles and then turned northeast. About 10 minutes into the uneventful flight, he received a radio call from another airplane on the airport's Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) that stated "aircraft east of Emmett…we almost got you." The pilot had not observed any aircraft in his range of view and elected to continue the flight. He landed about 40 minutes later and parked the airplane, but as he tied it down on the airport ramp, he observed a tear in the airplane's rudder, which was accompanied by a stretch of blue paint. The pilot reported that he monitored the airport CTAF, and had not heard any reports from anyone near the town of Emmett or transitioning through the town during the flight. He further stated that he did not observe any damage to the rudder before he departed. The pilot did not feel any sudden movement of the airplane between his departure and the time he received the radio call. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to the airplane rudder, which displayed a lateral tear and a blue mark at the trailing edge of the control surface. 

The other aircraft was not identified at any point during the investigation. A review of FAA radar data from 0820 and 0840 showed a total of three radar targets that passed through the town of Emmett. Two of the targets appeared as VFR primary radar targets, and did not display aircraft registration numbers. According to the pilot of the third target, identified as N471AM, he was on a cross country flight from Cascade, Idaho, to Nampa, Idaho, and was following a friend who was flying a brown and orange airplane. The pilot stated that he did not encounter a near mid-air collision at any point during the flight, and photographs of N471AM revealed that the airplane paint scheme did not contain any traces of blue consistent with the mark on the rudder of N8184B. 

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook states,

"Collision Avoidance

All pilots must be alert to the potential for midair collision and near midair collisions… This concept requires that vigilance shall be maintained at all times, by each person operating an aircraft regardless of whether the operation is conducted under instrument flight rules (IFR) or visual flight rules (VFR)…Most midair collision accidents and reported near midair collision incidents occur in good VFR weather conditions and during the hours of daylight. Most of these accident/incidents occur within 5 miles of an airport and/or near navigation aids."

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Aircraft: CESSNA 172, registration: N8184B
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 17, 2016, about 0930 mountain daylight time, a red and white colored Cessna 172 airplane, N8184B, was substantially damaged during a mid-air collision near Emmett, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Emmett Municipal Airport (S78), Emmett, Idaho at approximately 0920. 


According to the pilot, he departed runway 28 and flew the left hand traffic pattern during his ascent to 3,500 feet mean sea level. He exited the traffic pattern and flew east for approximately 2 miles after which he turned northeast. About 10 minutes into the uneventful flight, he received a radio call from another airplane on the airport's Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) that stated "aircraft east of Emmett…we almost got you." The pilot did not observe another airplane in his field of view and elected to continue the flight. After he landed about 40 minutes later, the pilot tied down the airplane and observed a tear in the airplane's rudder, which was accompanied by a stretch of blue paint. The pilot reported that he did not observe any mechanical malfunctions or anomalies at any point during the flight. 


The other airplane was not identified and a preliminary review of Federal Aviation Administration radar data did not show any aircraft that were operating in the area at the time of the radio call.


NTSB Identification: WPR16LA146B
14 CFR Unknown
Accident occurred Sunday, July 17, 2016 in Emmett, ID
Aircraft: UNKNOWN UNKNOWN, registration: unknown
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 17, 2016, about 0930 mountain daylight time, a red and white colored Cessna 172 airplane, N8184B, was substantially damaged during a mid-air collision near Emmett, Idaho. The private pilot was not injured. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Emmett Municipal Airport (S78), Emmett, Idaho at approximately 0920. 

According to the pilot, he departed runway 28 and flew the left hand traffic pattern during his ascent to 3,500 feet mean sea level. He exited the traffic pattern and flew east for approximately 2 miles after which he turned northeast. About 10 minutes into the uneventful flight, he received a radio call from another airplane on the airport's Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) that stated "aircraft east of Emmett…we almost got you." The pilot did not observe another airplane in his field of view and elected to continue the flight. After he landed about 40 minutes later, the pilot tied down the airplane and observed a tear in the airplane's rudder, which was accompanied by a stretch of blue paint. The pilot reported that he did not observe any mechanical malfunctions or anomalies at any point during the flight. 

A preliminary review of Federal Aviation Administration radar data did not show any aircraft that were operating in the area at the time of the radio call.

Aerostat crashes into Pease hangar: Only damage is to research balloon, officials say



PORTSMOUTH — An experimental tethered balloon crashed into a hangar at the Portsmouth International Airport at Pease on Friday, according to Pease Development Authority officials.

Bill Hopper, the PDA’s airport director, said the research aerostat operated by Altaeros Energies of Somerville, Mass., crashed into hangar 229.

“It did exactly what it was supposed to do from a safety standpoint. No one was hurt and it didn’t cause any damage to the hangar,” Hopper said Monday morning. “It did damage the balloon itself.”

The company, which was founded in 2010 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has a second balloon “that’s ready for flight,” Hopper said.

But the company first wants to do “a complete analysis of what took place,” Hopper said.

“They’ll be getting with the airport and we’ll make a determination on the safety going forward,” he said. “We don’t have any plans to launch in the immediate future.”

Attempts Monday to reach Altaeros Energies for comment were not successful. An email message was not returned by press time. 

The company’s website states its goal is to “deploy the world’s first commercial airborne wind turbine to harness the abundant energy in strong, steady winds at higher altitudes. Today that original vision has crystallized into helping rural and remote communities gain the benefit of state-of-the-art power, communications and other infrastructure."

The company explains on its website that “aerostats are the industrial versions of blimps and dirigibles.”

“The airborne portion, or ‘envelope’ uses helium gas to stay aloft, and is connected to a stationary ground system with a conductive tether,” the company states. “Aerostats have been deployed for decades to lift monitoring and communications systems in some of the harshest environments in the world.”

Hopper said under the agreement with the Pease airport the company can’t fly the aerostat any higher than 500 feet.

“Specifically they don’t have anybody under it because of this (risk),” Hopper said. “As long as the protocol is followed, the danger is very minimal.”

Hopper also noted the height restriction was put in place to make sure the balloon poses no danger to aircraft flying in and out of the former Pease Air Force Base.

The company is only allowed to operate the balloon at certain times and in certain weather conditions, he said.

When the balloon is operating there are “notices sent to airmen so anyone who’s flying is aware of it being up there,” Hopper said.

Hopper and David Mullen, the executive director of the Pease Development Authority, believe the balloon crashed because of high winds at the time.

The Portsmouth Herald previously reported that Altaeros Energies is aiming to develop more robust and resilient aerostat systems than those in use today. The experimental system deployed at the airport uses a helium-filled, urethane hull that is approximately 45 feet long. It is equipped with a number of environmental and inertial sensors that monitor the motion of the system in response to atmospheric conditions.

“They do know there’s always a possibility that these things could come down,” Hopper said. “They’re doing quite a bit of testing.”

Mullen said the company had to “cut a few cables” after the balloon “wrapped itself around the hangar.”

Two people from the company recovered the balloon and its tether after the crash, Hopper said.

The company lists its investors as Softbank, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD and the Suhail Bahwan Group, according to its website.

Source:   http://www.seacoastonline.com

Diamond DA40 F Diamond Star, N419FP, registered to and operated by Utah State University: Fatal accident occurred July 18, 2016 in Logan, Cache County, Utah

Frank Marino De Leon Compres

The last moments:  Compres showed up for his solo flight training with a big smile on his face. He was there early to check the maintenance of the plane before he took off.  Before he left, one of the flight instructors asked Compres which air training area he was headed to. Compres said he was headed toward the Southern flight training area in the Hyrum-Paradise area.  Frank told the flight instructor, "I’m going Paradise”. 


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
FAA; Salt Lake City, Utah
Lycoming Engines; Colorado
Diamond Aircraft Industries Inc
Utah State University; Logan, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N419FP 

Location: Logan, UT
Accident Number: WPR16FA144
Date & Time: 07/18/2016, 1105 MDT
Registration: N419FP
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA40 F
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 18, 2016, about 1105 mountain daylight time, a Diamond DA40, N419FP, impacted terrain while maneuvering near Logan, Utah. The private pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was registered to and operated by Utah State University as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated from Logan-Cache Airport (LGU), Logan, Utah, about 1034.

According to the pilot's flight instructor, the purpose of the flight was for the pilot to practice maneuvers required to obtain a commercial pilot certificate. These maneuvers included lazy 8's, 8's on pylon, steep turns, chandelles, steep spirals, and stalls.

A witness located about 1/3 mile from the accident site observed the airplane flying in slow counterclockwise circles while descending with the engine power at idle. He assumed the pilot was practicing stalls. He reported "unusual" weather that day; the wind was gusting 30-40 mph; however, in between the gusts, it was "dead calm." As the airplane continued to execute counterclockwise turns, the witness noticed it "rocking quite a bit as it descended through the gusts until it disappeared" from his sight.

A review of radar data showed that the airplane departed from runway 35 at LGU, turned south, and proceeded toward the practice area. At 1043:36, the airplane started maneuvering in the practice area at 7,300 ft mean sea level (msl). During the next 5 minutes, the airplane's altitude varied between 7,300 ft msl and 7,500 ft msl while it executed 2 counterclockwise orbits. It then completed 2 more orbits at altitudes between 7,800 ft msl and 8,200 ft msl. At 1101:48, the airplane started a clockwise orbit about 0.8 mile west of the previous flight path at 7,900 ft msl. At 1104:12, the airplane completed 3/4 of a clockwise orbit at 8,100 feet msl. At 1104:48, the airplane descended to 7,700 ft msl, and, at 1105:00, the airplane descended to 7,600 ft msl. The last recorded data point at 1105:12 showed the airplane at 6,300 ft msl. The wreckage was located on the ground below the last recorded data point.

At 1121, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration received signals from an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) near the accident site. About 2 hours later, a search and rescue team located the wreckage about 2 nautical miles east of the ELT signal's location. 



Frank Marino De Leon Compres

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 21, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied:  Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/18/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:

Flight Time:

(Estimated) 109.9 hours (Total, all aircraft), 60.1 hours (Total, this make and model), 40 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12.6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

The pilot, age 21, held a Dominican Republic private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. He did not have a Federal Aviation Administration medical certificate; all limitations and restrictions on the Dominican Republic pilot license applied. A review of the pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated about 109.9 hours of total flight time as of July 15, 2016. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC
Registration: N419FP
Model/Series: DA40 F NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 40.FC019
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/23/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2535 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6201 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A4M
Registered Owner: UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Pilot School (141) 

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing, fixed-landing-gear airplane, serial number 40.FC019, was manufactured in 2006. It was powered by a Textron Lycoming O-360-A4M engine, serial number L-40653-36E, rated at 180 horsepower. The airplane was also equipped with a Sensenich two-bladed fixed-pitch propeller, model 76EM8S10-0-63. A review of maintenance records showed that the most recent annual inspection was completed May 16, 2016, at a total aircraft time of 4,599.9 hours. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBMC, 4226 ft msl
Observation Time: 1655 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 254°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 0°C
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 17 knots/ 25 knots, 180°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LOGAN, UT (LGU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: LOGAN, UT (LGU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1034 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

The National Weather Surface (NWS) Analysis Chart for 1200 indicated a surface low pressure center southwest of the accident site near Salt Lake City, Utah, and a surface high pressure center in northwestern Colorado. At 0900, a warm front had just passed north of the accident site. With a warm frontal boundary moving northward past the accident site before the accident time and a surface low pressure and surface high pressure center areas relatively close together at the accident time, gusty low-level wind conditions would be expected over the mountainous terrain.

The NWS Storm Prediction Center Constant Pressure Charts depicted low-level troughs just southwest and northeast of the accident site. Troughs typically act as lifting mechanisms where enhanced lift, gusty winds, fronts, clouds, and precipitation can occur. Troughs and a frontal boundary close to the surface and near mountainous terrain also act to aid in the mixing of low-level air, allowing for the possibility of low-level wind shear (LLWS) and turbulence.

The closest weather station was an automated weather observing system (AWOS) located at Brigham City Airport (BMC), Brigham City, Utah, about 10 miles west-southwest of the accident site. At 1115, BMC reported wind from 180° at 17 knots with gusts to 24 knots. At 1135, BMC reported wind from 190° at 16 knots with gusts to 24 knots.

LGU, located 12 miles north of the accident site, had an automated surface observing system (ASOS). At 1051, LGU reported wind from 180° at 5 knots. At 1151, LGU reported wind from 230° at 14 knots with gusts to 31 knots.

Ogden-Hinckley Airport (OGD), Ogden, Utah, located 25 miles south-southwest of the accident site, had an ASOS with reports supplemented by air traffic control personnel. At 1053, OGD reported wind from 160° at 21 knots with gusts to 27 knots. At 1153, OGD reported wind from 160° at 23 knots with gusts to 30 knots.

The observations from BMC, LGU, and OGD surrounding the accident time indicated visual flight rules ceilings and visibilities. Each site had a south to southwest surface wind with wind gusts as high as 31 knots around the accident time. With the strong south to southwest wind over the terrain, low-level turbulence and LLWS conditions would be expected.

The closest official upper air sounding to the accident site was from Salt Lake City (SLC), Utah, located 50 miles south-southwest of the accident site. The sounding wind profile indicated a surface wind at SLC from 180° at 9 knots with an increase in wind speed to 28 knots by 4,900 ft. LLWS was identified between the surface and 5,000 ft, and several layers of clear air turbulence were indicated between the surface and 14,000 ft.

The area forecast issued at 0730, valid at the accident time, forecasted scattered clouds at 15,000 ft msl with a southwest wind gusting to 25 knots. The NWS Office in Salt Lake City issued an area forecast discussion at 0944 that discussed gusty southerly winds at the Salt Lake City Airport Terminal with possible wind gusts up to 35 mph.

According to the flight school's records, the pilot checked the weather observations for LGU. The observation recorded on the weight and balance sheet was made at 0951 and included the following weather information: wind from 330° at 6 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature of 25°C, dew point temperature of 6°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.08 inches of mercury. No records were located to indicate that the pilot obtained a weather briefing from an official weather briefing source.

For further weather information, refer to the weather study prepared by a National Transportation Safety Board staff meteorologist that is available in the public docket for this investigation. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.597500, -111.847778 (est) 

The accident site was located on the side of a hill at an elevation of 4,714 ft msl. The damage to the airplane was consistent with terrain impact in a nose-low, vertical descent with little to no forward movement, and the airplane came to rest upright on a heading of about 093° magnetic. The first point of impact identified was a 1.5-ft-deep crater consistent with propeller impact . The main wreckage consisted of the engine, cockpit, fuselage, and empennage.

The upper skin of the left wing was separated and located about 24 ft from the main wreckage. The left wingtip was attached to the upper skin portion of the wing. The rest of the left wing was fragmented; the forward and aft spars exhibited multiple deformations; and the left flap and aileron were separated from the wing. The left fuel tank was resting lengthwise along the fuselage and exhibited hydraulic crushing. The left main landing gear was attached to the wing.

The right wing remained partially attached to the fuselage. The leading edge of the wing was deformed, and the wing exhibited aft accordion crushing. The bottom surface of the wing along the leading edge was separated and deformed downward. The fuel tank was pushed aft. The right flap and aileron remained attached to the wing. The right main landing gear was separated and crushed under the right wing.

The two-blade propeller remained attached to the engine. One blade was bent about 30° aft and slightly twisted, and the other blade remained straight. Both blades exhibited chordwise scratching and nicks. The propeller spinner exhibited significant crushing.

The engine remained attached to the firewall and was resting upwards on the ground. The instrument panel remained partially attached to the firewall and was mostly destroyed by impact forces.

The front seats were crushed rearward into the back seats. The forward windscreen was fragmented, and the frame structure surrounding the forward fuselage and the cockpit area was bent, broken, and fragmented.

The forward section of the empennage remained partially attached to the aft section. The horizontal stabilizer, vertical stabilizer, elevator, and rudder remained attached to the empennage. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to all moveable flight control surfaces.

The airplane wreckage was further examined at the facilities of Precision Air Power, Woods Cross, Utah, on July 20, 2016. The examination revealed no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunction that would have precluded normal operations. For further information about the accident site and wreckage examinations, refer to the reports included in the public docket for this investigation. 

Medical And Pathological Information


The Office of the Medical Examiner at Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, Utah, completed an autopsy on the pilot and concluded that the cause of death was blunt force injuries. The Federal Aviation Administration's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. The results of the testing were negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and listed drugs.

NTSB Identification: WPR16FA144
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 18, 2016 in Logan, UT
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA40 F, registration: N419FP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 18, 2016 about 1121 mountain daylight time, a Diamond DA40, N419FP, was destroyed when it impacted terrain while maneuvering near Logan, Utah. The private pilot, the sole occupant, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Utah State University as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and no flight plan filed. The local flight originated from Logan- Cache Airport (LGU), Logan, Utah at about 1245.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reported that at 1121 they received signals of an emergency locator transmitter (ELT) ping in the vicinity of latitude/longitude position N41°35'54.87" W111°53'13.03". About 2 hours later, a search and rescue team located the wreckage 1.78 nautical miles east of the ELT signal at the elevation of 6,300 feet mean sea level . The small area of the wreckage footprint indicated that the airplane impacted terrain in a near horizontal attitude along a 093-degree magnetic bearing line. 

After the on-site documentation, the wreckage was recovered to a secured facility for further examination.







CACHE COUNTY — A Utah State University aviation student died in a plane crash Monday while flying as part of the school's pilot training program Monday afternoon.

Frank Marino De Leon Compres, 21, was flying over an area of hilly farmland between Hyrum and Paradise, according to authorities, when his single-engine, DA-40 Diamond Aircraft plane crashed just after noon.

Emergency responders found De Leon Compres dead. Nobody else was aboard the aircraft, said Cache County Sheriff's Chief Deputy Matt Bilodeau.

Additional aircraft from the Logan-Cache Airport were used to spot the crashed plane, Bilodeau said. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the crash.

De Leon Compres, who was from the Dominican Republic, was a senior in Utah State's aviation technology and professional pilot programs. He was flying to obtain more solo flight hours required to get his commercial pilot license, said university spokeswoman Maren Aller.

Others in the program are stunned and saddened by the student's sudden death, Aller said. De Leon Compres was also a member of USU's Dominican Republic Student Association and a resident assistant at the university's Davis Hall.

The plane took off from Logan-Cache Airport. There was a 6 mph wind at the time, but flying conditions were considered satisfactory with no applicable restrictions, Aller said.

Aller said De Leon Compres' death is the first in the history of the USU aviation program, which was founded in 1939. About 180 students are currently enrolled in the professional pilot program at the university.

Aviation professor Andreas Wesemman praised De Leon Compres, saying he was an honors student whom other students admired.

“He was one of our sharpest," Wesemman said in a statement. "He was well-motivated and well-liked in the program. This is a sad day for the USU aviation program.”

Story and video:  https://www.ksl.com