Wednesday, March 17, 2021

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna R172E, N7879N; accident occurred March 23, 2019 near Northern Colorado Regional Airport (KFNL), Loveland, Larimer County, Colorado








Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Loveland, Colorado
Accident Number: CEN19LA107
Date & Time: March 23, 2019, 10:43 Local 
Registration: N7879N
Aircraft: Cessna R172E 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

As the pilot approached the airport, another pilot heard him on the radio and advised him of "significant downdrafts" on the approach to runway 15. The pilot acknowledged the transmission and continued his approach. When he turned onto the base leg, he encountered the "severe downdraft/microburst" the other pilot had mentioned. He applied full power in an attempt to climb out, but the airplane continued to descend striking a power-line and tree, and subsequently impacted terrain.

A review of the weather showed that a complex wind pattern existed over the area during the period with a wind shift occurring immediately after the time of the accident. No support for convective microburst activity was noted over the area; however, a large area of light intensity precipitation with some potential for some outflow was noted, which could have been resulted in the different winds occurring over the accident site during the period. In addition, the High Resolution Rapid Refresh model sounding and satellite imagery and pilot reports noted support for mountain wave activity over the area, which supported downslope winds and downdraft activity in the area at the time of the accident. The National Weather Service had AIRMET advisories for turbulence and IFR and mountain obscuration conditions over the area, but no advisory for low-level wind shear.

It is likely the pilot encountered shifting winds due to weather system in the area. With his reduced engine power on the base leg of the traffic pattern, the pilot most likely got into a downdraft that produced a sink rate that he could not recover from.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
An inflight loss of control on landing approach due to encountering a down-draft, and the pilot's failure to take timely action to abandon the approach and perform a go-around.

Findings

Environmental issues Downdraft - Awareness of condition
Environmental issues Downdraft - Contributed to outcome
Personnel issues Incorrect action performance - Pilot

Factual Information

On March 23, 2019, at 1043 mountain daylight time, a Cessna R172E, N7879N, was destroyed when it struck a power line and impacted a dairy farm 1.5 miles northwest of runway 15 at Northern Colorado Regional Airport (FNL), Loveland, Colorado. The pilot was seriously injured and his two passengers sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to the U.S. Air Force and operated by the Peterson Air Force Base (AFB) Aero Club, Peterson AFB, Colorado, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan had been filed for the personal cross-country flight. The flight originated from the City of Colorado Springs Municipal Airport (COS), and was en route to FNL.

The pilot, a 10-year U.S. Army UH-60M Blackhawk helicopter pilot, said he was accumulating fixed-wing civilian flight time and had brought along two passengers. According to the pilot, he and his passengers intended to fly from COS to FNL and return. He said he was weather briefed for the flight and received multiple weather briefings before takeoff. As they approached FNL from the southwest, he made a call on FNL's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) and reported he was entering a right traffic pattern for runway 15. Another pilot heard the report and advised him of "significant downdrafts" on the approach to runway 15. The pilot acknowledged the transmission and continued his approach. When he turned onto the base leg, he encountered the "severe downdraft/microburst" the other pilot had mentioned. He applied full power in an attempt to climb out, but the airplane struck a power-line and tree, and impacted terrain.

At 1056, the automated weather observation station at FNL reported, wind 170° at 11 kts, visibility of 10 miles, light rain, few clouds at 1,600 ft, ceilings 3,800 ft broken, 4,800 ft overcast, temperature 43° F, dew point 36° F, and altimeter setting 29.93 inches of Mercury.

A NTSB Meteorologist's review of the weather showed that a complex wind pattern existed over the area during the period with a wind shift occurring immediately after the time of the accident. No support for convective microburst activity was noted over the area; however, a large area of light intensity precipitation with some potential for some outflow was noted, which could have been resulted in the different winds occurring over the accident site during the period. In addition, the High Resolution Rapid Refresh model sounding and satellite imagery and pilot reports noted support for mountain wave activity over the area, which supported downslope winds and downdraft activity in the area at the time of the accident. The National Weather Service had AIRMET advisories for turbulence and IFR and mountain obscuration conditions over the area, but no advisory for low-level wind shear.

History of Flight

Approach-VFR pattern base Other weather encounter
Approach-VFR pattern base Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Uncontrolled descent Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Military; Private
Age: 31, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: January 14, 2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: September 11, 2018
Flight Time: 1235 hours (Total, all aircraft), 52 hours (Total, this make and model), 31 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna 
Registration: N7879N
Model/Series: R172E
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1967
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: R172-0270
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: January 2, 2019 Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 44.3 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 17752.1 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-DB
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 210 Horsepower
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: fnl,5016 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 10:56 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 135°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 1600 ft AGL
Visibility:  10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3800 ft AGL
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 11 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Colorado Springs, CO (COS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Military VFR
Destination: Loveland, CO (FNL)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 09:15 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: Northern Colorado Regional FNL
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5016 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8500 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 Minor 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious, 2 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude:  40.451946,-105.01139(est)













Loss of Control on Ground: Piper PA-12 Super Cruiser, N2733M; accident occurred March 23, 2019 at Canadian Lakes Airport (0C5), Mecosta County, Michigan

 






Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Mecosta, Michigan
Accident Number: GAA19CA178
Date & Time: March 23, 2019, 10:45 Local
Registration: N2733M
Aircraft: Piper PA 12 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground 
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that he landed the airplane on the turf runway in variable wind conditions. During the landing roll, the airplane veered right and exited the right side of the runway. The airplane struck a runway cone and a windsock pole.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The weather reporting station at the nearest airport, about 24 miles from the accident site, reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 340° at 7 knots. The pilot landed the airplane on runway 36.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in impact with a windsock pole. 

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Environmental issues Windsock - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Sign/marker - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion
Landing-landing roll Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 47, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s):None 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:Yes 
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/14/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/15/2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 490 hours (Total, all aircraft), 52 hours (Total, this make and model), 490 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N2733M
Model/Series: PA 12 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:1946 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate:Other 
Serial Number: 12-1140
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 3
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/19/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3959.3 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 160 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Fractional Ownership

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMOP, 755 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 24 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1055 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 83°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 340°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.4 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -3°C / -8°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Mecosta, MI (0C5)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mecosta, MI (0C5)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Canadian Lakes (0C5)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 960 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3800 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Go Around; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 43.576944, -85.283889 (est)

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 140A, N5641C, accident occurred March 18, 2019 at Corvallis Municipal Airport (KCVO), Benton County, Oregon



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Corvallis, OR

Accident Number: GAA19CA189
Date & Time: 03/18/2019, 1200 PDT
Registration: N5641C
Aircraft: Cessna 140
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

According to both pilots in the tailwheel-equipped airplane, the newly endorsed tailwheel pilot was on the flight controls during the landing. The pilot at the controls recalled that, when the airplane touched down, it bounced, so she added power, but the airplane bounced again before it settled on the runway. During the landing roll, the airplane veered right, and she overcorrected to the left. She then applied right rudder, but the airplane became "squirrelly." The other pilot, who was the owner of the airplane, grabbed the yoke and applied rudder to regain directional control. The airplane decelerated, the propeller struck the runway, and the airplane nosed over. The other pilot reported that he did not apply the brakes. When asked, the pilot at the controls during the landing could not recall whether she applied the brakes.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the rudder and vertical stabilizer.

Both pilots reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll, which resulted in a propeller strike and subsequent nose-over.

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Abnormal runway contact
Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing-landing roll Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Landing-landing roll Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 10/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/01/2018
Flight Time: (Estimated) 3572 hours (Total, all aircraft), 39 hours (Total, this make and model), 3303.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 18.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor
Age: 55, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/04/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/31/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 877 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 572 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 29 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12.8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N5641C
Model/Series: 140 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1950
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: 15595
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/23/2018, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1500 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3350 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C90-14F
Registered Owner: Cruisair Llc
Rated Power: 90 hp
Operator: Cruisair Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCVO, 250 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1200 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 59°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 45°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.7 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Creswell, OR (77S)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Corvallis, OR (CVO)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1115 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Corvallis Muni (CVO)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 249 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 35
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5900 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  44.497222, -123.289444 (est)

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Air Creation Tanarg, N912TJ; accident occurred March 20, 2019 in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii









Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Kailua-Kona, Hawaii 
Accident Number: GAA19CA181
Date & Time: March 20, 2019, 10:00 Local
Registration: N912TJ
Aircraft: Air Creation TANARG 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

Analysis

The pilot of the weight-shift-control aircraft reported that he departed with 6 gallons of fuel onboard the airplane and that he estimated that the fuel burn was 3 gallons per hour. He added that, during the flight, he performed multiple climbs and descents, and he believed the aircraft burned more fuel than usual. He added that, about 1 hour 15 minutes into the flight, the engine lost power. He restarted the engine momentarily, but it then lost power again. He attempted to restart the engine multiple times to no avail. During the forced landing, he attempted to land the aircraft on a field, but it impacted terrain about 15 yards short of the intended landing site.

The aircraft sustained substantial damage to the fuselage.

The pilot added that, after visiting the hospital, he went back to look at the aircraft and did not see any fuel in the fuel tank.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the aircraft that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper preflight fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

Findings

Aircraft Fuel - Fluid level
Personnel issues Fuel planning - Pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Prior to flight Miscellaneous/other
Maneuvering Fuel exhaustion
Maneuvering Loss of engine power (total) (Defining event)
Maneuvering Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing Off-field or emergency landing
Landing Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Sport Pilot
Age: 45, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Sport Pilot
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/16/2018
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 533 hours (Total, all aircraft), 420 hours (Total, this make and model), 475 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 30 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AIR CREATION
Registration: N912TJ
Model/Series: TANARG
Aircraft Category: Weight-Shift
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: T06113
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/21/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 992 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 818 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 912UL
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 80 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PHKO, 43 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 214°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 250°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 17°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Kailua/Kona, HI (KOA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Kailua/Kona, HI (KOA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0845 HDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 19.808056, -155.998333 (est)

Mooney M20C, N6007Q: Pilot arrested at Richard Lloyd Jones Jr. Airport (KRVS) after authorities find more than 100 pounds of methamphetamine, multiple guns on plane

https://registry.faa.gov/N6007Q

 
Badlands McNally
March 17, 2021 
Authorities stopped and arrested a pilot at R.L. Jones Airport in Jenks early Wednesday morning after finding more than 100 pounds of meth and multiple guns in a plane. Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested 29-year-old Badlands McNally. 
(Tulsa County Jail)



JENKS, Oklahoma — Authorities stopped and arrested a pilot at R.L. Jones Airport in Jenks early Wednesday morning after finding more than 100 pounds of meth and multiple guns in a plane.

Tulsa County Sheriff’s Office deputies arrested 29-year-old Badlands McNally after authorities stopped to talk to him about the plane he was using.

According to an arrest report, deputies were called to the airport around midnight after Customs and Border Protection notified Homeland Security Investigations Tulsa Agents about the plane landing at the airport in Jenks around 10 p.m. Tuesday.

Agents conducted a certification inspection of the pilot and asked where he flew in from, according to the report.

Deputies say McNally told agents he flew in from Watonga and later admitted to carrying drugs in the plane.

“McNally said he was worried he may get his head chopped off,” a deputy wrote in the arrest report.

Deputies and the Tulsa police K9 unit were called to the airport and the plane was searched.

Agents found two large black duffel bags carrying a total of 101.7 pounds of methamphetamine, according to the arrest report.

Deputies say they also found two pistols and a rifle with multiple magazines behind the pilot seat.

Authorities arrested McNally who faces charges for aggravated trafficking of illegal drugs and possession of a firearm during the commission of a felony.

https://www.fox23.com


Troubled California skydiving school ordered to pay millions after another fatal jump

On August 6, 2016, Tyler Turner, an 18-year-old from Los Banos who had just graduated high school with a 4.3 grade point average, went skydiving for the first time to celebrate a friend's birthday.

Turner jumped in tandem with an instructor. The parachute did not open, and the two hit the ground with a fatal impact. Deputies found the bodies in a vineyard just south of the center’s landing zone. It was later revealed by the Sacramento Bee that the instructor reportedly did not have a proper license. 

This week Turner's family was awarded a $40 million dollar judgment against the owner of the skydiving school, Bill Dause, a man who claims to be a skydiving legend with over 50 years experience.

The 2016 tragedy forms part of a long troubled history of fatalities at the Lodi Parachute Center, which has seen 21 deaths over the years, say lawyers.

“Before he got on the plane, he knelt down and prayed, made his peace with God, and then turned around and gave me a great big, huge hug,” Turner's mom Francine Salazar told the Merced Sun Star in 2016. “He said, ‘I love you, Mom,’ and then he got on the plane.”

Salazar also said that she was worried before the jump because an instructor allegedly told the jumpers, gathered for the birthday celebration, they did not need to finish watching the safety video shown beforehand.

Dause told the Sun Star at the time: “I know she’s grasping for reasons, and we’re just as upset about it as everybody is.”

Paul Van Der Walde, an attorney representing the family of Tyler Turner at this week's hearing, said that since 1981 at least 21 people have died at the skydiving center near Lodi.

In 2019 the Washington Post reported that a 28-year-old woman died during a jump at the same school after a gust of wind sent her careening toward the flow of traffic on Highway 99. She slammed into a big rig and was found dead on the shoulder of the highway.

In 2006, an experienced jumper unsuccessfully sued the parachute center after his leap from a twin-engine plane at 3,000 feet left him with spinal cord injuries; he struck the plane’s tail before crash-landing in a vineyard near Highway 99.

Another jumper was left dead in a nearby vineyard after a failed jump at the center in 2012.

In 2014 a professional skier from Squaw Valley, Timothy "Timy" Dutton, 27, suffered the same fate at Lodi Parachute Center.

The list goes on.

The multi-million-dollar penalty handed down on Monday specifically targets Dause, whose company is also known as Skydivers Guild Inc.

San Joaquin County Superior Court Judge Barbara Kronlund wrote on Monday, “Following court trial Bill Dause is found to be the alter ego of Skydivers Guild Inc. and is responsible for their entire judgment of $40,030,000."

“We hare hoping this will allows us to get this placed closed or be sold to a responsible owner who can operate it safely,” Van Der Walde told the Fresno Bee. 

The Lodi Parachute Center did not immediately return a request to SFGATE for comment.

Plattsburgh International Airport (KPBG) to temporarily close runway this spring



PLATTSBURGH, New York — The more than a decade-long undertaking at Plattsburgh International Airport is coming to a close this year after the runway will close for more than two months for repaving. One small business shares how it's going to affect them.

Valcour Flight Endeavors is a small business operating out of Plattsburgh International Airport. They offer flight lessons to aspiring pilots.

"It's been obviously very rough, a lot of people don't even want to focus on flying when we're in the middle of a pandemic," said owner Karla Houk.

Now as business is picking back up for the flying classes, and travel restrictions are loosening, Plattsburgh International Airport's runway will close from April 13 to June 22, the latest, for repaving the 50-year-old surface.

"Unfortunately the pandemic has created an opportunity with reduced air traffic, the border restrictions, if there was ever a best-case scenario for a worst-case situation of having to close my only runway, this was probably the best-case scenario," said airport director Chris Kreig, who says the project will be an inconvenience for everyone at the airport.

He says it's a necessary project for continued safe operations at the airport, and it's been a cost for the county to maintain the runway as it deteriorates.

Houk is hoping the airport can find a way to keep 3,600 feet of the runway open - a portion that was completed back in 2018.

She is concerned for their business and others.

"It would be devastating to us, we would probably have to end up selling our planes and then the students would have to go somewhere else and we're the only place up here that teaches people how to fly in Plattsburgh," she said.

The airport's director says they've looked at all of their options, but more than a thousand feet of the completed runway is needed as a safety barrier.

"That is a requirement per FAA for maintaining a safe operating environment out there for not only the aircraft but for the construction workers because there's multiple entities that are going to be sharing the space at the same time," he said.

Kreig hopes they can finish the project sooner than June 22, when they can resume all air service and operations.

Federal Aviation Administration: Pilots reported more laser strikes in 2020 than in previous year, despite the pandemic; fewer planes were flying, but incidents were still climbing

Pilots, unlike cats, are not amused by shiny laser pointers.

The FAA has unfortunately reported on a significant increase in the number of pilots reporting laser strikes in 2020, even as fewer planes were flying due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

Last year, there were a total of 6,852 laser incidents reported to the FAA, according to information posted on the administration's website. This number is up about 12% from 2019, when there 6,136 reported cases. What makes this increase more noteworthy, and also concerning, is that it occurred during a year which saw a 60% decrease in the total number of flights flown, Forbes notes.

Incidents involving laser strikes on aircraft usually involve a person on the ground, pointing the laser light at an operating aircraft. While the light may appear small when shined at short distances, it can apparently fill a cockpit, and distract or possibly "incapacitate" a pilot. Intentionally shining a light at an aircraft is also a violation of federal law, the FAA points out.

Violators can and have faced severe consequences for shining laser pointers at planes. Brian John Loven pleaded guilty to one such incident earlier this year, after being accused of shining a laser at the cockpit of a SkyWest flight as it approached the Great Falls International Airport in Montana in 2020. Joven narrowly escaped jail time, but will instead serve several years of probation. 

Goldendale City Council approves airport fuel system

Klickitat County, Washington - The Goldendale City Council met March 15 with a bare quorum of four of the seven city councilors in attendance. Councilors passed a major milestone on the long-awaited upgrade of the Goldendale Airport in approving a bid from Northwest-based Masscot Equipment Company in an amount not to exceed $162,766.25 to install an aviation gas fuel system at the airport.

This is a project that has been in the works for several years and will be funded by a state grant for $550,000 for airport improvement that was awarded in 2019. While that was welcome, it was short of the initial request for $1.6 million, which would have included funds to expand the main runway from 3,500 feet to 5,000 feet; that would have allowed small jets to land.

The current project would supply 100 octane aviation gas which is used by commercially manufactured private airplanes. In response to a question from Councilor Kevin Feiock, consultant Corley McFarland said that the project had been planned from the start as a modular design that would easily expand, if more grants came through, to add another tank providing “Jet A” fuel for jet airplanes. 

He said the second part of the project, which would go out for bid shortly, would include, “Power to the fuel system, the concrete slab, and a small apron to park the aircraft on.”

He said the current lead time from bid to installation is running 16 weeks.

Councilors also approved a public meeting policy. Under the state’s new relaxed restrictions, all Washington counties will move to Phase 3 on March 22, which means that the council will be able to meet in person with a limited audience in the council chambers, along with masking and social distancing. One small positive outcome of the previous restriction is that more people were able to attend online, and Mayor Mike Canon said access by Zoom and telephone will continue even after meeting in person is allowed.

“Using Zoom and telephone ability to attend the meeting is going to be available long term—very long term,” he said. “The Zoom system has become very, very helpful for workshops and things of that nature, and the telephone has worked well as well.” He added that continuing those systems would be helpful for people who will not be comfortable attending meetings in person.

M-Squared Breese XL: Accident occurred March 17, 2021 in Chippewa County, Wisconsin





TOWN OF AUBURN, Wisconsin (WEAU) - A one-person aircraft struck a utility pole in northwest Chippewa County late Wednesday morning.

A crew from Chippewa Valley Electric Cooperative was dispatched to repair damage to the utility pole alongside Highway Q, north of Highway 64, about halfway between Bloomer and New Auburn. The crew was working to replace the utility pole, which snapped as a result of the crash.

The ultralight plane was attempting to land nearby when it was caught up in the power lines, according to the pilot.

No mechanical issues or injuries were reported from the the incident. The pilot says the aircraft sustained light damage.

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 152, N64895; accident occurred March 15, 2019 at Madras Municipal Airport (S33), Jefferson County, Oregon







Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Madras, OR
Accident Number: GAA19CA169
Date & Time: 03/15/2019, 1300 PDT
Registration: N64895
Aircraft: Cessna 152
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The student pilot reported that, following his first solo flight in the traffic pattern, the airplane's nose was pointed left of the runway centerline during touchdown, and the airplane bounced. The student further reported that the flight school has a "bounce and go" policy, so he applied full throttle and aborted the landing. The airplane continued to the left, the nose landing gear collided with a snow berm on the left side of the runway, and the airplane nosed over.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the aborted landing, which resulted in a collision with a snow berm and a subsequent nose-over. 

Findings

Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Environmental issues Snow/ice - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Abnormal runway contact
Landing Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Landing Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 24
Airplane Rating(s):None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s):None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/06/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 40 hours (Total, all aircraft), 40 hours (Total, this make and model), 27 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N64895
Model/Series: 152 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Utility
Serial Number: 15281461
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/03/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1670 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 23022.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-235-L2C
Registered Owner: Hillsboro Aero Academy Llc
Rated Power: 115 hp
Operator: Hillsboro Aero Academy Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KRDM, 3084 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1250 PDT
Direction from Accident Site: 178°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.41 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Redmond, OR (RDM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Redmond, OR (RDM)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1150 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Madras Municipal (S33)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 2436 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5089 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 44.670278, -121.155278 (est)

Loss of Control on Ground: Piper PA-11 Cub Special, N4926M; accident occurred March 15, 2019 at Omar N. Bradley Airport (KMBY), Moberly, Randolph County, Missouri



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Kansas City, Missouri

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Moberly, MO
Accident Number: GAA19CA170
Date & Time: 03/15/2019, 1500 EDT
Registration: N4926M
Aircraft: Piper PA 11
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning

Analysis

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll, the right wing "lifted abruptly and rapidly." He attempted to correct with right aileron, but the airplane veered left and then began to yaw left. The pilot added right rudder and power to correct to no avail. Subsequently, he reduced power, and the airplane exited the runway, impacted a ditch, and then came to rest inverted.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and rudder.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot estimated that the wind was from 300° at 24 knots, gusting to 28 knots. The airport's automated weather observation station reported that, about 5 minutes before the accident, the wind was from 320° at 15 knots, gusting to 21 knots. The pilot landed the airplane on runway 31.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during the landing roll in gusting wind conditions.

Findings

Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Pilot
Environmental issues Gusts - Effect on operation
Environmental issues Sloped/uneven terrain - Contributed to outcome

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll Miscellaneous/other
Landing-landing roll Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Landing-landing roll Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing-landing roll Runway excursion
Landing-landing roll Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)
Landing-landing roll Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/04/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/01/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 2500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2 hours (Total, this make and model), 2400 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 170 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 70 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N4926M
Model/Series: PA 11 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1947
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Restricted
Serial Number: 11-1638
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/26/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1220 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: C90 SERIES
Registered Owner: Orion Aviation Ltd
Rated Power: 90 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMBY, 867 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1955 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 92°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 15 knots / 21 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 320°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.28 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Omaha, NE (MLE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Moberly, MO (MBY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1300 CST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Omar N Bradley (MBY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 866 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5001 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.464167, -92.431944 (est)