Sunday, July 24, 2016

BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, N167BL, registered to Sport Flying USA Inc and operated by an individual: Accident occurred July 24, 2016 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N167BL 

Location: Oshkosh, WI
Accident Number: CEN16LA283
Date & Time: 07/24/2016, 1805 CDT
Registration: N167BL
Aircraft: BRISTELL E-LSA
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Business

Analysis 

The accident airplane was the trailing airplane in a flight of two landing on runway 36L at Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture when the accident occurred. The pilot reported that, while on final approach, he heard an air traffic control transmission telling a canard airplane to land on runway 36R. Mistaking the transmission for 36L, the pilot stated that he began to look for the canard airplane, which diverted his attention from the lead airplane and resulted in a loss of separation. As he approached the lead airplane's right wing, he reduced the engine power and pitched up to slow his airplane. He stated his airplane banked "hard to the right;" he corrected by banking to the left, which, combined with the airplane's nose-high pitch attitude, resulted in an aerodynamic stall.

Although the pilot stated that he was directly behind and below the lead airplane, and encountered the airplane's wake turbulence and prop wash, a GoPro camera mounted on the left wing of the accident airplane showed that the airplane remained behind and above the lead airplane; therefore, it is unlikely that the accident airplane encountered wake turbulence. The GoPro footage was consistent with the accident airplane slowing then subsequently experiencing an aerodynamic stall. It is likely that the pilot slowed the airplane excessively as he attempted to maintain separation and exceeded the airplane's critical angle of attack.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's exceedance of the airplane's critical angle of attack on short final approach, which resulted in an inadvertent aerodynamic stall and subsequent loss of control. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's distraction with other traffic in the area.

Findings

Aircraft
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)


Factual Information

On July 24, 2016, at 1805 central daylight time, a BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, collided with the terrain following a loss of control while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to Sport Flying USA, Inc., and was operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The last leg of the cross country flight originated from the Watertown Municipal Airport (RYV), Watertown, Wisconsin, at 1630.

The airplane was the trailing airplane in a flight of two that were landing on runway 36L at OSH during Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture. The pilot in the lead aircraft stated they were cleared to land on the purple dot. The purple dot was located 3,052 ft down the 8,002 ft long runway. He did not see the accident occur.

The accident pilot stated he turned onto final approach for runway 36L, and was established with 20 ° of flaps at 65 knots. He then heard an air traffic transmission telling a canard airplane to land on runway 36R not 36L. The pilot stated he began to look for the canard airplane which took his attention off the lead airplane resulting in a decrease of the separation between the airplanes. He stated he got within 10 ft of the lead airplane's right wing at which time he reduced the engine power and pitched up to slow his airspeed. The pilot stated that was then directly behind the lead airplane and below his altitude, when he encountered the lead airplane's wake turbulence and prop wash, and his airplane banked "hard to the right". He corrected by banking to the left, but must have had back pressure on the stick and the airplane stalled. The pilot stated he was about 150 ft above the ground when the loss of control initially occurred.

Witnesses reported the airplane was low and slow as it approached the runway. They stated it stalled, rolled left, and descended to impact with the terrain.

A GoPro camera was located amongst the wreckage. The 128GB Micro SD card was retrieved from the camera and downloaded by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. It was determined that the camera was mounted on the left wing. A summary of the video was prepared and is attached to this report. The lead airplane was visible in front of the accident airplane as they approached the airport. At one point while the airplanes were descending and approaching the airport, the accident airplane was about the same altitude as the lead airplane. Both airplanes then made a left turn [onto base leg] at which time at least two other airplanes were visible in the distance ahead of the lead airplane. At this point the lead airplane was below the altitude of the accident airplane. Both airplanes then made another left turn onto final approach. About 27 seconds after the accident airplane was established on final approach, the distance between the accident airplane and the lead airplane began to reduce. Other than the lead airplane, no other flying airplanes were visible on approach to either runways 36L or 36R. The distance between the two airplanes continued to reduce. The lead airplane was at or below the attitude of the accident airplane until the accident airplane entered a left bank and began to descend. The left bank continued to increase such that the airplane was nearly inverted as it descended to ground impact.

The air traffic control audio recording was reviewed by the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge. At 03:00 [lapsed recording time, minutes (MM): seconds (SS)], the controller cleared a canard airplane to land on runway 36L. About 31 seconds later, the controller changed the canard's landing runway to 36R. At 04:04, a second canard pilot requested landing on runway 36R and 14 seconds later, it was cleared to land on runway 36R. About 15 seconds later, the controller cleared the accident airplane and his lead airplane to land on runway 36L. At 04:42, the controller instructed the canard airplanes to keep rolling to the end of the runway. At 05:00, the accident is announced over the radio.

A damaged SD card from a Garmin GPS was also retrieved from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. The card was cracked through its memory chip which prevented data recovery from the card.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam: 
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  361 hours (Total, all aircraft), 150 hours (Total, this make and model), 314 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BRISTELL
Registration: N167BL
Model/Series: E-LSA
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 167-2015
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/22/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 35 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 912 IS
Registered Owner: Sport Flying USA, Inc.
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: Sport Flying USA, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OSH, 808 ft msl
Observation Time: 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 290°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Watertown, WI (RYV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1630 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Wittman Regional Airport (OSH)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8002 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  43.961111, -88.556944

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA283
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 24, 2016 in Oshkosh, WI
Aircraft: BRISTELL E-LSA, registration: N167BL
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 24, 2016, at 1805 central daylight time, a BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, collided with the terrain following a loss of control while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to Sport Flying USA, Inc. and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which not operated on a flight plan. The last leg of the cross country flight originated from the Watertown Municipal Airport (RYV), Watertown, Wisconsin. 

The airplane was one in a flight of two that were landing on runway 36L at OSH during Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture. The pilot in the lead aircraft stated they were cleared to land on the purple dot located 3,052 feet down the 8,002 foot long runway. He did not see the accident occur.

Witnesses reported the airplane was low and slow as it approached the runway. They stated it stalled, rolled left, and descended to impact with the terrain. The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N167BL 

Location: Oshkosh, WI
Accident Number: CEN16LA283
Date & Time: 07/24/2016, 1805 CDT
Registration: N167BL
Aircraft: BRISTELL E-LSA
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Business

On July 24, 2016, at 1805 central daylight time, a BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, collided with the terrain following a loss of control while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to Sport Flying USA, Inc., and was operated by an individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operated on a flight plan. The last leg of the cross country flight originated from the Watertown Municipal Airport (RYV), Watertown, Wisconsin, at 1630.

The airplane was the trailing airplane in a flight of two that were landing on runway 36L at OSH during Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture. The pilot in the lead aircraft stated they were cleared to land on the purple dot. The purple dot was located 3,052 ft down the 8,002 ft long runway. He did not see the accident occur.

The accident pilot stated he turned onto final approach for runway 36L, and was established with 20 ° of flaps at 65 knots. He then heard an air traffic transmission telling a canard airplane to land on runway 36R not 36L. The pilot stated he began to look for the canard airplane which took his attention off the lead airplane resulting in a decrease of the separation between the airplanes. He stated he got within 10 ft of the lead airplane's right wing at which time he reduced the engine power and pitched up to slow his airspeed. The pilot stated that was then directly behind the lead airplane and below his altitude, when he encountered the lead airplane's wake turbulence and prop wash, and his airplane banked "hard to the right". He corrected by banking to the left, but must have had back pressure on the stick and the airplane stalled. The pilot stated he was about 150 ft above the ground when the loss of control initially occurred.

Witnesses reported the airplane was low and slow as it approached the runway. They stated it stalled, rolled left, and descended to impact with the terrain.

A GoPro camera was located amongst the wreckage. The 128GB Micro SD card was retrieved from the camera and downloaded by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. It was determined that the camera was mounted on the left wing. A summary of the video was prepared and is attached to this report. The lead airplane was visible in front of the accident airplane as they approached the airport. At one point while the airplanes were descending and approaching the airport, the accident airplane was about the same altitude as the lead airplane. Both airplanes then made a left turn [onto base leg] at which time at least two other airplanes were visible in the distance ahead of the lead airplane. At this point the lead airplane was below the altitude of the accident airplane. Both airplanes then made another left turn onto final approach. About 27 seconds after the accident airplane was established on final approach, the distance between the accident airplane and the lead airplane began to reduce. Other than the lead airplane, no other flying airplanes were visible on approach to either runways 36L or 36R. The distance between the two airplanes continued to reduce. The lead airplane was at or below the attitude of the accident airplane until the accident airplane entered a left bank and began to descend. The left bank continued to increase such that the airplane was nearly inverted as it descended to ground impact.

The air traffic control audio recording was reviewed by the NTSB Investigator-in-Charge. At 03:00 [lapsed recording time, minutes (MM): seconds (SS)], the controller cleared a canard airplane to land on runway 36L. About 31 seconds later, the controller changed the canard's landing runway to 36R. At 04:04, a second canard pilot requested landing on runway 36R and 14 seconds later, it was cleared to land on runway 36R. About 15 seconds later, the controller cleared the accident airplane and his lead airplane to land on runway 36L. At 04:42, the controller instructed the canard airplanes to keep rolling to the end of the runway. At 05:00, the accident is announced over the radio.

A damaged SD card from a Garmin GPS was also retrieved from the wreckage and sent to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory. The card was cracked through its memory chip which prevented data recovery from the card.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Sport Pilot
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot
Last FAA Medical Exam: 
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  361 hours (Total, all aircraft), 150 hours (Total, this make and model), 314 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 24 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)
  
Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BRISTELL
Registration: N167BL
Model/Series: E-LSA
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental Light Sport
Serial Number: 167-2015
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/22/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1320 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 35 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: 912 IS
Registered Owner: Sport Flying USA, Inc.
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: Sport Flying USA, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OSH, 808 ft msl
Observation Time: 
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 23°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots, 290°
Visibility (RVR): 
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV): 
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Watertown, WI (RYV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1630 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Wittman Regional Airport (OSH)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8002 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  43.961111, -88.556944

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA283
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 24, 2016 in Oshkosh, WI
Aircraft: BRISTELL E-LSA, registration: N167BL
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 24, 2016, at 1805 central daylight time, a BRM Aero S R O, Bristell E-LSA, collided with the terrain following a loss of control while landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (OSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The pilot received serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The aircraft was registered to Sport Flying USA, Inc. and was operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which not operated on a flight plan. The last leg of the cross country flight originated from the Watertown Municipal Airport (RYV), Watertown, Wisconsin. 

The airplane was one in a flight of two that were landing on runway 36L at OSH during Experimental Aircraft Association AirVenture. The pilot in the lead aircraft stated they were cleared to land on the purple dot located 3,052 feet down the 8,002 foot long runway. He did not see the accident occur.

Witnesses reported the airplane was low and slow as it approached the runway. They stated it stalled, rolled left, and descended to impact with the terrain.



OSHKOSH, Wis. (AP) — A pilot suffered injuries that were not life threatening when his small plane crashed at the Oshkosh airport.

Thirty-nine-year-old Richard Maisano of Pennsylvania crashed at Wittman Regional Airport after his HXA-Bristell Light Sport stalled on Sunday. 

Experimental Aircraft Association spokesman Dick Knapinski says Maisano was taken to a Neenah hospital after the crash. 

Federal Aviation Administration Great Lakes Region spokesman Tony Molinaro told USA Today Network-Wisconsin that Maisano was the only occupant in the aircraft when it stalled as it approached the runway.

Oshkosh is hosting the EAA Airventure air show this week. 

The airport was briefly closed Sunday night after the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

OSHKOSH, Wis. (WBAY) – A plane accident during a landing at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh caused a pilot to be transported to the hospital Sunday evening.

EAA Airventure spokesman Dick Knapinski says the pilot was in a small aircraft when it went down the south end of the north-south runway. It did not go off the runway.

The pilot was conscious and alert after the accident and is now fine, Knapinski said.

The accident caused the airport to temporarily close. However, the east-west runway reopened around 7 p.m. before the entire airport closed at its scheduled time an hour later. The the north-south runway remained closed after the accident.

Wittman Regional Airport has two main runways.

Planes that were scheduled to land at Wittman Regional Airport for EAA Airventure were being diverted to other nearby airports during the time of the accident.

Source:  http://wbay.com

OSHKOSH - The main runway at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh was closed today after a small aircraft came up short on the runway and crashed.

EAA spokesman Dick Knapinski says there was only one person on board and they were alert and conscious but taken to a hospital.

It happened on the north/south runway just after 6 PM.

The plane did not catch fire. 

The entire airport closed for about an hour and just after 7 PM the east/west runway reopened. 

Normally, the airport closes at 8 PM so it is unclear if it will reopen again tonight.

Knapinski says the incident will not affect opening day tomorrow for EAA Airventure.

The FAA and NTSB are currently leading the investigation into what happened.

Source:  http://www.nbc26.com

OSHKOSH - A pilot was taken to a hospital after a small aircraft crashed early Sunday evening at Wittman Regional Airport.

The unidentified plane was arriving at the airport about 6 p.m. Sunday when it came down short of the south end of Runway 36, Experimental Aircraft Association spokesman Dick Knapinski said. A lone occupant, who was conscious and alert, was taken to a hospital with unknown injuries.

Wittman Regional Airport was completely closed for about an hour, with the east-west runways reopening about 7 p.m., Knapinski said.

It was the airport's second partial closure of the day after an aircraft touched down without its landing gear on Runway 27, Knapinski said.

EAA AirVenture Oshkosh 2016 officially kicks off Monday at Wittman Regional Airport in Oshkosh.

Allegiant Air emergency landing raises questions



Courtney Malpas remembers June 8, 2015, as the horrifying day that the pilot of Allegiant Air Flight 864 ordered an emergency landing after the crew reported smoke coming from the cabin.

Malpas of Chambersburg, Pa., said Friday in a Facebook interview that the pilot, Jason Kinzer, 43, remained calm as he explained to the 141 passengers on board that instead of continuing on to their destination at Hagerstown Regional Airport, he ordered an emergency landing at St. Pete-Clearwater International Airport in Florida. 

After landing, escape slides were deployed from the sides of the plane, and flight attendants evacuated the 141 passengers, The Herald-Mail reported last year. Some passengers were forced to jump from the wing to evacuate. Five passengers and one flight attendant reported injuries at the scene.

But the incident raises questions.

Though it has been reported that smoke was coming from the cabin, Malpas said Kinzer told the passengers that it was coming from the cockpit. 

Malpas said she never smelled smoke that day, and questions whether the pilot was telling the truth.

"I think the pilot did what he had to do, if there really was smoke in the cockpit," she said. "The flight attendants were ridiculously dramatic and terrifying in the way they instructed the passengers on what was happening and what to do. The pilot was calm and instructive, but, like I said, 'if there really was smoke.'"

The flight originally left St. Pete-Clearwater airport at 4:28 p.m. About eight minutes into the flight, the crew reported smoke in the cabin and returned to the airport. 

Upon landing, fire and rescue personnel told Kinzer that some smoke was coming from the No. 1 engine, and urged the crew to shut it down. Kinzer then ordered the evacuation.

But Allegiant Air determined after its investigation that the evacuation was not needed, and terminated Kinzer's employment.

"You ordered an evacuation that was entirely unwarranted and, as a result, your conduct and decision-making on June 8 compromised the safety of your crew and your passengers and led directly to the injuries," Mark Grock, system chief pilot for the airlines, said in a July 23, 2015, termination letter to Kinzer. 

"Furthermore, during a review of the event and in subsequent conversations, you have repeatedly insisted that you made a good decision to evacuate the aircraft and, if faced with a similar situation, you would follow the same course of action. It is for these reasons that your employment with Allegiant is terminated effective immediately," Grock said in the letter.

The letter is part of a 10-page complaint filed by Kinzer's lawyer, Michael J. Pangia, in Clark County (Nev.) District Court in November 2015. 

The complaint is part of a wrongful termination and defamation lawsuit that Kinzer, a Florida resident, has filed against the Las Vegas-based airline in response to his termination.

Pangia did not return repeated telephone calls to his office for comment.

Pilot seeks judgment

Kinzer, who stands by his actions, is asking for a judgment against the airline of more than $10,000, to be determined by a jury, according to the complaint. 

The money is to compensate for his loss of income due to his firing, humiliation, embarrassment, loss of reputation as a pilot and loss of his ability to find similar employment as a pilot or employee in the aviation industry.

"The discharge letter, signed by Mark Grock, Allegiant's chief pilot, as well as other writings and emails created by Allegiant, contain false and defamatory statements concerning Captain Kinzer," the complaint states.

Pre-trial testimony now is under way in court, according to a story published Tuesday by the Tampa Bay (Fla.) Times. 

The testimony of several Allegiant pilots, made public Monday, states that if presented with the same circumstances, they also would have evacuated the plane. 

A pilot also testified that Kinzer's firing was a warning by the airline to its pilots, who then were engaged through their union in bitter contract negotiations with Allegiant.

Malpas continues to have questions.

"It there truly was smoke or an issue that affected the safety of the flight, then no, he did the right thing," she said. "If there was no smoke and he did it because of the recent issues the pilots had had with the airline, then yes. People were panicked, and some even were injured that day. It just depends on what the truth is."

Source:   http://www.heraldmailmedia.com

Globe GC-1B, N801JF: Incident occurred September 09, 2016 in Woodruff, Spartanburg County, South Carolina

http://registry.faa.gov/N801JF

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA West Columbia FSDO-13

AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP, WOODRUFF, SOUTH CAROLINA.

Date: 09-SEP-16
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N801JF
Aircraft Make: GLOBE
Aircraft Model: GC1B
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: WOODRUFF
State: South Carolina

Lancair Legacy, N444XD: Incident occurred July 24, 2016 at Cline Falls Air Park (3OR8), Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon

http://registry.faa.gov/N444XD


FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Portland FSDO-09

Date: 24-JUL-16
Time: 19:00:00Z
Regis#: N444XD
Aircraft Make: LANCAIR
Aircraft Model: LEGACY2000
Event Type: Incident
Highest Injury: None
Damage: Unknown
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: REDMOND
State: Oregon


AIRCRAFT LANDED GEAR UP AT A PRIVATE AIRSTRIP AT CLINE FALLS, NEAR REDMOND, OREGON.


REDMOND, Ore. -  A Mississippi man who took off in his new Lancair kit plane from a private airstrip west of Redmond on Sunday said he didn’t like the way the aircraft sounded, so he quickly turned back and returned to the runway.

r, resulting in a crash-landing that damaged the plane but did not injure the pilot, who authorities said was alone in the cockpit.

Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies and a Redmond Fire Department crew was dispatched shortly after noon to the reported non-injury crash at the Cline Falls airstrip, a private runway off 7968 Northwest Eagle Drive, said sheriff’s Sgt. Doug Sullivan.

An investigation found that the pilot, Bernie Breen, 65, of Diamondhead, Mississippi, had taken off at the controls of a new Lancair Legacy, Sullivan said.

The pilot said he didn’t like the way the aircraft sounded shortly after takeoff, so he returned to the runway. But he inadvertently forgot to deploy the landing gear, causing the plane to land on its undercarriage and damaging the propeller, the sergeant said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were notified of the incident and are investigating, Sullivan said.

Source:  http://www.ktvz.com

A Mississippi pilot had a rough landing on a private air strip west of Redmond on Sunday, resulting in a report of a plane crash at the strip off Eagle Drive.

The pilot, Berni Breen, 65, of Diamondhead, Mississippi, returned to the runway shortly after takeoff because he “didn’t like the way the aircraft sounded,” according to a report from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office.

Breen inadvertently forgot to deploy the landing gear before landing and the plane landed on its undercarriage, damaging the propeller, according to the sheriff’s office.

Breen was alone in the 2016 Lancair Legacy aircraft at the time, and was not injured. No one on the ground was injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were notified of the incident and are investigating, according to the sheriff’s office.

Source:  http://www.bendbulletin.com

Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron, owned by the United States Air Force and operated by the LeMay Aero Club, N55NE: Fatal accident occurred July 24, 2016 in Leshara, Saunders County, Nebraska

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Lincoln, Nebraska
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N55NE

Location: Leshara, NE
Accident Number: CEN16FA282
Date & Time: 07/24/2016, 1500 CDT
Registration: N55NE
Aircraft: BEECH 95 B55 (T42A)
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 24, 2016, about 1500 central daylight time, a Beech 95-B55 airplane, N55NE, impacted terrain near Leshara, Nebraska. The commercial pilot and the designated pilot examiner were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by the United States Air Force and operated by the LeMay Aero Club under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as an airline transport pilot (ATP) checkride. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, and flight following services were provided. The local flight departed from the Millard Airport (KMLE), Omaha, Nebraska, about 1430.

According to radar and air traffic communication information obtained from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), at 1433, the pilot contacted air traffic control and reported departing from KMLE. At the pilot's request, the controller cleared the flight to proceed to and enter the west practice area.

Radar tracked the flight as it transitioned into the west practice area, which was located about 17 miles northwest of KMLE. The airplane made a level, left 360° turn followed by a level, right 360° turn. The airplane then tracked north-northwest and began slowing while at 5,500 ft mean sea level (msl). The airplane drifted slightly left as it slowed. At 1458:10, the airplane was at 5,500 ft msl, and 9 seconds later, it was at 4,700 ft msl, indicating that it was descending at a rate of about 5,000 ft per minute (fpm). Ten seconds after that, the airplane was at 3,600 ft msl and had reversed heading. The last radar return with an associated altitude occurred 9 seconds later when the airplane was at 2,500 ft msl, indicating that it was descending at a rate of about 6,000 fpm. No distress calls were received from the airplane.

A private-pilot-rated witness near the accident site heard an airplane and then heard "the engine[s] drop to idle" for about 2 to 3 seconds. The engine sound then increased for about 5 seconds. He heard sputtering and then the sound decreased again. At that point, the witness looked for the airplane and saw it "descending in a spiral, nose pointed downward, like a stall spin." The witness lost sight of the airplane as it descended behind trees and buildings; as he ran to go inside to notify emergency services, he heard the impact and saw black smoke. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Military
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/19/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/28/2016
Flight Time:  952 hours (Total, all aircraft), 14.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 64.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33.9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2.5 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Check Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/24/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 

Commercial Pilot

The commercial pilot, age 27, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He was issued a first-class medical certificate on May 19, 2016, with the limitation "must wear corrective lenses." He was a US Air Force pilot based at Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha and his most recent flight review was completed in a military Boeing RC-135 airplane on June 28, 2016. He had accumulated military flight experience of 672.6 hours in RC-135s and 265.1 hours as a military student pilot. His civilian pilot logbook had 7 entries from July 6 to July 23, 2016. According to the times entered, the pilot had flown at least 14.3 hours in the accident airplane.

Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE)

The designated pilot examiner (DPE), age 61, held an ATP certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. In addition, he was a ground instructor and a DPE. He was employed as a flight instructor and DPE for the LeMay Aero Club. His pilot logbook was not made available during the investigation. A Contractor Crewmember Record, Department of Defense Form 1821, indicated that the DPE's total flight experience as of July 15, 2016, was 12,777 hours of which 10,799 hours were in multi-engine airplanes. On the form, the DPE listed a combined time in Beech 95-B55 and Cessna 310 airplanes of 412 hours of which 271 hours were as an instructor. His most recent flight review was conducted in a Fairchild Swearingen SA227 on July 15, 2016. He was issued a first-class medical certificate on March 24, 2016, with the limitation "must wear corrective lenses." 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N55NE
Model/Series: 95 B55 (T42A)
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1965
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: TF-5
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/16/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 16066 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-470-L
Registered Owner: UNITED STATES AIR FORCE
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: LeMay Aero Club
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

The airplane was manufactured in 1968 as a Beechcraft T-42A Cochise, serial number TF-5. It was acquired by the LeMay Aero Club in December 1988 and registered with the FAA as a Beechcraft 95-B55. According to the Aero Club, the airplane logbooks were kept in the airplane. Fire-damaged logbooks were located in the wreckage. According to the logbooks, the airplane's last inspection was a 100-hour inspection completed on July 16, 2016. As of the date of this inspection, the airframe had accumulated 16,066 total hours, and each engine had accumulated 2,128 total hours and 434 hours since overhaul.

The airplane was equipped with two auxiliary fuel tanks. The fuel pickup points for the auxiliary tanks are located in the forward inboard corners of the tanks. According to the airplane operator's manual, the auxiliary fuel and crossfeed systems are for use in level flight only.

Regarding the stall warning indicator, the airplane operator's manual states, "As an impending stall is approached, a stall warning indicator triggered by a sensing vane in the left wing sounds a warning horn while there is ample time for the pilot to correct his attitude."

The performance specifications and limitations section of the manual states that the single-engine minimum controllable airspeed is 80 knots (kts), and the power-off stall speed for a 5,100-pound airplane in level flight with landing gear and flaps extended is 51 kts. According to14 CFR 23.149, the single-engine minimum controllable airspeed is defined as the calibrated airspeed at which, when the critical engine is suddenly made inoperative, it is possible to maintain control of the airplane with that engine still inoperative, and thereafter maintain straight flight at the same speed with an angle of bank of not more than 5°.

The normal operating procedures section of the manual states, in part:

The T-42A airplane is intended for only nonaerobatic passenger and cargo operations. Only those maneuvers incidental to NORMAL flying include[ing] stalls (except whip stalls) and turns in which the angle of bank does not exceed 60° are permitted. During a normal stall approach, a slight buffeting will provide a sufficient warning to permit a normal recovery; the severity of this warning will increase slightly with power on. In addition, the stall warning indicator gives aural indication of an impending stall approximately 5 to 10 mph (4 to 9 kts) above the actual stall. If a spin is entered inadvertently, cut the power on both engines. Apply full rudder opposite the direction of rotation and then move elevator forward until rotation stops. When the controls are fully effective, bring the nose up smoothly to a level flight attitude. Don't pull out too abruptly.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KFET, 1203 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1455 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 332°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 360°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 16°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: OMAHA, NE (MLE)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: OMAHA, NE (MLE)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 1430 CDT
Type of Airspace:  Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 41.332500, -96.438611 

The airplane impacted a bean field about 17 miles northwest of KMLE. A postimpact fire consumed a majority of the fuselage and the inboard portions of both wings. The left propeller had separated from the left engine and was partially buried in the soil at the initial impact point. The airplane came to rest about 4 ft from the left propeller aligned with a magnetic heading of 020°. The empennage was twisted about 80° to the right. The full length of the leading edges of both wings exhibited light upward and aft crushing.

Flight control continuity was established to all primary flight controls. The landing gear actuator was in the landing gear extended position. Flap position could not be determined due to fire damage. The fuel selector handles were broken, and the fuel selectors were opened to determine the selector valve positions; both valves were selected to their respective auxiliary tanks.

The left propeller was removed from the soil. All three blades remained intact and attached to the propeller hub. One blade was bent rearward near the blade root. The other two blades were relatively undamaged. All three blades displayed leading edge polishing near the blade tips.

The right propeller remained attached to the right engine. All three blade roots remained attached to the hub. One blade was relatively undamaged; one blade was partially consumed by fire; and one blade was fractured near the blade root. The separated blade exhibited leading edge polishing and chordwise scratches.

The engines were removed and transported to the engine manufacturer's facility in Mobile, Alabama, for further examination. Both engines had sustained damage that precluded running them on a test bed, but they were completely torn down and examined. The examinations found no evidence of any preimpact malfunctions or anomalies with either engine that would have precluded the normal production of power.

The airplane's stall warning switch and JPI EDM 760 Engine Analyzer were removed from the airplane and shipped to the NTSB laboratory in Washington, DC. The stall warning switch failed an initial continuity check. The electrical contacts appeared fouled by an undetermined substance. The switch's continuity was checked a second time, and the switch passed testing. The reason for the switch's failure of the first continuity check could not be determined.

The EDM 760 was examined by the NTSB Vehicle Recorders Laboratory. The memory components exhibited heavy thermal damage. As of June 2018, attempts to retrieve data have been unsuccessful but will be continued. If information is retrieved, this report will be amended. 

Medical And Pathological Information

Commercial Pilot

The Douglas County Morgue, Omaha, Nebraska, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. According to the autopsy report, the pilot's cause of death was massive blunt trauma. No preexisting conditions which could have contributed to the accident were identified.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the pilot; testing was negative for ethanol and drugs.

Designated Pilot Examiner (DPE)

The Douglas County Morgue, Omaha, Nebraska, conducted an autopsy on the DPE. According to the autopsy report, the DPE's cause of death was massive blunt trauma. The autopsy report noted atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (focal 51% to 75% narrowing of the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery) and myocardial hypertrophy. Sectioning of the heart did not identify any focal lesions in the myocardium. There was no evidence of an acute coronary thromboemboli.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed forensic toxicology on specimens from the DPE. Testing was negative for ethanol. Valsartan was detected in the liver and urine.

On the pilot's most recent FAA medical application, he reported the use of aspirin, atorvastatin, and valsartan. Valsartan is a prescription medication used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure. It is not generally considered to be impairing. 

Tests And Research

Airplane performance modeling using radar and weather information was conducted by the NTSB Vehicle Performance Division. The modeling determined that the airplane's heading fluctuated as the airplane slowed. The airplane began a rapid descent and heading change when the airplane's airspeed dropped below the airplane's single-engine minimum controllable airspeed of 80 kts.

Additional Information

After the accident, members of the LeMay Aero Club found a planned flight profile for the accident flight that included the following practice area maneuvers: clearing, steep turns, stalls, unusual attitude, and engine fail/feather/restart.

Another pilot was completing his ATP certificate about the same time as the accident pilot and took his ATP checkride in the accident airplane with the DPE 2 days before the accident. This pilot reported that the DPE was very thorough, used only the most current pilot training standards, and always used a checklist. During his checkride, they did airwork that included three stalls. During the stalls, the stall warning system failed to operate. They used the auxiliary tanks during all the airwork maneuvers, which included an engine shutdown. During the final landing, the stall warning system activated just before touchdown. This pilot reported that the stall warning system worked during the preflight and had always worked during his prior training flights in the airplane.

Ronald B. Panting, LTC, USAF (Ret)

Mr. Ron Panting, who served as a pilot under contract with Dyna-Tech, died on July 24th, 2016 along with a student pilot when their plane went down near Leshara, Nebraska. The 61-year-old flight instructor from Papillion, Nebraska had held a pilot’s license for 40 years, including a 23-year career in the United States Air Force and nine more years as a commercial pilot. In recent years, he flew as a contractor for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Northwestern Division and served as a check airman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

Capt. Michael Trubilla of Reading, Pennsylvania, was on an FAA checkride on July 24th, 2016 when the Beech 95-B55 (T42A) Baron he was piloting plunged vertically and crashed into a soybean field.


NTSB Identification: CEN16FA282
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 24, 2016 in Leshara, NE
Aircraft: BEECH 95 B55 (T42A), registration: N55NE
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 24, 2016, about 1500 central daylight time, a Beech 95-B55 airplane, N55NE, impacted terrain near Leshara, Nebraska. The commercial rated pilot and designated pilot examiner were fatally injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by the United States Air Force and operated by the LeMay Aero Club under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a check ride. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight. The local flight originated from the Millard Airport (KMLE), Omaha, Nebraska about 1445.

A witness, who was a rated pilot, heard the airplane approach his home from the south and travelled to the north. He later heard one of the engines reduce in power and begin to sputter. He next heard the engines increase in power followed by the engines going quiet. He was unsure if the engines were at idle or were stopped. He walked out to look for the airplane and saw the airplane in a nose low spin, as it descended towards the ground.

The airplane impacted a soy-bean field in a nose low attitude and a postimpact fire ensued. An examination of the wreckage found all major airplane components were accounted for at the accident site. The wreckage was retained for further examination.

At 1455, an automated weather reporting facility located at Fremont Municipal Airport (KFET), Fremont, Nebraska, about 8 nautical miles northwest of the accident site reported wind from 360° at 7 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, a clear sky, temperature 84° F, dew point 61° F, and a barometric pressure of 30.04 inches.




Panting, Ronald B., LTC, USAF (Ret) May 1, 1955 - Jul 24, 2016 Born in San Francisco, Ron graduated from UC Davis before commissioning as a pilot in the US Air Force in 1982. Following 23 years of honorable service, he retired as a lieutenant colonel from Offutt Air Force Base and transferred his skills as a military aviator into the civilian sector. In total, he logged nearly 15,000 flight hours. A devoted husband, loving father, and enthusiastic flight instructor, Ron led by example, setting high standards for himself and those around him. He instilled within his family a spirit of adventure, exploring six continents and embracing the diversity and experiences he encountered. He enjoyed working with his hands, reading, cooking, playing golf, drinking good wine, and passionately following the San Francisco 49ers and Giants. Ron is survived by his wife of 35 years, Lynne; daughter, Stephanie; son, Matthew; father, Norman (Karen); mother, Lois; sisters, Betzi (Harlan) and Teri (Leland); brother, Jim (Annette); and many nieces, nephews, and cousins. VISITATION Friday, 6-8pm at the mortuary. MEMORIAL SERVICE Saturday, 3pm at Offutt SAC Chapel. HEAFEY-HOFFMANN-DWORAK-CUTLER BEL AIR CHAPEL 12100 W. Center Rd. 402-391-3900 www.heafeyheafey.com

https://www.omaha.com



Volunteers from four area fire and rescue departments, including that of Valley and Waterloo, came together to offer assistance recently to a call of a small plane that crashed outside Leshara, killing both occupants.

Members of the Yutan Volunteer Fire Department and the Mead Fire and Rescue Department responded to a call from a witness who spotted a small plane crash in a soybean field near Leshara at approximately 3 p.m. on Sunday, July 24.

Don Dooley, chief of the Yutan Volunteer Fire Department said the four crews responded because the location was within close proximity of all departments, and since the plane size and severity of the situation was unknown.
Sheriff’s deputies from both Douglas and Sarpy County responded to the accident scene, as well, according to Chief Dooley.

Chief Dooley said upon examination, the crash was determined to have occurred in the Yutan Fire Department’s jurisdiction.

The aircraft was a Beechcraft Baron, flown by 27-year-old Michael Trubilla, who was an Air Force captain stationed at Offutt Air Force Base. Trubilla, originally of Reading, Pennsylvania, was taking a flying lesson at the time of the crash from passenger Ron Panting, 61, of Papillion. Both occupants were found dead when crews arrived at the scene.

Plane crashes are an uncommon occurrence in Nebraska, even for seasoned fire and rescue personnel. Chief Dooley said that in the 24 years that he has been with the Yutan Volunteer Fire Department, this was the first call that he has handled of a fatal plane crash.

 “This was not an everyday occurrence, that’s for sure,” Chief Dooley said.

Investigators have taken the wreckage of the plane offsite and are in the process of reconstructing it and examining it to determine the exact cause of the crash, according to Chief Dooley. He said a witness to the crash did recall noticing the plane’s engines sputter before the crash.

The investigation will be conducted by employees of the National Transportation Safety Board, as well as the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Small planes like that flown by Trubilla do not contain black boxes like those in most large commercial airplanes, according to Chief Dooley, so the reconstruction is completed in a different manner. 

Chief Dooley said upon responding to the crash scene, there was a small engine fire that his crew had to extinguish.


“W did have a small fire to put out, that came from both engines that had caught fire,” Chief Dooley noted.





LESHARA, Neb. (AP) — Authorities have identified the two people who were killed in a weekend plane crash in eastern Nebraska

The Saunders County Sheriff's office says 61-year-old Ron Panting of Papillion and 27-year-old Michael Trubilla both died in Sunday's crash.

Trubilla was an Air Force Captain from Reading, Pennsylvania, who was stationed at Offutt Air Force Base. Panting was a flight instructor and a former chief of wing safety at Offutt Air Force Base.

The plane crashed in a soybean field near Leshara, Nebraska, around 3 p.m. Sunday. A witness reported hearing the engine sputter before the Beechcraft Baron crashed.

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash.

Saunders County Sheriff's officials have identified the pilot killed in Sunday's plane crash. 

The victim was identified as 27-year-old Michael Trubilla.

SCSO said they was notified from a witness on Sunday, that a plane went down northwest of Leshara in a field.

Officials say the plane was a twin engine Beechcraft Baron. 

Officials say the crash resulted in two fatalities: 61-year-old Ron Panting of Papillion and Trubilla, a Captain from Reading, Pennsylvania residing at Offutt Air Force Base in Omaha.

The National Transportation Safety Board, who is in charge of the investigation and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the crash.

Officials say a witness advised that the plane was flying from the southeast to the northwest and they could hear the engine sputtering prior to the crash. Rescue and Fire Departments from Mead, Valley, Waterloo, and Yutan were dispatched to the scene.




The victims of a fatal air crash near the Saunders County village of Leshara have been identified as a 27-year-old service member from Offutt Air Force Base and his civilian instructor pilot.

The plane went down in a bean field about 3 p.m. Sunday near a farm along County Road T, said Saunders County Sheriff Kevin Stukenholtz. The site is between Valley and Fremont, south of the Platte River.

The student pilot was completing a check ride in the twin-engine Beechcraft Baron from the LeMay Flight Training Center, Stukenholtz said, and was at the controls of the aircraft when it crashed. The 61-year-old flight instructor was the other occupant.

Both Stukenholtz and Staff Sgt. Rachelle Blake of the Offutt-based 55th Wing said identifications would be released after the notification process for their families is complete.

Blake said the plane took off from Millard Airport about 1 p.m.

Two hours later, a witness called 911 and reported that the plane sputtered before dropping almost straight down into the field and erupting in flames, said Bob Thorson, Saunders County chief deputy sheriff.

The plane had been heading northwest immediately before the crash and had crossed a tree line before plummeting into the field, he said.

Fire and rescue personnel responded to the scene from multiple localities, including Yutan, Omaha, Valley and Waterloo.

A medical helicopter placed on standby was not needed.

“They knew pretty quickly that it was a fatal crash,” Stukenholtz said.

Blake said the aircraft was one of seven planes owned by the flight training center — formerly known as the Offutt Aero Club — which provides aircraft rental and FAA-approved flight instruction for private-pilot through airline-transport certification in single- and multi-engine airplanes.

The Baron that crashed was built in 1962 and had accumulated 18,000 flight hours, she said. The training center normally operates out of Offutt, but Blake said the airplanes had been transferred to Millard for the weekend because the base's airfield was closed for repairs.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.


Source:   http://www.omaha.com

LESHARA, Neb. (AP) - Two people were killed in the crash of a small plane near Leshara Sunday afternoon.

The Saunders County Sheriff’s Department says the plane went down in a soybean field near Ida Street and Ginger Cove Road around 3 p.m. A witness described seeing the aircraft come sputtering from the sky nose first.

Carol Lukowski’s granddaughter witnessed the crash. Lukowski called 911, but there wasn’t much more she could do.

"Immediately knew that something, well we figured it had to be an airplane,” said Lukowski.

Lukowski said they’re used to seeing crop dusters fly by but deputies say this was a passenger plane. She was cutting her son's hair in their home when her granddaughter watched the crash out the window.

"I had the clippers going and she heard it and she looked out the window and said ‘NaNa’ there's a fire outside,” said Lukowski.

Lukowski said they started looking for fire extinguishers.

"That's the only thing you think is how can you help. That is, that's the only thing cause…you know you probably you can't do much,” Lukowski said. “The smoke was black."

Sheriff's deputies told WOWT 6 News the crash created an instant ball of fire; one that no one would walk away from.

“I think we knew that it was too dangerous,” said Lukowski. "I don't think it was even a question of getting out there and being able to save anybody. I really don't.”

Officials confirm the plane is from LeMay Flight Club which is based out of Offutt. Investigators have not yet released the names of those killed in the crash. Lukowski said her family is praying for the victims and their families.

"One of the first things we did is come back here and say some prayers...for the families who are going to get that phone call, absolutely,” she said. 


Source:   http://www.wowt.com

Two people died in a small plane crash Sunday in Saunders County.

The plane crashed in a field near a farm at 799 County Road T, close to the village of Leshara around 3 p.m., Saunders County Sheriff Kevin Stukenholtz said.

Fire and rescue crews from Omaha, Yutan, Valley and Waterloo responded.

The two fatalities were confirmed, but authorities were still working on identifying the people. 

A witness heard the plane sputter. 

Stukenholtz added that the crash site indicated the plane came straight into the field and that there was no attempt of an emergency landing.

"It was apparent very early on that it was going to be a fatal crash," Stukenholtz said.

The plane has been confirmed a Beechcraft Baron twin engine. 

Federal Aviation Administration officials are on their way to the scene to investigate. 

Source:   http://journalstar.com



LESHARA, Neb. (KMTV) - The Saunders County Sheriff's Department confirms two people are dead after a small plane crash near Leshara Sunday afternoon.

The twin-engine Beechcraft airplane went down in a soybean field near the area of 799 County Road T.

 Sheriff's investigators believe the plane may have taken off from Millard Airport. 

The FAA is sending investigators to the crash site. 

Source:  http://www.kmtv.com



LESHARA, Neb. (AP) - Two people were killed in the crash of a small plane near Leshara Sunday afternoon.

The Saunders County Sheriff’s Department says the plane went down in a soybean field near Ida Street and Ginger Cove Road around 3 p.m. 

A witness described seeing the aircraft come sputtering from the sky nose first.