Sunday, October 18, 2020

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 172M, N8093; accident occurred October 28, 2019 at Daniel Field Airport (KDNL), Augusta, Georgia

 


Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

https://registry.faa.gov/N80931

Location: Augusta, GA
Accident Number: GAA20CA055
Date & Time: 10/28/2019, 1630 EDT
Registration: N80931
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

Analysis 

The solo student pilot reported that he configured the airplane for takeoff and that, during the takeoff roll, the airplane reached 55 knots and ascended about 5 ft above ground level. The airplane descended back onto the runway and veered right. He applied left rudder and pulled the throttle to idle as the airplane exited the right side of the runway. He leveled the wings and locked the brakes, and the airplane impacted a fence. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both wings. The student reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's failure to attain sufficient airspeed to climb out of ground effect, which resulted in a descent, loss of directional control, runway excursion, and impact with a fence.

Findings

Aircraft
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Fence/fence post - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event) 

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 53, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present:No 
Instructor Rating(s):None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/15/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 33.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 33.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 6 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 9.8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6.7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N80931
Model/Series: 172M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1976
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17266806
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 09/04/2019, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4206.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320-E2D
Registered Owner: Augusta Aviation Inc
Rated Power: 160
Operator: Augusta Aviation Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: DNL, 440 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 97°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:  Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Augusta, GA (DNL)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Augusta, GA (DNL)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1630 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Daniel Field (DNL)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 422 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 23
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4002 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries:  1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  33.466667, -82.039444 (est)

Hard Landing: Robinson R66, N661CG; accident occurred October 28, 2019 in Alexandria, Rapides Parish, Louisiana

 



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: 

Location: Alexandria, LA
Accident Number: GAA20CA052
Date & Time: 10/28/2019, 1945 CDT
Registration: N661CG
Aircraft: Robinson R66
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that he had departed in the helicopter from a local field at night under visual flight rules conditions. He reported that the weather was good, that he climbed the helicopter to 1,400 ft mean sea level for the 4-mile flight, and that he began the descent about 1 mile from the destination. He reported that he had "noticed and was consumed w/Engine & Rotor RPM, in the Yellow." During the approach, the helicopter stopped moving forward and began moving backward. The helicopter landed hard in a level attitude on the grass. The helicopter sustained substantial damage to the main and tail rotor drive systems and the fuselage. The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the helicopter that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's fixation on the instrument panel, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Attention - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Hard landing (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 65, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/26/2018
Occupational Pilot:No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 09/21/2019
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 1818 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1465 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Robinson
Registration: N661CG
Model/Series: R66 No Series
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 2011
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0057
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2700 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 944 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls Royce
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: RR300/A1
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAEX, 89 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0053 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 284°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:   10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1400 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 90°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 15°C / 12°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Alexandria, LA
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Alexandria, LA
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1940 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.238333, -92.437778 (est)

BRM Aero Bristell S-LSA, N438BL: Accident occurred October 18, 2020 at Carlisle Airport (N94), Cumberland County, Pennsylvania


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Location: Carlisle, PA 
Accident Number: ERA21LA025
Date & Time: October 18, 2020, 14:21 Local 
Registration: N438BL
Aircraft: Aero Bristell Bristell LSA 
Injuries: 2 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Aero Bristell
Registration: N438BL
Model/Series: Bristell LSA
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor 
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.188573,-77.178235 (est)


The National Transportation Safety Board is in the early stages of investigating the plane crash at the Carlisle Airport on Sunday afternoon that sent two people to the hospital.

The NTSB had no further information Monday beyond the initial crash report from the Federal Aviation Administration, according to NTSB spokesman Peter Knudson, but would aim to issue a preliminary report within two weeks.

Local emergency personnel were dispatched to the scene just before 2:30 p.m. Sunday, according to fire call records, after a small plane crashed into a wooded area just north of the airport, located in South Middleton Township just outside of Carlisle Borough. First responders on the scene reported that two people were transported to the hospital by Life Lion helicopter.

In an initial statement, the FAA said a single-engine Aero Bristell crashed into trees 500 feet north of the airport’s Runway 28 with two people aboard. The agency’s crash reported listed two “serious” injuries; local authorities did not have an update on the victims’ condition as of Monday.

The plane, a single-engine, fixed-wing aircraft, was built in 2019 and is registered to a name and address in Carlisle Borough, according to FAA records.

Mustapha Mouhacht, who lives near the airport, told ABC27 News he heard a loud sound and was the first at the scene.

“I just started running over there,” Mouhacht said. “When I got there, I found two people inside. I saw two people injured, their faces with blood coming out. So I talked to them to try to open the door inside.”

Mouhacht said there wasn’t smoke, and that he was able to get directly to the plane.

The NTSB typically won’t dispatch investigators to the scene of a nonfatal aircraft crash, Knudson said, given that the aircraft’s pilot usually knows what caused the crash. The plane is typically recovered by the aircraft’s insurance company and taken to a secure location, where FAA and NTSB personnel may examine the wreck if warranted.

The NTSB is legally required to investigate accidents involving a serious injury to a person and/or substantial damage to the aircraft; roughly 1,300 such accidents occur each year, Knudsen said, with 250 to 300 of them involving fatalities.



CARLISE, Pennsylvania – Two men were airlifted to the hospital after their small plane crashed in Cumberland County this afternoon shortly before 2:30 p.m.

According to FlightAware, the flight was slated to last approximately 15 minutes, but was in the air for nearly an hour and a half instead.

Residents of the neighborhood alongside the runway, Mustapha Mouhacht and wife, heard an unusual noise and called 911.

“And I stared running over there,” Mouhacht said. “When I got there, I found two people inside. I saw two people injured. Their faces with blood coming out. So I talk to them to try to open the door inside.”

In an effort to rescue the men, Mouhacht attempted to break the windows of the aircraft without success.

He then worked with them to try to pry the door open. “And I open it just like this space, and I took the first guy outside and then the second guy, I took him outside,” he said.

Mouchacht described two men of the aircraft and said their injuries did not appear to be life threatening.

The severity of their injuries is unknown at this time.

The National Transportation Safety Board is not expected to investigate the site of the crash until tomorrow.




There was no fear in Mustapha Mouhacht when he saw a plane sticking out of the trees behind his house.

Instead, Mouhacht said he wanted to help, so he ran across the tarmac to help get two men out of the plane.

The plane appeared to have missed the runway at the Carlisle Airport in the 200 block of Petersburg Road around 2:30 p.m. Sunday.

Instead, it came down at a harsh angle against trees next to the runaway.

For the neighbors in the Spring Green Estates mobile home park, they are used to planes coming down, since Meals Drive runs parallel to the runway. Their backyards face the runaway and, in this case, the crash.

Kathy Swope said in 10 years she’s gotten so used to the planes she can now sleep through them, which is why she wasn’t that alarmed when she first heard the crash.

Her dog alerted her that something might be more wrong, so she went outside and saw the plane sticking out of the trees. Mouhacht already was running over to the plane.

“It’s scary to look out there. I would have never thought that,” Swope said. “That’s why I didn’t pay that much attention to it.”

Swope called 911 and relayed what Mouhacht was seeing as he tried to get into the plane. She also heard a dispatch that there was a suspected fuel leak.

Mouhacht said when he got there he found two men who were alert and able to talk to him while he tried to pull open the door.

Swope said the whole time she was shouting to Mouhacht, who was relaying information that she was able to give to dispatchers about the men and their conditions.

Mouhacht said it took almost 15 minutes to get the door open, but once he got permission from one of the men to break the door and get it open, he was able to help the two men out.

Mouhacht’s wife even got involved when she brought him a hammer to use to break into the plane.

Though able to speak, Mouhacht said one was incoherent and the other appeared to have a broken leg. Both men were eventually life-flighted from the scene.

Once the men were out of the plane, ambulances and paramedics were able to begin helping them.

“When we were able to take them outside, the people from the ambulance told us to get them far from the airplane because they [could] smell the fuel,” Mouhacht said.

Mouhacht said even though he knew there was the threat of the plane exploding, he didn’t see smoke so he thought “it’s the opportunity to take them out, just like that."

Fear was the furthest thing from Mouhacht’s mind.

“No I’m not scared, because I like [to] help,” Mouhacht said. Being able to get them out made him happy, he said.

Officials have not made any additional comments on the crash as of 5 p.m. Sunday.



Two people were transported to the hospital via Life Lion after a plane crash at the Carlisle Airport Sunday afternoon, according to Ron Hamilton, emergency services administrator for South Middleton Township.

Reports from the scene indicate the plane was nose down off the runway in the wooded section of the airport. Union Fire Company Assistant Fire Chief Matt Hinken, who had command of the scene, said the crash is still under investigation by Pennsylvania State Police and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB). Hinken said the crash was reported both to NTSB and FAA.

Hinken said emergency crews were dispatched at 2:29 p.m. to the airport in South Middleton Township, and there were two injured people in the plane, though he did not know the severity of the injuries.

One Life Lion helicopter was already at Carlisle Airport and transported one person. Hinken said another Life Lion helicopter was called in from another station, and that arrived shortly after the other's departure to transport the second injured person.









SOUTH MIDDLETON TOWNSHIP, Pennsylvania  — Two people were injured when a plane crashed Sunday at the Carlisle Airport.

Emergency dispatchers say the plane missed the runway around 2:30 p.m. on Sunday. The plane landed on its nose in the woods next to the runway.

Two people were onboard. According to Emergency Dispatch Services, both were seriously injured and were airlifted by Life Lion to Hershey Hospital.

The Federal Aviation Administration has been notified of the crash.

Loss of Control in Flight: Piper PA-32RT-300T, N500MJ; fatal accident occurred August 31, 2018 near Mackinac County Airport (83D), St. Ignace, Michigan

Ronald Steven Dague



Ronald Dague








The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Grand Rapids, Michigan
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Piper Aircraft; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: 
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N500MJ

Location: St Ignace, MI
Accident Number: CEN18FA368
Date & Time: 08/31/2018, 2145 EDT
Registration: N500MJ
Aircraft: Piper PA32RT
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The instrument-rated pilot took off in dark night conditions over a lake that bordered the departure end of the runway. The airport manager witnessed the airplane depart and reported that the takeoff sounded normal. Two witnesses who were facing the lake reported that they observed an aircraft take off from the airport, and fly about 100 to 200 ft above the lake surface. It then banked to the right and disappeared from sight. About 10 to 15 seconds later, the witnesses heard what sounded like a crash into the water or an explosion. There were no distress radio calls from the pilot and there was no radar information for the flight. The airport manager and first responders reported that it was a very dark night and that there was no distinguishable horizon.

Examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation, and evidence was consistent with a slight right wing down, nose low, high speed impact with the water. A right turn would have been necessary at some point after takeoff to fly towards the destination airport and evidence is consistent that a right turn had been initiated. Although the reason for the impact with the water could not be determined, the overwater departure in dark night conditions would not have provided adequate visual cues to assure a positive rate of climb during the departure and initial turnout on course as a pilot would be vulnerable to illusions if flight instruments were not used to conduct the takeoff and initial climb. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain sufficient altitude after takeoff in dark night conditions which resulted in a collision with the water. 

Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Dark - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Initial climb
Loss of visual reference
Loss of control in flight (Defining event) 

On August 31, 2018, about 2145 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA32RT-300T, N500MJ, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near St Ignace, Michigan. The instrument-rated private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The manager of Mackinac County Airport (83D), St Ignace, Michigan, reported that, about 2000, the pilot fueled his airplane and told the manager that he would be returning to Mackinac Island Airport (MCD) to pick up five passengers. The manager said he was in his office about 2145 when he observed the airplane taxi to runway 7 and the airplane took off. He stated that the airplane sounded normal during takeoff. About 5 minutes later, the manager received a call from 911 dispatch, and the manager confirmed to dispatch that an airplane had just departed 83D.

Two witnesses who were facing a lake bordering the airport reported that they observed a low-flying airplane take off from the airport. They stated that the airplane was flying about 100 to 200 ft above the surface of the water, then the airplane banked to the right and they lost sight of it. About 10 to 15 seconds later, the witnesses heard what sounded like a crash into the water or an explosion. A county deputy sheriff spoke with four other witnesses who were staying at a nearby motel, and they reported similar observations to him.

There were no distress radio calls from the pilot, and there was no radar information available for the flight. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/03/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 650 hours (Total, all aircraft), 50 hours (Total, this make and model), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot flight logbooks were not available. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N500MJ
Model/Series: PA32RT 300T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1978
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 32R-7987051
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/16/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3650 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3276 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO540S1AD
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power:  300 hp
Operator:On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: MCD, 768 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2135 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 180°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.03 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: St Ignace, MI (83D)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Burlington, WI (BUU)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 2144 EDT
Type of Airspace:  Class E

The airport manager reported that it was a very dark night and that there was no distinguishable horizon. First responders who were present at the accident site about 15 to 20 minutes after the accident also reported that it was a very dark night and that there was no visible horizon. 

Airport Information

Airport: Mackinac County Airport (83D)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 623 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 7
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 3801 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Runway 7 had a published magnetic heading of 074 degrees. The departure end of runway 7 at 83D was located about 820 feet from Lake Huron, and aircraft departing from runway 7 fly over water during the initial climb. The destination airport MCD was located about 4.5 nm away on a magnetic course of about 118 degrees. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 45.902500, -84.706944 (est) 

Divers from the Michigan State Police (MSP) located the airplane wreckage in 44 ft of water, about 1 mile from the departure end of runway 7. MSP recovered the wreckage and transported it to a secure facility at 83D for examination by the National Transportation Safety Board.

Examination of the airframe, engine, and propeller occurred on September 5-6. The airframe was severely damaged, and deformations were consistent with a slightly right-wing-down, nose-low, high-speed impact with the water. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to all flight control surfaces. Bending signatures on the propeller blades and impact marks on the pitch change stops were consistent with the propeller rotating at impact. The airframe, engine, and propeller examinations did not show any preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

During the wreckage examination, MSP technicians swabbed the wreckage for evidence of bird residue from a possible bird strike. No bird residue was found within the interior or exterior of the wreckage. 

Medical And Pathological Information

An autopsy of the pilot was performed on behalf of the Mackinac County Medical Examiner's Office. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt force injuries and no significant natural disease was noted.

The Federal Aviation Administration Forensic Sciences Laboratory performed toxicological testing on the pilot's tissue samples. The toxicology tests were negative for drugs. Small amounts of ethanol were detected and its presence was most likely produced post mortem because the body had been submerged in water before recovery 17 days after the accident. 

Additional Information

During the on-scene investigation, investigators observed large geese nesting adjacent to the departure end of runway 7 and walking around during daylight hours. According to the airport manager, the geese are typically bedded down at night. During the on-scene investigation, a search of the area surrounding the departure end of runway 7 did not reveal any deceased bird remnants.

Passengers from the airplane's earlier flight on the day of the accident were interviewed. They did not report any mechanical defects with the airplane and stated that the flight seemed normal.

Loss of Control in Flight: Van's RV-4, N534MM; fatal accident occurred September 26, 2018 near Dogwood Airport (73AR), Lonoke County, Arkansas


Reagan Kyle Whitlow
January 24th, 1973 - September 26th, 2018



The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas 
Lycoming Engines; Dallas, Texas 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Location: Austin, AR
Accident Number: CEN18FA389
Date & Time: 09/26/2018, 1442 CDT
Registration: N534MM
Aircraft: Vans RV 4
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 26, 2018, about 1442 central daylight time, an amateur-built Vans RV-4 airplane, N534MM, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Austin, Arkansas. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

Radar data showed that the airplane departed North Little Rock Municipal Airport (ORK), North Little Rock, Arkansas, about 1424 and flew at an altitude between 2,600 ft and 2,700 ft mean sea level (msl) and a ground speed of between 110 and 120 knots until just west of the pilot's home (see figure 1). The airplane started to descend about 1439 and the ground speed increased to about 145 knots. The last radar location was recorded at 1440:41 about over the pilot's home and the accident site was located in an open field a few hundred feet east of the pilot's home.

Figure 1 - Radar data of accident flight

In a postaccident interview, the pilot's wife stated that, before the pilot left the house for work, he said the weather was "not good" for flying and he did not plan to fly the airplane that day. Later, he called her from the airport and told her he was going to fly. She asked him if he was "sure about flying due to the weather," and he said the winds had decreased and it looked good for the flight. Then he told her when to stand outside their house to see him fly by.

As the airplane flew overhead, the pilot's wife reported that she saw the right wing "tip up," the airplane climbed briefly, and then, "all of sudden," the airplane went upside down and dove down. She added that the airplane was flying so low and so fast that she knew he was not going to be able to recover. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 45, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/06/2006
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 5623 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10 hours (Total, this make and model)

The pilot actively flew Lockheed C-130 military transport airplanes, with the United States Air National Guard (US ANG). According to US ANG records, the pilot had logged a total of 5,613 hours of total time in the C-130.

The pilot had received a tailwheel endorsement on September 21, 2018. According to the pilot's wife, the accident flight was the pilot's first flight in the airplane without a flight instructor. According to the pilot's flight instructor, most of the pilot's training in the airplane consisted of takeoffs and landings and minimal time was spent training maneuvers and performance characteristics.

The pilot's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued on March 6, 2006, with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses, and it expired on March 31, 2008. The pilot's military medical clearance was active. According to 14 CFR 61.23(b)(9), "Operations not requiring a medical certificate," pilots that have a current military medical clearance with the US armed forces are not required to hold a current medical certificate for domestic flights that require a third-class medical clearance.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N534MM
Model/Series: RV 4 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1997
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: MM3756
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/08/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 811.7 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed
Engine Model/Series: O-360-A1A
Registered Owner: Herc Drivers Llc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The instrument panel was destroyed by the postimpact fire; as a result, investigators were unable to determine the airplane's total time.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLRF, 311 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1456 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 221°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 4200 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 6 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 20°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.09 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 21°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: N Little Rock, AR (KORK)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: N Little Rock, AR (KORK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1424 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

The upper air sounding chart created for the accident site at 1500 indicated a surface wind from about 30° at 10 knots with the wind remaining northeasterly through 4,000 ft. The wind increased in speed to 15 knots by about 800 ft msl and to 20 knots by about 1,700 ft. Wind decreased to 10 knots at 4,000 ft msl, and about 5,000 ft msl the wind direction shifted to about 10ยบ. The chart indicated below about 3,000 ft msl the atmosphere was unstable or conditionally unstable. 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.040000, -92.019444 (est) 

The airplane impacted an open field, vegetated in grass, in a wings-level, nose-low attitude, between 35° and 40° nose down. The main wreckage came to rest about 185 ft south/southeast of the initial impact point oriented on a heading of 323°, on the edge of Rick Lake (see figure 2).

Figure 2: Aerial photograph depicting initial impact point and location of main wreckage

During the on-scene investigation, investigators located fiberglass and metal fragments, the left aileron, and both propeller blades in the debris field between the initial impact point and the main wreckage. The grass between the initial impact point and the main wreckage was discolored, which was consistent with fuel blighting. The main wreckage included the engine, fuselage, empennage, and both wings. A postimpact fire damaged the fuselage, the inboard portion of both wings, and the skin of the empennage. The main landing gear separated partially from the airplane but remained with the wreckage.

The first ground scar was several inches deep, about 6 inches wide, and extended 5 ft to a larger ground scar. The larger ground scar consisted of three distinct sections; a center section, a left section, and a right section. The left section extended about 7 ft to the east and was about 1 ft 6 inches wide at its widest point. The right section extended about 7 ft to the west and was about 2 inches deep and 6 inches wide at its widest point. The center section extended south towards the main wreckage and was 9 ft long, several inches deep, and full of water. A dark substance consistent with oil pooled at the top of the water. Dirt was displaced out of the larger scar towards the main wreckage to the south.

One propeller blade was on the right side of the debris field and was bowed aft and twisted. The second blade was 38 ft from the end of the main scar with the tip buried in the ground. The second blade also exhibited leading-edge scoring at the tip and was otherwise unremarkable. One half of the propeller hub was 70 ft from the second blade while the other half was buried about 1 ft 6 inches deep in the large ground scar.

A line of trees and bushes between the initial impact point and main wreckage exhibited torn and separated bark. Witness marks on the trees and vegetation and discoloring of the leaves were also consistent with fuel blighting.

A postaccident examination of the airframe and engine conducted by the National Transportation Safety Board and parties to the investigation revealed no preimpact anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Arkansas State Crime Laboratory, Medical Examiner Division, Little Rock, Arkansas, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The autopsy indicated that the cause of death was multiple injuries.

Toxicological testing of the pilot's specimens performed by the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory was negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and drugs.

Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee F, N15608: Accident occurred October 16, 2020 in Sebring, Mahoning County, Ohio

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.  

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Location: Sebring, OH 
Accident Number: CEN21LA020
Date & Time: October 16, 2020, 19:30 Local
Registration: N15608
Aircraft: Piper PA-28 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N15608
Model/Series: PA-28 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling: Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: 
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.906,-81 (est)




SEBRING, Ohio -- A small airplane made a crash landing Friday evening in a cornfield north of the village.

The Fire Department was called to the landing site southeast of Courtney Road and North 12th Street in Smith Township around 7:45 p.m., Sebring Fire Chief Mike Springer said.

The pilot, Jonathan Sprague, 23, of Salem, had minor injuries and didn't need medical attention, according to the Canfield Post of the Ohio State Highway Patrol. 

Sprague was flying the Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee F south from Skeets Airport in Warren, when the airplane had engine trouble, according to the Highway Patrol. 

The pilot was trying to get to Tri-City Airport when the engine lost power at 1,000 feet and he had to make an emergency landing, according to the Highway Patrol. The unharvested cornfield was two miles north of the airport.

The Highway Patrol and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the incident.

Loss of Control on Ground: Cessna 170B, N3016A; accident occurred October 29, 2019 at Double Eagle II Airport (KAEG), Albuquerque, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

 



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Albuquerque, New Mexico

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Location: Albuquerque, NM
Accident Number: GAA20CA082
Date & Time: 10/29/2019, 0930 MST
Registration: N3016A
Aircraft: Cessna 170
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot receiving instruction for his tailwheel endorsement reported that he and the flight instructor were performing touch-and-go landings on the asphalt surface runway. The airplane was equipped with toe brakes, and after landing, he added power to abort the landing and applied right rudder as the airspeed accelerated to 30 knots. He recalled that he held the right rudder pedal application "too long" and that the airplane veered right. He attempted to correct the right veer by applying left rudder but overcorrected, and the instructor took the controls and applied full deflection of the right rudder. The airplane did not respond to the instructor's right rudder input, and he then applied left aileron. The pilot kept his feet on the pedals and inadvertently applied left brake. The airplane was side loaded to the right, and the right wing struck the ground. The instructor held his control inputs to direct the airplane to the right, but the right wing struck the ground again before the airplane exited the left side of the runway. The wheels dug into dirt on the left side of the runway, the elevator struck the ground, and the right wing struck the ground a third time before the airplane came to rest upright. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing and right elevator. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot receiving instruction failure to maintain directional control and his inadvertent left brake pedal application during the landing roll, which resulted in a runway excursion and ground-loop.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Brake - Unintentional use/operation (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Runway excursion
Attempted remediation/recovery
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Private
Age: 73, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/09/2019
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/13/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 7041 hours (Total, all aircraft), 589 hours (Total, this make and model), 6220 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 67.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12.3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/15/2019
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/07/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 753 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2.9 hours (Total, this make and model), 657 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 25.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3016A
Model/Series: 170 B
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1953
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 25660
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/27/2019, Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2200 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3901.5 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed
Engine Model/Series: C145-2H
Registered Owner: Perry Aeronautical Services Llc
Rated Power: 145 hp
Operator: Perry Aeronautical Services Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAEG, 5837 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0815 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 141°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:   10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.97 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: -6°C / -13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Albuquerque, NM (AEG)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Albuquerque, NM (AEG)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0825 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Double Eagle Ii (AEG)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5837 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 22
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7398 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.145278, -106.795278 (est)