Monday, July 13, 2020

Schleicher ASW 27-18, N167TM: Fatal accident occurred July 11, 2020 in Ely, White Pine County, Nevada

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada


Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N167TM

Location: Ely, NV
Accident Number:WPR20LA216 
Date & Time: 07/11/2020, 1500 PDT
Registration: N167TM
Aircraft: Schleicher ASW27
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 11, 2020, at 1500 Pacific daylight time, an Alexander Schleicher ASW 27-18 glider, N167TM, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Ely, Nevada. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

According to the tow pilot, after takeoff at 1119, he released the accident glider at an altitude of 7,800 ft mean sea level (msl) about 2 miles south of Ely Airport (ELY). About 10 minutes later he heard radio traffic that the accident pilot was climbing to 9,000 ft msl. The tow pilot stated that about 1540 he heard that a glider was down, and between 1600 to 1645 he flew over the wreckage, which was located on top of the Schell Creek Mountain, located about 5 nautical miles east of ELY.

An initial assessment of the accident site by local law enforcement personnel revealed that the glider had impacted terrain on the leeward side of the mountain at about the 8,800 ft level. Initial impact was with the right wing tip on a northeasterly heading. All components necessary for flight appeared to have been accounted for at the accident site.

The wreckage will be recovered to a secured storage facility for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Schleicher
Registration: N167TM
Model/Series: ASW27 18
Aircraft Category: Glider
Amateur Built:No 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KELY, 6262 ft msl
Observation Time: 1453 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 14 knots / 27 knots, 210°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Ely, NV (ELY)
Destination: Ely, NV (ELY)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:N/A 
Aircraft Fire:None 
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.297500, -114.748056 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.
WHITE PINE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE
JULY 11th, 2020
REPORT OF A DEATH

The reporting party discovered the wreckage of a glider in a remote area, with one decedent, The remains were removed and later transported to the Clark County Office of the Coroner/Medical Examiner for identification.

Golden Circle Air T-Bird Tandem TBT-06, N50JH: Fatal accident occurred July 11, 2020 in Grosse Ile, Wayne County, Michigan

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Detroit, Michigan

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N50JH

Location: Grosse Ile, MI
Accident Number: CEN20LA272
Date & Time: 07/11/2020, 1647 EDT
Registration: N50JH
Aircraft: Golden Circle Air T-Bird
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 11, 2020, about 1647 eastern daylight time, a Golden Circle Air T-Bird Tandem TBT-06, N50JH, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Gross Ile., Michigan. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was being operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

A witness told Federal Aviation Administration inspectors, who responded to the accident site, that he observed the airplane taxi out from between the hangars at Gross Ile Municipal Airport (ONZ) and take off to the south on taxiway C. About 1/3 of the way down the taxiway, the airplane lifted off and struck a taxiway light on the west (right) side of the taxiway at taxiway E. The pilot applied rudder into the wind and disappeared from sight.

Another witnesses near the accident site saw the airplane flying 200 to 300 ft over a residential area. He said the wind was getting stronger and it appeared the pilot was having difficulty gaining altitude and maintaining stability. "The motor also sounded like it was straining and at one point went full throttle," he wrote.

The airplane struck a tree and crashed in the 27000 block of Loma Circle, about 1/2-mile south of ONZ. FAA inspectors examined the wreckage and reported that the pilot's control stick was dislodged and was found on the floor of the airplane. The airplane wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Golden Circle Air
Registration: N50JH
Model/Series: T-Bird TBT-06
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ONZ, 590 ft msl
Observation Time: 1655 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 28°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9500 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.77 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Grosse Ile, MI (ONZ)
Destination: Grosse Ile, MI (ONZ)

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Jeffrey Dean Oliver
August 15 , 1964 - July 11 , 2020

OLIVER, Jeffrey D., age 55, of Lincoln Park, July 11, 2020. Beloved husband of Tammie Oliver. Loving father of Joshua (Holly Johnston) Oliver, Jessica (Adel Almuhtar) Oliver, Faith Oliver and Samantha Oliver. Dearest grandfather of Isabella, Jayce, Zakaria and Mia. Dear son of Shelby Turner. He is also survived by his brothers Todd Oliver and his son Joseph Oliver, Rick (Michelle) Oliver, his niece Angel, his nephew Ricky and his in-laws Wayne Tackett, Greg, Bobbi and Becky Salisbury and many nieces, nephews and friends. He is preceded in death by his father Pete Stevens.

https://mimemorial.com



A 57-year-old Lincoln Park man involved in a plane crash on Grosse Ile is dead, leaving officials with the task of figuring out if he died from the impact or if he died from a medical condition while flying, causing the crash.

Grosse Ile first responders responded to the 27000 block of Loma Circle at about 5 p.m. Saturday after receiving several reports that an airplane had crashed in the residential neighborhood, located near the south end of the island.

Officials found a ultralight aircraft overturned at the base of a tree in the backyard of a residence, according to a statement released by the Grosse Ile Police Department on Sunday.

The pilot, identified as Jeffrey Dean Oliver, had been ejected from the aircraft and was receiving CPR from a resident when rescue personnel arrived. Oliver was rushed to Henry Ford Wyandotte Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

An autopsy will be performed by the Wayne County Medical Examiner to determine whether the cause of death was the result of injuries sustained in the crash or a "medical condition that occurred while in flight," according to the statement released by police.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident.

https://www.thenewsherald.com




GROSSE ILE, Michigan – Police have provided new details following the death of a man after a plane crashed on Grosse Ile Saturday.

Officials say at around 4:47 p.m. an airplane crashed in a residential neighborhood in the 27000 block of Loma Circle. Police and fire personnel discovered a ultralight aircraft overturned at the base of a tree in the backyard of a residence, officials said.

Police say the pilot, 57-year-old Jeffrey Dean Oliver of Lincoln Park, was ejected from the plane. The man was receiving CPR when officials arrived on the scene.

Oliver was then transported to the hospital where he was pronounced dead.

Officials are investigating whether his death was caused by injuries sustained during the crash or a medical condition that may have occurred during the flight. The Wayne County Medical Examiner is scheduled to perform an autopsy.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating.

https://www.clickondetroit.com

Cessna T188C AGhusky, N2690J: Fatal accident occurred July 10, 2020 in Dustin, Hughes County, Oklahoma

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Textron; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N2690J

Location: Dustin, OK
Accident Number: CEN20LA271
Date & Time: 07/10/2020, 1440 CDT
Registration: N2690J
Aircraft: Cessna T188
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural 

On July 10, 2020, about 1440 central daylight time (CDT), a Cessna T188, N2690J, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Dustin, Oklahoma. The commercial pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 137 aerial application flight.

According to another company pilot who witnessed the accident, after taking on a load of about 165 gallons of herbicide, the airplane began its takeoff run. After departure, the airplane crested a hill and impacted a power pole with the wingtip. It then hit power lines and another pole before coming to rest in a draw. The witness stated that the airplane did not get airborne when it should have.

The airplane's left wingtip impacted the first of two power poles about 1,000 ft from the departure end of the turf runway about 25 ft below the top of the pole and between the top and bottom wire. After impact with the first pole and wires, the airplane impacted a second pole. The airplane then traveled about 180 ft before it impacted the terrain inverted, which resulted in substantial damage to the fuselage and wings.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors TSIO-520 series engine. A detailed engine examination is pending recovery of the airplane. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N2690J
Model/Series: T188 C
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Agratech Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:kmlc 
Observation Time: 1453 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 23°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Dustin, OK
Destination: Dustin, OK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.154167, -95.987778

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Fuel Starvation: Beech A36 Bonanza, N6677D; accident occurred July 25, 2015 near Dutchess County Airport (KPOU), Poughkeepsie, New York


Pilot Keith Kilgallen and his wife, Margaret discuss their experience.




The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this incident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey
Continental Motors Inc; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N6677D 

Location:  Poughkeepsie, NY

Accident Number: ERA15LA286
Date & Time: 07/25/2015, 1040 EDT
Registration: N6677D
Aircraft: BEECH A36
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 25, 2015, about 1040 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36; N6677D, was substantially damaged during an emergency landing, after a partial loss of power during takeoff at Duchess County Airport (POU), Poughkeepsie, New York. The private pilot received minor injuries, and the passenger was uninjured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an IFR flight plan was filed for the flight, conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, destined for Burlington National Airport (BTV), Burlington, Vermont.

According to the pilot, after arriving at POU from Lehigh Valley International Airport (ABE), Allentown, Pennsylvania, he purchased 15 gallons of fuel and then sumped the tanks in preparation for the next leg of the flight to BTV.

After starting the engine he taxied out, did his engine runup, checked the magnetos, and cycled the propeller. Then during the takeoff from runway 24, he noticed a vibration and unusual noise as he rotated. He believed that it may have been from the wheels and applied the brakes to stop the wheels from rotating and retracted the landing gear but, the vibration continued. He was however unable to continue climbing, as the engine suddenly incurred a partial loss of power.

He checked that the propeller, throttle, and mixture, was full forward but the airplane still would not climb. With the airspeed being low, he knew that he could not make it back to the airport without stalling the airplane.

There were "trees everywhere" and a set of power lines directly ahead of him. He then pulled back on the control wheel, was able to clear the power lines, and then "forced the nose down" to prevent the airplane from stalling, and landed gear up about 300 feet from the power lines. 

Pilot Information


Certificate: Private
Age: 67, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:No 
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/05/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/01/2015
Flight Time:  8954 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6311 hours (Total, this make and model), 8896 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 92 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 34 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and pilot records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane single engine sea, and instrument airplane. His most recent application for a FAA third-class medical certificate was dated August 5, 2014. The pilot reported that he had accrued approximately 8,954 total hours of flight experience, of which 6,311 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N6677D
Model/Series: A36
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: E-1581
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/17/2014, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3651 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 97 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6796.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-520-BB
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 285 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The accident airplane was a low wing, retractable single engine airplane, of conventional metal construction, equipped with retractable tricycle type landing gear. It was powered by an air cooled, 6-cylinder, horizontally opposed, 285 horsepower Continental IO-520-BB engine driving a McCauley 3-bladed, variable pitch, constant speed propeller.

According to FAA and maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1979. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was completed on December 17, 2014. At the time of the inspection, the airplane had accrued 6,796.6 total hours of operation. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: POU, 164 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1047 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 235°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 25°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Poughkeepsie, NY (POU)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: BURLINGTON, VT (BTV)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1042 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

The recorded weather at POU, at 1047, about 7 minutes after the accident, included: calm winds, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 25° C, dew point 13° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.01 inches of mercury.

Airport Information


Airport: Dutchess County Airport (POU)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 164 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5001 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing; Straight-in 

POU was owned by Dutchess County and was a public use, tower-controlled airport. It was located four miles south of Poughkeepsie, New York. The airport elevation was 165 feet above mean sea level.

There were two runways oriented in an 6/24 and 15/33 configuration.

Runway 24, had a left-hand traffic pattern, was asphalt, grooved, and in excellent condition. The total length was 5,001 feet-long and 100 feet-wide.

It was marked with precision markings in good condition and equipped with high intensity runway edge lights.

Obstructions were present off the departure end of the runway in the form of 18 ft trees, located 380 ft from the runway, 300 ft right of centerline which took a 10:1 slope to clear.

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 41.626667, -73.884167 (est) 

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane had initially touched down on its belly in a grassy area, then traveled over the top of a large rock and came to rest.

Examination of the airplane revealed that it had touched down with the landing gear in the up (stowed) position. All major parts of the airplane were on site, and the airplane had been substantially damaged when it struck and traveled over the rock.

The outboard sections of all three blades of the propeller had been bent backwards, the right side nose wheel door had separated at the hinge line, the aft portion of the lower cowling had been buckled and crushed, the upper cowling had partially opened on impact.

The nose landing gear wheel well had been crushed upward, and both right side engine mounts were fractured. The throttle body had one of the mount lugs fractured and two of the fuel fittings were fractured.

The lower portion of the firewall was buckled, and the fuselage had buckled just aft of the firewall. The wing flaps were in the 15°position, and the inboard portion of the left wing flap was bent. Fuel was observable in both the left, and right, wing tanks. 

Tests And Research


Review of Maintenance Records


Review of maintenance records and the Pilot/Operator Accident/Incident Report submitted by the pilot, indicated that the factory rebuilt engine was installed on the airplane on February 23, 2012, at a recorded tachometer time of 6,103.9 hours.

On June 14, 2013, at 279.1 hours after engine installation, maintenance personnel replaced the airplane's auxiliary fuel pump (fuel boost pump).

On February 6, 2014, (tachometer and engine time not specified), maintenance personnel located in Fort Pierce, Florida, "bled fuel line, checked fuel strainer, cleaned injectors due to rough running engine." The engine was test run and returned to service.

On February 7, 2014, at an unspecified tachometer and engine time, maintenance personnel located in Stuart, Florida, "removed all spark plugs, cleaned, gapped, and rotated upon reinstallation, removed all fuel injectors cleaned inspected and reinstalled, [and performed] aircraft operational and functional check" with no discrepancies noted.

On December 17, 2014, at a recorded tachometer time of 6,796.6 hours, the engine underwent an annual inspection. On December 18, 2014 (same tachometer reading as annual inspection), the spark plugs were removed, cleaned, and reinstalled, and the ignition leads, and magnetos were checked with no anomalies noted.

On May 11, 2015, at a tachometer time of 6,881 hours, the engine underwent an oil and oil filter change.

According to the pilot, the engine had accumulated 790 hours at the time of the accident.

Engine Test Run


On November 2, 2015, in order to help determine why in the maintenance records the engine had been reported to have been running rough and why the loss of engine power had occurred, an engine test run was performed.

Prior to the test run several airframe related items were removed in preparation for operation in the test cell. The removed items included:

- Both fractured Engine mounts (right front and right rear)
- Fuel fittings (the throttle body outlet and mixture return)
- Cooling Baffles
- Propeller Governor

The following substitute or repaired parts were then installed for engine operation:

- Engine Mount legs
- Fuel fittings

The magneto-to-engine timing which was specified to be 22° before top dead center (BTDC) was then checked, with the following results:

- Left Magneto (21°BTDC)
- Right Magneto (20°BTDC)

The engine was not disassembled prior to the engine run. The crankshaft end-play was measured 0.010" and the run-out was 0.001".

The engine was prepared for operation by installing the appropriate thermocouples, pressure lines and test pads for monitoring purposes. The engine was then moved to a test cell, mounted for operation, and then fitted with a club type propeller for testing.

The engine experienced a normal start on the first attempt without hesitation or stumbling in observed RPM. The engine RPM was advanced in steps for warm-up in preparation for full power operation. The engine throttle was advanced to 1200 RPM and held for five (5) minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was advanced to 1600 RPM and held for five (5) minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was advanced to 2450 RPM and held for five (5) minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was advanced to the fully open position and held for five (5) minutes to stabilize. The engine throttle was rapidly advanced from idle to full throttle five times where it performed normally without any hesitation, stumbling or interruption in power.

Throughout the test phase, the engine accelerated normally without any hesitation, stumbling or interruption in power and demonstrated the ability to produce rated horsepower.

After the test run with the engine still hot, a cylinder leakage test was performed in accordance with the latest revision of CMI Service Bulletin SB03-3 with the following results (master orifice reading – 43 PSI):

- Cylinder No. 1 - 17/80 PSI (rings)
- Cylinder No. 3 - 56/80 PSI (rings)
- Cylinder No. 5 - 60/80 PSI (rings)
- Cylinder No. 2 - 72/80 PSI (rings)
- Cylinder No. 4 - 36/80 PSI (rings)
- Cylinder No. 6 - 60/80 PSI (rings)

(*) – Leakage Source

Airplane Fuel System


Airplane fuel systems are designed to provide an uninterrupted flow of clean fuel from the fuel tanks to the engine. The fuel must be available to the engine under all conditions of engine power, altitude, attitude, and during all approved flight maneuvers. Two common classifications apply to fuel systems: gravity-feed and fuel-pump systems.

Low- and mid-wing single reciprocating engine airplanes cannot utilize gravity-feed fuel systems because the fuel tanks are not located above the engine. Instead, one or more pumps are used to move the fuel from the tanks to the engine.

In a low wing airplane, with a fuel injection system such as the Continental system, fuel pressurized by an engine-driven pump is metered as a function of engine rpm. It is first delivered from the fuel tanks (one for each wing), To a three-way selector valve (LEFT, RIGHT, or OFF). The selector valve also acts simultaneously as a diverter of air that has been separated out of the fuel in the engine-driven fuel pump and returned to the valve. It routes the air to the vent space above the fuel in the selected tank.

An electric auxiliary fuel pump draws fuel through the selector valve. It forces the fuel through the strainer, making it available for the engine-driven fuel pump. The electric auxiliary pump also supplies fuel pressure while starting, is used to prevent vapor lock, and is also used as a backup should the engine-driven pump fail and does not need to be operating to allow the engine-driven fuel pump access to the fuel.

The engine driven pump supplies a higher-than needed volume of fuel under pressure to the fuel control. Excess fuel is returned to the pump, which pumps it through the selector valve into the appropriate tank. Fuel vapor is also returned to tanks by the pump. The fuel control unit meters the fuel according to engine rpm and mixture control inputs from the cockpit and then supplies it to the fuel manifold and injectors, which spray fuel without any air mixed in directly into the cylinders, to provide a measured, continuous spray and smooth engine operation.

Auxiliary Fuel Pump


The auxiliary fuel pump was controlled by an ON-OFF toggle switch on the control console. It provided pressure for starting and emergency operation. Immediately after starting, the auxiliary fuel pump could be used to purge the system of vapor caused by extremely high ambient temperature or start with the engine hot. The auxiliary fuel pump provided for near maximum engine performance should the engine driven pump fail.

On May 4, 2016, the auxiliary fuel pump was tested.

It was noted that the fuel pump was intact and had not been disassembled from the time of manufacture.

During the testing, it took 5-7 seconds for the pump to self-prime and to start pumping.

Fuel pump requirements were a minimum of 42 gph at 16 psi, with a maximum amperage draw of 3 amps at 28 volts dc.

The pump during testing produced 53 gph at 16 psi, and amperage draw was 2.1 amps at 28 volts dc. indicating that the pump was operating within specifications.

During the testing however, it was discovered that the discharge fitting was leaking. Disassembly of the discharge fitting revealed that it appeared that it had had been installed to the proper torque, but it was observed that there were deep scratches on the O-Ring boss on the pump side of the fitting, and a piece of metal was found imbedded in the O-Ring.

The fittings were then removed, and the pump was then retested with another set of fittings. No leaks were found with the pump and /or the replacement fittings. 

Additional Information


According to the auxiliary pump manufacturer, fittings and O-rings can be a source of leakage. Care should be taken to ensure that fittings are inspected for cracks, scratches and cross threaded threads. New O-Rings should be installed at the time of fuel pump replacement and if the O-Rings have been on the fittings more than 10 years.
















Photo 13 – Image of Auxiliary Fuel Pump – Courtesy of CJ Aviation


Photo 14 – Pump Operating at 16 PSI and 53 GPH – Courtesy of CJ Aviation

Photo 15 – Pump Operating at 28 VDC at 2.1 Amps – Courtesy of CJ Aviation 

Photo 16 – Deep Scratches on O-Ring Boss on Pump Side of Discharge Fitting – Courtesy of CJ Aviation 

Photo 17 – Embedded Metal in O-Ring – Courtesy of CJ Aviation