Monday, April 23, 2018

Mysterious cockpit problems continue, but Air Force trainers still fly




The Air Force says pilots flying its T-6A Texan II, a trainer that was grounded this year because of oxygen system problems, have reported 12 additional unexplained physiological episodes since March 1.

Experts are investigating but so far have found no root cause for the incidents. The plane, flown by the San Antonio-based Air Education and Training Command, was idled in February after 21 episodes were reported earlier in the year.

The Air Force said it was not considering another grounding of the plane “at this time,” expressing confidence that ongoing efforts — including an accelerated inspection and cleaning schedule for the Onboard Oxygen Generation System, or OBOGS — will ensure that the T-6 is safe to fly.



A series of in-air oxygen system failures in a variety of military aircraft over the past several years have raised concerns in the Pentagon about pilot safety, but until a sudden spike in January, the T-6, the Air Force’s principal trainer for novice pilots, had seen few such episodes.

Inspections found that the OBOGS’ shut-off valve, inlet filter and drain valves failed at rates much higher than expected. Air Force Materiel Command spokesman Derek Kaufman cautioned that experts could not directly link these failures to the unexplained physiological episodes and don’t believe that they caused a failure in the OBOGS or a separate backup emergency oxygen system.

“While our mission is to produce pilots, the safety of our pilots has been and always will be our number one priority,” AETC spokesman Dan Hawkins said in a statement released in response to questions about the newest incidents. “Proactive maintenance mitigation practices and inspections based on flight hours have been created and are being accomplished on a much more aggressive timeline.”



A physiological event takes place when aircrew experience symptoms that can hinder a pilot’s ability to fly safely. It can result from hypocapnia, hypercapnia or other factors. Hypocapnia is a state of reduced carbon dioxide in the blood. Hypercapnia is excessive carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by inadequate respiration.

Maj. Gen. Patrick Doherty, commander of the 19th Air Force at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, grounded the T-6 fleet after a cluster of such events occurred in planes flying out of Columbus AFB, Mississippi; Vance AFB, Oklahoma; and Sheppard AFB in Wichita Falls in late January.

The Air Force statement said that more than 400 planes in the 444-strong T-6 fleet have seen complete evaluations of the aircrew breathing system. In all, 85 percent of the shut-off valves, which allow air from the engine to bleed into the OBOGS, failed in the open position, allowing unrestricted air flow. Inlet filters, which capture water and contaminants from incoming “bleed air” from the engine, failed at the same rate.



One in every five drain valves, used to remove moisture from the system, was found to not fully close. The Air Force said that contributed to small amounts of bleed air leakage and added that components “have been mitigated or replaced as necessary to ensure continued safe system operation.”

“We’re finding issues with some of the parts. … We’re finding moisture in the condensers that shouldn’t be there,” Gen. Ellen Pawlikowski, who heads the Air Force Materiel Command, said last month. “We’re finding valves that are sticking. All of those things are things that we’re fixing, and we’re looking at what’s the right cycle, the number of hours before we replace the different components in them.”

Similar events last year caused the Navy to idle its T-45 Goshawk trainer for three months and have occurred in recent years in the F-22A, one of the Air Force’s newest fighters, and the F-15C/D, a much older plane.



The T-6, a single-engine, two-seat plane designed for joint primary pilot training in the Air Force and Navy, began flying at Randolph around 18 years ago. Its troubles have left turbulence beyond the flight line, prompting a personnel shakeup in the T-6 System Program Office. While the Air Force didn’t directly address a claim made in an online pilot forum that six people in the office were shuffled into less-visible jobs elsewhere, it did say in response to a question that “limited personnel shifts and additions were made to align experience with the magnitude, impact and difficulty of this challenge.”

The program office “remains keenly focused on ensuring the T-6 remains an operationally safe, suitable and effective platform,” the statement said.

February’s delay in training aviators came as the Air Force has been shedding veteran pilots at an alarming rate. Last year, it was 1,300 pilots below its goal of 5,300. AETC had projected that it would train about 1,200 during the current fiscal year, 1,300 in fiscal year 2019 and 1,400 for 2020. During the month the plane was grounded, the Air Force said it lost flying time for more than 100 pilots.



Besides inspecting and cleaning the OBOGS, the Air Force has conducted a root-cause evaluation that includes a comprehensive assessment of all aircraft encountering unexplained physiological episodes.

AETC and the T-6 System Program Office will launch a feasibility study this month into the possibility of including an automatic backup oxygen system in the plane. In the meantime, it has bought new testing equipment and increased the frequency of existing maintenance work. It also is educating pilots about physiological events.

Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson “has asked for a belt-and-suspenders approach,” said the Materiel Command’s Pawlikowski. “The OBOGS is an important system, and the engineers have confidence in it. There is no single point of failure, but it doesn’t hurt to have a backup, since no root cause has been determined.”

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.expressnews.com

Students protest University of Kansas use of private jets; school says they're an investment



TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) - A group of KU students say the school's use of private jets is one of the reasons tuition costs are rising.

The group KU Against Rising Tuition was at the Chancellors house Monday afternoon, protesting the use of the jets. They say since they operate with state dollars, it takes millions from the school's general funds.

The group says the jet costs more than 10 times as much as flying coach.

"Considering this jet is used typically within a 300 mile radius, so say from here in Lawrence to Wichita, to Salina," Christian Espinosa said, "this is completely inefficient for a $5.6 million jet that costs almost $1 million in maintenance fees per year."

Espinosa says they aren't protesting for the school to completely get ride of the jet, they just want to find a more efficient way to get the same job done.

However, KU says the jets are an investment for the school. In a statement to 13 NEWS, the school says, "We appreciate our students taking an interest in the university’s business operations. The university has owned a plane for more than 40 years, and we use it because it is an efficiency tool with a clear return on investment for the university. We encourage students to learn more about KU’s aviation strategies by viewing the KU Aviation Services face sheets available online."

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wibw.com

Fire destroys plane at former Rantoul museum

A worker who was part of a salvage crew that was dismantling an old C-47 plane Monday, April 23, 2018, on the grounds of the former Chanute Air Museum in Rantoul watches as flames engulf it. 



RANTOUL — Rantoul Fire Department Capt. Dewey Shreves remembers training for aircraft fires at the former Chanute Air Force Base many years ago.

Twenty-five years after the base closed, he and other members of the department got to put that training into practice Monday morning.

Fire engulfed a C-47 plane on the grounds of the former Chanute Air Museum that was being dismantled by a salvage crew.

Fire Chief Ken Waters said the plane was a total loss.

“It was fully involved when they got there,” Waters said.

Firefighters were on the scene for about an hour after receiving the 9:22 a.m. call.

Shreves said the training the department received in fighting airplane fires was valuable in putting out the blaze.

“There’s a lot of magnesium in those planes,” Shreves said. “It’s mostly aluminum, copper and steel,” but the presence of magnesium means a fire can’t be put out using just water.

Waters said a 6 percent mixture of foam and water has to be used.

“If you use water only, it flares up because it’s magnesium,” said Waters, who was also part of that training when the base used to be open.

“In the ‘70s and ‘80s, Chanute Air Base Fire Training Command conducted joint training exercises with the Rantoul Fire Department on aircraft fire suppressions so that we could provide mutual aid to them in the event of an aircraft fire,” Shreves said. “Today, 25 years after they left, we used that training to put out a fire on one of their aircraft.”

Shreves said it was the first time there has been an aircraft fire on the former base.

The C-47 is the military version of a DC-3, according to Corky Vericker, Rantoul airport office supervisor.

“There had to be some fuel residue that was left inside (the plane),” Vericker said. “The acetylene torch ignited it. Everything on the inside is so old and rotten ... that it just don’t take much for it to ignite.”

Allen Jones Sr., former air museum operations manager, said the plane was one of “seven or eight” that are being cut up for salvage, as contracted by the Air Force.

The salvage operator said he lost $2,000 as a result of the fire, Waters said.  

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.news-gazette.com

Man cited after attempting to bring loaded handgun onto plane at Buffalo Niagara International Airport (KBUF)



A man was cited by police last Friday after he tried to bring a loaded semi-automatic handgun onto an airplane at Buffalo-Niagara International Airport.

According to a press release from the Transportation Security Administration, the East Amherst man was caught with a .380 caliber handgun in one of his carry-on bags. The weapon was loaded with seven bullets, including one in the chamber. 

A TSA officer contacted the Niagara Frontier Transportation Authority Police after spotting the gun in a checkpoint x-ray machine. They confiscated the firearm and cited the man on weapon charges.

There was no impact on the airport's operations. 

Story and video ➤ http://www.whec.com

Bellanca 7GCBC, N8737V, registered to United Aerial Advertising of Delaware Inc: Accident occurred April 23, 2018 at Aeroflex-Andover Airport (12N), Sussex County, New Jersey

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Saddle Brook, New Jersey 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8737V

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: ANDOVER, NJ
Accident Number: WPR18LA125
Date & Time: 04/23/2018, 1550 EDT
Registration: N8737V
Aircraft: BELLANCA 7GCBC
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 23, 2018, about 1550 eastern daylight time, a Bellanca 7GCBC, N8737V, was substantially damaged following a loss of engine power and loss of control, followed by impact with water near Aeroflex-Andover Airport (12N), Andover, New Jersey. The airline transport pilot, the sole occupant, was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to United Aerial Advertising of Delaware Inc., Wilmington, Delaware. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight, which was being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, was originating at the time of the accident.

According to a witness who observed the entire accident sequence, after making the first takeoff and experiencing a loss of engine power on initial climb, the pilot made a 180° turn, returned to the airport and landed. After trouble shooting and general maintenance having been performed on the engine, the engine was run at various power settings with no anomalies noted. The witness stated that the pilot attempted to make a second takeoff, however, during initial climb the airplane appeared to stall after experiencing a loss of engine power, followed by the left wing dropping. He was able to recover the airplane to a wings-level attitude, but subsequently impacted water in a flat, belly-flop type attitude. The pilot was rescued by first responders after having successfully egressed the airplane. He was then transported to a local hospital.

The airplane was recovered from the lake and moved to a secured location for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BELLANCA
Registration: N8737V
Model/Series: 7GCBC NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 12N, 583 ft msl
Observation Time: 1554 EDT 
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / -6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 200°
Lowest Ceiling: Unknown
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.38 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Departure Point: Andover, NJ (12N)
Destination: Andover, NJ (12N) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 41.011944, -74.735556 (est)























ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — A single-engine plane that crashed into Lake Aeroflex at Kittatinny Valley State Park on Monday morning is expected to be pulled out of the water sometime today, authorities say.

The pilot, identified by Chief Eric Danielson of the Andover Township Police Department as John Wells, was taking off from the airstrip at Aeroflex-Andover Airport, located within the park, when he crashed into Lake Aeroflex at approximately 11:50 a.m. The lake borders the runway of the airport.

The plane, identified by the Federal Aviation Administration as a two-seat Bellanca CH7A, landed in the middle of the 119-acre lake and was completely submerged within minutes, eyewitnesses said.

"This was a single-engine plane with no other passengers," Danielson said. "The pilot was able to get himself out of the plane and start swimming."

Wells was rescued by police who were able to row out to the pilot and take him to the shore. He was then airlifted from a nearby helipad to Morristown Medical Center where he was treated for back and ankle injuries, Danielson said.

Once the pilot was out of harm's way, efforts began to remove the plane from the water.

Dive teams from Picatinny Arsenal and Jefferson Fire Department Co. No. 2 attempted over the course of several hours to attach a line to the plane so that it could be hauled to shore with the use of a tow truck parked nearby.

At about 7 p.m., Danielson said salvage operations had to be terminated for the day.

"There was some trouble stabilizing the plane, and two of the divers were starting to show signs of hypothermia," Danielson said, adding that workers were also running out of daylight. "Safety is our top priority, so we decided to call it off."

Danielson said a professional salvage team would be called out to remove the plane today.

Justin Leyman, of Wantage, said he was unloading some fishing gear from his truck when he saw the plane fly overhead.

"I heard the engine cut out when it was about halfway across the lake," Leyman said. "I watched it make a sharp left bank and then come down in the water."

The plane landed "belly-down" as opposed to taking a nose dive, Danielson said.

"We're glad the pilot is all right, that was the main thing," Danielson said. "Now we just have to get this plane out of the water."

As the pilot had just taken off from the airstrip with a full tank of gas, Andover Township Fire Department Capt. Kyle Wilson estimated that 30-40 gallons of fuel were on the plane at the time of the crash.

Wilson noted that the fuel may spill into the water when it is pulled to the surface.

Larry Hajna, spokesperson for the Department of Environmental Protection, said the department's Borough of Emergency Response had been called to the scene and would continue to monitor the situation.

A statement issued by the Federal Aviation Administration indicated that the cause of the crash is currently unknown and the incident will remain under investigation.

Andover Township Police Department, the Andover Township Fire Department, the Lakeland EMS squad, New Jersey State Park Police, New Jersey State Police, representatives from the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and paramedics from Saint Clare's all responded to the scene throughout the course of the day.

The National Transportation Safety Board has also been notified of the crash.

http://www.njherald.com






ANDOVER TOWNSHIP — A light, single-engine plane ran off the runway at Aeroflex-Andover Airport and plunged into Lake Aeroflex on Monday morning, authorities said.

The 49-year-old pilot, the only occupant of the Citabria plane, was able to extricate himself and was swimming to shore when he was rescued by township police, authorities said.

His name has not been released, said Larry Hajna, spokesman for the state Department of Environmental Protection which manages the lake. He said the pilot complained of back and neck injuries.

The airport was closed down late Monday afternoon and not expected to reopen until Tuesday at 4:24 p.m.

Federal Aviation Administration records show the plane, manufactured by Bellanca, is registered to United Aerial Advertising of Delaware, Inc. The company is involved in towing advertising banners, authorities said.

A first responder on scene said the plane took a few minutes to sink. Police grabbed a rowboat from the shore and paddled out to the pilot, the first responder said.

A township police dispatcher confirmed the pilot was rescued from the lake and flown by helicopter to Morristown Medical Center. The incident was reported at 11:50 a.m. Monday.

The plane remains in the lake, said FAA spokesman Jim Peters, who added it is the responsibility of the plane owner to remove it from the lake. Once the plane is out, FAA investigators will examine it to reach a decision on cause of crash.

Citabria planes, which seat two people and are m, are used for flight training and personal reasons, authorities said.

The dispatcher said he did not immediately know whether the pilot was landing or taking off at the time.  

Hajna said the accident happened close to the shore.

Winds were reported as light at Andover today with few clouds in the area, making for an ideal flying day for recreation pilots.

The picturesque airport in Kittatinny Valley State Park is laid out between two lakes: the larger Lake Aeroflex to the north and Gardners Pond to the south. Runway 21 is to the north is 21, and runway 3 south. There is also a grass strip adjacent to the paved runway used for taking off and landing.

Aeroflex Lake is a popular spot for fishing and kayaking, surrounded by trails used heavily on weekends.

The small non-towered airport is used by a close-knit aviation community where several plane owners keep their smaller single-engine aircrafts.

The runway, 1,981 feet long and 50 feet wide, is ideal for tailwheel planes such as the iconic yellow Piper J-3 Cub. Several of those models can be spotted parked at the field. Tailwheel airplanes are often used for banner towing operations.

The FAA was notified. New Jersey State Forest Service, Andover Police, Andover fire, EMTs, and New Jersey Park Police were also involved, Hajna said.

The public airport and lake are part of Kittatinny Valley State Park and run by the New Jersey Forest Fire Service, which is part of the NJDEP's Division of Parks and Forestry.  

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailyrecord.com



ANDOVER TOWNSHIP - Authorities say a small plane crashed into a lake near a small airport in Sussex County Monday morning.

Officials say that the pilot was the sole occupant of the plane, and that he freed himself from the wreckage and swam away before a police rowboat plucked him from the water.

The single-engine plane went down shortly before noon near the Aeroflex-Andover Airport. It ended up in Lake Aeroflex in Newton, which is the state's deepest natural lake.

Authorities say the pilot was taking off from the airport when the crash occurred. He was taken to a hospital, but his name and further details on his injuries were not disclosed.

The airport is in Kittatinny Valley State Park and is owned by the state's Forest Fire Service.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

Story and video ➤ http://newjersey.news12.com









A pilot who crashed his Bellanca Citabria into a lake next to a Sussex County airport on Monday got out before it sank and was swimming toward shore when a police rowboat plucked him from the frigid water, authorities said.

The 49-year-old pilot was alone in the plane and complained of neck and back pain upon being rescued from Lake Aeroflex, state Department of Environmental Protection spokesman Larry Hajna said.

He was flown to Morristown Medical Center with what were described as non-life threatening injuries.

No one else was on the lake at the time of the 11:50 a.m. crash, but at least one person witnessed it and called 9-1-1, Andover Police Chief Eric Danielson said.

"The plane had taken off, went up, banked hard to the left and then went down -- not a straight nosedive, but landed more so on the belly of the plane and then tipped over and went down," Danielson said. 

Danielson said the plane was between 100 to 150 yards from shore when it crashed and sank to the bottom in at least 50 feet of water.

"The plane is totally submerged. You can't even see the tail," Danielson said.

Recounting the rescue, Danielson said Andover Township police officers Richard Then and Alex Price were rowing toward the pilot within 5 minutes of the 9-1-1 call.

The Federal Aviation Administration spokesman is investigating. FAA spokesman Jim Peters describe the plane as a Bellanca CH7A model.

Aeroflex-Andover Airport is in Kittatinny Valley State Park and is owned by the New Jersey State Forest Fire Service. The runway is 1,981 feet long and there is water at both ends of the runway.

The airport is owned by the New Jersey State Forest Fire Service.

Story and video ➤ http://www.nj.com

Evangel Air 4500-300-II, N4501L: Incident occurred April 21, 2018 in Anchorage, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft ground looped upon landing and struck runway lights.

http://registry.faa.gov/N4501L

Date: 21-APR-18
Time: 23:05:00Z
Regis#: N4501L
Aircraft Make: EVANGEL
Aircraft Model: 4500 300 H
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ANCHORAGE
State: ALASKA

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, N54288: Incident occurred April 21, 2018 in Chandler, Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Phoenix, Arizona

Aircraft experienced a bird strike.

Chandler Air Service Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N54288

Date: 21-APR-18
Time: 18:19:00Z
Regis#: N54288
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 172P
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: CHANDLER
State: ARIZONA

Bell 206B JetRanger, N49643: Incident occurred April 20, 2018 in Goleta, Santa Barbara County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Van Nuys, California

Rotorcraft struck a powerline, landed without incident.

Aspen Helicopters AG Helicopters Inc

http://registry.faa.gov/N49643

Date: 20-APR-18
Time: 15:50:00Z
Regis#: N49643
Aircraft Make: BELL
Aircraft Model: 206B
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: UNKNOWN (UNK)
Operation: 133
City: GOLETA
State: CALIFORNIA

Piper PA-34-220T Seneca, N8404B, registered to GILU Corporation and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred April 20, 2018 at Airglades Airport (2IS), Clewiston, Hendry County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office;  Miramar, Florida 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N8404B

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Clewiston, FL
Accident Number: WPR18LA124
Date & Time: 04/20/2018, 1700 EDT
Registration: N8404B
Aircraft: PIPER PA 34-220T
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 20, 2018, about 1700 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-34-220T, N8404B, sustained substantial damage when it impacted a taxiway following a loss of directional control during takeoff from the Airglades Airport (2IS), Clewiston, Florida. The airline transport pilot and three passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to GILU Corp, Middletown, Delaware, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight, that originated from Lakeland, Florida, about 1550, with an intended destination of 2IS.

The pilot reported that following an uneventful flight, he intended to practice landings at 2IS. After entering the airport traffic pattern for runway 31, he extended his downwind leg, and ultimately initiated a go-around due to traffic on the runway. The pilot stated that he flew to the west in order to provide spacing between himself and the other traffic and reentered the traffic pattern on a mid-field left downwind for runway 31. Following an uneventful full-stop landing, the pilot taxied back to runway 31. After takeoff, the pilot remained within the airport traffic pattern and intended on conducting a touch-and-go landing. The pilot further stated that after landing on runway 31, he set the flaps and advanced both throttles to takeoff power. Shortly after, he felt the airplane yaw to the right, observed an over-boost indicator light for the right engine, and lost control of the rudder/steering as the airplane exited the runway.

The pilot said that once the airplane was in the grass, he regained control and reduced both engines to idle and attempted to stop the airplane. However, the airplane struck the edge of a taxiway that spanned perpendicular to his direction of travel and the airplane became airborne briefly before landing on the opposite side of the taxiway. Subsequently, all three landing gear collapsed, and the airplane came to rest upright.

Post-accident examination of the airplane revealed that the fuselage and right wing were structurally damaged.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N8404B
Model/Series: PA 34-220T 220T
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOBE, 33 ft msl
Observation Time: 2115 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 34 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 14°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lakeland, FL
Destination: Clewiston, FL (2IS)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 26.733611, -81.048333 (est)

Southwest Airlines, Boeing 737-800: Incident occurred April 22, 2018 near Tampa International Airport (KTPA), Hillsborough County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Flight 4851: Encountered severe turbulence on descend, two (2) attendants reported injuries.

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 00:43:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: BOEING
Aircraft Model: B738
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: SOUTHWEST AIRLINES
Flight Number: 4851
City: TAMPA
State: FLORIDA

World Atlantic Airlines, McDonnell Douglas MD-83, N807WA: Accident occurred April 20, 2018 at Alexandria International Airport (KAEX), Rapides Parish, Louisiana

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Flight 708: Landed and main gear collapsed.

http://registry.faa.gov/N807WA

Date: 20-APR-18
Time: 19:19:00Z
Regis#: N807WA
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Aircraft Model: MD83
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PUBLIC USE
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: WORLD ATLANTIC AIRLINES
Flight Number: 708
City: ALEXANDRIA
State: LOUISIANA




An MD-80 Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) aircraft carrying 101 passengers made an emergency landing Friday afternoon at Alexandria International Airport.

Executive Director Jon Grafton said the aircraft, operated by World Atlantic Airlines in support of ICE, declared an in-flight emergency regarding a suspect landing gear at about 2:45 p.m. Friday. Grafton said the aircraft landed safely on runway 14 and traveled about 6,000 feet down the runway when the right landing gear collapsed. 

"Since they had declared an emergency, the emergency response crew was ready and on the scene immediately," Grafton said.

There were no reported injuries of any passengers or crew members.

Grafton said that as of Friday afternoon the plane is resting at the 32 end of the 14/32 runway, which is closed. The 18/36 runway remains open, and Grafton said there is no impact to commercial or private aviation and the airport is open for flights.

Grafton said standard incident protocols will be followed regarding notifying the Federal Aviation Administration and other airline safety agencies.

Original story can be found here ➤ https://www.thetowntalk.com



ALEXANDRIA, La. (AEX) - A U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement jet carrying 101 people was forced to make an emergency landing at Alexandria International Airport Friday afternoon.

According to England Airpark Executive Director Jon Grafton, the crew of the McDonnell Douglas MD-80 operated by World Atlantic in support of ICE called in an emergency approach around 2:45 p.m. Grafton said that the plane was having a problem with landing gear as it came in on Runway 14. It then traveled another 6,000 feet to the 32 end of the runway before it suffered a collapse of the right landing gear.

By that time, AEX’s Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting team had mobilized and was able to help the 101 passengers and crew safely leave the plane. ARFF then proceeded to foam the plane’s right wing.

Grafton said that the plane is resting on the 32 end of the runway, but that Runway 18-36 remains open to commercial and general aviation.

Story and video ➤ http://www.kalb.com

Beechcraft King Air 90, N73415: Incident occurred April 22, 2018 near Eppley Airfield (KOMA), Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Omaha, Nebraska

Aircraft experienced a bird strike on approach.

Baldi Bros Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N73415

Date: 23-APR-18
Time: 02:30:00Z
Regis#: N73415
Aircraft Make: RAYTHEON
Aircraft Model: C90GT
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: OMAHA
State: NEBRASKA

Robinson R44, N111VG: Incident occurred April 20, 2018 in Linden, Union County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Engine failure, which caused offsite landing.

N111VG LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N111VG

Date: 20-APR-18
Time: 14:15:00Z
Regis#: N111VG
Aircraft Make: ROBINSON
Aircraft Model: 44
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 135
City: LINDEN
State: NEW JERSEY

Gippsland GA-8 Airvan, N473CP: Incident occurred April 22, 2018 at Old Bridge Airport (3N6), Middlesex County, New Jersey

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Teterboro, New Jersey

Aircraft blew a tire on landing and veered off the side of the runway.

Civil Air Patrol: http://registry.faa.gov/N473CP

Date: 22-APR-18
Time: 18:30:00Z
Regis#: N473CP
Aircraft Make: GIPPSLAND
Aircraft Model: GA 8
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: OLD BRIDGE
State: NEW JERSEY