Saturday, March 16, 2019

Beechcraft D50 Twin Bonanza, registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N800DC: Fatal accident occurred March 16, 2019 near Riverside Municipal Airport (KRAL), California

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N800DC

Location: Riverside, CA
Accident Number: WPR19FA096
Date & Time: 03/16/2019, 1149 PDT
Registration: N800DC
Aircraft: Beech 50
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 16, 2019, about 1149 Pacific daylight time, A Beech BE-50 airplane, N800DC, impacted terrain in Riverside, California. The airline transport pilot was fatally injured; there were no ground injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight and no flight plan had been filed; however, the pilot had received flight following advisories. The flight originated from Chino Airport (CNO), Chino, California, at 1136, and was destined for Apple Valley Airport (APV), Apple Valley, California.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), prior to take off from CNO, the pilot had advised the local controller (LC) that there was an electrical issue and that he would advise when he was ready to takeoff. Shortly thereafter, the pilot informed the LC he was ready for takeoff. The pilot was cleared for departure and was instructed to turn right direct to Paradise (PDZ) VOR. The pilot was then transferred to Southern California TRACON (SCT). Shortly after the airplane took off, the CNO local controller was advised that the pilot was returning to the airport with electrical and engine issues; the pilot indicated that his right engine was out. The airplane subsequently diverted to Riverside Municipal Airport (RAL), Riverside, California, after the pilot reported that the airplane was losing altitude and RAL was the closest airport.

The airplane crashed about 2 miles southwest of RAL in a residential area.

Witnesses in the area heard the airplane and observed it flying at a low altitude before the nose of the airplane dropped, and the airplane began to spin. One witness estimated that the airplane made 1.5 revolutions before he lost sight of it behind houses. Another witness located in the front yard of the residence where the airplane crashed, reported that the airplane spun to the right before he lost sight of it behind his house.

The airplane was recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N800DC
Model/Series: 50 D50
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RAL, 818 ft msl
Observation Time: 1153 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / -3°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Chino, CA (CNO)
Destination: Apple Valley, CA (APV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  33.938333, -117.486389

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Coroner’s officials on Tuesday identified an Orange County man who died last weekend  when the small plane he was piloting crashed into the backyard of a Riverside residence.

Melvyn Caffey, 79, died Saturday just before noon, Riverside County coroner’s officials said. The Beechcraft D50 Twin Bonanza he was piloting was flying from Chino to Apple Valley, Federal Aviation Administration authorities said, and crashed shortly after Caffey sent a distress call to the tower at Riverside Municipal Airport.

The pilot was the sole occupant of the Beechcraft D50 Twin Bonanza, authorities said over the weekend. FAA records show that the plane was manufactured in 1956 and is registered to Caffey Aviation in Costa Mesa.

Four people were in the house in the 10500 block of Robinson Avenue near Norwood Avenue in the La Sierra Acres when the plane went down, Riverside police said. The plane struck a tree before landing in the yard.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane flying unusually low and hearing the engine sputtering before the crash. Two men in the area ran to the crash site but the pilot was already dead.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.


https://www.pe.com



Authorities identified a 79-year-old Orange County man as the pilot who died when a plane crashed into a Riverside residential area, the Riverside County coroner’s office said Tuesday.

Melvyn Caffey died Saturday after a Beechcraft D50 Twin Bonanza he was piloting crashed on the 10500 block of Robinson Avenue near Norwood Avenue in the La Sierra area at around 11:50 a.m., according to the Riverside police and fire departments.

Shortly before the crash, the pilot made a distress call to the Riverside Municipal Airport tower about engine trouble, fire officials said at the time, adding that there was was very little time between when the call came out and when the plane crash was reported.

Witnesses reported seeing the plane nose-diving into a home’s yard.

Four people were inside the home, but there were no injuries reported, officials said.

The home’s patio, fence and a tree in the yard sustained minor damages in the crash, according to the Riverside Fire Department.

The coroner’s office described Caffey’s home as being in Orange County, without offering any specific city.

No further information was available on what led to the crash.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were investigating the incident.


https://ktla.com


The pilot and sole occupant of a Beechcraft D50 Twin Bonanza died Saturday, March 16, when the plane crashed in a residential backyard in Riverside just before noon, shortly after the pilot reported engine trouble, authorities said.

The preliminary investigation determined that the plane was flying from Chino to Apple Valley, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Ian Gregor said.


FAA records show that the plane was manufactured in 1956 and is registered to Caffey Aviation in Costa Mesa.


The pilot’s name had not been publicly announced Saturday afternoon. Riverside Fire Capt. Brian Guzzetta said the pilot was an “older man.”


The crash occurred in the 10500 block of Robinson Avenue near Norwood Avenue in the La Sierra Acres area.


Four people were in the house where the plane went down, Riverside police spokesman Ryan Railsback said. The plane, which crashed almost immediately after the pilot’s 11:50 a.m. distress call to the tower at Riverside Municipal Airport, struck a tree before landing in the yard, he said. The neighborhood in the La Sierra area is slightly rural, with mostly one-story homes on large lots, some with horses and other farm animals.


No one on the ground was injured, Guzzetta said.


The two adults and two children at the Robinson Avenue home where the plane nosedived into the backyard had been working in that yard earlier on what was a rare sunny and warm Saturday morning this winter before going inside for lunch, he said.


“It was fortunate for the homeowners in the area. When you think of an aircraft going down, you think of it maybe taking out several homes,” he said.


Norwood Avenue resident Josh Nunnally said he saw the plane flying unusually low for the neighborhood, and it pitched up before it crashed.


“He came around the back side of this property,” Nunnally said, pointing east. “He was fighting the wind, and right when he got around this oak tree right here, it looked like he pulled straight up on the stick to gain altitude and it just dropped immediately. It straight nose-dived and it went straight into the ground real quick. It was a loud crash.”


He said an engine was “sputtering.”


Nunnally said he called 911. Then he and friend Albert Ortega rushed to the backyard of a home on Robinson and found a crumpled blue and white plane with the pilot dead.


“There was nothing we could do about it,” Nunnally said.


There was no fire or smoke, only the smell of engine fuel, according to Guzzetta.


Debris from the plane caused minor damage to nearby homes — a tree, a patio, a fence, Guzzetta said — and no debris field.


The plane went down about 2.5 miles west of the Riverside airport. About the same distance to the east of the airport a little more than two years ago, on Feb. 27, 2017, four people died when a small plane crashed, setting several homes ablaze.


That tragedy was fresh in the minds of Riverside firefighters when the standard plane crash response of two engines, a truck, a battalion chief and an ambulance were dispatched after multiple 911 callers reported an aircraft down.


“We always think worst-case scenario,” Guzzetta said. “When you think of an aircraft that comes down we’re thinking potential homeowners that are home, it’s a Saturday afternoon, people are out in the yards.


“I think we were all surprised when we came around the corner that we didn’t see a fire.”


The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash. An FAA employee at the crash site declined to comment. Robinson remained closed and the plane was still in the yard late Saturday afternoon. 


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.pe.com








RIVERSIDE, California (KABC) -- A small plane crashed into the backyard of a home in Riverside Saturday afternoon, killing one person. 

The Riverside Fire Department and Federal Aviation Administration confirmed the Beechcraft D50 Twin Bonanza crashed on the 10500 block of Robinson Avenue approximately at noon. 

Prior to the crash, Riverside Airport received a distress call of the plane going down. When authorities arrived on the scene, one victim -- a male -- was found. 

Fire officials said the plane crashed into a tree and no other damage was reported, but resources remained on the scene. 

No injuries were sustained by the four residents inside the home when the plane crashed nearby. 

A witness described watching the aircraft crash occur. 

"We saw the aircraft coming down, flying real low, and it was making noises and it came around the backside of this property, and it was trying to take a hard right to maybe do a crash-landing or something like that. He pitched up and then as soon as he pitched up, it looked like all the wind came out from underneath his wings, and it went straight down into the ground and it was a big crash," described witness Joshua Nunnally. 

Only one person appeared to be aboard the plane, which was flying from Chino to Apple Valley, the FAA said. 

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate the incident. The FAA said it typically takes the NTSB a year or more to determine the probable cause of an accident. Neither agency identifies people involved in aircraft accidents.

Story and video ➤ https://abc7.com

MXR Technologies MXS, registered and operated by Rob Holland Ultimate Airshows LLC under provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N540JH: Accident occurred March 25, 2018 at Kalt Ranch Airport (9TE5), Fulton, Aransas County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

 
http://registry.faa.gov/N540JH


Location: Fulton, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA127
Date & Time: 03/25/2018, 1645 CDT
Registration: N540JH
Aircraft: MX AIRCRAFT LLC MXS
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Uncontained engine failure
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 25, 2018, about 1645 central daylight time, a MX Aircraft LLC, MXS airplane, N540JH, collided with an object during a forced landing on an abandoned runway. The pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered and operated by Rob Holland Ultimate Airshows LLC under provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which was not operating on a flight plan. The flight originated from NAS Kingsville (NQI) Kingsville, Texas, about 1620, with an intended destination of The Red River Airport (0R7), Coushatta, Louisiana. The abandoned runway was identified as the Kalt Ranch Airport (9TE5), Fulton, Texas.

The pilot reported that while in cruise flight at 11,500 ft above mean seal level (msl) the engine began to vibrate. About 30 seconds later he heard a "bang." He reported the engine lost all power and there was an extreme vibration until he slowed the airplane and the propeller stopped rotating. A piece of the engine penetrated the engine cowling and engine oil covered the outside of the canopy restricting the pilot's vision.

The pilot located 9TE5 on his GPS and maneuvered the airplane to stay close to the airport. The pilot first saw the runway at an altitude of about 700 ft msl after he descended below the cloud layer at which time, he was committed to land with a 25-knot tailwind. The airplane touched down about one-third the way down the runway. The pilot did not see a large piece of debris on the runway due to the oil on the canopy. The left main landing gear separated from the fuselage, when it contacted the debris. The airplane slid on its belly before veering off the runway into the grass. The debris was identified as a piece of a building roof, that had been blown onto the airport during Hurricane Harvey.

The engine was a modified version of a six-cylinder Lycoming AEIO-540 engine. An examination of the engine revealed a hole in the top of the crankcase just behind the oil filler cap at the No. 5 cylinder. All four engine mounts were torn from the engine and the only structure holding the engine in place was the cowling. The engine was removed and examined further. The crankshaft was visible through the hole in the top of the engine and a broken counterweight was noted. The accessory section of the engine was pulled away and angled to one side. The aft top section of the oil sump was fractured, and only residual oil remained in the sump. The left magneto had separated from the engine. The oil screen and oil pump were clear of debris. The crankshaft gear was damaged, and all other accessory gears were undamaged. The top cylinders exhibited normal combustion signatures. It was noted that the crankshaft was broken, and one counterweight was missing.

The broken crankshaft was removed from the engine and sent to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) Metallurgical Laboratory for examination. The examination revealed the crankshaft fractured between the No. 5 and No. 6 rod journals. The forward fracture surface contained crack arrest marks indicative of fatigue cracking that emanated from the aft radius of the No. 5 rod journal. The fatigue crack propagation was through about 90% of the cheek cross section. The remaining fracture exhibited features consistent with overstress separation. The surface of the No. 5 rod journal and both radii for this journal exhibited black-blue heat tint consistent with exposure to heat and contained circumferential gouges. All the lubrication ports were free of debris.

A connecting rod which was fractured at the arm, remained attached to the No. 6 rod journal. The arm portion in the area of the fracture showed evidence of elongation deformation. One of the two counterweight assemblies fractured from the cheek. An ear portion extends out of the cheek and it serves as an attachment point for the counterweight assembly. The counterweight separated at the ear portion. The fracture surfaces on the connecting rod arm and the attachment ear for the counterweight assembly exhibited signatures consistent with an overstress separation.

During the investigation it was determined that the airport was abandoned and that the property, now part of the Goose Island State Park, belonged to the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department. Although the property was no longer maintained as an airport, the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department had not contacted the Federal Aviation Administration regarding the status of the airport. The Assistant Superintendent of the park was contacted by the NTSB investigator-in-charge regarding the status of the airport. The assistant supervisor promptly took the steps to have the airport decommissioned. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial; Flight Engineer
Age: 43, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 5-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/30/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/29/2017
Flight Time:   14993 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1850 hours (Total, this make and model), 14823 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 13 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MX AIRCRAFT LLC
Registration: N540JH
Model/Series: MXS NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2011
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 14
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/04/2018, Continuous Airworthiness
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2100 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 13 Hours
Engines: Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1706 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: AEIO-540
Registered Owner: ROB HOLLAND ULTIMATE AIRSHOWS LLC
Rated Power: 359 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: RKP, 24 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1753 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 220°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  6 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1300 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 16 knots / 22 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 150°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.82 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Haze
Departure Point: KINGSVILLE, TX (NQI)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: COUSHATTA, LA (0R7)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1620 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Kalt Ranch Airport (9TE5)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 15 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Holes; Rough
Runway Used: 30
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1650 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 28.154167, -96.975833 (est)

Cessna 180K, N77NP: Accident occurred March 23, 2018 in Canton, Madison County, Mississippi

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Jackson, Mississippi

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N77NP


Location: Canton, MS
Accident Number: ERA18LA115
Date & Time: 03/23/2018, 1800 CDT
Registration: N77NP
Aircraft: CESSNA 180K
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Landing area overshoot
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 23, 2018, about 1800 central daylight time, a Cessna 180K, N77NP, was substantially damaged during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power near Canton, Mississippi. The private pilot was not injured. The privately-owned airplane was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed from a private airstrip.

According to the pilot, while returning to the private airstrip, after a 20-minute flight over a river at 2,000 ft mean sea level (msl), the engine began accumulating carburetor ice and began to run "very rough." The pilot applied carburetor heat, but the engine continued to run rough. Since he was near the private airstrip he intended to land at, the pilot attempted to land with about 5 to 7 knots of tailwind. The airplane continued beyond the departure end of the runway and impacted trees before to coming to rest in the upright position.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector conducted an examination of the airplane after the accident and found that the wings, vertical stabilizer, rudder, and fuselage were substantially damaged. The engine remained attached to the airframe and the propeller remained attached to the engine. In addition, an unmeasured amount of fuel was noted in the fuel tanks.

In the NTSB Pilot/Operator Accident Report, the pilot indicated that there were no failures or malfunctions of the airplane that would have precluded normal operation prior to the accident.

The 1753 recorded weather observation at Hawkins Field Airport (HKS), Jackson, Mississippi, located about 18 nautical miles southwest of the accident location, included wind from 190° at 9 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 8,500 ft agl, temperature 24°C, dew point 4°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.10 inches of mercury.

The carburetor icing probability chart from Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB): CE-09-35 Carburetor Icing Prevention, June 30, 2009, showed a probability of icing at cruise/glide power at the temperature and dew point reported at the time of the accident.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 74, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/24/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/12/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 750 hours (Total, this make and model), 1500 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 10 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0.3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Registration: N77NP
Model/Series: 180K K
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1977
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18052937
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/05/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2800 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5283.3 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: R-O-470-U81B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HKS, 342 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 18 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1753 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 199°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 8500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 190°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.1 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Canton, MS
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Canton, MS
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1730 CDT
Type of Airspace:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.622500, -90.103056

Fairchild Funk M-62C F-23A, registered to and operated by the Texas Air Museum in accordance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight, N1131Z: Accident occurred March 23, 2018 in Columbia, Maury County, Tennessee


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N1131Z




Location: Columbia, TN
Accident Number: ERA18LA113
Date & Time: 03/23/2018, 1610 CDT
Registration: N1131Z
Aircraft: FAIRCHILD FUNK M62C F 23A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Positioning 

On March 23, 2018, about 1610 central daylight time, a Fairchild Funk M62C F-23A, N1131Z, operated by the Texas Air Museum, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near Columbia, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured and the airplane received substantial damage. The flight was operated in accordance with Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Smyrna Airport (MQY), Smyrna, Tennessee and was destined for Slaton Municipal Airport (F49), Slaton, Texas.

The pilot reported that before departing MQY, the airplane had a full fuel load of 44 gallons. He was anticipating making three or four stops along the 700-mile route. About 30 minutes after departing MQY, at an altitude of 2,500 ft mean sea level, he switched the fuel selector handle from the left tank to the right to "balance the load." About 1 minute after changing tanks, the engine began to "cough," then it shut down. The pilot attempted to restart the engine by switching the fuel selector back to the left tank, increased the mixture and turned on the fuel boost pump followed by the manual boost pump, but he was unable to restart the engine. His altitude was about 1,500 ft above ground level when he stopped trying to restart the engine. He found a long, grassy field and landed the airplane, but as the airplane touched down it sunk into the soft ground during the landing roll, which sheared off the landing gear as the airplane skidded to a stop.

During a postaccident interview the pilot stated that it was possible that he switched the selector to the incorrect position, but he could not be sure. He described that of the two of the airplanes he flies, the M62C, the accident airplane and the other airplane, an M62 are very similar; however, the accident airplane had a fuel selector handle and markings that were dissimilar to those of the other airplane he operated more frequently.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the right main landing gear separated from the airplane and the wing spar was bent. The left fuel tank was ruptured and contained no fuel. The right fuel tank indicated three-quarters or about 16 gallons of fuel. Several pieces of wreckage led from the touchdown point to the final resting place of the airplane; a distance of about 75 feet. Additional examination of the fuel system revealed no anomalies or defects.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His total flight time reported was 371 hours, of which, 18.9 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1965; it was a single-engine, low-wing, tandem two-seat airplane that was issued a special airworthiness certificate for experimental exhibition on July 7, 2012. It incorporated tailwheel landing gear and was equipped with a Jacobs R-755B2M, 275 hp radial engine and a 22-gallon fuel tank in each wing. The engine had accumulated 3,026 hours total time and 175.2 hours total time since major overhaul as of its last condition inspection on July 22, 2017.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private 
Age: 24, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam:03/17/2015 
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/24/2016
Flight Time:  371 hours (Total, all aircraft), 19 hours (Total, this make and model), 234 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FAIRCHILD FUNK
Registration: N1131Z
Model/Series: M62C F 23A NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1965
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 9
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/22/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 4300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1788 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Jacobs
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: RT55B2
Registered Owner: TEXAS AIR MUSEUM
Rated Power: 275 hp
Operator: TEXAS AIR MUSEUM
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KMRC, 681 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1615 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 75°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SMYRNA, TN (MQY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: SLATON, TX (F49)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1530 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  35.613333, -86.985000 (est)

Eurocopter-Kawasaki BK-117B-2, registered to Milwaukee Regional Medical Center and operated by Air Methods Corporation under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a helicopter air ambulance flight, N1174U: Accident occurred March 04, 2018 at Sheboygan County Memorial Airport (KSBM), Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Air Methods Corporation; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N1174U


Location: Sheboygan, WI
Accident Number: CEN18LA115
Date & Time: 03/04/2018, 2324 CST
Registration: N1174U
Aircraft: MESSERSCHMITT-BOLKOW-BLOHM BK 117 B-2
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Flight control sys malf/fail
Injuries: 3 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Medical Emergency) 

On March 4, 2018, about 2324 central standard time, a Messerschmitt-Bolkow-Blohm BK 117 B-2 helicopter, N1174U, operated by Air Methods Corporation, Englewood, Colorado, sustained substantial damage during a hard landing at Sheboygan County Memorial Airport (SBM), Sheboygan, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot, flight nurse, and flight paramedic were not injured. The flight was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a helicopter air ambulance flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a flight plan was not filed for the flight that departed about 2257, from Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. The flight was destined for the HSHS St. Nicholas Hospital, Sheboygan, Wisconsin.

According to the pilot, prior to departure from Fond du Lac, standard flight control and hydraulic transfer checks were performed, and no anomalies noted with the flight controls; the hover and departure were normal. The pilot, who was wearing night vision goggles, climbed the helicopter to 2,500 ft above ground level (agl) and accelerated to 125 knots indicated airspeed. Approaching the hospital, the pilot started a slow descent utilizing the collective and performed the before landing checks; all systems were normal. When attempting to decelerate from cruise speed, the pilot noticed restricted cyclic control movement, about 1 inch in any direction, with normal collective and yaw control. He then elected to abort the descent and execute a precautionary landing at SBM, located about 6 miles west of the hospital.

During the short flight to SBM, the pilot cycled the hydraulic test switch twice, which was located on the cockpit overhead panel, with no change noted to his flight controls. In addition, he asked the flight paramedic, who was seated in the left seat, to check if any circuit breakers were popped, verify systems were in normal operational ranges, and no cautions or advisory lights were illuminated. All circuit breakers and systems were normal with no anomalies noted.

The pilot initially flew an approach to runway 22; however, due to being too high and fast, he elected to circle to land on runway 13, which provided a more favorable quartering headwind. During the runway 22 approach and circle to land to on runway 13, the pilot held the cyclic trim switch aft in an attempt to gain additional aft cyclic authority. With continuous cyclic pressure against the aft stop, the pilot was able to slow the helicopter to 80 kts on final approach. The helicopter touched down near runway centerline, skidded about 500 ft, exited the runway surface, and came to rest upright.

During the landing, the helicopter's top wire strike protection system was separated due to contact by the main rotor blades, and the landing gear skids were partially collapsed. One main rotor blade had a portion of the blade skin and core separated, and all the blades sustained leading edge damage.

Postaccident examination of the helicopter's showed the cyclic trim position was found in the full forward and left position. Examination of the flight control system, to include the trim system, revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operations. The flight control dual hydraulic pack was functionally tested on the helicopter with no anomalies noted. The pack was removed from the helicopter for further examination and testing.

On April 5, 2018, under the supervision of a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, the helicopter cyclic control trim system switch and motors were tested about 50 times in each direction of full travel and from the neutral positions. No anomalies were noted during the tests.

On April 16, 2018, under the supervision of FAA inspectors at Air Methods Corporation, which was an approved component overhaul facility, the dual hydraulic pack was tested in accordance with repair manual REM 401-04-22 Dual Hyd-Pack Final Work/Test procedure. No anomalies were noted during the examination or test procedures.

A review of the aircraft maintenance logbook revealed no reports of control problems or recent maintenance to the flight control system.

According to the helicopter flight manual should a hydraulic system caution light illuminate, the hydraulic test switch should not be operated in-flight, but remain in the [normal] position.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 57, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Helicopter
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/27/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/05/2017
Flight Time:  5684 hours (Total, all aircraft), 84 hours (Total, this make and model), 3746 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: MESSERSCHMITT-BOLKOW-BLOHM
Registration: N1174U
Model/Series: BK 117 B-2
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Year of Manufacture: 1988
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Transport
Serial Number: 7146
Landing Gear Type: Skid
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/15/2018, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 7385 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 2 Turbo Shaft
Airframe Total Time: 8613 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Honeywell
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: LTS-101
Registered Owner: MILWAUKEE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER INC
Rated Power: 675 hp
Operator: Air Methods Corporation
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: SBM, 755 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2353 CST
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 9 knots / 18 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: 110°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.34 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 2°C / -4°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fond du Lac, WI (FLD)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Sheboygan, WI (SBM)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 2257 CST
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport: Sheboygan County Memorial (SBM)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 755 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5002 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Precautionary Landing; Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 None
Latitude, Longitude:  43.764444, -87.851389 (est)