Sunday, September 2, 2012

Aircraft MFG & Development Company, CH 2000, N651AM: Accident occurred August 30, 2012 in Nephi, Utah

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA378 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Nephi, UT
Aircraft: AIRCRAFT MFG & DEVELOPMENT CO CH 2000, registration: N651AM
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On August 30, 2012, about 1615 mountain daylight time, an Aircraft MFG & Development Company, CH 2000, N651AM, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while in the traffic pattern at the Nephi Municipal Airport (U14) near Nephi, Utah. The aircraft was registered to private individuals and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The certified flight instructor and private pilot receiving instruction were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the instructional flight. The local flight originated from the Provo Municipal Airport near Provo, Utah, about 1500.

According to witnesses located adjacent to the accident site, the airplane was observed on a southerly heading south of U14 before it turned left to a northerly heading at an altitude of about 150 feet above ground level. Multiple witnesses reported that the airplane seemed to be traveling at a slow speed when it suddenly pitched downwards and descended into the ground. One witness stated that prior to the sound of impact the engine seemed to be at a high power setting. Witnesses further stated that at the time of the accident, a thunderstorm with strong wind, heavy rain and lighting were present in the area.

Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) revealed the airplane impacted an open field about 1.7 miles southeast of U14. Wreckage debris was found within about 50 feet of the main wreckage. All major structural components were located within the wreckage debris area. The wreckage was relocated to a secure location for further examination.



(Courtesy photo) Robert  Lamb


Mark Patey still has work to do on his hangar, which is right next to that of his brother-in-law Robert Marion Lamb at the Spanish Fork-Springville airport.  

Lights hang from hooks, most of it is still a wood frame, but in the corner is a finished bathroom, with a door, tiles and painted walls. Patey had only mentioned in passing to Lamb that the plumbing was done, but when Patey came back to the hangar a week later, he’d found Lamb had finished the whole bathroom for him.

"When I asked him what I owe him, he just laughed," Patey said. Lamb joked that Patey just better let him run over from his own hangar next door to use the bathroom.

That was six months ago. Lamb’s hangar looks lonely these days, Patey said.

Lamb, 45, of Woodland Hills, and Peter John Mrowiec, 58, of Ontario, Canada, died Thursday in a fiery plane crash near Nephi.

Read more here: 
http://www.sltrib.com


AMD CH2000 Alarus, N651AM:  Accident occurred August 30, 2012 at Nephi Municipal Airport (U14),  Utah

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 651AM        Make/Model: CH20      Description: CH-200 Zénith
  Date: 08/30/2012     Time: 2355

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: NEPHI                       State: UT   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  WITNESS REPORTED AIRCRAFT NOSED OVER AND WENT STRAIGHT DOWN. THUNDERSTORM 
  REPORTED IN THE AREA.

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

WEATHER: KPVU 302348Z 31008KT 15SM -RA BKN080 BKN100 28/14

OTHER DATA


  FAA FSDO: SALT LAKE CITY, UT  (NM07)            Entry date: 08/31/2012 
http://www.airliners.net/photo
http://registry.faa.gov/N651AM 
http://flightaware.com/live/flight/N651AM

Aero Vodochody L-39C Albatros, Private (Warbird Education Foundation), N139GS: Accident occurred September 01, 2012 in Davenport, Iowa

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA602 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 01, 2012 in Davenport, IA
Aircraft: AERO VODOCHODY L39C, registration: N139GS
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On September 1, 2012, approximately 1330 central daylight time, an Aero Vodochody L39C single-engine turbo-jet airplane, N139GS, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain while maneuvering during an air show performance at the Davenport Municipal Airport (DVN), Davenport, Iowa. The commercial pilot sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was registered to the Warbird Education Foundation, Frisco, Texas, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, as an air show flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The flight originated from DVN approximately 1315.

Preliminary video and witness information revealed the flight of three L-39 airplanes during their air show performance. Shortly before the accident, the three airplanes were traveling in a westerly direction away from the spectators. According to the lead pilot, the airplanes were executing a crossover break maneuver, which the accident airplane was in the left wing position. During the crossover break maneuver, the lead airplane first entered a climbing maneuver, the left wing airplane entered a right turn and then the right wing airplane entered a left turn with adequate longitudinal spacing. During the maneuver, the accident airplane entered the right turn, descended, and impacted the terrain. A post-impact fire ensued. No evidence of any in-flight collision with the other airplanes was observed.

Examination of the accident site by Federal Aviation Administration inspectors showed the airplane was severely fragmented and consumed by fire. The main wreckage came to rest 1.2 miles from DVN in a field. The airplane was recovered from the field and brought to a secure location for further examination.

At 1347, the DVN automated surface observing system reported the wind from 070 degrees at 14 knots, visibility 9 miles, decreasing rain, scattered clouds at 2,300 feet, sky overcast at 4,000 feet, temperature 22 degrees Celsius, dew point 20 degrees Celsius, and an altimeter setting of 29.97 inches of Mercury.


 

Glenn “Skids” Smith was flying as a member of The Hoppers flight team when his plane crashed at the Quad City Air Show Saturday, September 1, 2012.

The crash happened just after 1 p.m. in an alfalfa field southwest of the Davenport Municipal Airport at Mount Joy, Iowa.

See more about the crash, including video and photos at this link:  http://wqad.com/2012/09/01/plane-goes-down-at-quad-city-air-show/

The Hoppers website said Smith was the newest member of The Hoppers team and he was working on becoming a certified lead formation pilot. 

Smith was from Frisco, Texas. 

 Smith had more than two decades, and more than 2,000 hours, of flying experience and held a commercial pilot’s license with instrument rating. 

“The Hoppers quickly became close and trusted friends. They are a special group of aviators dedicated to aviation safety and proficiency; and we use the excitement of aviation as a message to motivate kids to succeed,” the site said, quoting Smith.

Smith flew as First Officer on the crew for the Grace Flight Around the World Mission 2010.  He and two other aviators flew around the world in the summer of 2010 to raise awareness and funding for Grace Flight of America, which relies on donations and volunteer pilots to give free air transportation for medical and humanitarian purposes.  

Smith was also a certified scuba diver and licensed sailor who enjoyed snow skiing and golf.  He was 58 years old.

Story, photo gallery, video:  http://wqad.com


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 139GS        Make/Model: EXP       Description: AERO VODOCHODY L39C
  Date: 09/01/2012     Time: 1830

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: DAVENPORT   State: IA   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, NEAR DAVENPORT, IA

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: DES MOINES, IA  (CE01)                Entry date: 09/04/2012 
 
 http://registry.faa.gov/aircraftinquiry/NNum_Results.aspx?NNumbertxt=139GS

'Shake and bake': Testing a modern jet fighter helmet

The BBC has been given behind the scenes access to BAE Systems' Rochester plant, where they manufacture the latest model of digital, smart helmets designed for jet fighters. 

 These allow pilots to see an "augmented reality" view of the airspace around them, thanks to a system of LEDs on the helmet, sensors in the cockpit and cameras mounted outside the plane.

The technology in this "Striker" generation of helmets is being used at the moment by UK jet pilots flying Typhoon planes, for example.

Alan Jowett of BAE Systems explained the long programme of tests that takes place before a pilot can wear a helmet in a combat situation.

These begin at the development stage, where many possible design concepts are put through their paces, and end at the manufacture stage, where individual helmets that have actually been built are tested before leaving the plant.

Video Journalist: Dougal Shaw

Read more and watch video:
    http://www.bbc.com

Dana Air Crash: Senator David Mark Gives Scholarship To Victim’s Children

As the remains of one of the victims of the ill-fated Dana Air crash and Commanding Officer of the 6 Battalion, Nigerian Army, Abak, Akwa Ibom State, Lt. Col. Owoicho Jumbo Ochigbo,  was yesterday committed to mother earth, Senator David Mark announced scholarship to university level for the three children of late Ochigbo. The Senate president also adopted them as his children.

In his tribute at the grave side, the president of the Senate lamented the untimely death of late Ochigbo whom he described as an officer and a gentleman in every sense of it.

According to Mark "Lt. Col. Jumbo Ochigbo was clearly an officer and a gentleman in every sense of the word. He was passionate about development of the Nigerian Army. He was an intelligent young man with a very bright future who conducted himself in an exemplary manner" .

He counselled the bereaved family and the Nigerian Army to take solace in the fact that the deceased lived an exemplary life worthy of emulation.

In his tribute, the Chief of Army Staff, lamented  that  late Ochigbo will be greatly remembered for his gallantry, good sense of purpose and selfless service to our fatherland.

He said:" He was a worthy son of Nigeria, an officer and a gentleman. It is our fervent hope that we take solace  that his calling is beyond man's ability and imagination",

Read more here:  http://www.leadership.ng

Samoa aviation authority warns Samoa Air after near collision

The Samoa Civil Aviation has released its findings into a near collision involving planes operated by Polynesian Airlines and Samoa Air.

In the report, it found the incident on the 21st of June this year was the result of the Samoa Air aircraft departing Upolu for Savaii without communication and proper authorization from airport control.

The report issued a stern warning to Samoa Air, and for the airline in future to follow standard operating procedures.

Both aircraft were not carrying passengers at the time.

Neither airlines were immediately available for comment.
 

Source:  http://www.rnzi.com

Cessna 182P Skylane, N5981J: Accident occurred September 02, 2012 in Newberry, Michigan

NTSB Identification: CEN12TA604 
 14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Sunday, September 02, 2012 in Newberry, MI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/22/2013
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N5981J
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

The pilot detected a “hot electrical” odor during the local flight and decided to return to the airport. While on short final, a large puff of smoke was emitted from under the right side of the instrument panel and distracted the pilot. About the same time, the airplane encountered convective turbulence so severe that the pilot hit his head on the ceiling and everything that was on the seats was thrown forward. The pilot stated that he was further distracted by the turbulence encounter, and the airplane entered a nose down attitude and impacted the terrain before the pilot could take remedial action. The airplane slid about 200 feet before coming to a stop and a postimpact fire ensued. The cause of the electrical smell and smoke could not be determined as the fuselage was consumed by the postimpact fire, which likely resulted from fuel lines being ruptured during the impact.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane due to distraction from a combination of smoke in the cockpit and a sudden turbulence encounter while on short final approach. The cause of the cockpit smoke could not be determined due to the extensive damage sustained by the airplane during the postimpact fire.

On September 2, 2012, at 1415 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N5981J, owned and operated by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, collided with the terrain while landing at the Luce County Airport (KERY), Newberry, Michigan. The airline transport rated pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged by impact and a postimpact fire. The public use flight was being operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from KERY at 1257.

The pilot reported he was on a routine fire detection mission and was about 10 to 12 miles from the airport when he detected a “hot electrical” odor. He stated that everything was operating normally with the airplane at the time, but he was concerned enough that he radioed the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and told them he was going to return to KERY.

The pilot reported he entered the traffic pattern for runway 11 at KERY and set up for a stabilized approach to the runway. He reported the air was a little choppy and there was some convective turbulence in the area. While on final approach at a distance of 400 to 500 feet from the approach end of the runway, a large puff of smoke was rapidly emitted from under the right side of the instrument panel under the circuit breaker panel. This momentarily distracted him. At almost the same time, the airplane encountered convective turbulence that was severe enough that he hit his head on the ceiling and everything that was on the seats was thrown forward. He stated the turbulence extended his distraction. When he looked forward and turned his attention back to the airplane, the nose was down and all he could see was grass out of the windscreen. The airplane immediately hit the ground.

The nose gear broke off upon impact and the airplane slid forward up onto the runway. It continued to slide about 200 feet before stopping. By the time the airplane came to a stop, there were flames coming up into the cockpit. He suspected the flames were at least in part from damage sustained in the impact.

The pilot exited the airplane at which time he noticed his legs were burned. The airplane continued to burn. The fuselage aft of the firewall back to the empennage and the inboard section of both wings was consumed by fire. The empennage was present, but it sustained a substantial amount of damage from the fire. Due to the amount of fire damage, the cause of the electrical smell and subsequent smoke could not be determined.


NTSB Identification: CEN12TA604
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Sunday, September 02, 2012 in Newberry, MI
Aircraft: CESSNA 182P, registration: N5981J
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.


On September 2, 2012, at 1245 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182P, N5981J, owned and operated by the Michigan Department of Natural Recourses, collided with the terrain while landing at the Luce County Airport (KERY), Newberry, Michigan. The airline transport rated pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged by a post impact fire. The public flight was being operated under 14 Code of Federal Regulation Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from KERY at 1115.

The pilot reported he was on a routine fire detection mission and was about 10 to 12 miles from the airport when he detected a “hot electrical” odor. He stated that everything was operating normally with the airplane at the time, but he was concerned enough that he radioed the Michigan Department of Natural Resources and told them he was going to return to KERY.

The pilot reported he entered the traffic pattern for runway 11 at KERY and set up for a stabilized approach to the runway. He reported the air was a little choppy and there was some convective turbulence in the area. While on final approach at a distance of 400 to 500 feet from the approach end of the runway, a large puff of smoke was rapidly emitted from under the right side of the instrument paned near the circuit breaker panel. This momentarily distracted him. At almost the same time, the airplane hit turbulence that was severe enough that he hit his head on the ceiling and everything that was on the seats was thrown forward. He stated the turbulence extended his distraction.

When he looked forward and turned his attention back to the airplane, the nose was down and all he could see was grass out of the windscreen. The airplane immediately hit the ground.

The nose gear broke off and the airplane slid forward up onto the runway. It continued to slide about 200 feet before it stopped. By time the airplane came to a stop, there were flames coming up into the cockpit. He suspected the flames were at least in part from damage sustained in the impact.

The pilot exited the airplane at which time he noticed his legs were burned. The airplane continued to burn. The only portions of the airplane remaining were forward of the firewall, the wings from the fuel caps outboard, and a portion of the empennage.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 5981J        Make/Model: C182      Description: 182, Skylane
  Date: 09/02/2012     Time: 1816

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: NEWBERRY   State: MI   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED OFF THE END OF THE RUNWAY, NEWBERRY, MI

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   0     Ser:   1     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: GRAND RAPIDS, MI  (GL09)              Entry date: 09/04/2012 
 
 http://registry.faa.gov/N5981J

 
Courtesy Photo | Michigan DNR

June 2, 2012:  How Duck Lake Fire was discovered: Michigan DNR pilot spots a curl of smoke

September 2, 2012:   LUCE CO. -- A single engine plane crashed at the Luce County Airport this afternoon, police said.
 

The pilot, Dean Minett, 61, of Newberry, was taken to Helen Joy Hospital for burns to his legs and arms. Troopers from the Michigan State Police Sault Ste. Marie Post arrived on scene around 2:15 p.m. 

To find the plane on the west of the runway fully engulfed in flames. Minett told police he smelled smoke in the cockpit and tried to turn around to land but was distracted by smoke filling up the cockpit and crashed.

The plane was owned by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. It was being flown for aerial fire assistance. The plane is a total loss.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the crash. Michigan State Police was assisted on scene by the Luce County Airport staff, the Luce County Emergency Management Director, Luce County EMS, the Michigan DNR, and the Newberry Fire Department.

Read more:     http://www.uppermichiganssource.com
 

 LUCE COUNTY -- A Newberry man is lucky to be a live, after he crashed his plane and was able to walk away from the burning wreckage on Sunday. 

 Michigan State Police say they were called to the Luce County Airport at around 2:15pm Sunday afternoon on reports of a plane crash. When they got there, they saw a single engine plane on the west end of the runway fully engulfed in flames.

Fortunately the pilot, 61 year-old Dean Minett was able to walk away from the crash. He was taken to the hospital to be treated for some burns to his arms and legs.

Minett says during his flight, the cockpit of the plane filled with smoke, distracting him and caused him to crash.

The plane was owned by the Michigan DNR and was being flown for aerial fire assistance. The plane was a total loss.

The FAA and NTSB are investigating the crash.


Read more:  http://www.upnorthlive.com

Report: FAA should improve control of birds, wildlife near airports

By Ashley Halsey III,   Sunday, September 2, 2012

The victims could fill a novice bird-watcher's bucket list:  blackpoll warbler, double-crested cormorant, American black duck, short-billed dowitcher, black-crowned night heron, magnolia warbler, budgerigar and green-winged teal.

The other victims could fill an airplane repair shop:  several Boeing 737s, a Boeing 717, a Beechjet 400, a Boeing 747, a Boeing 757 and a Boeing 767.

Birds and jet airplanes don’t play well together.

This fact made news in 2009 when Capt. Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger III landed a US Airways flight in the Hudson River after a flock of geese stalled both of its engines. Such encounters don’t all turn out that well. In 1960, a flock of European starlings was blamed for an Eastern Airlines crash into Boston Harbor that killed 62 people.

Now there are more planes and more large birds flying around, and collisions between them are happening five times more often than they did in 1990, a new federal report says, sometimes with deadly results.

Almost 75 commercial planes have hit birds this year while taking off or landing at Washington’s three major airports, and in more than than a dozen instances in the past five years, the airplanes have suffered major damage.

At Dulles International Airport, the culprits doing damage have included a pair of red-tailed hawks and a starling. A Canada goose badly damaged a Boeing 737 at Reagan National Airport. And at Baltimore-Washington International Marshall Airport, planes have suffered substantial damage in collisions with a long-tailed duck, an American kestrel, a snow goose and a great blue heron.

Read more here:  http://www.washingtonpost.com

More patients for Royal Flying Doctors

The Royal Flying Doctors Service says a lack of remote health care has led to an increase in their services in the past year. 

Operational statistics for the past financial year show the number of emergency evacuations has increased by more than 10% in the south-east section.

In that area, the RFDS saw almost 42,000 patients.

Executive director of the RFDS South-East, Clyde Thompson, said there's a growing demand for the clinics in rural areas.

"Our patient contact numbers have increased, our total number of general practitioner clinics have also increased, and along with our primary health clinics have increased by about 16 percent," he said.

Read more:  http://www.abc.net.au

Cessna 172 Skyhawk: Plane flips but no one injured in wind-related incident at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport (KBJC), Denver, Colorado

Two men escaped uninjured Sunday after the single-engine plane they were flying flipped over after a hard landing at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport, according to officials with the North Metro Fire Rescue District.

Rescue crews were first called out to the airport, 11755 Airport Way, Broomfield, shortly after 4:30 p.m. when air traffic controllers reported that a plane had flipped over at the end of one of the runways, according to a news release.

When crews arrived they found a Cessna 172 Skyhawk flipped upside down about 100 yards east of the end of Runway 29 Right, according to the release.

The plane's two male occupants, a student and an instructor, were helped out of the plane. They were not injured in the crash, the release said.

The instructor told investigators they had been practicing take-offs and landings when strong down draft winds kept them from gaining the necessary altitude, and forced a hard landing the resulted in the plane flipping, according to the release.

The plane suffered heavy damage, but North Metro officials reported there were no fuel leaks or fire.

The Federal Flight Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident.

http://www.timescall.com

Teen flies solo: Falwell Airport (W24), Lynchburg, Virginia

 
Chris Tugman, right, and instructor Bob Walker stand next to the Cessna Skyhawk that Tugman trained in at Falwell Airport in Lynchburg. / AP

LYNCHBURG — The low-pitched groan of the metal doors gave way to a bolt of light as the sky opened up on the darkened hangar. 

 It was early yet, and the glare of the sun still was rising in the east. Christopher Tugman was ready to meet it.

“I’ve been looking forward to this for a long time,” said Christopher, who just turned 16. “I feel ready for it. I’m surprised; I thought I’d be nervous, but I’m not. I’m happy it’s coming.”

Christopher, an E.C. Glass High School sophomore, hadn’t been 16 for even eight hours when he stepped into Falwell Airport on Aug. 21. But he was about to reach a milestone that had made much older men sweat: his first solo flight.

If all went well, by the end of the morning Christopher would have his student pilot’s license and fly for the first time without the aid of an instructor — and in the process he’d likely stand, for at least one day, as the youngest licensed pilot in the nation.

“He’ll be flying before he’s driving; how about that?” said longtime flight instructor Bob Walker, who has trained Christopher for more than a year. “It’s so rare that this happens,” Walker said.

To get a student pilot’s license, which is required to fly solo, the Federal Aviation Administration requires a minimum age of 16. This made Aug. 21 the earliest Christopher could take the challenge, and made it highly unlikely there was any younger solo pilot in the air that morning. “I can’t say someone won’t come in the next day or the next day, but at least for today, he’ll have it,” Walker said proudly.


Read more here:   http://www.newsleader.com

Wing walker Jane Wicker wows crowd at Cleveland National Airshow

Sunday, September 02, 2012
Wicker stands atop her plane, a Boeing PT-17 "Super Stearman" biplane, as her pilot and ex-husband, Kirk Wicker, takes the Jane and the plane, Aurora, on a nosedive during their Swing Time Wingwalking demonstration at the Cleveland National Air Show at Burke Lakefront Airport on Sunday, September 2, 2012. Jane's boyfriend, Rock Skowbo, is also a pilot and a mechanic for the plane. Kirk's fiance, Diane D'Aubin, is also part of the team, which hails from northern Virginia. The show runs through Labor Day.


Published: Sunday, September 02, 2012, 4:39 PM 
Updated: Monday, September 03, 2012, 10:46 AM

 
Jane Wicker jumped down from the sunburst-painted wings of Aurora, her 450 HP Stearman airplane and strode over to the airfield fence to sign autographs.  

 Girls of all ages lined up to see svelte blond, with windblown hair who the Cleveland National Airshow's announcer described as maybe "120 pounds, soaking wet with a rock in her pocket."

"Did you see the airplane with the lady on it," one mother asked her pigtailed daughter.

"I was that lady," Wicker said smiling.

The 45-year-old Federal Aviation Administration Budget analyst had just spent around 20 minutes in the air carefully maneuvering about the wings of her plane over Burke Lakefront Airport.

Wicker started by standing atop center of the restored airplane with her arms raised high. Then she balanced between the wings on before hanging from her legs as the aircraft flipped over, leaving her sitting on the bottom side of the wing.

On top of that, the plane was flown by her ex-husband, Kirk, who joked about the many offers he's had from other divorcees to take their ex-wives on the wing.

Wicker began wing walking in 1990 after answering a classified newspaper advertisement for the position. She performed until 2002 and then took a break but bought her latest plane in 2009 and had it  restored  so she could return to the skies, where she also flies planes herself.

As Wicker signed shiny cards with her picture for the kids and leaned in close for photos, she repeated her mantra, "Girls can do anything guys can do. And better," Wicker told 3-year-old Jane Faulk, of Warren, who wore a pink sparkly hat over her blond hair.

One of the most common questions Wicker gets is about the danger involved with performing. She said she said she feels safer in the sky than anywhere else because she is in control of the risk. She also puts in a lot of practice time. Wicker almost didn't walk because morning rains left the canvas-covered wings of her plane wet and slippery. But the rains let up and despite some mighty humidity, thousands streamed into the 49th annual show -- a Labor Day weekend tradition for many -- to watch her zoom past, walking untethered and with no parachute.

"That is nuts," said Jacob Ryan, 12.

Ryan drove in for the show from Erie, Pa., with Bob Heath, his Big Brother.

Ryan explored all of the traditional air show exhibits, from the giant cargo planes to the popular United Boeing 737-800 -- even hopping inside the giant engine intake, a popular spot for photos.

The show's crowd grew steadily in the lead up to the heavily anticipates U.S. Navy Blue Angel's demonstration.

The show also featured scads of Navy-related displays to tie the event in with Cleveland's Navy Week and Bicentennial of the War of 1812.

As part of that recognition, air show attendees got to see a "pass in review" or mini-parade through inner harbor flight line that included the a patrol ship, the USS Hurricane and two Canadian coastal defense vessels, the HMCS Moncton and the HMCS Summerside.

During the show announcers told visitors that all air show tickets would be accepted again for admittance today, though rain showers and thunder storms are forecast.

Fans who bought tickets for today's show can check the clevelandairshow.com site for schedule updates and information on performance cancellations.


Source:  http://www.cleveland.com

Quad City Challenger II, N2481P: Accident occurred August 30, 2012 in Ocala, Florida

http://registry.faa.gov/N2481P

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA537
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Ocala, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/11/2014
Aircraft: QUAD CITY ULTRALIGHTS CHALLENGER II, registration: N2481P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

After takeoff, the pilot remained in the traffic pattern, performed a low pass, and then departed to the southeast. When the airplane was about 4 miles away from the departure airport with no adverse weather nearby, the airframe was overstressed, which resulted in the in-flight separation of the outer 3 feet of the right wing and a portion of the right flaperon. The airplane then descended uncontrolled and impacted terrain. No preexisting cracks were noted in the fracture surfaces of the forward and aft spars of the right wing. Inspection of the engine and flight controls revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot's inadvertent overstress of the airplane, which resulted in the in-flight separation of the outer section of the right wing.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 30, 2012, about 1612 eastern daylight time, a Quad City Ultralights Challenger II, N2481P, registered to and operated by a private individual, crashed in a field surrounded by trees near Ocala, Florida. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight from Morriston, Florida, to Leeward Air Ranch Airport (FD04), Ocala/Belleview, Florida. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The flight originated from Morriston, Florida, about 7 minutes earlier.

The purpose of the flight was to reposition the airplane to a nearby airport for an intended annual inspection.

The son of both occupants reported to either the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector-in-charge or the NTSB investigator-in-charge that he and his father, who is not a certificated pilot, inspected the airplane before he (the son) started the engine. The son stated that he asked his father how much fuel was on-board and he replied 13 gallons; the son later reported that was more than adequate to complete the intended flight. With his father seated in the front seat, the son started the engine and reported the engine started, "right up." After the engine was started a fuel leak at the carburetor was noted, smoke was noted coming from the engine, and it did not develop static maximum red line rpm. This was attributed to the choke that was left on. His mother then boarded the airplane, and it was taxied to the runway where an engine run-up lasting 5 minutes was performed. The son reported the engine sounded OK, and no discrepancies were reported. After takeoff the son reported that his mother performed a low pass then the flight departed to the southeast.

The son also reported that personnel from the airport where his parents had intended flying arrived at the departure airstrip and inquired about his parents. Law enforcement was then notified of the overdue airplane and a search was initiated.

There were no known witnesses to the accident, which occurred during daylight hours. The wreckage was located about 2000 hours the same day.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot, age 50, seated in the rear seat, was the holder of a private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land rating issued on April 23, 2012. On the application for the private pilot certificate she listed a total time of 47.3 hours. She held a third class medical certificate with a restriction to have available glasses for near vision issued October 25, 2011.

The front seat occupant was not a FAA certificated pilot.

The son of both occupants was asked if his parents performed aerobatic maneuvers and he reported they never did. He reported they fly straight and level from point A to B.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was built from a kit manufactured by Quad City Ultralight Aircraft Corporation. On January 13, 1992, the kit was sold to a company in Florida, and was built as model Challenger II, and was designated serial number CH20192-0779B. It was powered by a 52 horsepower Rotax 503 dual carburetor dual ignition engine and equipped with a wooden fixed pitch propeller. An operating Light Sport Aircraft Special Airworthiness Certificate was issued on January 7, 2008. On the application for U.S. Airworthiness Certificate, the airframe total time was listed at 300 hours.

According to FAA records, the pilot and front seat occupant purchased the airplane on August 21, 2011.

The FAA-IIC reported that the maintenance records were not located; however, the son of both occupants reported the airplane was always kept in great shape.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

A surface observation weather report taken at Ocala International Airport-Jim Taylor Field (OCF), Ocala, Florida, at 1550, or approximately 22 minutes before the accident indicates the wind was from 180 degrees at 3 knots. The visibility was 10 statute miles, and scattered clouds existed at 4,000 and 5,500 feet. The temperature and dew point were 32 and 23 degrees Celsius, respectively, and the altimeter setting was 30.04 inches of mercury. The accident site was located approximately 4 nautical miles and 301 degrees from OCF.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The accident site consisted of an open field surrounded by trees. The main wreckage was located at 29 degrees 12 minutes 26.02 seconds North latitude and 082 degrees 17 minutes 24.47 seconds West longitude, while the outer section of the right wing was located at 29 degrees 12 minutes 24.46 seconds North latitude and 082 degrees 17 minutes 28.46 seconds West longitude, or about about 390 feet and 245 degrees from the main wreckage location.

The main wreckage came to rest nearly inverted in a field with the outer 3 foot section of the right wing and outer portion of the right flaperon separated. Also located away from the main wreckage along an energy path were a wing inspection panel, a hat, splintered pieces of the propeller, 2 pieces of ribs from the inboard section of the right wing, and Dacron fabric covering. There was no evidence of tree contact on the leading edge of the right wing, nor on any of the observed components. The horizontal and vertical stabilizers remained attached, and all remaining flight control surfaces remained attached. Extensive impact damage was noted to the left wing, fuselage, and cockpit. The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Examination of the elevator, rudder, and flaperon flight control system revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction.

Examination of the right wing revealed the main and aft spars fractured just outboard of the lift strut attach point. Closely matching the fracture surfaces of the main and aft spars but not allowing them to touch revealed the outer portion of the right wing was displaced up approximately 45 degrees. Additionally, the main spar of the right flaperon was displaced up about 7 degrees beginning at a splice joint, and the inboard hinge of the flaperon was bent up approximately 30 degrees. The fracture surfaces of the main and aft spars of the right wing were labeled as to location and direction, and were cut out and retained for further examination by the NTSB Materials Laboratory. Additionally, the mating sections of the left wing were also sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for comparison purposes.

Examination of the cockpit revealed the airspeed indicator and tachometer were off scale low, both needles of the cylinder head temperature gauge were at or just below the low end marking. The exhaust gas temperature of one cylinder was indicating 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit, while the other was indicating off scale low.

Examination of the engine which remained attached to its attach points on the airframe revealed the drive belt was in place and the engine rotated freely by hand. Power train continuity was confirmed. The exhaust was removed and no evidence of scoring was noted on the sides of the pistons. Inspection of the carburetors revealed 1 bowl had some debris, while the bowl of the other carburetor contained some fuel. Inspection of the fuel pump revealed no evidence of preimpact failure or malfunction.

Examination of the wooden propeller which remained attached to the engine revealed one blade was fractured; three pieces were recovered along the debris field. The other blade

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Postmortem examinations of the pilot and passenger were performed by the District 5 Medical Examiner's Office, Leesburg, Florida. The cause of death for both was listed as "Multiple blunt force injuries due to airplane crash."

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens of the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory (FAA CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and also by Wuesthoff Reference Laboratory (Wuesthoff), Melbourne, Florida. The toxicology report by FAA CAMI indicated testing for carbon monoxide, and cyanide was not performed. No volatiles were detected in the vitreous fluid and no tested drugs were detected in the liver specimen. The toxicology report by Wuesthoff indicated the results were negative for volatiles, and tissue immunoassay screen. Unquantified amount of caffeine was detected, and the carboxyhemoglobin saturation was 0.62 percent. Iron (470 mcg/g) was detected, and was above the reporting limit of 1.9 mcg/g. Additionally, the following was detected in the vitreous fluid (18.2 mg/dL urea nitrogen, 0.53 mg/dL creatinine, 138 mEq/L sodium, 15.4 mEq/L potassium, 121 mEq/L chloride, and less than 10 mg/dL glucose.

Forensic toxicology testing was performed on specimens of the passenger by Wuesthoff. The results were negative for volatiles, and urine immunoassay screen, and unquantified amounts of caffeine and ibuprofen were detected in the urine specimen. Additionally, the following was detected in the vitreous fluid (18.1 mg/dL urea nitrogen, 0.55 mg/dL creatinine, 140 mEq/L sodium, 14.5 mEq/L potassium, 121 mEq/L chloride, and less than 10 mg/dL glucose. The carboxyhemoglobin saturation was 0.69 percent. Iron (420 mcg/g) was detected, and was above the reporting limit of 1.9 mcg/g.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Examination of the fractured right wing pieces was performed by the NTSB Materials Laboratory located in Washington, DC. The results of the examination revealed the outboard portion the forward spar at the fracture area was deformed up relative to inboard portion, while the outboard portion of the aft spar at the fracture area was deformed forward and slightly up relative to the inboard portion. Bench binocular microscope examination of the forward and aft spar pieces for the right wing revealed the fractures faces exhibited slant fractures with coarse features consistent with overstress separation with no evidence of fatigue cracking. The aft spar contained a through hole in the area above the trailing edge wing strut. Examination revealed the fracture in the aft spar intersected the center portion of this hole, exposing the outboard and inboard side of the hole. The inboard face of the hole was severely deformed consistent with ground impact damage, whereas, the mating half of the hole for the most part did not show evidence of deformation damage.

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA537
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, August 30, 2012 in Ocala, FL
Aircraft: QUAD CITY ULTRALIGHTS CHALLENGER II, registration: N2481P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 30, 2012, about 1612 eastern daylight time, a Quad City Ultralights Challenger II, N2481P, registered to and operated by a private individual, crashed in a field surrounded by trees near Ocala, Florida. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for the 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight from Morriston, Florida, to Leeward Air Ranch Airport (FD04), Ocala/Belleview, Florida. The airplane sustained substantial damage, and the private pilot and one passenger were fatally injured. The flight originated from Morriston, Florida, about 7 minutes earlier.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector-in-charge (FAA-IIC), there were no known witnesses to the accident. Inspection of the accident site revealed a debris path of airplane parts oriented on a southeasterly heading, consistent with a flight towards the destination airport. The main wreckage came to rest nearly inverted in a field with a 3 foot section of the right wing separated; the separated right wing piece was located about 370 feet from the resting spot of the main wreckage. The inspector also noted there was no evidence of tree contact on the leading edge of the right wing, nor on any of the observed components. The wreckage was recovered for further examination.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 2481P        Make/Model: EXP       Description: EXP- CHALLENGER II
  Date: 08/30/2012     Time: 2010

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Unknown

LOCATION
  City: OCALA   State: FL   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES.

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   2
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    

WEATHER: KOCF 301950Z 18003KT SCT040 SCT055 32/23 A3004

OTHER DATA


  FAA FSDO: ORLANDO, FL  (SO15)                   Entry date: 08/31/2012 


 
Cathy Jennings, age 50, of Morriston passed away on Thursday, August 30, 2012. She was born in Middletown, OH on December 26, 1961 and was married to Gilbert Jennings for 35 years.

She is survived by their sons Jereme (Leslie Seale) Jennings of Morriston, FL and Josh (Kayla) Jennings of Morriston, FL. Cathy is the daughter of John Perry and sister of John (Mary) West of Morriston, FL. She graduated from Vanguard High School and worked her own metal fabrication shop for 20 years. She was a member of the MeadowBrook Church.

Visitation will be held Tuesday 6:00pm-8:00pm at the Fellowship Baptist Church where the service will be held Wednesday 10:00am at the church with burial following at West Marion Baptist Church Cemetery. 

Arrangements are by Roberts Funeral Home 19939 E. Pennsylvania Ave Dunnellon, FL 34432. Condolences may be left at RobertsofDunnellon.com

Guest Book:  http://www.legacy.com/guestbook

Obituary:  http://www.legacy.com


Gilbert Jennings, age 53, of Morriston passed away on Thursday, August 30, 2012. He was born in Ocala, FL on June 9, 1959 and was married to Cathy Jennings for 35 years.

He is survived by their sons Jereme (Leslie Seale) Jennings of Morriston, FL and Josh (Kayla) Jennings of Morriston, FL. Gilbert is the son of Bill and Leona Jennings and brother of James (Glenda) Jennings and Willie Jennings. He graduated from Vanguard High School and worked his own metal fabrication shop for 20 years. He enjoyed flying, antique cars and his family and was a member of the MeadowBrook Church.


Visitation will be held Tuesday 6:00pm-8:00pm at the Fellowship Baptist Church where the service will be held Wednesday 10:00am at the church with burial following at West Marion Baptist Church Cemetery.

Family suggests contributions may be made to the Breast Cancer Awareness.
Arrangements are by Roberts Funeral Home 19939 E. Pennsylvania Ave Dunnellon, FL 34432. Condolences may be left at RobertsofDunnellon.com 


Guest Book:    http://www.legacy.com

Obituary:   http://www.legacy.com


 
Gilbert Jennings and Cathy Jennings
 (Family photo)

Fear of flying schoolboy stuck in Dubai 'flies'

The schoolboy whose fear of flying has left him marooned in Abu Dhabi has just "landed" an Airbus passenger jet as part of his therapy.

Joe Thompson, 11, from Weston-super-Mare, has had a one-hour session on a pilot training Airbus A320 simulator at Etihad Airways HQ to try to overcome his fear of all long-distance travel.
 

His father, Tony, told the Western Daily Press yesterday: "He had a bad anxiety attack in the car going down and when we got to within 20 yards of the entrance was doubled up with stomach pains – these are usual symptoms.

"But he managed to make it into the training centre and after some encouragement entered the simulator and really enjoyed the session. In fact he landed the plane twice! He said the experience really helped him and he was able to speak to some of the aircrew.
 

Read more:   http://www.thisissomerset.co.uk

Glenn L. Martin Company: This Martin retiree was born when company was: 1912

Roy S. Greenough winces slightly when he recalls the 24-hour work shifts at the Glenn L. Martin Co. during World War II. With tens of thousands of other workers, he built warplanes at Martin's Baltimore plant to fight Hitler's Third Reich.  

"Sometimes we'd work around the clock to get those planes out the door," he said. "A lot of times, people didn't have a chance to go home. Wives would come to the plant and bring their husbands a change of clothes." 

The memories are still vivid for the Kissimmee resident, who turned 100 in July — just a month before his longtime employer celebrated its own century mark.

Like many of his generation, Greenough honed a strong work ethic that became his trademark. But few people today have had the same connection with their employer that Greenough had with the Glenn L. Martin Co. — now Lockheed Martin Corp., the nation's biggest military contractor and one of Central Florida's biggest employers.

Not only was Greenough born just weeks before U.S. aviation pioneer Glenn L. Martin started his company in August 1912, he also grew up in Cleveland, which became the company's headquarters in 1918, when Martin moved there from California. As a youngster, Greenough said, he saw the company founder nearly crash-land his plane at a local airfield.

Read more:    http://articles.orlandosentinel.com

Air Zimbabwe to resume operations

ZIMBABWE – Cabinet is expected to come up with a raft of measures tomorrow to enable Air Zimbabwe to resume international flights by early next month. 

Permanent Secretary for Transport, Communications and Infrastructural Development Mr Munesu Munodawafa last week said that the national airline’s future was being discussed at the highest level. He said Transport, Communications and Infrastructural Development Minister Nicholas Goche would issue a statement after the Cabinet meeting.

Mr Munodawafa could not disclose the new measures, saying they were subject to Cabinet approval.  “There are discussions going on in Government that are at an advanced stage,” he said.

“As I have said, these developments are subject to Cabinet approval. The Minister (Goche) will issue a statement after Cabinet probably next week (this week).”

Read more:   http://www.zimdaily.com

What an airline merger might mean for you

NEW YORK — While American Airlines and US Airways have started merger discussions, it would be several months — if not years — before passengers see any real impact. 

Passengers with existing tickets on American or US Airways — and members of both frequent-flier programs — shouldn’t fret. No changes will come anytime soon.

Assuming quick merger negotiations, American’s parent company, AMR Corp., would still have to work its way through the bankruptcy process. Then, the Department of Transportation and the Justice Department would have to sign off on it. Finally, once a deal closes, the new company could operate two separate airlines for a number of years.

If the airlines finally merge, here’s what passengers can expect:  http://www.dispatch.com

Four Israeli fighter jets violate Lebanese airspace

Four Israeli fighter jets have penetrated Lebanese airspace and flown over parts of the country in flagrant violation of a UN Security Council resolution. 

The military aircraft violated Lebanese airspace over the southern border village of Kfar Kila, located 96 kilometers (59 miles) south of Beirut, at 10:15 a.m. local time (0715 GMT) on Sunday, according to a statement issued by the Lebanese military.

The warplanes flew over several areas in southern Lebanon before they left Lebanese airspace at 12 p.m. local time (0900 GMT), while flying over the border town of Alma al-Shaab.

Lebanon's government, the Hezbollah resistance movement, and the UN Interim Force in Lebanon, known as UNIFIL, have repeatedly condemned the overflights, saying they are in clear violation of UN Resolution 1701 and the country's sovereignty.

Read more:  http://www.presstv.ir

Western Michigan University College of Aviation part of Michigan Aviation Month celebrations

More than 20 aviation events will be held statewide in September, a month proclaimed Michigan Aviation Month by Gov. Rick Snyder.

Events include the seventh annual fly-in at Gogebic-Iron County Airport on Sept. 8, and the Western Michigan University College of Aviation fly-in pancake breakfast on Sept. 15 at W.K. Kellogg Airport in Battle Creek.

Dreams and Wings Fly Day will be held on Sept. 29 at Dupont Lapeer Airport in Lapeer, where pilots will give rides to children with disabilities.

Michigan Air Tour, where a group of pilots will fly to airports in Detroit, Marshall, Adrian, Battle Creek, Cadillac and Alpena from Sept. 21 to 23 to highlight each airport’s services and economic importance.

State officials say aviation-related activities contribute more than $10 billion annually to Michigan’s economy.


http://www.battlecreekenquirer.com

Jabiru ultralight: Pilot escapes injury in fiery aircraft crash - near Bairnsdale in eastern Victoria, Australia

AN ultra light pilot has walked away from his aircraft unharmed after crashing in farmland and watching his plane burst into flames in Victoria's east this afternoon. 

 Police say the pilot, in his 20's, was 500 metres in the air when his engine started faltering and he made a quick decision to land on some flat farm land at Johnsonville, near Bairnsdale.

They say his craft hit an overhead optic cable as he came into land at around 1.40pm (AEST).

Police say he was able to unstrap himself from his harness and get clear of the crash site before the plane went up in flames.

http://www.news.com.au

Man uses plane for heroics

Hamburg Township Supervisor Pat Hohl, right, presents township resident Dick Lawrence with the Angel Flight Michigan Pilot of the Year Award during a township Board of Trustees meeting Aug. 22. Lawrence uses his private plane to transport medical emergency patients who are unable to travel on commercial airlines. / SUBMITTED PHOTO

Hamburg Township resident Dick Lawrence was presented with the Angel Flight Michigan Pilot of the Year Award at the Hamburg Township Board of Trustees meeting Aug. 21. 

 "In mid-July, Angel Flight Mid-Atlantic contacted me and advised that Hamburg resident, Dick Lawrence had been named Angel Flight Michigan Pilot of the Year and asked that we present him with this award," said Hamburg Township Supervisor Pat Hohl. "Angel Flight Mid-Atlantic is an organization that coordinates and facilitates private pilots in the transportation of medical emergency patients that are unable to travel on commercial airlines. These volunteers provide the plane, fuel and time to transport these people, sometimes on a moment's notice in the middle of the night."

"Recently, on a Saturday afternoon as I was mowing my lawn, I received a phone call from Mercy Medical Air Lift that they had a young girl from Detroit that had to be in Pittsburgh by 6:30 p.m. that day to receive a lung transplant," said Lawrence. "I rushed to Howell, got my plane, flew to Detroit for her and her mother, and landed in Pittsburgh at 6:07 p.m., where an ambulance was waiting. This little girl is on oxygen 24/7 and requires 4 liters per minute. They had four cylinders with them for this trip.

"The mother later called to thank me and told me that, unfortunately, there was a problem with the donated lung and the operation did not happen. The little girl's comment was, 'It's OK, Mom. There will be another time,' " he added.

Read more: http://www.livingstondaily.com

Beech 95-A55, N71BM: Accident occurred August 29, 2012 in Millville, New Jersey

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA535
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 29, 2012 in Millville, NJ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013
Aircraft: BEECH 95-A55, registration: N71BM
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot receiving instruction was conducting a simulated engine-out emergency landing when the accident occurred. Several eyewitnesses reported that the airplane began to roll to the left while it was in flight. One eyewitness reported hearing the airplane's engines increase in power. During postaccident interviews, the flight instructor stated that the left engine was at the idle power setting to simulate the engine failure for landing; however, he could not recall the events that took place during the accident sequence. Examination of the airframe and engines revealed no anomalies or malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation. Review of the private pilot’s medical history revealed nothing to suggest a medical cause for impairment or incapacitation. Therefore, it is likely that during the landing flare, the pilot receiving instruction added power to the right engine and failed to properly compensate for the increased asymmetrical thrust, which resulted in a loss of control.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The pilot receiving instruction failed to maintain airplane control during the simulated engine-out landing. Contributing to the accident was the flight instructor's failure to take timely remedial action.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On August 29, 2012, about 1445 eastern daylight time, a Beech 95-A55, N71BM, impacted the ground while landing at Millville Municipal Airport (MIV), Millville, New Jersey. The certificated flight instructor (CFI) sustained serious injuries, and the certificated private pilot receiving instruction was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and all flight control surfaces. The airplane was registered to the pilot receiving instruction and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed.

Several eyewitnesses reported that the airplane appeared to have touched down on the runway before it veered to the left and "cart-wheeled" prior to coming to rest about 500 feet from the edge of the runway. Other witnesses reported that the airplane was approximately 20 feet above ground level, rolled to the left, climbed, then nosed over, impacted the ground, and "cart-wheeled." One eyewitness reported hearing the "engines power up," and then observed the airplane pitch up and to the left prior to impacting the ground in a nose-low attitude.

According to a written statement by the CFI, the pilot receiving instruction was conducting a simulated engine-out emergency landing with the left engine at idle power when the accident occurred. However, the CFI at the time of this writing had no memory of the accident sequence. He stated that his last recollection of the accident was being over the runway threshold in the simulated engine-out landing configuration.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Flight Instructor

The CFI, age 69, held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land and instrument airplane. He also held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single- and, multi-engine, and instrument airplane; as well as a flight engineer certificate with a rating for jet. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate was issued September 1, 2011. He reported 2,729.9 total hours of flight experience, of which 35.8 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent flight review was conducted on July 24, 2011.

Pilot Receiving Instruction

The pilot receiving instruction, age 60, held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine land. His most recent FAA third-class medical certificate was issued August 25, 2010, and was not valid for any class after. The pilot's logbook was recovered and indicated 216.9 total hours of flight experience, of which 11.9 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. His most recent flight review was conducted on August 23, 2012.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a low-wing, multiengine, retractable tricycle gear airplane. It was equipped with two Continental Motors IO-470-L, 260-hp engines, and two Hartzell 2-bladed propellers. According to FAA and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1962 and registered to the owner on December 15, 2011. The airplane's most recent annual inspection was dated on July 1, 2012. At the time of the inspection, the reported aircraft total time was 3,813.8 hours. At the time of the inspection, the right engine had 1,771.8 hours since major overhaul and the left engine had 761.0 hours since major overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1454 recorded weather observation at MIV included wind from 290 degrees at 5 knots, 10 miles visibility, clear skies, temperature 27 degrees C, dew point 13 degrees C; barometric altimeter 29.97 inches of mercury.

COMMUNICATION

At 1426:59, one of the pilots made initial contact with Millville Radio, which was monitored by personnel at Lockheed Martin Flight Service. The pilot subsequently reported that the airplane was 5 miles to the southwest of MIV, and was inbound for landing. At 1429:16, the pilot reported entering the downwind leg of the traffic pattern for runway 32. The final transmission recorded from the accident flight was at 1431:52, when the pilot stated "seven one bravo mike wilco we're uh simulate an engine out."

AIRPORT INFORMATION

MIV was a publicly-owned airport and at the time of the accident did not have an operating air traffic control tower; however, a flight service station was located on the airport at the time of the accident. The airport was equipped with two runways, designated as runway 10/28 and 14/32. The runways were reported as "in good condition" at the time of the accident. Runway 10/28 was 6,003-foot-long by 150-foot-wide and runway 14/32 was 5,058-foot-long by 150-foot-wide. The airport was 85 feet above mean sea level.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Initial examination by an FAA inspector revealed that the initial ground scars were located approximately 115 feet from the side edge of the runway and the airplane came to rest about 300 feet from the ground scars and facing back to the direction of travel. One engine was located approximately 30 feet from the wreckage and the other engine was located under the airplane, both had been detached from the firewall. The left wingtip was bent in the positive direction, and the right wing exhibited crush damage. Flight control continuity was confirmed to all surfaces.

During recovery of the airplane, approximately 62 gallons of fuel was removed from the fuel tanks.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot receiving instruction on August 31, 2012, by the City of Philadelphia Office of the Medical Examiners, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The autopsy findings listed the cause of death as "multiple blunt impact injuries" and the report listed the specific injuries.

Toxicological testing was performed post mortem at the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The tests were negative for carbon monoxide, cyanide, and ethanol. The following drugs were detected in the specimens submitted for testing:

- Atropine was detected in the Urine; however, was not detected in the Blood (Heart)
- Clopidogrel was detected in the Urine; however, was not detected in the Blood (Heart)
- Desmethylsildenafil was detected in the Urine and the Blood (Heart)
- Etomidate was detected in the liver and the Blood (Heart)
- Lorazepam was detected in the Muscle and the Blood (Heart)
- Salicylate was detected in the Urine
- Sildenafil was detectyed in the Blood (Heart) and the Urine
- Trimethoprim was detected in the Blood (Heart) and the Urine.

The toxicology results include some medications administered intravenously during hospital interventions: atropine (a Cardiac stimulant) and etomidate (a sedative/hypnotic). Oral medications ingested prior to the crash include clopidogrel (an antiplatelet medication used to prevent heart attacks and strokes), salicylate (also known as aspirin, an antiplatelet medication used to prevent heart attacks and strokes), and trimethoprim (an antibiotic used to prevent urinary tract infections after kidney transplant).

The toxicological report also identified Lorazepam (a hypnotic benzodiazepine); however, it is unclear from the records if this was an oral medication administered prior to the accident, or given in the hospital.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Engine Examination

Both engines were sent to the manufacturer's facility in Mobile, Alabama for further examination. Both engines were mounted in a test stand and operated at varying power settings. During the tests, neither engine exhibited any signs of hesitations, malfunctions, or anomalies. A detailed examination report for both engines is located in the docket that accompanies this accident report.

Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3A)

According to FAA publication FAA-H-8083-3A, Airplane Flying Handbook, Chapter 12, "Transition to Multiengine Airplanes" which states in part "Engine Inoperative Approach and Landing: The approach and landing with one engine inoperative is essentially the same as a two-engine approach and landing…the differences will be the reduced power available and the fact that the remaining thrust is asymmetrical…large, sudden power applications or reductions should also be avoided…the pilot must be prepared, however, for a rudder trim change as the power of the operating engine is reduced to idle in the roundout just prior to touchdown…"

FAA Advisory Circular 61-21A

FAA Advisory Circular 61-21A, states in part "Due to variations in performance, limitations, etc., of many light twins, no specific flightpath or procedure can be proposed that would be adequate in all engine-out approaches. In most light twins, however, a single-engine approach can be accomplished with the flight path and procedures almost identical to a normal approach and landing."


 NTSB Identification: ERA12LA535 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, August 29, 2012 in Millville, NJ
Aircraft: BEECH 95-A55, registration: N71BM
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 29, 2012, about 1445 eastern daylight time, a Beech 95-A55, N71BM, impacted the ground while landing at Millville Municipal Airport (MIV), Millville, New Jersey. The certificated flight instructor sustained serious injuries, and the pilot-rated student was fatally injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and all flight control surfaces. The airplane was registered to the pilot-rated student and was operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed.

According to recordings obtained from Lockheed Martin Flight Service, the accident flight's first transmission over the airport advisory service frequency stated that it was about five miles from the airport. The last recorded transmission from the accident airplane occurred a few minutes prior to the accident, when they reported simulating an engine failure. No other transmissions were recorded from the accident airplane.

Several eyewitnesses reported that the airplane appeared to have touched down and while on the ground, veered to the left, "cartwheeled," and then came to rest about 500 feet from the edge of the runway. Other witnesses reported that the airplane was approximately 20 feet above ground level, rolled to the left, climbed, then nosed over, impacted the ground and "cartwheeled."

Initial examination by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the initial ground scars were located approximately 115 feet from the edge of the runway and the airplane came to rest about 300 feet from the ground scars and facing back to the direction of travel. One engine was located approximately 30 feet from the wreckage and that other engine was located under the airplane, both had been detached from the firewall. The left wingtip was bent in the positive direction and the right wing exhibited crush damage.

During recovery of the airplane approximately 62 gallons of fuel was removed from the fuel tanks. The engines were retained for further examination.




 
Ronald L. LeCates

Ronald E. LeCates

AGE: 60 • Swedesboro, New Jersey

Ronald E. LeCates of Swedesboro, NJ, passed away on Thursday, August 30th, 2012. He was 60 yrs of age. Born in Camden, NJ, he has resided in Swedesboro for the past 14 yrs. and was formerly of Medford, NJ. Ron was as Regional Sales Manager for Analytic Stress Relieving Inc. in Robbinsville, NJ and was formerly with Cooper Heat. He was a former volunteer for the Taunton Fire Company #252 in Medford and a member of the dive rescue team. 


A Certified Pilot, Ron's love flying and traveling took him on an adventurous life that many people only dream of. He is the Beloved Father of Rebecca E. LeCates and her fiancé Jon of New Hope, PA, the loving son of Richard E. LeCates Sr. of Media, PA and Grandfather of Zachary. He is also survived by his Brothers Robert LeCates and his wife Marlene of Dacula, GA and George LeCates and his wife Cami of Quakertown, PA and his fiancé Ellen Kurtz. 

Relatives and friends are invited to greet the family on Tuesday from 6:00 - 7:00 PM at the BRADLEY & STOW FUNERAL HOME, 127 Medford-Mt. Holly Rd., Medford, NJ. (609-953-7600), where a Celebration of his life will be held on Tuesday at 7:00 PM.

In lieu of other expressions of sympathy the family requests memorial donations to the National Kidney Foundation , 111 S. Independence Mall E., Suite 411, Phila, PA 19106.

(www.BradleyStow.com)

Guest Bookhttp://www.legacy.com/guestbook

Source:  http://www.legacy.com

Published in Courier-Post on September 2, 2012


Ronald L. LeCates of Swedesboro passed away Thursday, Aug. 30, 2012. He was 60.
 
Born in Camden, he had resided in Swedesboro for the past 14 years, and was formerly of Medford. Ron was a regional sales manager for Analytic Stress Relieving Inc. in Robbinsville, N.J., and was formerly with Cooper Heat.

He was a former volunteer for the Taunton Fire Company 252 in Medford, and a member of the dive rescue team. A certified pilot, Ron's love of flying and traveling took him on an adventurous life that many people only dream of.

He was the beloved father of Rebecca E. LeCates and her fiancé, Jon, of New Hope, Pa., the loving son of Richard E. LeCates Sr. of Media, Pa., and grandfather of Zachary. He also is survived by his brothers, Robert LeCates and his wife, Marlene, of Dacula, Ga., and George LeCates and his wife, Cami, of Quakertown, Pa., and his fiancé, Ellen Kurtz.

Relatives and friends are invited to greet the family from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesday, at Bradley & Stow Funeral Home, 127 Medford-Mt. Holly Road, Medford, where a celebration of his life will be held 7 p.m.

In lieu of other expressions of sympathy, the family requests memorial donations to the National Kidney Foundation, 111 S. Independence Mall E., Suite 411, Philadelphia, PA 19106. Bradley & Stow Funeral Home, Medford
www.BradleyStow.com

Source:  http://www.phillyburbs.com  

Beech 95-A55 Baron, N71BM: Accident occurred August 29, 2012 at Millville Municipal Airport (KMIV), New Jersey 

IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 71BM        Make/Model: BE55      Description: 55 Baron 
  Date: 08/29/2012     Time: 1845

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Destroyed

LOCATION
  City: MILLVILLE   State: NJ   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT ON LANDING, BOUNCED OFF THE RUNWAY ONTO ITS NOSE, MILLVILLE, NJ

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   2     Fat:   0     Ser:   2     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Training      Phase: Landing      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: TETERBORO, NJ  (EA25)                 Entry date: 08/30/2012 

http://registry.faa.gov/N71BM 

Potomac Consolidated Terminal Radar Approach Control Facility (TRACON): Refrigerator fire at FAA facility causes ground stop at KDCA, KIAD, KBWI

WASHINGTON - A small fire at a regional air traffic control facility Sunday morning caused a brief ground stop at all three D.C. area airports, according to the FAA.

A refrigerator caught fire in an office area at the Potomac TRACON facility, which controls the area's airspace.

The ground stop only lasted about 25 minutes, and affected fewer than 20 flights at Reagan National, Dulles International and BWI Marshall airports. 


Read more:  http://www.wtop.com 

A fire in an office refrigerator at an FAA facility in Warrenton led to a ground stop at all three major Washington-area airports early Sunday morning. 

The agency confirmed that the fire broke out at the Potomac Consolidated Terminal Radar Approach Control Facility (TRACON), which handles flights to the D.C. area. The ground stop was officially put in place at 8:40 a.m. Sunday and lasted for approximately 25 minutes.

The fire did not result in any injuries and affected only 15 flights. All other traffic was overseen by the FAA's Washington Center.

Read more :  http://www.nbcwashington.com