Sunday, September 08, 2019

Loss of Engine Power (Total): Beech A36 Bonanza, N87RY; fatal accident occurred August 28, 2017 in Ellabell, Bryan County, Georgia

Pilot Randy Hunter (bottom right) along with (top right) William Byron Cocke and wife Catherine Cocke died when the Beechcraft A36 Bonanza they were in (left) crashed in Bryan County, Georgia, on August 28th, 2017.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N87RY 


Catherine and William Byron Cocke

Location: Ellabell, GA
Accident Number: CEN17FA331
Date & Time: 08/28/2017, 0839 EDT
Registration: N87RY
Aircraft: BEECH A36
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 3 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On August 28, 2017, at 0839 eastern daylight time, a Beech A36 airplane, N87RY, was destroyed when it collided with trees and terrain near Ellabell, Georgia, during a forced landing following a complete loss of engine power. The pilot and two passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to the pilot who was operating it under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)Part 91 as a business flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport (SAV), Savannah, Georgia, at 0829 and was destined for Cobb County International Airport – McCollum Field (RYY), Kennesaw, Georgia.

Radar data for the flight showed that the airplane departed SAV at 0829. After takeoff, the airplane made a left turn to a heading of about 300° and reached an altitude of 3,900 ft mean sea level (msl) about 6 minutes later; at that time, the airplane was about 16 miles northwest of SAV. At 0835:46, the pilot declared an emergency and reported that the airplane's engine had failed. At 0837:35, a tower controller at SAV provided the pilot with directional guidance to Cypress Lakes Airport (GA35), Bloomingdale, Georgia, but the controller then expressed concern about whether the airplane would make it to GA35. The final communication that the controller received from the pilot was at 0838:57; the pilot stated that the airplane "would probably make it."

After reaching its peak altitude of 3,900 ft msl about 0835, the airplane began descending and made a left 180° turn. The final radar data point, at 0839:39, showed the airplane at an altitude of 400 ft msl and a heading of about 120°. At that time, the airplane was about 0.1 mile from the accident site, which was about 6 miles from GA35.

Pilot Randy Hunter of Peachtree City, Georgia 
Hunter Aviation and Consultants

PERSONNEL INFORMATION


The 39-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued on March 20, 2017, without waivers or limitations.

The pilot's logbook was found within the wreckage. The logbook indicated that the pilot had accumulated 1,420 hours of total flight experience, including 786 hours in single-engine land airplanes and 633 hours in multiengine land airplanes.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Beech A36, serial number E-2917, was manufactured in 1994 as a single-engine airplane with retractable tricycle landing gear and seating for six occupants, including two flight crewmembers. The airplane was constructed primarily of aluminum and was powered by a 300-horsepower Continental Motors IO-550-B29B engine, serial number 675936.

The airplane's maintenance records indicated that the airplane was maintained in accordance with 14 CFR 91.409, Inspections, using a program recommended by the airplane manufacturer. The most recent engine overhaul was performed on December 5, 2007, at which time the engine had accumulated a total of 1,815 hours. A maintenance entry dated May 23, 2016, indicated that all six engine cylinders were replaced on that date; the Hobbs meter reading at the time was 516.6 hours. The most recent maintenance was performed on June 29, 2017, at which time the airframe had accumulated a total of 3,215.2 hours. The recording hour meter reading at the time was 680.6 hours.

The recording hour meter reading during the postaccident examination was 743.2 hours, indicating that the airplane had accumulated 62.6 hours since the most recent maintenance and that the engine had accumulated 226.6 hours since the engine cylinders were replaced.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0853, the weather reporting station at SAV recorded wind from 030° at 12 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 4,000 ft above ground level (agl), broken clouds at 7,000 ft agl, broken clouds at 25,000 ft agl, a temperature of 23°C, a dew point of 18°C, and an altimeter setting of 30.12 inches of mercury.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

Radar data and voice communications revealed the airplane was traveling on a heading of about 300° when the pilot reported the engine power loss. At that time, GA35 was about 6.5 nautical miles (nm) away on a heading of 174°, which required a 126° left turn to divert to GA35. Radar plots showed that the airplane was able to glide about 6.3 nm after the pilot declared the emergency and made the left turn.

FAA published charts for the area showed that Briggs Field Airport (GA43), Guyton, Georgia, was about 3.4 miles away on a heading of 345° when the pilot reported the engine power loss, which would have required a 45° right turn toward GA43. GA43 was a private airstrip with a 2,300-ft long turf runway. Although GA35 was depicted on the air traffic controller's emergency obstruction video map (EOVM) that was used in handling the accident flight, GA43 was not depicted. The figure shows the positions of the airports relative to the airplane's track.


Figure - Google Earth plot of the airplane's flight path (in white) along with the nearest alternate airports. 


FAA Order JO 7210.3Z, Facility Operations and Administration, which was in effect at the time of the accident, provided guidance regarding items depicted on the EOVM. Paragraph 3-8-4d, EOVM Design, stated that the basic design of the EOVM must incorporate, among other items, satellite airports and other airports that could serve in an emergency. This paragraph of the order contained a note stating "to avoid clutter and facilitate maintenance, information depicted on the EOVM should be restricted to only that which is absolutely essential." No guidance was found regarding the determination of airports essential for depiction on the EOVM.

After the accident, GA43, along with several other small airports in the Savannah area, were added to the EOVM at the SAV ATCT.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION


The airplane impacted trees and terrain near Ellabell, GA. The airplane was found in a wooded swamp area at a GPS elevation of 59 ft. The airplane was upright and facing 323°. An impact crater was centered about 10 ft directly in front of the nose of the airplane. Beyond the impact crater were trees with broken limbs and trunks that indicated a descent angle of about 45°.

The engine was partially separated from the fuselage. The fuselage was buckled in the cabin section with the aft section bent upward. The tail surfaces remained attached to the aft fuselage. The elevator was attached to the horizontal stabilizer, and the rudder was attached to the vertical stabilizer. The windshield and window posts had been cut by first responders to facilitate extrication of the occupants. The forward fuselage was crushed rearward. Both wings exhibited rearward crushing with the right wing crushing more pronounced than that on the left wing. The crush angles indicated a ground impact that was about 25° from vertical. Both wings remained attached to the fuselage, and the flaps and ailerons remained attached to the wings.

The location of the airplane and the terrain precluded a comprehensive on-scene examination. The airplane was recovered from the accident site and transported to a facility for a more comprehensive examination. Subsequent examination of the airframe revealed:
  • The aft fuselage had been cut off to facilitate removal from the scene.
  • The left horizontal stabilizer and elevator had been cut to facilitate removal from the scene
  • The right wing tip had been cut to facilitate removal from the scene.
  • The engine had been removed to facilitate removal from the scene.
Flight control system continuity was verified. The flaps were found in the up position (0°). The landing gear was retracted. No preimpact defects were noted on the airframe.

Examination of the engine revealed a hole that was about 2 inches in diameter in the top right rear of the engine case. The crankshaft was visible through the hole, and no connecting rod was attached to the rod journal. A subsequent teardown examination of the engine revealed that the No. 1 connecting rod was separated from the crankshaft and the piston. Fragments of the No. 1 connecting rod were found within the crankcase. Further examination revealed that four of the eight nuts that retained the No. 1 cylinder and one nut that retained the No. 2 cylinder were loose during disassembly, and no breakout torque reading could be measured. Two of the loose nuts on the No. 1 cylinder were on the studs that provided clamping force on the No. 1 main crankshaft bearing (through-studs). Disassembly of the crankcase revealed that the No. 1 main bearing had shifted to the rear of the crankcase, which obstructed the oil flow to the No. 1 main bearing and the No. 1 connecting rod bearing. All other connecting rods exhibited normal operating signatures with some mechanical damage from the internal components of the engine. No other preimpact anomalies were detected.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Division of Forensic Sciences, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Savannah, Georgia, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was multiple injuries.

Toxicology testing performed at the FAA Forensic Sciences Laboratory was negative for all substances in the screening profile. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial; Private
Age: 39, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/20/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/01/2016
Flight Time:  1420 hours (Total, all aircraft), 873 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N87RY
Model/Series: A36 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1994
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: E-2917
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 6
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/29/2017, AAIP
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3651 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 63 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3278 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental Motors
ELT: C91A installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-550-B29B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 300 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SAV, 50 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1253 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 120°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 7000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 30°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 29.89 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SAVANNAH, GA (SAV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: ATLANTA, GA (RYY)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0829 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 3 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  32.239444, -81.439167

Cirrus SR22 GTS X G3 Turbo, N878SR: Accident occurred September 01, 2019 in Foley, Baldwin County, Alabama

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Birmingham, Alabama
Continental Aerospace Technologies; Mobile, Alabama 
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 
  
https://registry.faa.gov/N878SR


Location: Foley, AL
Accident Number: ERA19LA264
Date & Time: 09/01/2019, 1520 CDT
Registration: N878SR
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On September 1, 2019, about 1520 central daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR22, N878SR, experienced a loss of engine power and was substantially damaged during a forced landing at Foley, Alabama. The private pilot and three passengers were not injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. No flight plan was filed for the flight that originated from Jack Edwards National Airport (JKA), Gulf Shores, Alabama, about 1510 and was destined for Concordia Parish Airport (0R4), Vidalia, Louisiana.

The private pilot stated that he completed the preflight inspection, engine run-up, and before-takeoff checks with no anomalies noted. About 10 minutes after departure, while climbing to cruise altitude and turning to avoid a storm cell, he felt the engine "buffet" then observed a loss in engine RPM. When he turned the airplane toward JKA, the engine stopped producing power and the propeller ceased rotating. He declared an emergency and moved the throttle to idle then full forward; however, the engine did not respond. He aimed for a field to initiate a forced landing.

The airplane owner, who was seated in the front left seat, reported no anomalies during climbout until the airplane reached about 2,500 ft agl. At that time, he said it felt like "when you take the foot off the gas in your car. It just stopped producing power." He stated that he cycled the throttle; however, the engine did not respond. When the airplane reached 1,200 ft agl, he suggested activation of the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). The pilot concurred, and the owner activated the CAPS.

The other passengers stated that everything seemed normal until the airplane turned away from the thunderstorm cell, at which point they felt a thud, heard some beeps that quickly stopped, and felt the plane descending. They reported that after turning back toward the airport, they heard lots of beeps and could no longer feel the engine.

Initial examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed that the airplane descended via parachute and landed upright in a field. The fuselage aft of the firewall exhibited buckling and cracking, the bottom portion of the rudder exhibited a crack about 7-8 inches in length, and the nose gear was detached from its mounting location. The flap selector switch was in the 50% position, the fuel lever was in the left tank position, and the fuel pump was in the boost position.

According to FAA airman records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued May 23, 2019. He reported 390 hours of total flight time, 102 hours of which were in the accident airplane make and model.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the low-wing airplane was manufactured in 2007. It was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-550-N series, 310-horsepower engine. According the pilot, the most recent annual inspection, as well as other maintenance that included installation of a new cylinder, was completed the week prior to the accident flight.

The 1535 recorded weather observation at JKA included wind from 140° at 5 knots, visibility of 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 29° C, dew point 25° C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury.

The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N878SR
Model/Series: SR22 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJKA, 17 ft msl
Observation Time: 1535 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 25°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 140°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Gulf Shores, AL (JKA)
Destination: Vidalia, LA (0R4)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 3 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude: 30.368611, -87.687778 (est)

Aeronca 7AC Champion, N85199: Incident occurred August 30, 2019 in Jasper, Walker County, Alabama

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama and NW Florida

Aircraft made emergency off airport landing on interstate.


https://registry.faa.gov/N85199 


Date: 30-AUG-19
Time: 19:49:00Z
Regis#: N85199
Aircraft Make: AERONCA
Aircraft Model: CHAMPION
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: JASPER
State: ALABAMA



A plane landed on U.S. Interstate 22 in the Jasper area on Friday afternoon. 

The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency (ALEA issued the following statement: 

"At approximately 2:20 pm on this date, ALEA Communications – Quad Cities was notified of an aircraft landing on Interstate 22 near Jasper in Walker County. The pilot of the single-engine plane successfully performed an emergency landing in the westbound lanes near mile marker fifty-eight after the aircraft lost power.  The pilot was the only occupant of the aircraft.  There were no injuries or property damage reported.  The pilot was able to restart the aircraft and taxi under escort off the interstate to a nearby parking lot for further inspection.  Any inquiries for additional information should be directed to the Federal Aviation Administration.  No further information is available from Alabama Law Enforcement Agency."

Original article can be found here ➤ http://mountaineagle.com

Piper PA-18-135, N1124: Accident occurred August 30, 2019 in Fairbanks, Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fairbanks, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N1124

Location: Fairbanks, AK
Accident Number: ANC19LA048
Date & Time: 08/30/2019, 1310 AKD
Registration: N1124
Aircraft: Piper PA-18
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On August 30, 2019, at about 1330 Alaska daylight time, a float-equipped Piper PA-18 Super Cub airplane, N1124, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing following a total loss of engine power while in cruise flight near Fairbanks, Alaska. The certificated commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 when the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an FAA flight plan had been filed. The flight departed Fairbanks International Airport (PAFA), Fairbanks.

According to the pilot, she had been airborne for about 3 hours when the engine began to sound "funny", and she decided to return to Chena Marina Airport (AK28), Fairbanks. About 13 miles west of Fairbanks, all engine power was lost, and the pilot had to select a heavily forested area as a forced landing site. The airplane subsequently sustained substantial damage to the wings. An initial examination of the engine revealed that the number 3 cylinder had separated from the engine case.

The airplane was equipped with a narrow deck, Lycoming O-320 series engine. A detailed engine examination is pending following recovery.

The closest weather reporting facility is Fairbanks International Airport, (PAFA), Fairbanks, Alaska. At 1353, a METAR from PAFA was reporting in part: wind, 020 at 4 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; sky condition, few clouds 6,000 ft, few clouds 10,000 ft; temperature, 63° F; dew point 43° F; and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N1124
Model/Series: PA-18
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PAFA
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 6°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 6000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 20°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Fairbanks, AK
Destination: Fairbanks, AK

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  64.892500, -148.368889

Piper PA-18AS-125 Super Cub, N655HE: Accident occurred September 01, 2019 in Beluga, Alaska

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N655HE


Location: Beluga, AK
Accident Number: GAA19CA521
Date & Time: 09/01/2019, 1620 AKD
Registration: N655HE
Aircraft: PIPER PA18
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Miscellaneous/other
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel and tundra tire-equipped airplane reported that, during takeoff on an off-airport field, the airplane had climbed 15 to 20 ft above the ground, but then began to descend. He reported that a wind gust "pushed" the airplane down. He then verified that the engine was at full power and attempted to climb, but the airplane's left wheel struck the ground, the airplane veered left, and came to rest in a ditch.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported that the wind was light and variable, gusting to 8 to 10 knots.

The pilot added that when the airplane was "hit" by the wind gust, the notch of flaps he was using "dropped out." He then verified full power and attempted to "grab [the] notch of flaps but [he] wasn't fast enough."

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 30, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Center
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/02/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 01/26/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 227 hours (Total, all aircraft), 227 hours (Total, this make and model), 186 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 64 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N655HE
Model/Series: PA18 AS125
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1952
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18-1740
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/27/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4619.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, activated, aided in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320-A2D
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered
Visibility:  7 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts:  Light and Variable / 10 knots
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.6 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 56°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Palmer, AK (4AK6)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Tyonek, AK
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 0700 AKD
Type of Airspace: Class G

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None

Latitude, Longitude: 61.229444, -151.769167 (est)

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska — Airmen with the Alaska Air National Guard’s 210th and 212th Rescue Squadrons rescued the pilot of a PA-18 aircraft and a passenger September 1st after the plane crashed in vicinity of the Beluga bench about 28 miles northwest of Tyonek.

According to Alaska Air National Guard Capt. Wes Ladd, Alaska Rescue Coordination Center, the mission was opened following a receipt of the 406 Emergency Locator Transmitter beacon signal from a previously destroyed Cessna 207. Despite the confusion, the AKRCC tasked the Alaska Air National Guard’s 210th and 212th Rescue Squadrons to respond.

An HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter with the 210th RQS launched from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson with two 212th RQS Pararescuemen (PJs).  The crew of the Pave Hawk honed in on the 406 ELT signal and found a damage Piper PA-18 and the two occupants sheltered nearby.

The helicopter landed and made contact with the pilot and passenger. After the PJs ensured there were no injuries, they were taken to the Wasilla Airport and released to the Alaska State Troopers.

Ladd would like to remind the aviation community that incorrect information in the 406 ELT database could have made the search effort a longer process. He said users and their maintenance personnel should ensure correct current information is maintained in the database to ensure rapid response and coordination with family or friends. 

“Despite the confusion due to the information correlated to a destroyed aircraft, we couldn’t rule it out as non-distress,” Ladd said.  “We are always obligated to search and effect rescue if needed.”

For this mission, the AKRCC, the 210th and 212th Rescue Squadrons were awarded two saves.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.echoak.com

Luscombe 8A, N25100: Accidents occurred August 30, 2019 and October 24, 2015 at Ernest A. Love Field Airport (KPRC), Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N25100


Location: Prescott, AZ
Accident Number: GAA19CA568
Date & Time: 08/30/2019, 1300 MST
Registration: N25100
Aircraft: Luscombe 8
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot in the right seat of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, he had just sold the airplane to the pilot in the left seat. The right seat pilot was on the controls, and during a wheel landing, the airplane encountered a wind gust from the right. The airplane veered right, and he "apparently over-corrected," to the left. The airplane exited the left side of the runway and the right wing struck the ground. The airplane was not equipped with brakes on the left seat pilot's side.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing spar and aileron.

The airport's METAR reported that about the time of the accident, the wind was from 290° at 10 knots. One hour prior to the accident, gusts were reported at 17 knots, and one hour after the accident, gusts were reported at 20 knots. The pilot landed on runway 21L.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 76, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/12/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/28/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 11000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 500 hours (Total, this make and model), 10700 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 40 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 23, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Glider
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/21/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 0 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Luscombe
Registration: N25100
Model/Series: 8 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1939
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1024
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C-85
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPRC, 5052 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1953 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 209°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 9500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:
Wind Direction: 290°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C / 7°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Prescott, AZ (PRC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Prescott, AZ (PRC)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time:  MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: Prescott Rgnl - Ernest A Love (PRC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5045 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 21L
IFR Approach:None 
Runway Length/Width: 7619 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.654722, -112.419167 (est)



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 


Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Location: Prescott, AZ
Accident Number: WPR16LA017
Date & Time: 10/24/2015, 1510 MST
Registration: N25100
Aircraft: LUSCOMBE 8A
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis

The commercial pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane stated that, upon touching down in a three-point attitude, the airplane veered left. The pilot attempted to correct with rudder, but the airplane continued left and ground looped. Examination revealed that the tailwheel had rotated 180°, leaving its control chains crossed over one another. Under this condition, the tailwheel direction of movement would be opposite that commanded by the pilot. Further examination revealed that the tailwheel steering arms were bent upward, allowing the wheel to rotate past its travel stops and into the reversed condition. It is likely that, as the pilot initially lost control and the airplane began to ground loop, the wheel passed beyond its travel limits, causing the controls to become reversed, which made recovery unlikely.

Probable Cause and Findings
The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during landing, and his inability to recover due to a malfunction of the tailwheel.

Findings

Aircraft
Nose/tail landing gear - Malfunction (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

On October 24, 2015, about 1510 mountain standard time, a Luscombe 8A, N25100, experienced a loss of directional control during the landing roll, and ground looped at the Ernest A. Love Field Airport, Prescott, Arizona. The pilot, who owned the airplane, was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The certified flight instructor and his passenger were not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The personal cross-country flight departed from Gallup Municipal Airport, Gallup, New Mexico, about 1245 with a planned destination of Prescott. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a company flight plan had been filed.

In a written report, the pilot stated that as he entered the vicinity of the destination airport, he maneuvered the airplane for a straight-in approach to runway 21L. The approach was slightly higher than his normal glide slope, and the pilot configured the airplane into a left slip in an effort to lose altitude. After becoming established, he maintained a left crab angle to compensate for an approximate 7 kt left crosswind. He configured the airplane for a three-point landing and touched down on the centerline. The airplane continued the landing roll until decelerating to about 15 mph at which point it began to veer to the left. The pilot input full rudder control to try to counteract the veer, but despite his attempts, the airplane ground looped.

During the accident sequence, the airplane incurred substantial damage to the wing. The pilot opined that the loss of control was precipitated by a tail wheel malfunction. According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot purchased the airplane on the day of the accident; he reported having amassed about 200 hours of flight time in the same make and model.

The Luscombe 8A was equipped with a Scott 3-24B tailwheel (now Scott 2000), with a steerable six-inch rubber tire with full-swivel capability. The rudder control horns were connected via chains to the assembly, which uses spring pressure to hold a set of steering arms into machined flats on the wheel fork. As the wheel pivots to its travel limit, it comes into contact with a stop on the fork bracket, which releases the assembly, allowing the wheel to castor freely. According to the Scott 3-24B Handbook, "The tail wheel assemblies provide directional control throughout full rudder travel of the aircraft while the tailwheel is in contact with the ground. The assemblies will automatically full-swivel only well after the maximum point of air rudder control is reached in either direction…The tailwheel steering and release mechanism is so designed that 65-degrees of tailwheel turn (or travel) is provided either right or left from neutral steering position before the mechanism begins to release."

The airplane came to rest on the edge of the runway with the right landing gear collapsed and folded under the fuselage. The tailwheel steering chains remained affixed to their respective rudder horns as well as their respective steering arms mounted on the tailwheel body. However, the tailwheel had rotated over 180-degrees and was canted to the left leaving the chains crossed over one another. Additionally, the steering arms appeared bent upwards. A complete report with accompanying photographs are attached to the public docket for this accident.

An FAA certified airframe and powerplant mechanic examined the tailwheel. He stated the examination revealed that the tailwheel was turned around 180-degrees from its normal configuration. The right steering arm was bent upwards, and he observed that it was able to clear over the stop, allowing the steering head to continue to the reversed position, rather than unlock to caster freely. Under this condition, the tailwheel direction of movement would be opposite that commanded by the pilot, rather than free-castering as designed. He additionally noted that the leaf spring assembly was loose, allowing a possible shudder to develop. Following the examination, he repaired the assembly, and the steering arms were reconfigured to their correct straight position, enabling them to contact the stops and release the wheel to freely caster with the steering chains remaining on their respective side. 

History of Flight

Landing-landing roll
Runway excursion (Defining event) 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 72, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: None None
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/16/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 11000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 200 hours (Total, this make and model), 10800 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 11.9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11.9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: LUSCOMBE
Registration: N25100
Model/Series: 8A A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1939
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport; Normal
Serial Number: 1024
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/04/2014, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1260 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 10 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: C85-12F
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 85 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KPRC, 5052 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2153 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 209°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.13 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C / 1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Gallup, NM (KGUP)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Destination: Prescott, AZ (KPRC)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1245 MST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Ernest A Love Field Airport (KPRC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5044 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 21L
IFR Approach:None 
Runway Length/Width: 7619 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Straight-in

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 34.654722, -112.419167 (est)