Friday, January 22, 2021

Life Flight Network unveils new state-of-the-art flight training simulator


After more than a year of development, Life Flight Network, the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States, announced recently a new Frasca flight simulator to augment its rigorous pilot training program. Life Flight Network’s simulator lab contains a state-of-the-art simulator and enough space for pilots to prepare for and analyze their flights. Built specifically for Life Flight Network, the new simulator allows pilots to practice maneuvers and scenarios that cannot be practiced in live aircraft training.

Additionally, Life Flight Network is leading the industry by providing medical crews with the ability to “ride-along” in the simulator and experience real-world examples of in-flight hazards and weather.

“We are committed to ensuring the safety of our patients and crews,” said Michael Griffiths, Chief Executive Officer, Life Flight Network. “This new simulator expands our training program and gives our pilots invaluable practice at safely handling even the most challenging situations and weather conditions common to the communities we serve.”

The simulator is customized for Life Flight Network’s specific needs and allows for realistic, immersive, and scenario-based training. This world-class resource represents a significant investment and will allow pilots to practice a host of scenarios that are difficult to simulate in an actual aircraft.

“As a not-for-profit air and ground ambulance provider, we reinvest in safety and access to care for the communities we serve, rather than returning profits to shareholders,” continued Griffiths. “For more than 43 years throughout the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West, we’ve placed lifesaving air ambulance resources in rural communities where they’re needed most.”

A not-for-profit air ambulance program with a local community impact

As a nationally recognized air medical transport service, Life Flight Network employs close to 700 people across its bases serving the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West. Each base contributes more than $1 million annually to the local economy by creating approximately 15 to 20 new jobs.

Every Life Flight Network aircraft is equipped to operate as a mobile intensive care unit (ICU) with leading-edge medical equipment such as video laryngoscopes, ICU ventilators, and blood products, allowing specialized critical care treatment during transport. Life Flight Network aircraft are staffed with a Flight Registered Nurse, Flight Paramedic, and highly skilled EMS pilot. Its bases operate 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

The not-for-profit health care provider offers household memberships for a $69 annual fee. Members incur no out-of-pocket expense if flown for medically necessary emergent conditions by Life Flight Network or one of its reciprocal partners. To request more information about the membership program, or if organizations would like an in-person presentation, contact the Life Flight Network membership office at 800-982-9299.

About Life Flight network

Life Flight Network, a not-for-profit air medical service, is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS), the National Accreditation Alliance of Medical Transport Applications (NAAMTA), and Helicopter Association International (HAI). Life Flight Network is the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States and maintains its own FAA Part 135 Operating Certificate.

It offers ICU-level care during air transport across the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain West. Life Flight Network is headquartered in Aurora, Oregon. For more information about Life Flight Network or to become a member, visit www.lifeflight.org.



Boutique Air to launch daily round-trip flight from Rapid City to Chadron


A concierge-style airline is bringing Rapid City and Chadron, Nebraska, closer together.

Boutique Air announced this week that on Feb. 15 it will launch daily flights that connect Chadron Municipal Airport and Rapid City Regional Airport.

The San Francisco-based airline says that it will offer rates comparable to other commercial flights. Boutique Air serves 29 small, mid-size and major cities nationwide.

The airline now offers two round-trip flights daily between Chadron and Denver International Airport. The airline cites the COVID-19 pandemic as one reason it is expanding into Rapid City and other locations, according to a company spokeswoman.

“We’re basically helping major airlines with cities that are not able to have as many flights, or maybe they’ve been cut altogether because of COVID-19. We’re working to help fill the gaps and accommodate cities that are looking for more connections,” said Teresa Mesman, marketing director and regional manager for Boutique Air.

Mesman said the airline hopes to keep Rapid City as a permanent destination after the pandemic eases. Boutique Air will start with one daily round-trip flight from Chadron to Rapid City, which according to its website is a 40-minute flight one way. It's around a 100-mile drive from Rapid City to Chadron.

“We’re very excited to offer Rapid City Regional Airport to our Chadron passengers,” said Brian Kondrad, Boutique Air vice president of business operations. “Rapid City is the busiest airport in the region and gives our passengers plenty of opportunities to make continuing connections or spend the day conducting business.”

“Rapid City has been a location we’ve really wanted to fly into for some time. It’s a jewel of tourism and business destinations for that part of the United States,” Mesman said. “We’re very proud of knowing that we’re going to be part of the Rapid City airport. We’re excited to work with them.”

From check-in to landing, passengers will experience concierge-style services typically found on private planes. Boutique Air flights are on executive configuration Pilatus PC-12s.

“This is an eight-seat aircraft. It is an executive-style plane. It’s very comfortable but not large and don’t be afraid to try it,” Mesman said. “We are an airline that once you start flying with us, you’re treated like family. It’s a wonderful experience. I think people will really enjoy the experience of a private flight without having to pay the exorbitant costs.”

As Boutique Air becomes established in Rapid City, she said the airline hopes to get involved in local activities.

“That’s where we’re unique. We definitely become part of the community,” Mesman said.

Founded in 2007, Boutique Air is an FAA-certified air carrier providing both scheduled and charter air service. It is a codeshare partner with United Airlines and has an interline agreement with American Airlines.

All planes are disinfected between flights following all Centers for Disease Control and the Federal Aviation Administration protocols. Masks are required for passengers.




Pilatus PC12/45, N451SS: Incidents occurred January 21, 2021 and November 10, 2018

Incident occurred January 21, 2021 near Chicago O'Hare International Airport (KORD), Illinois

Boutique Air 
Targaryen LLC

https://registry.faa.gov/N451SS



CHICAGO (CBS) — A tire fell from the landing gear of a small plane and was found on the ground in the Jefferson Park neighborhood Thursday evening.

The Chicago Department of Aviation said at 6:19 p.m., airfield operations at O’Hare International Airport were notified of a small plane making sparks as it landed on Runway 28C. The sparks were coming from the landing gear on the left side of the aircraft.

The plane landed safely, and an emergency response began when it came to a stop. At that time, it was found that the left landing gear assembly was missing, the department said.

No injuries were reported, and the five passengers and two crewmembers were taken to Terminal 5.

The single-engine Pilatus PC-12 was being flown by as a charter flight by Boutique Airlines and had been headed to Chicago from Ironwood, Michigan in the Upper Peninsula, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Police later responded to reports of missing airplane landing gear on the sidewalk on Leland Avenue between Central and Linder avenues.

As CBS 2’s Jermont Terry reported, the tire crashed right between two houses as it fell from the sky, and left neighbors with quite the scare.

The tire was not very big. But when it plummeted thousands of feet from the air, it no doubt forced people to wonder what the noise was.

That includes the Rose Bock. The senior didn’t realize the noise was from a plane’s tire until she spotted police in her front yard with flashlights.

Living so close to O’Hare means planes fly over all the time. But this one took everyone in neighborhood by surprise.

“It was a big boom! I didn’t know what it was. I didn’t know if it was in my house – I checked the basement, everything; I didn’t really didn’t look outside,” Bock said. “She calls me and says, ‘They’re all by your house.’ He said: ‘There’s a tire. How did that tire get there?’”

“A tire is a tire coming from that high. it’s a scary situation, and after finding out what it was, I was mortified because planes fly over here all the time – something so close to the airport. We’re right on the landing pattern, so it could happen,” said Sue Davis Bilbo, who also lives on the block. “Unfortunately, it did happen, and nobody was injured.”

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board were investigating Thursday night, with support from the Chicago Police Department and the Department of Aviation.




A tire fell off a small aircraft shortly before the plane's arrival at O'Hare International Airport Thursday evening and ended up in a nearby neighborhood, authorities said.

The flight, which originated from Ironwood in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, was operated by Boutique Air, a regional commuter airline.

None of the seven people on board, two crew members and five passengers, sustained injuries.

At approximately 6:19 p.m., O'Hare operations officials were notified that the plane, which was landing at the time, was sending off a considerable amount of sparks from the landing gear on the left side, according to a statement from the Chicago Department of Aviation.

Airport workers then determined the left landing landing gear was missing.

According to the Chicago Police Department, the tire was discovered in the yard of a home in the 5500 block of West Leland Avenue. No injuries were reported there, authorities added.

Shortly before the plane landed at O'Hare, one Jefferson Park resident said she heard a big "boom."

"I didn't know what it was," Rose Bock said. "I didn't know if it was in my house. I checked the basement. I really didn't look outside."

A neighbor then called Bock to tell her several police officers were examining the area outside her home. Officers cordoned off the area surrounding the tire as they investigated the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board are both investigating the incident.



Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama

November 10, 2018: Veered off the end of the runway at Northwest Alabama Regional Airport (KMSL), Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, Alabama. 

Date: 10-NOV-18
Time: 21:40:00Z
Regis#: N451SS
Aircraft Make: PILATUS
Aircraft Model: PC 12/45
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: NONE
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MUSCLE SHOALS
State: ALABAMA

Aerodynamic Stall/Spin: Cessna 414, N727RP; fatal accident occurred August 05, 2018 near John Wayne Airport (KSNA), Santa Ana, Orange County, California

 

Floria Hakimi posted this picture to Instagram two hours before the plane crashed with the caption, 'Flying out to LA'.


 Nasim Ghanadan

Lara Shepherd and pilot husband Scott.

Navid Hakimi



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Long Beach, California
Continental Aerospace; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation;  Wichita, Kansas 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Santa Ana, California 
Accident Number: WPR18FA211
Date & Time: August 5, 2018, 12:29 Local
Registration: N727RP
Aircraft: Cessna 414
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Aerodynamic stall/spin 
Injuries: 5 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation

On August 5, 2018, about 1229 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 414 airplane, N727RP, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Santa Ana, California. The pilot and four passengers were fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight.

A review of the John Wayne-Orange County Control Tower (SNA) Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) audio revealed that the pilot contacted SNA tower at 1225, and reported the airplane was at an altitude of 1,700 ft. The controller instructed the pilot to make right traffic for runway 20R. The pilot acknowledged the instruction and the controller then asked the pilot if he could accept runway 20L and informed him the runway was 2,850 ft long. The pilot responded that he was unable to land on runway 20L. Subsequently, the pilot was instructed to hold over the South Coast Plaza, a local VFR holding point, and to conduct left 360 turns for sequencing. Less than a minute after denying the original response to land on runway 20L, the pilot responded that he could accept runway 20L for landing. The controller then instructed the pilot to accomplish a left 270° turn and cross directly over the tower at or above 1,300 ft, for left traffic to runway 20L. The pilot acknowledged the instruction.

About 23 seconds later, the controller instructed the pilot to “climb back up to 1,300 ft or above.” Four seconds after the instruction the pilot stated, “emergency, emergency, emergency.” A review of audio transcripts, flight data, and a discussion with an ATCT who witnessed the event, were all consistent with the pilot’s emergency transmissions being made during the start of the steep nose-down descent. No further transmissions were received by the pilot.

A review of flight data provided by the airplane’s Appareo Stratus 2S ADS-B device showed at 1929:10 (all times given as Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), the airplane was at 96 knots and an altitude of 960 ft msl. Shortly thereafter, the airplane began a left turn. Initially, the airplane’s left bank increased to about 15°; about 10 seconds later, the left bank increased to about 30°. At 1929:15, the airspeed was 91 knots, and the altitude was 955 ft msl. At 1929:20, the airspeed was 85 knots and the altitude was 950 ft msl. The airplane continued the left turn and at 1929:25, the airspeed was 73 knots, the altitude was 894 ft msl, and the roll rate was increased to over 40° of bank; over the next few seconds, the bank increased to nearly 90°. The airplane began to descend, and the vertical speed was about -1200 ft per min (fpm). From this time forward, the airplane’s descent rate increased rapidly. At 1929:27, the airspeed was 62 knots, the altitude was 765 ft msl, and the vertical speed was about -2,300 fpm. At 1929:30, the airspeed was 66 knots, the altitude had decreased to 499 ft msl, and the vertical speed was about -4,400 fpm. The last recorded data point was at 1929:33, when the airspeed was 59 knots, the altitude was 292 ft msl, and the vertical speed about -5,250 fpm.

Multiple witnesses, near the accident site, observed the airplane enter the left bank turn and shortly thereafter, they observed the bank increase and the airplane descend towards the ground at a steep angle.An Air Force pilot said that it looked “like the onset of a spin.” Another pilot holding on the taxiway at SNA, said that this “was the classic stall and spin.”

The airplane came to rest in a shopping mall parking lot and struck several vehicles before coming to rest upright about 35 ft from the entrance of a store.

Observation of online video of the accident airplane showed it in a steep vertical nose down descent, while rotating to the left.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 53,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Multi-engine land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: October 20, 2017
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 980 hours (Total, all aircraft), 120 hours (Total, this make and model)

Passenger Information

Certificate: 
Age: Female
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Passenger Information

Certificate: 
Age: Female
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Passenger Information

Certificate: 
Age: Male
Airplane Rating(s):
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s):
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot: 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

Passenger Information

Certificate:
Age: Female
Airplane Rating(s): 
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): 
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: 
Last FAA Medical Exam:
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:

The pilot began flying the accident airplane in January 2017. In the 6 months before the accident, the pilot flew the accident airplane on 14 flights (not including the accident flight) for a total flight time of about 43 hours.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N727RP
Model/Series: 414 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1973
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 414-0385
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle 
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: November 26, 2017 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6350 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3963.6 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C126 installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: TSIO-520-NB
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 325 Horsepower
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The airplane was modified in accordance with Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) SE4327SW, which allowed for operation of 325 horsepower at 38 inches manifold pressure at 2,700 rpm. The airplane was also modified IAW STC SA09971SC-D by installation of Hartzell three-bladed constant speed PHCC3YF-2UF propellers.

Airplane Stall Speeds:

The airplane’s Pilot’s Owner’s Manual (POH) listed the stall speeds. The speeds were listed in mph and were converted to knots for a better comparison with the flight data. At the gross weight of 6,350 pounds, with gear and flaps up, and no bank angle, the stall speed is 81 knots, at 20° of bank, 84 knots, at 40° of bank, 96 knots and at 60° of bank, 121 knots. With the gear extended, 15° of flaps, and no bank angle: the stall speed is at 80 knots, at 20° of bank, 83 knots, at 40° of bank, 91 knots, and at 60° of bank, 114 knots. (Note: The Airplane Flight Manual Supplement for the STC only listed stall speeds for a gross weight of 6,510 pounds. For stall speed at and below 6,350 pounds, the original Pilot’s Operating Manual would be referenced).

The airplane’s POH landing performance table indicated that the landing distance with wing flaps 45° would be sufficient for the use of runway 20L. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSNA,56 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 12:53 Local
Direction from Accident Site: 136°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 210°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.86 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 18°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No 
Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Concord, CA (CCR) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Santa Ana, CA (SNA) 
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 10:20 Local 
Type of Airspace: Class C

Airport Information

Airport: JOHN WAYNE AIRPORT-ORANGE COUN SNA
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 56 ft msl
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 20L IFR
Approach: None Runway
Length/Width: 2887 ft / 75 ft VFR 
Approach/Landing: Traffic pattern
Runway 20L was 2,887 ft long and 75 ft wide.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 4 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.696109,-117.884445(est)

The airplane impacted a parking lot about 1.6 miles northwest of SNA. The wreckage was contained within an approximate 150 ft debris trail. The first piece of identified wreckage was the left-wing tip which was located about 90 ft from the main wreckage. The last piece of identified wreckage was the right-wing tip which was located about 60 ft from the main wreckage.

The initial impact point (IIP) was a depression in the asphalt. About 12 ft from this depression was a crater about 3 ft long, 2 ft wide and 6 inches deep. A propeller blade from the left engine was separated from the hub and found in the crater. Several left-wing fragments were found near the IIP. The aileron trim actuator, which was located in the left wing, separated from the wing upon impact, and was observed in the parking lot near the IIP. The aileron trim cables were observed separated, consistent with tension overload.

The main wreckage consisted of the fuselage, right engine, right wing, and empennage. The fuselage was slightly canted to the left. The empennage was mostly separated from the fuselage but remained attached by the control cables. The front of the aircraft and cabin area was destroyed during impact. The cabin door remained attached.

The inboard section of the left wing was separated from the fuselage at the wing root. Furthermore, the left engine, left flap and left main landing gear, remained attached to this inboard wing section.

The right wing remained partially attached to the fuselage. The right wing section outboard of the nacelle was separated and was found within the debris path. The right aileron remained attached at the inboard connection.

The right engine impacted into an unoccupied parked vehicle. The vehicle was then displaced by about 65 ft from its original location. The right propeller separated at the hub and was found inside the aft section of the vehicle. Additionally, a few other unoccupied vehicles were struck by the airplane debris.

The empennage remained partially attached to the fuselage. The vertical stabilizer remained attached to the empennage and was relatively intact. The rudder remained attached to the vertical stabilizer and the rudder trim was near the neutral position. The leading edge of the left horizontal stabilizer sustained impact damage. Both elevators remained attached to their respective horizontal stabilizer. The elevator trim was observed near the neutral position.

Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit area to each respective flight control surface, except for the left aileron, which had separated. Aileron flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the control surfaces bell crank through cable separations that exhibited tensile overload. Rudder and elevator flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit to the control surface bell cranks, through cable separations that exhibited either tensile overload or were cut by investigators to facilitate recovery.

Examination of the flap motor revealed that the left and right flap chains had 7.5 links from the sprocket, consistent with about a 10° flap setting.

The landing gear actuator was observed in the extended position. Brake assembly parts were observed in one of the impact craters. Additionally, impact markings and damage sustained to the main landing gear assemblies were consistent with the gear in the extended position.

The airplane was configured with the following fuel tanks: left and right main tanks (located at the wing tips), left and right auxiliary tanks (located in the wings outboard of the nacelles), and right wing locker (located in the right nacelle behind the engine).The left fuel selector handle was observed between the left main and left auxiliary tanks, and the right fuel selector handle was observed between the right main and right auxiliary tanks. The pointer tip of the left fuel handler selector was fractured. The left and right fuel selector cables were stretched during the separation of the wings outboard of the nacelles and the left and right control arms were pulled beyond the off position. The fuel selector valves were substantially damaged by impact and unable to be functionally tested. The only fuel tank not breached
was the right auxiliary tank.

During the examination, about 2.5 gallons of fuel were drained from the tank. The fuel was observed to be blue in color and clear of contaminants. The airplane was refueled on the morning of the accident flight; the main tanks were topped off and the right auxiliary tank was not refueled since it was full, and the left auxiliary tank received about 15 gallons. The fuel load was sufficient for the flight.

Left Engine

Impact damage to Cylinder’s Nos. 2, 4, and 6 were noted. Cylinder’s Nos. 4 and 6 rocker box covers were separated. Manual rotation was attempted by using a hand tool but was unable to be accomplished. A borescope inspection of the cylinders revealed normal operational conditions. Both magnetos were separated from the engine but remained attached to the ignition harness. The magnetos sustained impact damage but when manually rotated, spark was observed at all leads. The oil sump sustained extensive
crush damage. The top spark plugs were removed and exhibited normal worn out wear signatures when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug comparison chart. The fuel flow divider lines were attached at all cylinder fuel injectors.

Examination of the fuel pump revealed no anomalies. The turbocharger remained attached to its respective housing. The turbocharger blades were observed bent.

Cylinder Nos. 1 and 3 were removed and eventually rotation was confirmed. The remaining cylinders were also removed, and the crankcase was disassembled. No thermal damage was observed, and all bearings displayed normal wear. The crankshaft and camshaft were also removed, and no anomalies were noted.

The oil filter was removed and cut open. The filter folds were clear of contamination.

Right Engine

The No. 6 cylinder sustained impact damage. The No. 6 rocker cover was separated. Both magnetos were separated from the engine but remained attached to their respective ignition harness. All spark plugs were removed and exhibited normal worn out wear signatures when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug comparison chart. The fuel flow dividers lines remained attached at all cylinder fuel injectors. Examination of the fuel pump revealed no anomalies. 

Both magnetos were manually rotated, and spark was observed at all leads. The turbocharger remained attached to its respective housing. The turbocharger blades were observed bent. 

All six cylinders, crankshaft, and camshaft were removed, with no anomalies noted.

The oil filter was removed and cut open. The filter folds were clear of contamination.

The crankcase was disassembled, and no thermal damage was observed. The bearings displayed normal wear and no anomalies were noted.

Propeller examination

The propeller examination revealed that both propellers showed signs of rotation and there were no indications that either propeller was at or near the feathered position. Leading edge gouging, chordwise/rotational scoring, blade bending, and twisting were observed on both propellers, which is consistent with rotation. Overall, the damage to both the left and right propellers was similar and consistent with a power on, symmetric condition, at the time of impact.

Cockpit/Cabin Observations

The cockpit area sustained substantial impact damage and most instrumentation was damaged and unreadable. The throttles were near the idle/aft position and the mixture and propeller controls were full forward.

Postaccident examination of the airframe and engines revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

Medical and Pathological Information

Orange County Sheriff-Coroner, Santa Ana, California, conducted an autopsy of the pilot. The pilot’s cause of death was multiple traumatic blunt force injuries.

Toxicology testing performed at the FAA's Forensic Sciences Laboratory was negative for carbon monoxide, ethanol, and drugs.