Sunday, September 30, 2012

Baltimore Orioles charter plane makes emergency landing at Jacksonville International Airport (KJAX), Florida: Oven on plane catches fire

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -

The Baltimore Orioles have been one of the hottest teams in Major League Baseball the second half of the season.


Things got even hotter Sunday evening when the team's charter flight to Tampa was forced to make an emergency landing at the Jacksonville International Airport because of a reported fire on board.

“They came on and told us we needed to make an emergency landing, and then we were nearly free-falling for a few minutes as they raced to get us on the ground as fast as possible,” Ned Rice, who is with the baseball operations department of the Orioles, posted on his Facebook page.

Channel 4 Sports Director Sam Kouvaris confirmed the fire was in an oven in the plane's kitchen area and was not mechanical.

The Orioles were headed to Tampa from Baltimore for the final series of the season.

Baltimore is currently tied with the New York Yankees
.

http://www.news4jax.com

Quest Aircraft Kodiak 100, N745: Accident occurred September 30, 2012 in Anchorage, Alaska

NTSB Identification: ANC12GA114  
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Anchorage, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/13/2014
Aircraft: QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY LLC KODIAK 100, registration: N745
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

The pilot was landing an amphibious, float-equipped airplane on a lake on the final leg of a 4-day, wildlife survey operation. The pilot stated that she had not conducted a water landing recently, so she elected to land on the water to maintain proficiency. She said that because the airplane had a tendency to turn left during water landings, she was not comfortable landing it in the lake’s water lane (a confined area). Before landing, the pilot set about 50% right rudder trim to compensate for the left-turning tendency and confirmed that the wheels were in the up position. She noted that her airspeed during the approach was slightly faster than normal. The pilot said that during touchdown, the airplane veered to the left, then to the right, then veered violently to the right, as though it "caught a float," and the right wing struck the water. The airplane then pivoted abruptly to the right, cartwheeled, and began to sink. The pilot was able to escape through a broken side window.

Postaccident examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation.

The flight in the government-owned, government-operated airplane was a public aircraft operation (PAO). Because the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has no statutory authority to regulate PAOs, the agency’s training program was not subject to civil aircraft requirements. A review of the flight training program revealed that it did not include curriculums, events, or testing and checking procedures. No written maneuvers and procedures guide with acceptable performance standards had been developed. As a result, no standardization existed within the pilot group, and tribal knowledge and experimentation were accepted as part of the organization’s culture. Multiple checklists existed for the airplane, and pilots were allowed to use whichever checklist they preferred. The agency did not, nor was it required to, incorporate best practices and industry standards into its training program and airplane operations, and no FAA oversight was required or provided. The agency’s vendor pilot requirements were substantially higher with stricter standards, and required FAA oversight, compared to those for agency pilots flying similar missions.

The pilot had logged 232 flight hours in the accident make and model airplane, including 68 water landings, only 2 of which were logged without an instructor on board. She stated that during her training in the accident make and model airplane, she completed only one step turn. She further stated that during her interagency pilot evaluation/qualification check, step turns were not completed. The pilot said that the check pilot was not comfortable performing the maneuver, so they agreed to sign off the maneuver on the check ride form but did not accomplish the task. Because performing step turns develops a pilot’s skill in maintaining directional control of a floatplane during high-speed water taxiing, if the pilot had received thorough training in performing step turns in the accident make and model airplane, she would have been less likely to lose control of the airplane during landing.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control while landing, which resulted in a collision with the water. Contributing to the accident were the pilot's lack of experience conducting waterborne operations in the accident make and model airplane and the public aircraft operator’s lack of training standardization.

History of Flight

On September 30, 2012, about 1545 Alaska daylight time, an amphibious float-equipped Quest Aircraft Company, LLC, Kodiak 100 airplane, N745, sustained substantial damage while landing at the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, Anchorage, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country public-use flight under 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The certificated commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. The flight originated at the King Salmon Airport, King Salmon, Alaska, about 1300.

The flight was the final leg of a 4-day Emperor Goose survey that began on September 27, when the pilot and another pilot/biologist departed from Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, Anchorage, Alaska to King Salmon Airport. On September 28, they flew a 5-hour mission to Cold Bay Airport, Cold Bay, Alaska. On September 29, they flew a 4-hour survey mission and then departed the Cold Bay Airport for the King Salmon Airport. All landings during this 4-day mission prior to the accident flight were made on a prepared runway surface using wheels.

The accident flight originated at the King Salmon Airport, stopped briefly at the Kenai Municipal Airport, Kenai, Alaska, to drop off the accompanying pilot/biologist, and continued to the Lake Hood Seaplane Base. The pilot stated she had not conducted a water landing since September 1, and had predetermined that, if the conditions were favorable, she would land at Lake Hood Seaplane Base to maintain water-landing proficiency, rather than land at the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport on wheels. The pilot reported that, before landing, she completed the before-landing checklist, set approximately 50 percent right rudder trim, and confirmed the wheels were in the up position. She noted that her airspeed on approach was slightly faster than normal. During touchdown the airplane veered to the left, then to the right. The airplane then veered violently to the right, as though it "caught a float," and the right wing struck the water. The airplane pivoted abruptly, cartwheeled, and the wreckage began to sink. After unfastening her seatbelt, the pilot attempted to open the pilot side door but was unable. Looking rearward, she noticed a broken passenger window at water level and exited through the window onto the inverted fuselage.

A pilot-rated witness who was standing on the north shore of Lake Spenard at the Lake Hood Seaplane Base stated that the airplane appeared to touch down in a slight nose-low attitude. After touchdown, the airplane veered left and right, and rolled from side-to-side. The amplitude increased rapidly, and the airplane pivoted to the right, cartwheeled, and came to rest inverted. During the accident, sequence the airplane appeared to shed parts, and the floats became detached from the fuselage.

Personnel Information

The pilot, age 36, was a dual-function pilot (pilot/biologist) for the DOI, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

She held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and single-engine sea. She reported 1,650 total hours of flight experience, 550 hours which were in seaplanes. She had accumulated 232 hours and 68 water landings, 66 of which were associated with training or ongoing proficiency accompanied by an instructor in the Kodiak 100 equipped with amphibious floats. Her most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued in September 2011.

The pilot had received approximately 8 hours of flight training in the Kodiak 100 equipped with amphibious floats from Lake and Air Inc., and approximately 68 hours of flight training from a combination of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Office of Aviation Services. The training included both water and land operations and was completed in March 2012. Her interagency pilot evaluation/qualification check was completed on April 1, 2012.

The Airplane Pilot Qualification card, issued by the DOI, authorized her to fly the Kodiak 100 with the following limitations: "MISSION FLIGHTS = LOW LEVEL. Mission flights limited to 2 (two) carded pilots on board. OK for solo non mission flights."

The pilot's most recent flight review was completed on October 15, 2011. According to training records provided by the DOI, the flight review consisted of 2 hours of ground training and 0.7 hours of flight time in an amphibious float-equipped Kodiak 100. Title 14 CFR 61.56 states, in part: "A flight review consists of a minimum of 1 hour flight training and 1 hour of ground training."

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on October 2, the pilot stated that she was not comfortable landing in the water lane at Lake Hood Seaplane Base due to the left-turning tendency of the airplane during water landings. She had set 50 percent right rudder trim in anticipation of the left-turning tendency. She also stated that, at the first sign of a loss of directional control, her initial instinct was to lower the water rudders or add power.

During a separate telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC on October 16, the pilot stated that she had completed one 180-degree step turn during her initial training. In addition, she stated that, during her interagency pilot evaluation/qualification check, step turns were not completed. According to the accident pilot, the check pilot was not comfortable performing step turns, so they agreed to sign off the maneuver on the check ride form but did not accomplish the task.

Aircraft Information

The airplane was manufactured in 2009 and registered to the owner in September 2010. It was equipped with a Pratt & Whitney PT6A-34, 750-shaft horsepower turbo-propeller engine and a Hartzell HC-E4N-3PY/D9511FS four-blade propeller. The airplane had accumulated 284 hours at the time of the accident. Its most recent annual inspection was completed on May 31, 2012. The airplane was manufactured with fixed tricycle landing gear and received Supplemental Type Certificate (STC) approval for the installation of Wipaire, Inc., Wipline 7000 amphibious floats in June 2010. The float installation was completed on July 8, 2010, and the airplane had accumulated approximately 245 hours of flight time since the installation.

Meteorological Information

The closest weather reporting facility is Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport, approximately 1 mile west of the accident site. About 8 minutes after the accident, at 2353, an aviation routine weather report reported in part, wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles, few clouds at 6000 feet, scattered clouds at 13,000 feet, scattered clouds at 20,000 feet, temperature 45 degrees F, dew point 29 degrees F, and altimeter 30.02 inHG.

Wreckage and Impact Information

On October 2, 2012, recovery crews and a diver recovered the wreckage from Spenard Lake. All of the airplane's major components were recovered from the accident site, and control continuity was established to all flight controls.

On October 2 and 3, a wreckage examination and layout was conducted under the direction of the NTSB IIC. A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Operations aviation safety inspector from the Anchorage Flight Standards District Office, two air safety investigators from Quest Aircraft Company, and two engineers from Wipaire, Inc., assisted the NTSB IIC.

The left wing was separated at the fuselage with extensive leading edge crushing and upward bending from approximately wing station (WS) 176 outboard. The left wing flap remained connected to its respective attach point, the right aileron was fragmented at WS 176, and the hinge bracket was pulled out of the aileron spar. The right wing remained attached to the airplane fuselage, but it was displaced aft of its normal position. The right wing's flight control surfaces remained connected to their respective attach points.

The engine remained attached to the firewall and sustained impact damage to the front and left side. The propeller remained attached to the reduction gearbox. All four of the propeller blades remained attached to the hub assembly, were bent aft, and had torsional "S" twisting.

The fuselage was intact and relatively free of impact damage.

The left and right horizontal stabilizers and elevators remained attached to the fuselage mounting attach points, but the right horizontal stabilizer and elevator sustained impact damage.

The vertical stabilizer and rudder remained attached to the empennage and were relatively free of impact damage.

The rudder trim was measured at approximately 50 percent to the right.

Both left and right forward and aft float struts were separated at their attachment fittings. The rear float spreader bar separated at both float attachment points, and the spreader bar was not recovered. The wheels were confirmed in the up and locked position, consistent with a water landing.

Organizational and Management Information

Pilot Requirements

The DOI Departmental Manual, Aviation Management, Part 351 Aviation Operations, Chapter 3 Flight Crewmember Policy, 3.2 Pilot Qualifications states in part: Pilots shall meet the following minimum rating, and experience requirement prior to flying operational missions.

Incidental/Dual Function: Commercial Pilot Certificate with appropriate category and class ratings, Instrument Rating, Recent Flight Experience as appropriate (14 CFR Part 61), VFR 500 hours Pilot in Command (PIC), 25 hours PIC night, 24 hours PIC last fiscal year in category, 10 hours PIC in make and model, and 25 hours PIC in seaplanes.

Vendor Pilot Qualifications: Shall meet the PIC requirements of 14 CFR Part 135; 1500 hours total pilot time, 1200 hours PIC time, 25 hours PIC in seaplanes, and 100 hours in the last 12 months.

Training Program

Prior to operating aircraft for the DOI, a pilot must complete certain flight training requirements. An aircraft make and model checkout requires 10 hours of flight time in the specific make and model to be operated. The turbine aircraft training module requires 50 hours in make and model. The floatplane operations training module requires 10 hours lake and general float operations, 10 hours river and stream operations, 5 hours for ocean and saltwater operations, and 10 hours for amphibious float operations. If a pilot has accumulated 25 hours or more of seaplane operations, the hour requirement is waived, and the pilot must only meet the standards of the module with no hourly requirement.

In order to operate the Kodiak 100 on amphibious floats for the DOI, the pilot must have completed a minimum of 50 hours flight training.

An in depth review of the DOI flight training program revealed a general outline with hour requirements. The flight training program did not include curriculums, events, or testing and checking procedures. No maneuvers and procedures, or acceptable performance guidelines were developed for the amphibious float-equipped Kodiak 100.

The flight training for the Kodiak 100 was recorded on the "Seaplane Instruction Form" grading is accomplished by placing a number next to the maneuver that was performed: 1 = Below Acceptable Standards, 2 = Improving/Below Standards, 3 = Satisfactory, 4 = Above Average, 5 = Excellent. No grading was used on the accident pilot's Kodiak 100 flight training record, a check mark was placed next to the maneuver that was performed.

The DOI had not developed or written any specific procedures for the Kodiak 100. According to the Chief Pilot/Training and Standardization Manager for the Alaska Region, Office of Aviation Services (OAS) who is responsible for conducting training and checking for DOI, multiple checklists existed for the Kodiak 100, and pilots were allowed to use whichever checklist they preferred.

Government Aircraft Operations

FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 00.1-1, "Government Aircraft Operations," dated April 19, 1995, provides "guidance on whether particular government aircraft operations are public aircraft operations or civil aircraft operations under the statutory definition of public aircraft." As explained in the AC, an operation is considered public or civil depending on the circumstances of the particular operation rather than the ownership or overall use of an aircraft. Generally, public aircraft operations include law enforcement, low-level observation, aerial application, firefighting, search and rescue, biological or geological resource management, aeronautical research, national defense, and intelligence missions.

During the NTSB's February 2009 public hearing on the safety of helicopter emergency medical services operations, FAA representatives testified that, with the exception of operations within the National Airspace System, the FAA has no statutory authority to regulate public aircraft operations. Title 49 United States Code Section 44701 is the primary authority for federal aviation regulations. This section instructs the FAA administrator to promote the safe flight of civil aircraft in air commerce through regulations and standards prescribed in the interest of safety. Unless a government-owned aircraft is engaging in a civil operation, it is not subject to civil aircraft and pilot requirements pertaining to certification, maintenance, and training.

Additional Information

During an interview with the NTSB IIC on October 3, the Chief Pilot/Training and Standardization Manager for the Alaska Region, Office of Aviation Services (OAS), who conducts training and checking for the DOI, stated that the Kodiak 100 on Wipline 7000 amphibious floats had a left-turning tendency when the propeller was in beta and that the water rudders could be deployed if directional control was needed once coming off the step. He also stated the Kodiak 100 on Wipaire, Inc., Wipline amphibious floats was not a "beginner's airplane" and tended to be unforgiving.

During a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC on October 3, the Senior Flight Instructor for Lake and Air, who conducted training for Wipaire, Inc., stated that, as the Kodiak 100 on Wipline 7000 amphibious floats came off the step, there was a left-turning tendency when power was applied to the propeller. He also stated that he did not condone nor recommend deploying the water rudders with the airplane still on the step.

FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 3, Chapter 19, Section 1, Scope, Concept, and Definitions states in part:

Training program - "A system of instruction which includes curriculums, facilities, instructors, check airmen, courseware, instructional delivery methods, and testing and checking procedures."

Curriculum - "A complete training agenda specific to an aircraft type, a crewmember or dispatcher duty position, and a category of training".

Event - "An integral, task- oriented part of training, checking, or qualification module that requires the use of a specific procedure or procedures. A training event provides a student an opportunity for instruction, demonstration, and/or practice using specific procedures. A checking or qualification event provides an evaluator the opportunity to evaluate a student's ability to correctly accomplish a specific task without instruction or supervision.


UNITED STATES DEPT OF THE INTERIOR
C/O NBC AVIATION MANAGEMENT
http://registry.faa.gov/N745

NTSB Identification: ANC12GA114
14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Anchorage, AK
Aircraft: QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY LLC KODIAK 100, registration: N745
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. : NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this public aircraft accident report.

On September 30, 2012 about 1550 Alaska daylight time, an amphibious float-equipped Quest Aircraft Kodiak 100 airplane, N745, sustained substantial damage while landing at the Lake Hood Seaplane Base, Anchorage, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) cross-country government flight, under Title 14, CFR Part 91, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the U.S. Department of Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The commercial certificated pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and a VFR flight plan had been filed. The flight originated at the King Salmon Airport, King Salmon, Alaska, about 1300, and had completed a planned stop in Kenai, Alaska, before continuing to Anchorage, the flights final destination for the day.

During an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC) on October 2, the pilot said the accident flight originated at the King Salmon Airport, stopped briefly in Kenai, and continued to Anchorage. Before landing, the pilot said she configured the airplane for a water landing, by confirming the wheels were in the up position. She noted that her airspeed during the approach to the lake was slightly faster than normal. During touchdown, the airplane veered to the left, and then to the right. The airplane then veered violently to the right, as though it “caught a float” and the right wing struck the water. The airplane then pivoted abruptly to the right, cartwheeled, and the wreckage began to sink.

The pilot stated that there were no pre-accident anomalies with the airplane. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the wings, empennage, and fuselage during the accident.

The accident airplane was equipped with a set of Wipline 7000 amphibious floats, which were designed specifically for the Quest Kodiak 100 airplane. A postaccident inspection confirmed that the wheels were in the up position.

The closest weather reporting facility is Anchorage International Airport, approximately 1 mile west of the accident site. About 8 minutes after the accident, at 2353, an aviation routine weather report (METAR) at Anchorage, Alaska, reported wind calm, visibility, 10 statute miles, few clouds at 6000 feet, scattered clouds at 13,000 feet, scattered clouds at 20,000 feet, temperature, 45 degrees F; dew point 29 degrees F; altimeter, 30.02 inHG.

At the time of the accident a pilot rated witness standing on the north shoreline of Lake Spenard stated the airplane appeared to touchdown in a slight nose-low attitude. After touchdown the airplane veered left and right, and rolled from side-to-side. The airplane nosed over abruptly, and came to rest inverted.

 
A worker on a rescue boat places containment boom around U.S. Dept. of Interior float plane that crashed while landing on Spenard Lake on Sunday, September 30, 2012. The female pilot was able to safely exit the turbine Quest Kodiak amphibious float plane and get to shore.




ANCHORAGE, Alaska— A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service float plane crashed in Lake Spenard Sunday afternoon, and the pilot -- the sole occupant -- made her own way out to safety, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.

Clint Johnson, chief of the Alaska region for the safety board, said he spoke briefly to the pilot, who was shaken up by the ordeal but didn't suffer physical injuries. "Just cold and wet," he said.

He declined to identify her, saying the safety board doesn't release pilot names. The agency is investigating the crash of the turboprop Kodiak, an amphibious plane with both floats and wheels manufactured by Quest Aircraft Co.

"What she said is after touchdown she felt a grabbing of one of the floats," Johnson said. "The next thing she knew, the plane was cart-wheeling upside down."

He didn't yet know how she escaped the plane underwater. Two nearby planes started up and came to her aid, helping her to shore, he said. He plans to conduct a more in-depth interview Monday and also to inspect the plane, which he said appears to have been seriously damaged.

The amphibious plane is leaking fuel and under water. It was surrounded by containment boom on Sunday afternoon.

The National Transportation Safety Board will examine it after the Department of Interior, which includes the Fish and Wildlife Service, hauls it out of the water and into its hangar.

The pilot had dropped off a crew on the Kenai Peninsula and was returning to Anchorage when she lost control trying to land in the east-west water lanes, Johnson said.

Lake Spenard is part of the busy Lake Hood float plane basin. On its Web site, Quest describes the Kodiak as a top performer in difficult conditions.

The NTSB confirms that a pilot escaped injury after a Kodiak plane crashed into Lake Spenard.  She was the only person on board, and the  NTSB says no one else was hurt.

Clint Johnson with the NTSB says the plane was owned and operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Johnson said the plane lost control during touchdown, which caused it to crash. Johnson said the east-west water lane at the airport was closed for arrivals and departures.

NTSB said they are in the formative stages of the plane crash investigation. 

Keuthan BUCCANEER II, N710WP: Fatal accident occurred September 30, 2012 in Granite Quarry, North Carolina

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N710WP

NTSB Identification: ERA12LA584
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Granite Quarry, NC
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/13/2014
Aircraft: KEUTHAN BUCCANEER II, registration: N710WP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot added about 5 gallons of automotive gasoline to the airplane’s fuel tank before departing on a local flight. Witnesses reported that they observed the airplane flying at a low altitude and that the engine then lost power. The airplane struck power lines and crashed in an open field. Examination of the airframe and engine revealed no evidence of a preexisting mechanical malfunction or failure that would have precluded normal operation. An examination of the airplane’s fuel lines revealed only a small amount of residual fuel. The fuel tank contained only residual fuel and was not breached.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s inadequate preflight fuel planning, which resulted in a total loss of engine power due to fuel exhaustion.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 30, 2012, about 1755 eastern daylight time, a Keuthan Buccaneer II, N710WP, was substantially damaged following a forced landing near Granite Quarry, North Carolina. The private pilot was fatally injured. The experimental, amateur-built, amphibious airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated at Rowan County Airport (RUQ), Salisbury, North Carolina, about 1655.

A witness, who was also the pilot’s flight instructor, observed the pilot refuel the airplane with 5 gallons of automotive gasoline about one hour prior to the accident. Subsequently, other witnesses observed the engine lose power at low altitude. They observed or heard the airplane descend and crash in a rural field about 4 1/2 miles from RUQ.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and airplane single-engine sea. He reported a total flight experience of 500 hours on his latest airman certificate application for his airplane single-engine sea rating, dated August 18, 2012. At that time he reported 445 hours as pilot-in-command.

The pilot’s personal logbook was not located following the accident.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was a single-engine, high-wing, amphibious airplane, serial number 1. It was powered by a Rotax 582 DCDI engine rated at 65 horsepower. The airframe and engine logbooks were not recovered following the accident.

According to the manufacturer’s performance charts, the fuel consumption range was about 2.1 gallons per hour (at 3,000 rpm) to 6.1 gallons per hour (at 6,800 rpm). According to the aircraft weight and balance data, the aircraft fuel capacity was about 10 gallons.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 1755 surface weather observation for RUQ included clear skies, wind calm, visibility 10 statute miles or greater, temperature 20 degrees C, dew point 12 degrees C, and altimeter 29.87 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

Federal Aviation Administration inspectors responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The airplane crashed at the edge of an open field, about 4 1/2 miles from RUQ. The accident site coordinates were 35 37.05N, 080 26.63W. Evidence of electrical arcing was observed on the left wing leading edge. Power lines located about 20 yards from the main wreckage showed evidence of impact damage.

The inspector confirmed substantial damage to the airframe. Flight control continuity was established from the cockpit controls to the ailerons, elevator, and rudder. The airplane was equipped with a recovery parachute and showed evidence of partial deployment.

The plastic main fuel tank contained only residual fuel and was not damaged or leaking. Air bubbles were observed in the plastic fuel line from the fuel tank to the engine. There was no fuel in the line to the engine carburetors. A lack of fuel in the fuel line prevented the inspector from obtaining a fuel sample. There was no evidence of leaking fuel around wreckage.

The engine propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange. The blades showed no evidence of rotational damage or tip curling. The engine turned freely by hand and internal continuity was confirmed.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot at the North Carolina Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The autopsy report noted the cause of death as “blunt force trauma of the head and chest due to an ultra light plane crash.”

Forensic toxicology testing was performed on specimens of the pilot by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory (CAMI), Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The CAMI toxicology report indicated no carbon monoxide, cyanide, ethanol, or drugs.


NTSB Identification: ERA12LA584 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Granite Quarry, NC
Aircraft: KEUTHAN BUCCANEER II, registration: N710WP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 30, 2012, about 1755 eastern daylight time, a Keuthan Buccaneer II, N710WP, was substantially damaged following a forced landing near Granite Quarry, North Carolina. The private pilot was fatally injured. The experimental, amateur-built, amphibious airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated at Rowan County Airport (RUQ), Salisbury, North Carolina, about 1655.

A witness observed the pilot refuel the airplane with automotive gasoline and depart RUQ about one hour prior to the accident. Witnesses observed the engine lose power and the airplane descended and crashed in a rural area about five miles from RUQ.

Federal Aviation Administration inspectors responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The inspector confirmed substantial damage to the airframe. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the control surfaces to the cockpit. The engine propeller did not exhibit evidence of rotational damage. The main fuel tank was not breached and contained only residual fuel. Air bubbles were observed in the transparent fuel lines. There was no fuel in the line to the engine carburetors.





Cecil 'Dwayne' Brown

FAITH - Cecil "Dwayne" Brown, 49, of Faith, passed away Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012.

Dwayne was born Aug. 11, 1963, in Rowan County, the son of Cecil Voight Brown and Betty "Faye" Martin Brown of Faith.

Dwayne was a 1982 graduate of East Rowan High School and a graduate of the HVAC program at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College.

Dwayne was a lifelong member of Shiloh Reformed Church of Faith, where he was a member of the Bell Choir and the Christians in Action Sunday School Class.

He was a member of the Rowan County Chapter of the EAA and active in the Young Eagles organization. Dwayne was owner and operator of Central Piedmont Heating and Air of Salisbury.

He had a passion for flying and boating and loved sharing those experiences with family and friends.

In addition to his parents, survivors are brother Darrin Scott Brown and wife Sharon of Salisbury; nephews Chase and Will Brown; niece Devynne Brown; special twins Natalie and Alayna Day; and many aunts, uncles and cousins.

Visitation: 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4 at Shiloh Reformed Church in the Fire Place Lobby.

Funeral Services: 3:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4 at Shiloh Reformed Church, conducted by Rev. Wayne Trexler, pastor. Interment will follow in the church cemetery.

Memorials: In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Shiloh Reformed Church, Po Box 308, Faith, NC 28041.

Powles Funeral Home of Rockwell is serving the Brown family. Online condolences may be made to the Brown family at www.powlesfuneralhome.com




GRANITE QUARRY, N.C. – FAA investigators are looking for the cause of a Rowan County plane crash.

According to the Rowan County Sheriff's Office, Cecil Dwayne Brown, 49, of Faith, was killed Sunday when his Ultra-Light Experimental plane crashed in a Granite Quarry field. The accident happened around 6 p.m. in a wooded area on Troutman Street behind Shaw's Mobile Home Park.

Monday, relatives were at the crash site to pay their respects.

"If he has to be gone, you know I want to remember him for all the good things he did you know, he loved people, he loved to fly," said Brown's uncle Eddie Martin. 

Martin said his nephew built the plane himself.

"He went down to Florida and brought it up here, it was you know, in two pieces or whatever and he rebuilt the plane," said Martin. 

Martin said Brown had been flying small planes for a decade or more, and had even flown the plane before. However on a clear Sunday, relatives say Brown caught power lines crashing on family-owned property.

"The plane sputtered and all and he engine just cut off and he just couldn't clear the power lines," said Martin.

An FAA investigation into the cause could take up to a year. But for Brown's family, they said its an unfortunate accident that happened to a man doing what he loved most.

Brown's body was taken to Chapel Hill Sunday for an autopsy.

ROWAN COUNTY, NC (WBTV) - 

One man has died after his plane crashed near Granite Quarry Sunday evening, according to emergency officials.
 
According to the Rowan County Sheriff's Office, 49-year-old Cecil Dwayne Brown, of Faith, was killed when his plane went down.

The plane, described by witnesses as a yellow experimental type "sea plane" crashed in a wooded area near Shaw's Mobile Home Park, off Old Stone House Road shortly after 6 pm Sunday night.

A witness told WBTV that she saw a plane fitting that description flying near High Rock Lake earlier on Sunday.

Jonathan Stephens and Robert Price describe hearing the engine stutter then a loud boom. The power to the area was knocked out.

It appears the plane may have hit power lines before going down. The pair say they came outside to see the plane's cockpit nearly snapped in two.

Emergency personnel who reached the scene, located a ultra light, experimental aircraft that was occupied by one pilot. There were no other victims of this crash, officials told WBTV.

The Granite Quarry Fire Department and Union Fire Department responded along with units from the Rowan County Sheriff's Office, Granite Quarry Police Department,  NC State Highway Patrol, Rowan EMS, and Rowan County Rescue Squad.

Brown's body was transported to Chapel Hill for an autopsy to be conducted

Family member were notified on Sunday evening, by the NC State Highway Patrol.

FAA Investigators are scheduled to be at the crash site Monday morning to conduct their investigation. 


GRANITE QUARRY - A small experimental plane crashed near Old Stone Church Road Sunday night, killing one man. 

 Authorities said an Ultralight aircraft went down in a field close to Shaw's Mobile Home Park just before 6 p.m.

Frank Thomason, chief of emergency services in Rowan County, said the pilot was the only person on board.

Authorities did not release information about the pilot Sunday night, citing pending notification of the family.

Investigators said the next of kin was out of town Sunday night.

Some neighbors in the area said they saw the plane go down into a field after it appeared to have engine problems.

Danny Gilmore, a resident in the area, said he saw it hit the ground near his home.

"I saw it go over and then it just went down when the motor cut off," he said. "It's a very sad thing."

Other neighbors said the plane appeared to stall out shortly before impact.

Thomason said the plane departed from Rowan County Airport shortly before the crash Sunday evening.

The pilot was believed to have been heading to a location near High Rock Lake, Thomason said.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were also notified.

FAA and NTSB investigators are expected to arrive at the scene Monday morning, Thomason said.

Crews quickly wrapped the scene in yellow caution tape and neighbors stood on their porches or near the crash site Sunday evening.

Rowan investigators and the North Carolina State Highway Patrol assisted in the preliminary investigation.

Crews initially secured the scene for fires or leaking fluid.

"The plane is pretty much intact," Thomason said.

Authorities removed the body less than two hours after the crash.

Emergency personnel from about 10 fire, police and EMS departments assisted Sunday night.

Power lines were also down near the crash site and many neighbors said they knew something happened when their power went out.

A neighbor, who identified herself as Rita, said she knew something was wrong when her children playing outside came running in.

"We heard a loud bang, twice," she said. "The power went off, but we didn't see it.


Read more:  

http://charlotte.news14.com

http://www.wcnc.com

 http://myfox8.com

 http://www.wbtv.com

 http://www.salisburypost.com


ROWAN COUNTY, NC (WBTV) - One man has died in a plane crash off Troutman Street in Granite Quarry, according to emergency officials. 

 The plane, described by witnesses as a yellow experimental type "sea plane" crashed in a wooded area near a mobile home park shortly after 6 pm Sunday night.  A witness told WBTV that she saw a plane fitting that description flying near High Rock Lake earlier on Sunday.

Jonathan Stephens and Robert Price describe hearing the engine stutter then a loud boom. The power to the area was knocked out. It appears the plane may have hit power lines before going down. The pair say they came outside to see the plane's cockpit nearly snapped in two.

The name of the victim has not been released.

According to a release by the Rowan County Sheriff's Office, "The FAA was notified and will respond on Monday morning to conduct their investigation of the crash.  Law enforcement units will maintain a presence at the crash scene until FAA Investigators arrive.  The victim was transported from the scene and will be sent for an autopsy.  The NC Highway Patrol will make notifications to family members of the pilot."

 

SALISBURY, NC -- Investigators are on the scene of a fatal plane crash near OldStone House Road in Salisbury. According to Rowan County Sheriff's Department, several calls came in around 5:56 p.m. on Sunday in regards to a small plane that crashed in the area. We are told the victim is a white male who's name is not being released until an autopsy is performed.

Emergency Management Crews, fire officials, and highway patrol officers are on the scene. At this time, one person is confirmed deceased. There is no word yet on any other injuries. Old Stone House Road is near American Quarry Road.

The FAA was notified and will respond on Monday morning to conduct their investigation of the crash.








ROWAN COUNTY, N.C. -- Authorities remain on the scene of a deadly plane crash in Rowan County. 

Officials say the plane crashed on Old Stone House Road in the area of Troutman Street in Salisbury just outside of Granite Quarry.

According to officials, the call came in from several witnesses saying a plane went down around 6 p.m. Sunday evening.

"It was awfully close to the treetops, and then his engine cut off," said Tanner Hardwood, who witnessed the accident.

Officials tell WCNC, it appears that an experimental plane was involved in the crash.

At least one person is confirmed dead. No word yet on the identity of the pilot.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is now investigating the crash.


GRANITE QUARRY, N.C. – One person is dead after a plane crash Sunday in Rowan County. 

It happened around 6 p.m. in a wooded area on Troutman Street in Granite Quarry. The pilot's identity has not been released. Officials say he was the only person on board.

They confirm the plane departed from the Rowan County Airport and was headed to the High Rock Lake area.

Nearby residents say the plane was having some sort of mechanical issues and was circling above their homes before the engine just stopped.

Air Creation TANARG, N2751N: Accident occurred September 30, 2012 in Safford, Arizona

http://registry.faa.gov/N2751N

NTSB Identification: WPR12LA442  
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Safford, AZ
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013
Aircraft: AIR CREATION TANARG, registration: N2751N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

While flying in loose formation with another airplane to the destination airport, the accident airplane descended to about 400 feet above ground level. The pilot subsequently advised the pilot of the other airplane that the wind had become stronger and was affecting his airplane’s controllability. He added that he might attempt to land or consider returning to the departure airport. Shortly thereafter, the airplane made a descending right turn and impacted the ground.

An examination of the wreckage revealed that the airplane was equipped with a nonstandard, smaller wing and was trimmed to the near full nose-down position, which would increase the airplane’s stall speed. According to the wing manufacturer, the nonstandard wing has controllability problems at high speeds. Surface weather observations reported wind gusting to 22 knots near the time of the accident. The combination of the nonstandard wing, which reduced controllability, the full nose-down trim, which increased the stall speed, and the high wind gusts resulted in the pilot’s failure to maintain control of the airplane.

Postmortem toxicological testing of specimens from the pilot indicated the recent use of marijuana. Although the levels were such that the use may have been impairing, the actual effects on the flight could not be determined.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot’s failure to maintain airplane control while maneuvering in high wind conditions and his failure to adjust the trim appropriately. Contributing to the accident was the airplane’s nonstandard modified wing configuration.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On September 30, 2012, about 1630 mountain standard time, an experimental Air Creation, Tanarg, weight-shift control, airplane, N2751N, impacted terrain about 38 nautical miles north of Safford, Arizona on the San Carlos Indian Reservation. The sport pilot was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The pilot, the sole occupant sustained fatal injuries; the airplane sustained substantial damage. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight. The airplane departed Safford Regional Airport (SAD), Safford, Arizona about 1600 with a destination of Show Low Regional Airport (SOW), Show Low, Arizona.

A family member in a similar airplane model was flying in loose formation with the accident airplane. The family member reported after clearing a ridge that the accident airplane dropped down to about 400 feet above ground level. The family member was positioned above and behind the accident airplane when the accident pilot made a radio transmission that the wind had become stronger and was making the airplane abruptly turn. The pilot added that he may attempt to land or abort the flight to SOW. Shortly thereafter, the accident airplane made a descending right turn and impacted the ground.

The airplane impacted a flat area at an elevation of 5,050 feet mean sea level, that was surrounded by mountainous terrain. The debris field was scattered in a 70 foot vicinity of the main wreckage. All major structural components were located within the wreckage debris area.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

A review of Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records revealed that the 50 year-old-pilot held a sport pilot certificate. An examination of the pilot’s personal logbook indicated he had amassed 78 flight hours since his initial training flight in May 2009. The most recent logbook entry was dated April 2011. The pilot had amassed his total flight hours in the accident airplane and in an Evolution Revo, a similar make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The airplane was an experimental, weight-shift-control, Air Creation, Tanarg, serial number T05004. The airplane was equipped with a Rotax, 912UL, motor number 4406447. A review of the airplane’s maintenance logbooks revealed that the last entry was dated September 17, 2012 with an airplane total time of 566 hours. According to a FAA inspector, the standard 15 meter wing was replaced with a non-standard 12.5 meter wing about a month prior to the accident flight. The aircraft logbooks did not have an entry for the replacement of the wing.

METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

The closest aviation weather observation station was located at SAD, which issued an automated surface weather observation at 1551 (about 40 minutes prior to the accident) reporting the following: the wind was variable at 3 knots; 10 miles or greater visibility; sky conditions clear below 12,000 feet, temperature 33 degrees Celsius; dew point minus 2 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 29.91 inches of mercury. An observation issued a 1651 (about 20 minutes after the accident indicated the wind was from 340 degrees at 9 knots, gusting to 22 knots; 10 miles or greater visibility; sky clear below 12,000 feet; temperature 34 degrees Celsius; dew point minus 3 degrees Celsius; and an altimeter setting of 29.91 inches of mercury.

Density altitude was calculated and ranged in the area from 6,003 to 6,135 feet during the time of the accident.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot by the Gila County Medical Examiner in Globe, Arizona. The Forensic Pathologist reported that the cause of death of the pilot was due to blunt force injuries. Toxicological tests on specimens from the pilot were performed by the FAA Civil Aeromedical Medical Institute. Analysis revealed no carbon monoxide, cyanide or ethanol. The toxicology testing identified ranitidine, an over the counter medication that reduces stomach acid and is used to treat heartburn, in the urine. In addition, 0.0027ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol (marijuana) and 0.0054ug/ml of tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid (marijuana’s primary metabolite) was detected in the pilot’s blood and 0.065ug/ml tetrahydrocannabinol carboxylic acid was detected in his urine.

TESTS AND RESEARCH

Following recovery, the airplane was examined at Air Transport in Phoenix, Arizona. The propeller assembly was removed and the engine was setup for a test run. A header tank was secured to the upper beam and a fuel line was attached to the airplanes fuel tank outlet line. The engine started with little hesitation and smoke was visible from each muffler assembly. The engine ran smoothly for approximately two minutes. Fuel was leaking at the attachment area of the fuel inlet line and the engine driven fuel pump. When the engine was shut down, fuel continued to leak.

The header tank was detached from the beam and relocated to the pilot’s seat, near the airplane’s fuel tank. The engine was restarted and ran smoothly for about one minute with no hesitations. No fuel leaked from the fuel pump inlet line attachment area. The fuel line was loose at the fuel pump attachment fitting and moved freely by hand. No other anomalies were noted during the engine run.

The wing assembly was disassembled and impact damage was noted throughout its internal structure. The trim actuator was found extended to nearly its full length. According to aircraft documents, the wing would be in the full forward position with the actuator extended to the full length. The full forward position increases maneuverability and speed and decreases pitch stability. The trim actuator motor was operated by use of an aircraft battery and no anomalies were noted.

A detailed report of the airplane examination is contained in the public docket for this accident.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

According to the FAA inspector, this was the only make/model airplane to have the 12.5-meter aftermarket wing installed and electric trim modification. The inspector stated that the wing manufacturer does not recommend the model of wing that was on the airplane at the time of the accident because of controllability issues. The manufacturer added that with the wing in the forward trim position, an additional 15 knots is added to the stall speed equating to a speed of 60 knots. In turbulent air the wing will experience controllability issues and should be flown at slower speeds.

The FAA also stated that when the airplane wing was changed the airplane should have gone back to re-authorization. No documents were found to indicate any additional recertification for the Letter of Authorization.



NTSB Identification: WPR12LA442 
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Safford, AZ
Aircraft: AIR CREATION TANARG, registration: N2751N
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.
 

On September 30, 2012 about 1630 mountain standard time, an Air Creation, Tanarg, N2751N, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain about 37 miles north of Safford, Arizona on the San Carlos Indian Reservation. The airplane was registered to private individuals and operated by the sport pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The sport pilot was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight. The cross-country flight departed Safford Regional Airport (SAD), Safford, Arizona about 1600 with a destination of Show Low Regional Airport (SOW), Show Low, Arizona.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector interviewed a family member who was flying alongside the accident airplane when the accident occurred. The family member, who is also a sport pilot, was flying a similar airplane model. After clearing a ridge the accident airplane dropped down to about 400 feet above ground level (agl) where he reported to the other pilot that the winds had become stronger. The other pilot who was higher in altitude at this point saw the airplane and heard the accident pilot report that the winds were making the airplane do abrupt turns. He further stated that he might try to land or abort the flight to SOW. Shortly thereafter the other pilot witnessed the accident airplane make a right turn and impact the ground.

Examination of the accident site by the FAA revealed the airplane impacted level ground surrounded by mountainous terrain. Wreckage debris was found within 70 feet of the main wreckage. All major structural components were located within the wreckage debris area.

The wreckage was relocated to a secure location for further examination.


IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 2751N        Make/Model: EXP       Description: AIR CREATION TANARG
  Date: 09/30/2012     Time: 2045

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Fatal     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: SAFFORD   State: AZ   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  AIRCRAFT CRASHED INTO MOUNTAINOUS TERRAIN, THE 1 PERSON ON BOARD WAS 
  FATALLY INJURED, NEAR SAFFORD, AZ

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   1
                 # Crew:   1     Fat:   1     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Unknown      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: SCOTTSDALE, AZ  (WP07)                Entry date: 10/01/2012 



An Alabama man died Sunday after the ultralight aircraft he was flying crashed on the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation, Graham County officials said.

 The man and his brother took off from Safford on Sunday afternoon in separate ultralights, which are light weight, slow flying, fixed-wing aircraft. They planned to fly to Show Low, according to Graham County Undersheriff Jeff McCormies.

The ultralight crashed about 2 p.m. in the Point of Pines area near San Carlos, the Sheriff's Office said.

The ages and names of the brothers and the cause of the crash were not available Sunday night.


 SAFFORD, AZ (CBS5) -  One person is confirmed dead in a plane crash near San Carlos on the White Mountain Indian Reservation, the Graham County Sheriff's Office said.

Sheriff's spokesman Lt. Jerry Nelson said the victim's name has not been released.

The crash happened Sunday afternoon.

No other information is available at this time.  


SAN CARLOS APACHE INDIAN RESERVATION - One person has died after a small plane crashed on the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation Sunday afternoon.


 Sheriff's spokesman Lt. Jerry Nelson said two people were on board when the plane went down.

One person died in the crash, the other person's condition is unknown at this time.

Officials said a DPS helicopter is on scene investigating the accident.

County Donegal, Ireland: Pilot critically injured in plane crash

The emergency services are at the scene of a plane crash today in Co Donegal which left a 22-year-old man critically injured in hospital.

Fire crews, ambulances and Gardai were at the scene of the incident which happened just past 2pm between Convoy and Castlefin.

Air accident investigators are also on the way to the incident.

The two-seater micro-light aircraft came down in an airfield at Kilpatrick and wreckage was spread over a wide area close to farm buildings.

The pilot, a 22-year-old Buncrana man, is in a critical condition and was airlifted to hospital in Letterkenny by the Sligo rescue chopper.

The scene has been sealed off.

No-one else was on board.

It’s thought the plane crashed after getting into difficulty in high winds.

“This is a very serious incident and all efforts at the moment are concentrated on recovery,” said one source.

“It’s a miracle that he survived.”

http://www.donegaldaily.com

Two in hospital after plane crash - Queensland coast, Australia

Two men have been taken to hospital after their ultralight plane crashed near the Queensland coast.

The crash is believed to have happened just before 6pm (AEST) on Sunday on a rural property in Marian near Mackay, police said.

The men, aged 20 and 21, were taken to Mackay Base Hospital with suspected spinal injuries.

The 21-year-old passenger was in a serious condition.

http://news.ninemsn.com.au

Agusta A109E Power, CareFlite, N144CF: Accident occurred September 30, 2012 in Eastland, Texas

 http://registry.faa.gov/N144CF

NTSB Identification: CEN12FA670 
 Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Eastland, TX
Aircraft: AGUSTA SPA A109E, registration: N144CF
Injuries: 3 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 30, 2012, approximately 0932 central daylight time, an Augusta 109E Emergency Medical Service (EMS) helicopter, N144CF, registered to Wells Fargo Bank NW NA Trustee, Salt Lake City, Utah, crashed after an uneventful 26 minute cross-country flight. The crash occurred while the helicopter was being maneuvered to avoid local weather prior to setting up for an instrument approach to the Eastland Airport, Eastland, Texas. All three occupants, the airline transport rated pilot, flight nurse, and a flight paramedic, sustained serious injuries. The flight was being operated by CareFlite of Grand Prairie, Texas, and was conducted under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91 as a repositioning flight to pick up a patient. The helicopter departed the CareFlite base located at Granbury Airport (GDJ), Granbury, Texas, at 0906. Its intended destination was the Eastland Airport (ETN), Eastland, Texas. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed along the route of flight from Granbury to Eastland, however, marginal visual meteorological conditions or instrument conditions were reported in the vicinity of the accident site. A company VFR flight plan was activated upon departure from Granbury and an IFR flight plan was placed on file with ATC, but was not activated.

According to first responders to the accident site, the helicopter impacted the ground in an open field, aproximately 4.4 miles south of Eastland Airport. Emergency responders transported the occupants to a nearby hospital. The helicopter was transported to a secure facility for examination.




IDENTIFICATION
  Regis#: 144CF        Make/Model: A109      Description: AGUSTA SPA A109E
  Date: 09/30/2012     Time: 1500

  Event Type: Accident   Highest Injury: Serious     Mid Air: N    Missing: N
  Damage: Substantial

LOCATION
  City: EASTLAND   State: TX   Country: US

DESCRIPTION
  N144CF AGUSTA SPA A109E ROTORCRAFT, CRASHED UNDER UNKNOWN CIRCUMSTANCES, 
  NEAR EASTLAND, TX

INJURY DATA      Total Fatal:   0
                 # Crew:   3     Fat:   0     Ser:   3     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Pass:   0     Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    
                 # Grnd:         Fat:   0     Ser:   0     Min:   0     Unk:    


OTHER DATA
  Activity: Other      Phase: Unknown      Operation: OTHER


  FAA FSDO: FORT WORTH, TX  (SW19)                Entry date: 10/01/2012 



EASTLAND, Texas — A CareFlite medical helicopter with a crew of three on board made a "hard landing" near Eastland on Sunday morning on its way to pick up a patient.

All three CareFlite personnel suffered "minor to moderate" but not life-threatening injuries, company president and CEO Jim Swartz said.

The crash site — near County Road 309 — was less than six miles from the Eastland Municipal Airport, where the patient was waiting.

Department of Public Safety spokesman Trooper Sparky Dean said the injured were taken by ground ambulance to a hospital in Eastland. He said the helicopter's engine was still running when it hit the ground around 9:30 a.m.

Swartz said the cause of the accident was unknown, but added that the crew of the Agusta 109 helicopter was experienced. He said there will be a full investigation. The company was dispatching ambulances to bring the injured employees back to Fort Worth. They were identified as:

  • Pilot Scott Wayne Wallace, 58, of Fort Worth
  • Medic Teresa Lynn Campbell, 53, of Granbury
  • Medic Rhett Derek Drahen, 34, of Frisco
All three were said to be conscious and talking at the crash site. 

Representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board were expected to examine the wreckage on Monday.

Eastland, the seat of Eastland County, is about 90 miles southwest of Fort Worth.

A pilot and a mechanic were killed two years ago in the fiery crash of a CareFlite helicopter in Ellis County. 

http://www.wfaa.com

EASTLAND, Texas – A CareFlite Helicopter crashed in Eastland County Sunday morning while traveling to pick up a patient. Three people were injured.

“When we responded to the scene we found 3 of the occupants–which were all part of the CareFlite crew. They were out of the helicopter, on the ground–all of them had injuries,” Sgt. David Foster with the Department of Public Safety said.

First responders arrived at the crash site–three miles south of Eastland and a quarter of a mile east of the intersection of Texas Highway 06 and County Road 309–at about 9:30 a.m.

The engine was still running when they arrived and a small fire had ignited. Responding firefighters from all over the county were able to prevent the engine from exploding.

“They did an excellent job and were able to get the fire out and we were actually able to get the engine put out by putting water in the exhaust,” Foster said.

The pilot, Scott Wallace of Fort Worth, and the two medics, Teresa Campbell of Granbury and Rhett Drahen of Frisco, were flying from Granbury in Hood County to pick up a patient in Eastland County. The pilot was trying to divert to the Eastland County Airport due to limited visibility caused by stormy weather.

Foster said the people involved in the crash were all conscience and able to talk with authorities. He said they will likely have broken bones at the very least and one suffered some head trauma.
 
All things considered, Foster said they were all very lucky.

“You can see that there’s power lines–some high voltage lines–apparently the pilot saw those, he did an excellent job in avoiding those. This could have possibly turned out a lot worse than it was.”

The people involved in the crash will be taken to a hospital in the Metroplex. There is no official word on the cause of the crash but the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating.

 http://www.ktxs.com

Germanwings Airbus A319-100, D-AGWK, Flight 4U-753, Accident occurred December 19, 2010 - Cologne, Germany

Jörg Handwerg wants the airline industry to start taking air contamination seriously

 
Report in German (PDF)


An interim investigation report reveals that a Germanwings Airbus narrowly escaped disaster in 2010. The pilots nearly lost consciousness when poisonous vapor is thought to have seeped into the cockpit.

The Germanwings flight from Vienna to Cologne-Bonn airport on 19 December 2010 appeared to be going normally. Take-off had been delayed by two hours because of heavy snow at the destination airport, but otherwise everything seemed fine.

Then, as they started their descent towards Cologne-Bonn, the two pilots suddenly became aware of a "strange, very strong, unpleasant" smell in the cockpit, an investigation report of the incident revealed. They checked with the chief purser, who said there were no unusual smells in the passenger cabin.

Shortly after this the co-pilot felt so sick that he grabbed his oxygen mask, and the pilot felt he was "quite literally, losing my senses." There was a sudden, strong tingling sensation in his hands and feet, his field of vision shrank, and he felt dizzy.

Summoning their last reserves of strength, the two pilots succeeded in safely landing the Airbus, which had 149 passengers on board. Later, however, they told the German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation that they had had extreme difficulty in concentrating, and even in thinking clearly. Everything had seemed "surreal" and "like in a dream."

Obviously they had only barely succeeded in averting a disaster. But it's only now, almost two years later, that the incident has been made public, in the Bureau's interim report on its investigation.

Jörg Handwerg from the pilots' association Cockpit told DW what he believes happened. "As far as we're concerned, all the evidence points to this having been an oil vapor incident. Oil vapors from the engines got into the cabin air via a faulty seal."

Since the 1960s planes have usually been constructed in such a way that they suck in air for the cockpit and the passenger cabin via the two engines. Obtaining the air this way can be risky, said Handwerg, "If a seal breaks, it's possible for a lot of oil vapor to get into the cabins. In fact, for construction reasons, these seals are never 100 percent closed. Small amounts of oil vapor always seep into the cabin."

A well-known problem

Handwerg said that, unfortunately, this is not the first incident of its kind, although it is "extremely rare" for it to have such dramatic effects. Green party delegate Markus Tressel told the German parliament on Friday that over the past three years the authorities in Germany had logged 67 incidents involving contaminated air in the cabin.

In fact, the same Germanwings plane had earlier been involved in another unexplained incident. A flight from Dublin to Cologne in May 2008 was forced to turn back after the pilot complained he had lost sensation in his arm and that he and the cabin crew felt unwell.

After landing in Cologne in December 2010 the plane was immediately thoroughly checked by Germanwings engineers. They too noticed the smell in the cockpit, but attributed it to the de-icing fluid with which the Airbus had been treated several times that day.

Handwerg said he found this explanation unconvincing. It's not uncommon for de-icing fluid to get into the cabin in winter, he said. When this happens, the evaporating alcohol creates a kind of "white fog," and doesn't have such serious effects on the pilot's ability to function.

"The tingling in the fingers, the signs of paralysis, as well as the reduced ability to think clearly correspond precisely with experiences we've had of incidents involving oil vapor, and not with experiences of de-icing fluid," he said.

Business over security?

The pilots' association Cockpit has for years called for planes to switch over to systems that don't draw in cabin air across the engines. "Technically speaking, new planes should not be built in such a way that it's possible for something like this to happen. And we need filter technology or sensors for the existing planes to reduce the problem as much as possible."


The EASA does not see oil vapor contamination as a serious risk

Handwerg was critical not only of Germanwings, who he claimed are playing down the severity of the incident, but also of the European Aviation Safety Agency. Early in 2012 the EASA said it could see no causal connection between health-related complaints made by some pilots, crew members and passengers and contamination of cabin air with oil vapor.

Germanwings has defended itself against the accusations. It insists that it reported the incident in the proper manner to the authorities responsible, the German Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation and the German Federal Aviation Authority.

The airline's description of the incident was much less dramatic: "The captain told Germanwings that despite his physical impairment he had 'everything under control at all times.'"


Source:  http://www.dw.de

Fireworks prompt report of plane crash

HARDIN, Ky. -- An explosion in western Kentucky turned out to be the plane crash that wasn't.

Marshall County Sheriff Kevin Byars told The Paducah Sun that a motorist reported possible downed aircraft Saturday night near Hardin in Marshall County.

Search efforts were called off two hours after the report.

Byars and Duane Hawes, deputy director for Marshall County Emergency Management, say a motorist reported hearing a boom and seeing an orange glow around 8 p.m. Emergency responders from Marshall and Calloway counties searched between Hardin and Dexter but found no aircraft.

Hawes and Byars say a church group shot off fireworks in the area about the same time as a gas container caught fire and exploded, creating a loud noise. Byars says that caused the motorist to make the report.

Cessna 414A Chancellor, Evram Inc., N738W: Accident occurred September 30, 2012 in Innsbruck, Austria


NTSB Identification: CEN12WA664 
14 CFR Non-U.S., Non-Commercial
Accident occurred Sunday, September 30, 2012 in Innsbruck, Austria
Aircraft: CESSNA 414A, registration: N738W
Injuries: 6 Fatal,2 Serious.

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

On September 30, 2012, at 0459 coordinated universal time, a Cessna 414A, United States registered N738W, owned by Evram Inc., was destroyed when it impacted terrain under unknown circumstances near Innsbruck, Austria. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The pilot and five passenger were fatally injured and two passengers were seriously injured. The flight was originating at the time of the accident and was en route to Valencia (LEVC), Spain.

The Austrian investigators received reports that the airplane took off from runway 26 on a visual flight rules flight plan and turned south. The airplane impacted wooded terrain and a post impact fire ensued.

The accident investigation is under the jurisdiction and control of the Austrian government. This report is for informational purposes only and contains only information released by or obtained from the Austrian government or the Federal Office of Transport, Accident Investigation Branch, Department of Aviation. Further information pertaining to this accident may be obtained from:

BMVIT – IIBAV/UUB/LF
Federal Office of Transport
Accident Investigation Branch, Department of Aviation
Postfach 207, 1000 Wien
Lohnergasse 9, 1210 Wien
Austria


 N738W - Cessna 414A Chanchellor 
 C/N 414A0027 
kurz vor dem Abflug nach Zell am See







 











 http://orf.at/stories/2143488/

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http://tirol.orf.at



A Cessna 414 crashed Sunday morning from at Oberellbögen.  

On board were a total of eight people. Except for the pilots they should all come from the Tyrol. Two occupants were able to free himself from the wreckage, as Walter Pupp, head of the Office of Criminal Investigation Tyrol, told a press conference of the forces in the late morning. As the police had against tt.com before, the one person was seriously injured another. The victims were brought to the hospital in Innsbruck. The seriously injured were emergency surgery. According to information from the hospital he was in the artificial hibernation. The second survivor to have suffered burns and is currently in the recovery room.

Passengers from probably the Zillertal

For the other six persons, including the pilot, all help came too late. After unconfirmed information are regarded as the victims are men from the valley, who were friends. The pilot came from Zell am See. The aircraft took off at 6.50 clock from Innsbruck airport in the direction of Valencia in Spain. The pilot had issued an emergency call, it was announced at the press conference. At 7.12 clock disappeared two-engine aircraft on radar. The airport informed the control center. A few minutes later, a hunter was on a high seat witnessed the crash. The man heard the Cessna engine noise and the impact. He rushed to the site. On the forest, which is ten meters from the crash site, was met by the hunter one of the survivors. The seriously injured were in a steep wooded area.Half an hour after the first alarm, the first rescue workers were at the scene. The six deaths were in the burning wreck.

Crime scene investigators on site

The aircraft was at an altitude of 1612 meters. It had the crash struck a roughly 100 meters long in the forest. The salvage operations were difficult. The security forces had to advance on foot to the scene in rough terrain. Heavy fog and low clouds could be no helicopter in the crash area.The Cessna totally burned out in the disaster. The fire in the forest could be cleared by the emergency services.The accident site was cordoned off by police.  
The bodies of the six victims were recovered that morning and taken for autopsy to Innsbruck. A crisis intervention team took care of the family. Crime scene investigators have begun the investigation. The cause of the crash is still unclear, an Aircraft Accident Board is to be used.

Total on Sunday some 100 firefighters, 70 men of the rescue, 20 police officers and twelve detectives were in use. 


 A total of eight occupants

 
The crash of a Cessna above elbows in Tyrol Innsbruck-Land district Sunday morning, six people have been killed. According to information from the Red Cross and the police, there were two survivors. A total of eight people were found in the aircraft.One person has minor injuries, another seriously injured, it said. The aircraft  had a Tyrolean group on board was launched in Innsbruck at 6.50 clock - the destination was Valencia, Spain. The pilot, according to police in Zell am See (Salzburg), the twin-engine Cessna was admitted in the Tyrol.

 
Hunter heard engine noise and impact


 Immediately after the takeoff, it had once given via radio contact with the pilot. A little later, the Cessna had disappeared from the radar. At 7.12 clock gave the airport the information to the control tower to say that the Wipptal a aircraft was down. A few minutes later, a hunter heard on a high level of aircraft engine noise and the impact.Upon arrival at the accident scene burned the wreck, one of the survivors came to meet him at the ten meters away from the crash site forest. The second survivor was severely burned in a steep section of the forest. Already at 7.42 clock then were the first helper on the spot. The six deaths were in the wreck. The fire in the forest could be extinguished by firefighters.

 
Helicopter operation aborted
 Support of search and rescue operations from the air was due to the bad weather conditions is not possible. Low clouds forced a termination of the requested helicopter use. The relief efforts by the Red Cross and fire brigades were made from the floor. The crash site was declared a prohibited area by police. Crime scene investigators were on Sunday afternoon busy with the investigations on the exact circumstances of the accident. Clarification should be used Aircraft Accident Board.Bodies brought for autopsy to Innsbruck

At a site inspection by representatives of the media four hours after the accident at 1612 meters altitude on smoke still rose from the Cessna. The bodies were brought for autopsy to Innsbruck. Clearly visible despite the still prevailing mist was part of the 100-meter-long corridor that had pulled the machine through the forest. On the steep slopes of the Cessna was finally broken in flight east.Time of use of about 100 men of the fire brigade, rescue 70 men and 20 police officers and twelve detectives. A crisis intervention team of the Red Cross took care of the family members who were gathered in a building near the State Police in Innsbruck.
Zwei Insassen konnten sich selbst aus dem Wrack befreien. Die Maschine war Sonntagfrüh in ein Waldstück gestürzt und in Flammen aufgegangen.

The aircraft accident occurred shortly after 7:00 in the Tyrol area near Innsbruck has left 6 dead.  Two persons survived the tragedy.  One of these suffered minor injuries, while the second is in critical condition.  The aircraft, Cessna 414A Chanchellor, N738W, crashed near the village of Ellbogen, not far from the Italian border (approximately 20 kilometers).  The tourists aboard came from Zillertal.

 

http://orf.at

http://www.tt.com

Insgesamt acht Insassen

 Beim Absturz einer Cessna oberhalb von Ellbögen im Tiroler Bezirk Innsbruck-Land sind Sonntagfrüh sechs Menschen ums Leben gekommen. Nach Informationen des Roten Kreuzes und der Polizei gab es zwei Überlebende. Insgesamt hatten sich acht Personen in der Maschine befunden.

Eine Person sei leicht, eine weitere schwer verletzt worden, hieß es. Die Maschine mit einer Gruppe Tiroler an Bord war in Innsbruck um 6.50 Uhr gestartet - ihr Ziel sollte das spanische Valencia sein. Der Pilot stammte laut Angaben der Polizei aus Zell am See (Salzburg), die zweimotorige Cessna war in Tirol zugelassen.


 Jäger hörte Motorengeräusche und Einschlag

Unmittelbar nach dem Start habe es über Funk einmal Kontakt mit dem Piloten gegeben. Wenig später sei die Cessna vom Radar verschwunden. Um 7.12 Uhr gab der Flughafen die Information an die Leitstelle weiter, dass im Wipptal eine Maschine außer Kontrolle geraten sei, berichtete der Chef des Landeskriminalamtes, Walter Pupp. Wenige Minuten später hörte ein Jäger auf einem Hochstand Motorengeräusche des Flugzeuges und den Einschlag.

Beim Eintreffen an der Unfallstelle brannte das Wrack, einer der Überlebenden kam ihm an dem zehn Meter von der Unglücksstelle entfernten Forstweg entgegen. Der zweite Überlebende lag mit schweren Verbrennungen in einem Steilstück des Waldes. Bereits um 7.42 Uhr waren dann die ersten Helfer an Ort und Stelle. Die sechs Toten befanden sich im Wrack. Das Feuer in dem Waldstück konnte von Feuerwehrleuten gelöscht werden.

 Hubschraubereinsatz abgebrochen

Eine Unterstützung der Bergungs- und Rettungsarbeiten aus der Luft war aufgrund der schlechten Wetterbedingungen nicht möglich. Tief hängende Wolken erzwangen einen Abbruch des angeforderten Hubschraubereinsatzes. Die Hilfsmaßnahmen durch Rotes Kreuz und Feuerwehren erfolgten vom Boden aus. Die Absturzstelle wurde von der Polizei zum Sperrgebiet erklärt. Tatortermittler waren ab Sonntagmittag mit den Untersuchungen zum genauen Hergang des Unglücks beschäftigt. Zur Klärung sollte eine Flugunfallkommission eingesetzt werden.

Leichen zur Obduktion nach Innsbruck gebracht

Bei einem Lokalaugenschein von Medienvertretern vier Stunden nach dem Unglück in 1.612 Meter Höhe stieg immer noch Rauch aus der Cessna auf. Die Leichen waren zur Obduktion nach Innsbruck gebracht worden. Deutlich zu sehen war trotz des immer noch herrschenden Nebels ein Teil der rund 100 Meter langen Schneise, die die Maschine durch den Wald gezogen hatte. Auf dem steilen Hang war die Cessna schließlich in Flugrichtung Osten aufgeschlagen.

Im Einsatz standen rund 100 Mann der Feuerwehr, 70 Mann der Rettung und 20 Polizeibeamte sowie zwölf Kriminalbeamte. Ein Kriseninterventionsteam des Roten Kreuzes kümmerte sich um die Angehörigen, die in einem Gebäude in der Nähe der Landespolizeidirektion in Innsbruck zusammengekommen waren.

http://orf.at

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Ellbögen – Eine Cessna 414 stürzte Sonntagfrüh bei Oberellbögen ab. An Bord befanden sich insgesamt acht Personen. Bis auf den Piloten sollen sie alle aus Tirol stammen. Zwei Insassen konnten sich selbst aus dem Wrack befreien, wie Walter Pupp, Leiter des Landeskriminalamts Tirol, bei einer Pressekonferenz der Einsatzkräfte am späten Vormittag sagte. Wie die Polizei gegenüber tt.com bereits zuvor bestätigt hatte, wurde eine Person schwerst, eine weitere verletzt. Die Unfallopfer wurden in die Klinik nach Innsbruck gebracht. Der Schwerverletzte wurde notoperiert. Laut Auskunft der Klinik befand er sich im künstlichen Tiefschlaf. Der zweite Überlebende soll Verbrennungen erlitten haben und liegt derzeit in der Aufwachstation.
Passagiere vermutlich aus dem Zillertal
Für die anderen sechs Personen, darunter auch der Pilot, kam jede Hilfe zu spät. Nach noch nicht bestätigten Informationen soll es sich bei den Opfern um Männer aus dem Zillertal handeln, die befreundet waren. Der Pilot soll aus Zell am See stammen. Das Flugzeug war um 6.50 Uhr vom Innsbrucker Flughafen in Richtung Valencia in Spanien gestartet. Der Pilot habe keinen Notruf abgesetzt, hieß es bei der Presskonferenz. Um 7.12 Uhr verschwand die zweimotorige Maschine vom Radar. Der Flughafen informierte die Leitstelle. Wenige Minuten später wurde ein Jäger auf einem Hochsitz Zeuge des Absturzes. Der Mann hörte Motorgeräusche der Cessna und den Einschlag. Er eilte zum Unglücksort. Auf dem Forstweg, der zehn Meter vom Absturzort liegt, kam dem Jäger einer der Überlebenden entgegen. Der Schwerverletzte lag in einem steilen Waldstück.

Bereits eine halbe Stunde nach der ersten Alarmierung waren die ersten Rettungskräfte am Unglücksort. Die sechs Toten befanden sich in dem brennenden Wrack.

Tatortermittler vor Ort

Das Flugzeug lag auf einer Seehöhe von 1612 Metern. Es hatte beim Absturz eine rund 100 Meter lange Schneise in den Wald geschlagen. Die Bergungsarbeiten gestalteten sich schwierig. Die Einsatzkräfte mussten zu Fuß zur Unglücksstelle im unwegsamen Gelände vordringen. Dichter Nebel und tiefhängende Wolken ließen keinen Hubschrauberflug in das Absturzgebiet zu. 
Die Cessna brannte bei dem Unglück total aus. Das Feuer in dem Waldstück konnte von den Einsatzkräften gelöscht werden.
Der Unglücksort wurde von der Polizei abgesperrt. Die Leichen der sechs Opfer wurden noch am Vormittag geborgen und zur Obduktion nach Innsbruck gebracht. Ein Kriseninterventionsteam kümmerte sich um die Angehörigen.

Tatortermittler haben mit den Untersuchungen begonnen. Die Unglücksursache ist noch völlig unklar, eine Flugunfallkommission soll eingesetzt werden.

Insgesamt standen am Sonntag rund 100 Feuerwehrmänner, 70 Mann der Rettung, 20 Polizeibeamte und zwölf Kriminalbeamte im Einsatz. (mami, tt.com, APA)

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