Saturday, December 1, 2018

Cirrus SR22 or Piper Cherokee: Aircraft used to harass elk in northwest Colorado; Rewards are available if the information leads to an arrest or citation

Wildlife officers say using an aircraft to harass wildlife or as an aid in hunting violates state and federal laws.



Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials are seeking information about a small aircraft that allegedly harassed a herd of elk near Craig.

Witnesses told wildlife officer Evan Jones that they saw a small, single-engine aircraft fly two low passes over a herd of elk on November 16th near Moffat County Road 18, causing the elk to scatter.

Using an aircraft to harass wildlife or as an aid in hunting violates Colorado's wildlife laws and federal regulations, said parks and wildlife spokesman Mike Porras.

Witnesses described the aircraft as a single-engine with a low-wing design, either white or yellow, and may have been a Cirrus SR22 or a Piper Cherokee.

"We don't know what the pilot was intending, if they were scouting for someone on the ground, but that's certainly something we would like to talk to the pilot about," Porras said.

In a statement, Jones said that the agency takes self-reporting into account when assessing penalties.

"The pilot still has the opportunity to do the right thing and contact us as soon as possible," Jones said.

Jones can be contacted at 970-878-6090 or information can be submitted anonymously through Operation Game Thief at 877-265-6648.

Original article ➤ https://www.oneidadispatch.com




CRAIG — Colorado Parks and Wildlife officers are looking for a pilot who flew an airplane low over a large herd of elk north of Craig.

CPW said in a release that several witnesses reported seeing a small, single-engine aircraft make two low passes over the elk on the afternoon of November 16. The maneuvers disturbed the elk and caused them to scatter. The aircraft is believed to have been a white or yellow Cirrus SR22 or Piper Cherokee.

Wildlife officers say using an aircraft to harass wildlife or as an aid in hunting is illegal.

Anyone with information about the case is asked to call Wildlife Officer Evan Jones at 970-878-6090. 

If you want to remain anonymous, you can call Operation Game Thief at 877-265-6648. 

Rewards are available if the information leads to an arrest or citation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.9news.com

Cessna 335, privately owned and operated, N79HP: Fatal accident occurred December 01, 2018 near Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (KFXE), Broward County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Miramar, Florida
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Continental Motors, Inc.; Mobile, Alabama

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


https://registry.faa.gov/N79HP


Location: Fort Lauderdale, FL
Accident Number: ERA19FA060
Date & Time: 12/01/2018, 1326 EST
Registration: N79HP
Aircraft: Cessna 335
Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 1, 2018, about 1326 eastern standard time, a privately owned and operated Cessna 335, N79HP, impacted the ground and a building during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport (FXE), Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The commercial pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured and one occupant of the building sustained minor injuries. The airplane was destroyed by a postcrash fire, and the building sustained structural and fire damage. The airplane was being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and visual flight rules flight following was obtained for the flight that originated about 3 minutes earlier. The flight was destined for Hilliard Airpark (01J), Hilliard, Florida.

According to preliminary voice data from the FXE air traffic control tower, the pilot was cleared for takeoff and advised that the wind was from 150° at 18 knots with gusts to 23 knots. After takeoff the controller advised the pilot that he was not receiving the transponder and provided the transponder code. The controller then instructed the pilot to contact Pompano Tower but immediately asked the pilot if he was flying low along the shore. About 1325:27, an occupant in the airplane advised, "ground we got a fire left engine turning right back." The controller stated say again, and the same occupant advised there was a loss of engine power from the left engine and they were turning back. The controller cleared the pilot to land on any runway.

Preliminary radar track data indicated the airplane departed Runway 9, turned left and flew in a northerly direction until about 1326, when it then turned to the west, followed by a turn to the southwest. The airplane continued on a southwest direction for about 10 seconds, turned right briefly on a northwesterly direction, then turned left and flew on a south-southwesterly direction towards FXE. The airplane proceeded near the accident site and radar data was lost about 1326:40.

Examination of the airplane revealed it was nearly consumed in the postaccident fire. The flaps and landing gear were retracted. The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N79HP
Model/Series: 335 No Series
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FLL, 65 ft msl
Observation Time: 1253 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 3200 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 16 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 20000 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Departure Point: Fort Lauderdale, FL (FXE)
Destination: Hilliard, FL (01J)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Explosion: On-Ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude: 26.205000, -80.157222

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Eladio Neftali Marquez, 51, of Rahway, New Jersey, passed away tragically on December 1st, 2018 in Ft Lauderdale, Florida. 

A memorial gathering will be on Sunday, December 16th from 2-3PM at Calvary Chapel Old Bridge, 123 White Oak Lane, Old Bridge, New Jersey, with service following beginning 3PM at Calvary Chapel.

Arrangements have been entrusted to the Old Bridge Funeral Home. 

https://www.oldbridgefh.com




The pilot of the small plane that crashed into a Florida building housing a therapy center for children with autism has been identified as a New Jersey man.

Eladio Marquez, 51, of Rahway, was identified by his wife as the man piloting the Cessna 335 that exploded into a fireball into the Fort Lauderdale building on the 1000 block of Northwest 62nd Street Saturday.

His widow spoke in Spanish to the Telemundo station in South Florida, saying he was flying with a friend who was also a former flight student. She said Marquez had been flying for 12 years and been an instructor for 10. 

Both died in the fiery crash. 

Marquez's widow told Telemundo he was bringing the plane back to New Jersey. 

A Florida business’s surveillance camera captured video footage of a small plane exploding into a fireball after it crashed into a building housing a therapy center for children with autism in Fort Lauderdale over the weekend.

Video footage from a nearby business shows the plane skidding across the parking lot, trailed by heavy smoke, and then erupting into flames upon impact.

Several people, including children, could be seen running out of the building. There were eight adults and five children inside the center at the time of the crash but none were injured.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the incident.

Story and video ➤ https://www.nbcnewyork.com



FLORIDA - Un piloto dominicano y otra persona que lo acompañaba murieron al estrellarse el avión en que viajaban con un centro de rehabilitación para niños en Fort Lauderdale.

Eladio Neftaly Marquez, quien era oriundo San Juan de la Maguana, había viajado desde Nueva Jersey hasta La Florida para buscar el avión, que había sido sometido a reparaciones.

La caída del aparato provocó que el centro de asistencia a niños con autismo se incendiara, pero ninguno de los niños que se encontraban dentro sufrieron lesiones.

El accidente fue reportado alrededor de la 1:30 de la tarde en la 1101 Northwest y la calle 62.

Según las autoridades, al momento del accidente donde falleció Eladio Marquez y Marquez (Netaly) y la otra persona no identificada hasta el momento, en el interior del centro habían cinco niños y ocho maestros, una de las cuales resultó herida cuando sacaba a los menores fuera del edificio en llamas.

La mujer, la única herida en el suceso, no requirió ser hospitalizada mientras que el piloto dominicano, oriundo de Juan de Herrera, en la provincia San Juan, y el pasajero de la aeronave perecieron tras la colisión, informó el jefe de los bomberos de Fort Lauderdale, Stephen Gollan.

Hasta el momento se desconoce la identidad de la otra persona que iba en el avión, un Cessna 335, que acababa de despegar del aeropuerto ejecutivo de Fort Lauderdale con destino a Hilliard, Florida

Llegó a EEUU con Blas Durán y se quedó en busca de su sueño americano
El piloto dominicano, Eladio Márquez y Márquez (Netaly), oriundo de Juan de Herrera, en la provincia San Juan,  fallecido ayer en un accidente aéreo en Fort Lauderdale, en el sur de Florida, Estados Unidos, emigró en busca del “sueño americano” en el año 1989, relató él mismo en un video colgado en las redes sociales.

“Emigré a los Estados Unidos en el 1989, con una visa H1 de trabajo, cuando para ese entonces tocaba con la orquesta de Blas Duran”, relató quien también destacó la bella de su comunidad natal y su gente.

“La razón que decido quedarme a vivir en los Estados Unidos después de haberse terminado la gira con Blas Durán fue, al ver las grandes oportunidades que los Estados Unidos le ofrece a las inmigrantes y vi la brecha de obtener o realizar mis sueños de piloto el cual en mí país era sumamente difícil de adquirir”, continuó detallando el exmúsico.

Márquez, describió que su trayectoria no fue distinta a la de cualquier migrante en la referida nación, reseña Diario Libre. 

Trabajó como repartidor de volantes en la calle, joyero, camionero y luego estudió hasta llegar a ser piloto.

https://fuegoalalata.do














The final, fiery moments of the fatal crash of a Cessna 335 into a Fort Lauderdale warehouse were recorded on surveillance video that was made available Monday.

A pilot and passenger in the plane died in the accident on Saturday afternoon. The video was shared by a business owner based at the Executive Office Park.

It shows the plane flying from the north and close to the ground before it collides with the north side of a warehouse, at 1001 W. Cypress Creek Rd.

“It’s pretty incredible,” Josh Shapiro, owner of H&J Electronics International, Inc., said about the heart-stopping video that he shared.

After the plane struck the facade of the gold colored building, fire enveloped the wreckage and flames traveled back along the parking lot the Cessna had flown over.

People from inside the area businesses, including women and children from an autism therapy center, can be seen running from the blaze before firefighters arrive to spray water and foam over the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it won’t release the plane’s tail number until relatives of the victims are notified.

Right after the crash at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, paramedics examined a teacher from the autism center, but she was not taken to a hospital.

“The teachers of that center are the true heroes in this situation, for their quick response and getting the children out of the building,” said Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Stephen Gollan.

Five children and eight instructors escaped the fire, he said.

No other injuries were reported.

The ill-fated flight originated from the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, the FAA said. It crashed in a warehouse complex that is across the street from the airfield’s northeast corner.

The airport is west of Powerline Road and Interstate 95.

Edgar Allen, owner of Care Assist Home Care, said Monday that his business is also in the warehouse struck by the plane and that he was at work Saturday when he heard a loud explosion.

“I ran out of my office. I came outside and I saw fire coming out, all over the building,” Allen said. “I yelled ‘call 911, call 911.’”

He feared the ceiling could come down and said the building was shaking. He had fled without his keys and phone and ran back inside the business to grab them, he said.

“About 10 minutes later, the ambulances started coming in,” Allen said. “The fire kept coming, there were explosions.”

He said bystanders were unable to help the people inside the plane.

“There was too much heat,” Allen said. “The fire was intense. We couldn’t go anywhere close.”

On Monday morning, a crane was preparing to lift the wreckage onto a flatbed truck so it could be hauled away.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.sun-sentinel.com




FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - A small private plane crashed into a therapy center for autistic children Saturday afternoon in Fort Lauderdale, killing two people on board and setting the building on fire, authorities said.

Battalion Chief Steven Gollan, a spokesman for the Fort Lauderdale Fire-Rescue Department, said around eight teachers and five children were in the building when the plane crashed. One of the teachers suffered minor injuries as she ushered the children from the building, but she was not hospitalized.

The view from Sky 10 showed foam-covered debris littered across the parking lot. The front facade of the concrete building suffered heavy damage.

Gollan said the crash happened around 1:30 p.m. in the 100 block of Northwest 62nd Street. By 2:30 p.m., fire crews had put out the fire, Gollan said.

The crash left a large amount of aviation fuel on the ground, complicating the firefighting efforts, Gollan said.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the plane was a Cessna 335, which had just taken off from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport. The plane was en route to Hilliard, a town in north Florida, the FAA said.

"We just seen a whole bunch of smoke," witness Jada Forrester-Reid said.

"I saw the airplane pass just over me and the engine (went), 'put, put, put,' and after I see black smoke," witness Gerald Houle said.

"I heard the plane engines popping, about three times, 'bang, bang, bang,' and then it went right by me," witness David Devine said.

Regional director Claudia Axelrod described the moments she and her staff members jumped into action as the roof began to collapse and the building went up in flames. Their focus was the children.

"They felt the building shake, and they thought it was a car that probably hit," Axelrod said. "Quickly, the door began to catch on fire, so they grabbed each child. The person in charge started to shout, 'You have this one, you have this one,' to make sure that everyone was accounted for."

Everyone inside the building made it out safely. Firefighters who battled the blaze stopped it from spreading to other business, calling staff members who rushed the half-dozen children to safety the real heroes.

"Our condolences with the families of the two people that passed away today in this tragedy," Axelrod said. "Our prayers are with you."

Investigators said they are working to find out who was aboard the plane.

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash and plans to send investigators to the scene either Saturday night or Sunday morning.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.local10.com



FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. (WSVN) - Two people were killed after a small plane crashed through the roof of an industrial building in Fort Lauderdale that contained a therapy center for autistic children, sparking a fire.

Fort Lauderdale Police and Fire Rescue responded to the scene near Northwest 10th Terrace and West Cypress Creek Road, Saturday afternoon.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the Cessna 335 aircraft collided with the building after departing from Runway 9 at the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport.

Officials said both passengers in the Cessna 335 were killed.

Cellphone video captured firefighters as they worked to put out flames.

The structure is home to several warehouses and several other businesses, including the Positive Behavior Supports Corporation, a therapy facility for children on the autism spectrum.

Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Steven Gollan said eight teachers and five children were in the building at the time of the crash. Staff at the center were able remove the children to a safe location.

One of the teachers suffered minor injuries, but she was not hospitalized. No one else inside the businesses or nearby warehouses was hurt.

The flight was reportedly headed to Hilliard Airpark in Hilliard, Fla.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://wsvn.com

Two people were killed when a small plane crashed through the roof of a children’s therapy center in a warehouse district near Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport on Saturday, officials said.

The victims, who have not yet been identified, were the pilot and a passenger. The crash set the autism therapy center on fire but none of the children inside was hurt, according to a Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue spokesman, Battalion Chief Steven Gollan.

One of the eight teachers was slightly hurt as she helped children evacuate, and firefighters removed her from the building on a gurney.

The crash was reported about 1:30 p.m. at 1101 Northwest 62nd Street.

There were heavy flames initially but Fort Lauderdale Fire Rescue brought them under control, officials said.

The plane crashed through the roof on the north side of the building located just east of the airport.

The Cessna 335 went down soon after takeoff from Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.sun-sentinel.com

Controlled Flight into Terrain: Piper PA-28-140 Cherokee, N56884; accident occurred August 05, 2017 near Sky Manor Airport (N40), Pittstown, New Jersey


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N56884 



Location: Pittstown, NJ
Accident Number: ERA17LA267
Date & Time: 08/05/2017, 2230 EDT
Registration: N56884
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The student pilot owned the airplane and intended to conduct a 20-minute night, cross-country flight to a nearby airport for avionics installation. During a circling descent to the destination airport, the airplane collided with trees and terrain, which resulted in a postcrash fire.

Examination of the wreckage did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. The student had a total flight experience of 105 hours, of which 5 hours were at night. He had not flown during the 90-day period preceding the accident.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's improper decision to conduct a night flight and his failure to maintain adequate altitude during the approach, which resulted in controlled flight into trees and terrain. Contributing to the accident was the student pilot's lack of total and recent night flight experience.

Findings

Aircraft
Altitude - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Identification/recognition - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Student pilot (Cause)
Total experience - Student pilot (Factor)
Recent experience - Student pilot (Factor)

Environmental issues
Tree(s) - Effect on operation (Cause)
Dark - Effect on personnel

On August 5, 2017, about 2230 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N56884, owned and operated by the student pilot, was substantially damaged during a collision with trees and terrain, while on approach to Sky Manor Airport (N40), Pittstown, New Jersey. The student pilot and one passenger were seriously injured, while a second passenger sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a visual flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey, about 2210.

Due to his injuries, the student pilot did not recall the accident sequence. He reported a total flight experience of 105 hours, of which, 5 hours were at night. The student pilot had not flown during the 90-day period preceding the accident. The front seat passenger stated that he and the student pilot previously spoke several times about flying the airplane to N40 for required equipment (avionics) installation. The front seat passenger was also seriously injured and remembered only some of the accident sequence. He recalled the student pilot saying, "we are losing altitude, this is not good."

The rear seat passenger sustained minor injuries and recalled that the student pilot stated they had to complete a 360° turn before landing. The student pilot then adjusted the wing flaps and the rear seat passenger saw a red blinking light, powerlines, and trees. The student pilot then stated that they needed to climb, but they were not climbing. The student pilot subsequently remarked that he thought he saw the problem and adjusted the wing flaps again. The rear seat passenger did not recall the impact.

Review of radar data and air traffic control (ATC) communications provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), revealed that the airplane was at 3,500 feet mean sea level (msl) when the student pilot reported beginning a descent to ATC at 2224. The airplane flew a track consistent with an approximate 3-mile left base leg to final leg of the airport traffic pattern for runway 7, at N40. While on final approach, the airplane descended from about 2,300 feet msl to 1,300 feet msl as it neared the runway threshold (which was at 548 feet msl). The airplane then completed a right 360° turn and the last radar target was recorded over the airport about 2230, indicating a groundspeed of 70 knots and an altitude of 1,000 feet msl.

The wreckage was located about 1/2-mile beyond the departure end of runway 7 and had been partially consumed by a postcrash fire. Examination of the wreckage by an FAA inspector did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. The inspector was able to rotate the crankshaft by hand and confirm camshaft, crankshaft, and valve train continuity to the rear accessory section of the engine. He also attained thumb compression on all four cylinders. The inspector added that the passengers were not certificated pilots.

The student pilot's flight instructor reported that the student pilot attempted to schedule a lesson for August 4, 2017, to gain proficiency; however, the flight instructor already had a commitment. The student pilot then scheduled the flight instructor for August 10, 2017. The flight instructor added that he last provided ground instruction to the student pilot on February 18, 2017, and the student pilot subsequently completed a solo cross-country flight uneventfully during the same day.

The recorded weather at an airport located about 12 miles east of the accident site, at 2253, included calm wind, clear sky and visibility 10 miles.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 34, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 105 hours (Total, all aircraft), 105 hours (Total, this make and model), 35 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: PIPER
Registration: N56884
Model/Series: PA28 140
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7425057
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/17/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2150 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 3791 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-320
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: SMQ, 106 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 12 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2253 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 90°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Calm /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 15°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Blairstown, NJ (1N7)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: VFR
Destination: Pittstown, NJ (N40)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 2210 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Sky Manor (N40)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 560 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 7
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2900 ft / 50 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Serious, 1 Minor
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  40.407500, -74.966111










NTSB Identification: ERA17LA267
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, August 05, 2017 in Pittstown, NJ
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-140, registration: N56884
Injuries: 2 Serious, 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On August 5, 2017, about 2242 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-28-140, N56884 was substantially damaged during a collision with trees and terrain, while on approach to Sky Manor (N40), Pittstown, New Jersey. The student pilot and one passenger were seriously injured, while the other passenger received minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the flight that departed Blairstown Airport (1N7), Blairstown, New Jersey, about 2215.

The student pilot and front seat passenger had been in an intensive care unit and unable to initially provide a statement. According to preliminary information from a Federal Aviation Administration inspector, the three occupants were related, but neither of the passengers held a pilot certificate. According to the rear seat passenger, family members, and the student pilot's flight instructor, the student pilot had planned to ferry his airplane to N40 the following week with his flight instructor to have avionics installed. However, the three occupants had been at a family picnic during the day of the accident and the student pilot decided to ferry the airplane with them that night, instead of the following week with his instructor. Another family member drove to N40 to provide ground transportation back to the student pilot's home once the airplane had landed.

The rear seat passenger further stated that the airplane was in a circling descent near N40 when the student pilot noted red obstruction lights related to utility wires and indicated that something was not correct. The airplane then collided with trees and impacted the ground. The three occupants were able to egress before a postcrash fire consumed a portion of the cockpit.

The recorded weather at an airport located about 12 miles east of the accident site, at 2253, included calm wind, clear sky and visibility 10 miles.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

North American P-51D Mustang, owned by Mustang Historic Military Aircraft LLC and operated by the pilot, N251PW: Fatal accident occurred July 16, 2017 in Cummings, Atchison County, Kansas

Vlado Lenoch


Bethany Root

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas
Warbird Heritage Foundation; Waukegan, Illinois
Tab-Air Maintenance & Restoration; East Troy, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

http://registry.faa.gov/N251PW




Location: Cummings, KS
Accident Number: CEN17FA270
Date & Time: 07/16/2017, 1018 CDT
Registration: N251PW
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN/AERO CLASSICS P 51
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

On July 16, 2017, about 1018 central daylight time, a North American Aero Classics P-51-D airplane, N251PW, was destroyed when it impacted trees and the ground 2.5 miles northeast of Cummings, Kansas. The airline transport pilot and the commercial pilot-certificated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was owned by Mustang Historic Military Aircraft, LLC., and it was operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The local personal flight departed Amelia Earhart Airport (K59), Atchison, Kansas, about 1005.

According to several witnesses located between K59 and the accident site, the airplane performed aerobatics in the area south of the airport. A witness located several hundred feet from the accident location observed the airplane fly over nearby power lines between 25 ft and 30 ft above the ground. The airplane then pitched up to climb in a near vertical attitude, the nose of the airplane turned to the left, the airplane turned left and then pitched down in a nose-low attitude. The airplane descended towards the ground and just before impact the tail of the airplane came up. The airplane impacted the ground in a near vertical attitude. When the witness heard the airplane flying overhead, he initially thought it was the pilot-certificated passenger flying an agricultural airplane, as she routinely flew over that area in the same manner during agricultural operations.

Radar data, provided by the FAA in National Track Analysis Program (NTAP) format, identified and depicted the accident flight from shortly after departure at 1009:41 until the time of the accident. The airplane initially climbed to 2,000 ft mean sea level (msl); the altitude varied between 2,100 ft and 4,400 ft msl. During the last 30 seconds of the flight, the altitude was about 2,500 ft at 1018:04, increased to 2,700 ft at 1018:08, decreased to 2,500 ft at 1018:22, and continued to decrease to 1,600 ft at 1018:27. The last radar target was located 250 ft to the northeast of the initial impact point.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial; Flight Engineer
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Glider; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/22/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 03/18/2016
Flight Time: (Estimated) 10879 hours (Total, all aircraft), 4000 hours (Total, this make and model)



Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 34, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Unknown
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/09/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 2000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 0 hours (Total, this make and model)

Pilot

The pilot's most recent second-class airman medical certificate contained the limitations "Holder shall possess glasses for near/intermediate vision. Not valid for any class after 05/31/2018."

The pilot held a FAA Statement of Aerobatic Competency for four different warbird airplanes including the P-51. His altitude level was "Level 1: Unrestricted" and he held endorsements for solo and formation aerobatics. His endorsement expired in October 2019. According to the pilot's family, he had been flying the make and model of the accident airplane for over 20 years.

Pilot-Certificated Passenger

The pilot-certificated passenger's most recent second-class airman medical certificate contained the limitations "must wear corrective lenses." On the application for this certificate, she estimated her total flight time as 2,000 hours; of which 600 hours had been logged in the past 6 months.

The pilot-certificated passenger was the airport manager at K59 and was employed by McElwain Aerial Spraying as an agriculture pilot. She did not have any flight time or experience in the accident airplane make and model.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: NORTH AMERICAN/AERO CLASSICS
Registration: N251PW
Model/Series: P 51 D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Limited
Serial Number: 44-72086
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/01/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 11610 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  1108.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Rolls-Royce
ELT: C91  installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: V-1650-7
Registered Owner:  MUSTANG HISTORIC MILITARY AIRCRAFT LLC
Rated Power: 1590 hp
Operator: Warbird Heritage Foundation
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The North American P-51-D Mustang is a low-wing, single seat, single engine, propeller driven airplane originally designed and built as a long-range fighter for the military and used during World War II and the Korean War. The accident airplane, Serial Number (S/N) 44-72086, was delivered to the Army Air Forces on January 20, 1945. The airplane was acquired by the current owner in 1996 and restored to an airworthy condition in 2011. The airplane was painted in the markings of Capt. Herbert G. Kolb's "Baby Duck" from the U.S. Army 8th Air Force, 353rd Fighter Group, 350th Fighter Squadron.

The airplane was modified by the addition of a second seat aft of the standard single pilot seat. According to the airplane maintenance records, the aft seat was equipped with a second set of flight controls that were installed in 1968. The controls consisted of a control stick, rudder pedals without brake inputs, throttle lever, and a limited set of flight instruments. There were no trim controls, landing gear controls, or radios in the aft compartment.


The North American P-51D Mustang “Baby Duck” flown by Vlado Lenoch during the Wings Over Waukegan Northern Illinois Airshow in 2016. Lenoch was killed July 16, 2017 when the Mustang crashed in Kansas.



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSTJ, 826 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1053 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 25°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 4 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 230°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 29°C / 24°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Atchison, KS (K59)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Atchison, KS (K59)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1005 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class E



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.482222, -95.204444 

The accident site was located in rolling terrain at an elevation of 1,050 ft msl and the airplane impacted the ground on a magnetic heading of 259°.

Several branches were separated from a tree and the angle of damage through the tree was estimated at 60°. A long and narrow ground scar, oriented perpendicular to the debris path, was located just forward of the tree and contained the pitot tube from the wing. A large crater contained bent and torn metal, the engine, gearbox, and propeller assembly. The empennage and fragmented pieces of the fuselage were located 25 ft northwest of the propeller assembly. Fragmented pieces of both wings, the rudder, elevator, and the fuselage were scattered in the debris field that extended over 450 ft from the initial impact point.

The cockpit instruments had separated from their cockpit locations and did not convey reliable readings. All the major portions of the airplane were accounted for on scene. 

Medical And Pathological Information

Pilot

The Forensic Medical Morgue of Kansas City, Kansas, performed the autopsy on the pilot on July 17, 2017, as authorized by the Atchison County Coroner's office. The autopsy concluded that the cause of death was "blunt traumatic injuries sustained in a plane crash" and the report listed the specific injuries. The autopsy was limited by the severity of trauma but revealed coronary artery disease described as "mild" and focal hypertrophic cardiac myocytes and a focal healed endomyocardial scar by microscopy. The pilot had longstanding diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol, which were controlled with medications. He had reported these conditions and their treatment to the FAA.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological tests on specimens that were collected during the pilot's autopsy. Tests of the tissue revealed 54 mg/dL ethanol in the liver, 10 mg/dL ethanol in muscle, atorvastatin in the lung and liver, and losartan in the liver. Putrefaction was present in the samples. Atorvastatin and losartan do not cause impairment or incapacitation. When ethanol is ingested, it is quickly distributed throughout the body's tissues and fluids fairly uniformly. Ethanol may also be produced in the body after death by microbial activity.

Pilot-Certificated Passenger

The Forensic Medical Morgue of Kansas City, Kansas, performed the autopsy on the pilot-certificated passenger on July 17, 2017, as authorized by the Atchison County Coroner's office. The autopsy concluded that the cause of death was "blunt traumatic injuries sustained in a plane crash" and the report listed the specific injuries. No significant natural disease was identified.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological tests on specimens that were collected during the pilot-certificated passenger's autopsy. Results were negative for carbon monoxide and tested drugs. Tests of the blood revealed 36 mg/dL ethanol. Putrefaction was present in the samples. 



Tests And Research

The wreckage of the airplane was recovered to a secured facility for further examination.

The forward and aft flight control components were reconstructed to ascertain continuity. The controls were deformed, fractured, and separated in numerous places, and all fractures had a dull, grainy appearance consistent with overstress separation. The empennage wreckage consisted of the left and right horizontal stabilizers, elevator, vertical stabilizer, and aft fuselage. There was significant impact damage and deformation.

The propeller separated from the engine at the reduction gear box and one propeller blade fractured at the hub flange. All four propeller blades exhibited leading edge damage and chordwise scratching on the camber sides. The blower assembly separated from the aft end of the engine. The first stage impeller blades in the blower were all bent clockwise, opposite the direction of rotation.

For a detailed description of the wreckage examination see the Airworthiness Group Chairman's factual report available in the public docket for this accident.

Additional Information

The accident airplane was owned by Historic Military Aircraft, LLC, and was operated by the Warbird Heritage Foundation. The pilot was hired through Dacy Airshows to perform in an airshow; part of the Amelia Earhart Festival which took place the day before the accident.

The pilot-certificated passenger approached the pilot on the evening before the accident and queried about a flight in the airplane. It was agreed that they would fly together before he departed the next day. One witness stated that he was not aware of any agreement for the pilot-certificated passenger to manipulate the flight controls. The pilot-certificated passenger was seated in the back seat and had access to the flight controls; however, investigators were not able to determine who was manipulating the flight controls just before or at the time of the accident.







NTSB Identification: CEN17FA270
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, July 16, 2017 in Cummings, KS
Aircraft: NORTH AMERICAN/AERO CLASSICS P 51, registration: N251PW
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 16, 2017, about 1020 central daylight time, a North American Aero Classics P-51 D airplane, N251PW, was destroyed when it impacted trees and terrain 2.5 miles northeast of Cummings, Kansas. The airline transport pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) flight plan had been filed for the flight. The local flight departed the Amelia Earhart Airport (K59), Atchison, Kansas, about 1005.

According to several witnesses located between K59 and the accident site, the airplane was observed performing aerobatics at a high altitude. A witness, located further to the south of K59, and several hundred feet from the accident location, observed the airplane fly over nearby power lines between 25 ft and 30 ft above the ground. The airplane pitched up to climb in a near vertical attitude and then the nose turned to the left and the airplane turned and pitched down in a nose low attitude. The airplane descended towards terrain and just prior to impacting the ground the tail of the airplane came up. 

The airplane impacted the ground just short of a grove of trees. A large crater marked the initial ground impact point and contained bent and torn metal, the engine, transmission, and propeller assembly. The empennage and fragmented pieces of the fuselage were located 25 feet northwest of the propeller assembly. Fragmented pieces of both wings, the rudder, and the fuselage were scattered in the debris field that extended over 400 feet from the initial impact point. 

The closest official weather observation station was located 25 miles northeast of the accident site near St. Joseph, Missouri. The weather observation taken at 1053 recorded the wind at 230° at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, sky condition clear of clouds, temperature 29° Celsius (C), dewpoint temperature 24° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.06 inches of Mercury.