Wednesday, June 16, 2021

Lancair Evolution, N704AK; fatal accident occurred June 16, 2021 -and- Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N6026P; accident occurred June 14, 2011

 Dr. Antenor Velazco, his wife Dr. Kathleen Hartney-Velazco and their canine companion, Mali. 


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado
Lancair Owner & Builders Organization; St. Louis, Missouri 
Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Pratt & Whitney Canada Corporation 

AKV Aviation LLC

Location: Parker, CO 
Accident Number: CEN21FA272
Date & Time: June 16, 2021, 13:45 Local 
Registration: N704AK
Aircraft: ANTENOR VELAZCO LANCAIR EVOLUTION 
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On June 16, 2021, about 1345 mountain daylight time, a Lancair Evolution, N704AK, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Parker, Colorado. The two private pilots sustained fatal injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

Air Traffic Control information showed the pilot was established on the RNAV (GPS) runway 35R approach to Centennial Airport (APA), Centennial, Colorado, when he contacted the air traffic control tower about 7 miles south of the airport. The tower controller issued the wind conditions to the pilot and cleared the airplane to land on runway 35R. The airplane was about 2.6-miles from the end of the runway when the controller queried the pilot if he was executing a 360° turn, to which the pilot advised that the airplane had lost its autopilot capabilities. A nearby airplane reported to the controller that it had the airplane in sight, and then saw it impact powerlines, and subsequently the terrain. A postimpact fire ensued that consumed most of the composite airplane.

A postaccident examination at the scene showed evidence that the airplane had impacted two east-west running transmission static lines, that were strung between two transmission towers.

The transmission towers had flashing lights mounted on their tops and the wires between the towers were marked with multi-colored marker balls. The accident site was at an elevation of 6,270 ft msl. The airplane came to rest about 200 ft due north of the powerlines at an approximate 50° incline, and 3.40 miles from the approach end of runway 35R on a heading of 336°.

The wreckage was recovered for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: ANTENOR VELAZCO 
Registration: N704AK
Model/Series: LANCAIR EVOLUTION
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KAPA,5883 ft msl 
Observation Time: 13:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 4 Nautical Miles 
Temperature/Dew Point: 34°C /1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 9 knots / , 350°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.21 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Neosho, MO (EOS)
Destination: Centennial, CO (APA)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: On-ground
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 39.507794,-104.85518 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Dr. Antenor "Andy" Velazco
March 22, 1948 - June 16, 2021


Dr. Kathleen "Kathy" Joan Hartney-Velazco
September 11, 1955 - June 16, 2021
~

Dr. Antenor “Andy” Velazco, MD., 73, and Dr. Kathleen “Kathy” Hartney-Velazco, MD., M.M.SC., 65, died June 16th, 2021, in a private plane crash near Centennial, CO. Mali, their faithful 2-year-old Belgium Malinois, was also killed in the crash.

Andy— husband, father, grandfather, surgeon, ultramarathoner, triathlete, pragmatist, adventurist.

Andy was born March 22, 1948, in Lima, Peru, to Dr. Antenor Velazco and Elisa Castro. Andy came to the US when he was 16. He attended the University of Southern Mississippi where he excelled.  He enjoyed reading all the course work early and asking the professor to give him the final exam on the first day of class. His professor once told the class that Andy outdid them, without even speaking English!

Andy returned to Peru in 1970, where he studied at the Universidad Nacional Mayor De San Marcos. He earned his Doctor of Medicine degree, graduating in the top 10% of his class. While in Peru, Andy first became a father. Son Geoffrey Antenor was born in 1970. His is daughter Kristin Elisa was born in 1976. Andy worked at a Pediatric Orthopaedics and Spine clinic in Peru until 1978.  After her birth, Andy and family returned to the US where he completed his surgical internship and residency in Orthopaedic Surgery at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, GA.

As an Emory Resident, he met Kathy. She thought he was cute. One day he asked if she was going to a coworker’s party, and she said, “Yes.” He said: “Good. Then I’ll go too.” Family lore is that he sat next to her at the party and put his hand on her knee. The rest is history.

For much of his career, Andy worked as an orthopedic surgeon and hand and spine specialist. He was affiliated with Henry Medical Center in Stockbridge, Spalding Regional in Griffin, and Southern Regional Medical Center in Riverdale, GA. He lectured and organized seminars on orthopaedics, sport injuries, unstable pelvic fractures, and more. He authored multiple publications, papers, and editorials. At Atlanta restaurants, former patients would recognize him and tell his family how he had saved their life. Even if he didn’t remember their names, he always remembered their ailments and treatments.

When he retired from Resurgens Orthopaedics at the age of 65, Andy founded Orthopaedic Solutions with partner Dr. Radhakrishnan V. Nair. Andy continued to practice for the next 8 years and retired at the end of March 2021.

Kathy— wife, mother, boss doc, entrepreneur, fashionista, runner, athlete, all around bad ass.

Kathy was born September 11, 1955, in Bethesda, Maryland, to Dr. Thomas and Georgia Hartney. Her father was a physician in the U.S. Navy who retired to Tampa, FL, in 1967. Kathy’s love of water sports grew from water-skiing on Lake Carroll.

Kathy came to Atlanta in 1973 to attend Emory University. She graduated college in 1978, Magna cum Laude with a B.S. in Chemistry. She initially worked as a Computer Programmer in Emory’s Data Processing Department. In 1978, she earned her Master of Medical Science with a specialty in Anesthesia from Emory.

Following her Masters, Kathy worked full-time as an anesthetist at Grady Memorial Hospital. Never one to rest on her laurels, in 1981 she matriculated to the Emory University School of Medicine. While in medical school, she worked as a Physician’s Assistant in Anesthesia and was on the Emory Faculty from 1981-82. She married Andy in 1982, gave birth to her first daughter, Kari Dyan, in 1984. Also in 1984, Andy and Kathy bought a land lot on Lake Spivey and began building their forever home. It became the site of many great parties and family gatherings, creating wonderful memories for multitudes of people over many years.

Kathy received her Doctor of Medicine degree in 1985 from Emory University while pregnant with her second daughter, Katie Dawn. Kathy specialized in Outpatient Surgery Anesthesia and Pain Management during a fellowship year. Always multitasking, Kathy gave birth to Alec Bryant in 1988 and completed her residency in Anesthesiology in 1989. She worked as an anesthesiologist at South Fulton Medical Center in Atlanta for the next four years.

In 1993, Kathy founded Capitol Anesthesiology, P.C., to meet the needs of the ambulatory surgery patient (forming companies when she saw an unmet need became her forte). In 1996, Kathy was recruited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and became a surveyor in their ambulatory division.

Over the next several decades, Kathy was affiliated with multiple medical and surgery centers across Georgia. When asked if she ever planned to retire, her immediate answer was: “Nope.” She loved what she did, and she excelled in every endeavor.

Andy and Kathy— an example of love for four decades.

As a couple, many people said there were no two people better suited for each other. Both the eldest children of doctors, they were fearless and tenacious in everything they did. It was this trait that made what happened outside of their careers nothing short of amazing.

Andy raced, in cars and on foot. When he first moved to the US, he would say that he wanted to be successful enough to buy a Ferrari. He bought his first in the early 1980s, and we believe this drove his love for speed. He drove Ferraris, Lotus Sevens, Formula Fords, and Formula Mazdas; he raced in multiple series and had over 16 podium place finishes. The pinnacle of his career culminated in 1996 when he won first place in the South Atlantic Road Racing Championships at Road Atlanta and finished 3rd overall in the 1996 Regional Championship.

Andy picked up running in 1986 when a friend dared him to run a 10K. This turned into a passion for long-distance racing. His first marathon was the 1991 New York City Marathon (time 4:36:36). In his lifetime, Andy ran over 350 marathons and 100 ultramarathons. He lured Kathy into running with him by promising her they would travel and that he would buy her a charm for every state they ran in. The joke would be on him, as Kathy finished a marathon in all 50 states five years after he achieved the same feat. What started as a marathon charm bracelet turned into a charm belt as Kathy went on to finish more than 100 marathons. Their running took them around the world, their children and Kathy’s siblings joining them for many races over the years. Andy ran the Disney marathon 28 years in a row, one of the few people who had an unbroken streak since the Disney marathon was founded. He was passionate about running and the science behind it, researching and writing articles for several prominent running periodicals.

Andy’s top running accomplishment was completing the Badwater Ultramarathon in Death Valley, CA. This elite 135-mile road race is in one of the hottest locations on earth and spans from the lowest evaluation to the highest in North America. Badwater is one that very few people finish. It requires intense training for both the heat and the elevation. In 2003, Andy successfully completed the race with a time of 48:51:13. He returned to Death Valley many times over the years to serve on the crew for various running friends, helping them achieve the same success.

When asked what goal he wanted to tackle next, Andy said: “I would like to complete an Ironman. But first, I need to learn how to swim.” Eleven months later, Andy completed his first Ironman.

While Kathy joined Andy on many of his races, she also had her own passions. She was an avid tennis player until tennis elbow forced her to tackle another sport. Being a business owner, Kathy took up golf as she knew many business relationships happen on the golf course. As she always strove for perfection, she began reading all she could, took lessons, was often found at the golf range, and eventually played at over 50 courses around the country.

Andy and Kathy’s next pursuit took them off the ground. Andy had always been fascinated with flight. When he told Kathy he wanted to learn how to fly, she started working towards her pilot license also. She had grown up watching the Blue Angels with her family and had herself been interested in pursuing a career as a pilot from a young age. Over the next 13 years, they spent countless hours in the air. Andy loved the challenge of flying, and Kathy loved visiting more people and places. They each attained various levels of airplane and instrument ratings. Never one to stop at mid-level, Kathy was in the process of getting her commercial’s pilot license.

Andy and Kathy were easily the most interesting people in any room. They alpine skied, scuba-dived, sky-dived, and shot guns at the range. They exercised daily, often out-running or out-doing their children who they often cajoled into exercising with them.

Andy was known for his sarcastic wit, crazy stories, and fanatic exercising. He would do one-handed pushups in the break room between surgeries. He could often be found with a book in his hand or taking ‘micro naps’ without missing a thing.

Kathy had a magnetic personality and loved fiercely. Kathy could light up a room with her smile and vivacious personality. She drew people to her and had an infectious laugh. She treated everyone around her the same, regardless of their walk of life. Her fashion sense and passion for Louis Vuitton became the stuff of legends, as she almost always wore a LV purse with matching belt and shoes. In her honor, the Louis Vuitton’s Lenox Mall store threw her a 50th birthday party! She was known for her generosity and always wanted to share everything she had, including Peloton bikes, with the people she loved.Their lives were interrupted and left unfinished. Andy had just started a hobby of woodworking and was reading a book about how to grow bonsai trees. Kathy was planning their next trips to visit more family and was so excited about her future grandchildren.

Their family and friends are heart-broken.

They are survived by their children: Geoffrey Antenor (Becky) Velazco of CA., Kristin Elisa (Tina Riedel) Velazco of CA, Kari Dyan Velazco of Smyrna, Katie Dawn (Mayghan McPherson) Velazco of MD and Alec Bryant Velazco of CA., granddaughter: Juliet Velazco of CA., and extended family members. Dr. Andy Velazco is also survived by his brothers: Fernando (Mary) Velazco and Alberto (Cecilia) Velazco all of Peru, sister: Gabrielle (Lance) Wyant of MD. Dr. Kathy Hartney-Velazco is also survived by her brother: Dr. Thomas (Judy) Hartney of Augusta, sisters: Mary (Jeff Titus) Hartney of FL., Carol Hartney Blomgren of FL., Karen (Jeff) Lambert of FL and Dr. Anne (Dr. Mark) Baucom of Atlanta.

Family and friends are invited to celebrate Andy and Kathy at a memorial service on July 3, 2021, between 1-4 pm, at Eagles Landing Country Club in Stockbridge, GA.

In lieu of flowers, it is requested that donations be made to: BRCA Strong, https://brcastrong.org/, City of Hope Duarte, CA, 1-800-826-4673, http://www.cityofhope.org/ or FORCE, 1-866-288-7475, https://www.facingourrisk.org/ in Memory of Dr. Antenor “Andy” Velazco and Dr. Kathleen “Kathy” Hartney-Velazco.

“Injuries have been always the price of doing stuff, and life without stuff probably would be boring.” – Andy Velazco


Kathleen and Antenor Velazco

Dr. Antenor Velazco, MD

June 16, 2021 
Lancair Evolution, N704AK


LONE TREE, Colorado — Two people who died in a small plane crash in Douglas County on Wednesday have been identified as a 65-year-old woman and a 73-year-old man, officials said.

Kathleen Velazco and Antenor Velazco, both from Jonesboro, Georgia, died in the crash, which happened south of Ridgegate Parkway in Lone Tree.

The Douglas County Coroner's Office identified the victims.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Lancair Evolution hit power lines and crashed shortly before 2 p.m. while on approach to Centennial Airport.

The crash sparked a brush fire in the area, but South Metro Fire said crews had gotten a handle on the blaze and were being careful around the downed lines until the charge was mitigated. A helicopter dropped water on embers to prevent the fire from sparking again, according to Kim Spuhler, a spokesperson for South Metro Fire.

This is the second crash involving planes on approach to Centennial Airport in five weeks. On May 12, two airplanes collided as they tried to land at the airport. One of the planes landed safely despite suffering severe damage and another used a parachute to land in a field at Cherry Creek State Park.


June 14, 2011
Cessna 172S, N6026P

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:


Location: Covington, Georgia
Accident Number: ERA11CA343
Date & Time: June 14, 2011, 14:24 Local
Registration: N6026P
Aircraft: Cessna 172S
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

According to the solo student pilot, the purpose of the flight was to practice takeoffs and landings. He departed his home airport, and flew a short distance to practice at the accident airport where he completed six uneventful takeoffs and landings. The pilot then configured the airplane for a short field takeoff and applied takeoff power. He said the airplane lifted from the runway at 50 knots, he pushed the nose down, and the right wing "suddenly lifted up." The airplane diverted 45 degrees to the left of the runway and the pilot elected to abort the takeoff.

During the aborted takeoff the left wing and left main landing gear struck the ground and the airplane rotated 180 degrees. The airplane came to rest facing opposite the direction of travel, with the left wing separated, and a postcrash fire ensued. After the accident, the pilot reported that there were no deficiencies with the performance and handling of the airplane.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain directional control during takeoff.

Findings

Aircraft Directional control - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Incorrect action performance - Student/instructed pilot

Factual Information

History of Flight

Takeoff Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Takeoff-rejected takeoff Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None 
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without waivers/limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: June 16, 2010
Occupational Pilot: No 
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 142 hours (Total, all aircraft), 142 hours (Total, this make and model), 10 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 58 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N6026P
Model/Series: 172S 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal 
Serial Number: 172S10204
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: May 11, 2011 Annual 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 12 Hrs 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1972 Hrs as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: 
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LZU,1062 ft msl 
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 14:45 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 360°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 8000 ft AGL 
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 10 knots / 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  /
Wind Direction: 290° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  /
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg 
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Covington, GA (9A1)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Covington, GA (9A1)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Convington Municipal Airport 9A1 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 809 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 28 IFR
Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5500 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 33.62611,-83.841667(est)


COVINGTON, Georgia  — A small plane registered to a Gainesville company crashed Tuesday afternoon at the airport in Covington, but the student pilot escaped uninjured.

Jonesboro resident Antenor Velazco, 63, was practicing takeoffs and landings in a Cessna 172 around 2:30 p.m. when he lost control and crashed in a ditch near the runway at Covington Municipal Airport, according to airport engineer Vincent Passariello. Velazco, the only person in the aircraft, is an orthopedic surgeon for Resurgens in Henry County.

Covington police detective Daniel Seals told The Covington News Velazco was finishing up work on his pilot's license Tuesday, going east to west down the runway.

"During one of the touch-and-gos, (he) lost control of the aircraft," Seals said. "He went off the runway, spun around at least once, came to rest, caught on fire. He was able to get out, which is good. The aircraft obviously now has been put out."

The right wing detached during the crash, causing the plane to catch fire, but the blaze was extinguished by firefighters, Passariello said.

Because the plane was destroyed, the investigation will be handled by the National Transportation Safety Board, Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Jim Peters said.

The aircraft was owned by Wheeler Equipment Leasing in Gainesville, but it is advertised as available for rental on the website of Lanier Flight Center, which is located at Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport in Gainesville. Airport officials said the plane was rented at Peachtree-DeKalb Airport.

Lanier Flight Center officials declined comment Tuesday as they said they are working to put out accurate information.

Passariello said Velazco had 143 hours of flying experience, according to his logbook.

Piper PA-28-140, N4281J: Accident occurred June 15, 2021 at Ozark-Blackwell Field Airport (71J), Dale County, Alabama

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Alabama Location: Ozark, AL
Accident Number: ERA21LA254
Date & Time: June 15, 2021, 19:25 Local
Registration: N4281J
Aircraft: Piper PA-28-140 
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Piper
Registration: N4281J
Model/Series: PA-28-140 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: HEY,317 ft msl 
Observation Time: 19:58 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C /22°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 230°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 8 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Ozark, AL
Destination: Ozark, AL

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 31.432919,-85.622618 

De Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter, N636KT: Incident occurred June 15, 2021 in Talkeetna, Alaska

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aircraft tail ski detached during flight and sustained tail damage on landing. 

Rustair Inc


Date: 15-JUN-21
Time: 23:30:00Z
Regis#: N636KT
Aircraft Make: DEHAVILLAND
Aircraft Model: DHC3
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
Aircraft Operator: RUSTS FLYING SERVICE
City: TALKEETNA
State: ALASKA

Zenair CH 601 XL Zodiac, N249WP: Incident occurred June 15, 2021 at Phoenix Deer Valley Airport (KDVT), Maricopa County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Aircraft landed and gear collapsed. 

Zodiac King Aviation LLC


Date: 15-JUN-21
Time: 15:45:00Z
Regis#: N249WP
Aircraft Make: ZODIAC
Aircraft Model: 301XL
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PHOENIZ
State: ARIZONA

Mooney M20C, N167LD: Incident occurred June 15, 2021 in Dunsmuir, Siskiyou County, California

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Sacramento, California

Aircraft made an emergency landing in a field. 


Date: 15-JUN-21
Time: 23:00:00Z
Regis#: N167LD
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20C
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: MINOR
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: DUNSMUIR
State: CALIFORNIA

Airbus A321-200, N908AA: Incident occurred June 15, 2021 at Miami International Airport (KMIA), Miami-Dade County, Florida

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; South Florida

Aircraft departed and returned to airport due to an odor and an inspection revealed the R2 panel and emergency exit slide separated.  

American Airlines


Date: 15-JUN-21
Time: 13:20:00Z
Regis#: N908AA
Aircraft Make: AIRBUS
Aircraft Model: A321
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: AMERICAN AIRLINES
Flight Number: AAL2878
City: MIAMI
State: FLORIDA

Socata TBM-850, N850LC: Incidents occurred June 15, 2021 and June 13, 2018

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas 

June 16, 2021:  Aircraft landed gear up at Marysville Municipal Airport (KMYZ), Marshall County, Kansas

Landoll Corporation LLC


Date: 16-JUN-21
Time: 01:40:00Z
Regis#: N850LC
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TBM700
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: MARYSVILLE
State: KANSAS

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; DuPage

June 13, 2018: Aircraft experienced a hard landing, exited runway into the grass at South Bend International Airport (KSBN), St. Joseph County, Indiana.

Date: 13-JUN-18
Time: 20:05:00Z
Regis#: N850LC
Aircraft Make: SOCATA
Aircraft Model: TBM 700
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: CORPORATE
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SOUTH BEND
State: INDIANA

Cessna 310C, N1852H: Incident occurred June 15, 2021 at St. Charles County Smartt Airport (KSET), Missouri

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; St. Louis, Missouri

Aircraft landed and gear collapsed. 

I Fly STL LLC


Date: 15-JUN-21
Time: 13:25:00Z
Regis#: N1852H
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 310
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: ST CHARLES
State: MISSOURI

Bell UH-1H, N398M: Accident occurred June 15, 2021 in Townsend, Broadwater County, Montana

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana

USDA Forest Service Federal Excess Personal Property Program 


Location: Townsend, MT
Accident Number: WPR21LA236
Date & Time: June 15, 2021, 17:00 Local
Registration: N398M
Aircraft: Bell UH-1H 
Injuries: 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Public aircraft

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell 
Registration: N398M
Model/Series: UH-1H 
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: 
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation: KHLN,3868 ft msl 
Observation Time: 16:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 33 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C /9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 310°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.84 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: HELENA, MT
Destination: TOWNSEND HELISPOT, MT

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 46.3245,-111.291

Mooney M-20J, N40FG: Incident occurred June 15, 2021 at Portland International Airport (KPDX), Oregon

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Oregon

Aircraft gear collapsed after landing. 

Caballeros Aircraft LLC


Date: 15-JUN-21
Time: 19:20:00Z
Regis#: N40FG
Aircraft Make: MOONEY
Aircraft Model: M20J
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: PORTLAND
State: OREGON

Cessna 525 CitationJet CJ1, N51GS: Incident occurred June 15, 2021 at Tri-Cities Airport (KTRI), Blountville, Sullivan County, Tennessee

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aircraft struck a bird on departure. 

General Shale Building Materials Inc


Date: 15-JUN-21
Time: 18:10:00Z
Regis#: N51GS
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 525
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: TAKEOFF (TOF)
Operation: 91
City: BRISTOL
State: TENNESSEE

Quickie Q2 Tri-Q, N8054Y: Fatal accident occurred June 15, 2021 at Gila Bend Municipal Airport (E63), Maricopa County, Arizona

Gabriel Draguicevich
~

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

Peter A. Stein


Location: Gila Bend, AZ 
Accident Number: WPR21FA227
Date & Time: June 15, 2021, 08:20 Local 
Registration: N8054Y
Aircraft: COVEY Quickie Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On June 15, 2021, about 0820 mountain standard time, an experimental Covey Quickie airplane, N8054Y, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Gila Bend, Arizona. The pilot was seriously injured, and the passenger was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

The owner had recently purchased the airplane and was flying it home to Texas. They had refueled the airplane the day before the accident, at the Gila Bend Municipal Airport (E63).

A witness reported that he was working on his airplane when he saw two men perform a preflight and then board the accident airplane. The engine started and was taxied to the hold short line where it sat for about 20 minutes, with the engine running before the airplane took off on the active runway. During the takeoff run, about a 1/3 of the way down the runway, the witness observed a dirt cloud, and surmised that the landing gear must have departed the runway surface. The airplane returned to centerline and continued down the runway; about midway down the runway, it appeared that the airplane was yanked off the runway and struggled to gain altitude. The witness estimated that the airplane reached an altitude of about 50 ft when it made a left turn, stalled, and impacted the ground.

The airplane came to rest about 200 ft. west of the runway adjacent to the airport perimeter fence. The first identified point of impact (FIPC) were witness marks from the landing gear in the hard packed desert floor. The debris path continued an additional 140 ft before it struck a small rise and a fire ensued. Most of the airframe was destroyed by the postcrash fire. The main wreckage came to rest inverted with the wing and landing gear lying adjacent to the cockpit. The engine separated and was found near the main wreckage. The propeller hub remained attached to the engine crankshaft; however, all three propeller blades separated from the propeller hub.

The wreckage was recovered for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: COVEY 
Registration: N8054Y
Model/Series: Quickie
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCGZ,1462 ft msl 
Observation Time: 08:56 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 48 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 35°C /9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 200°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.87 inches Hg 
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious 
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 32.944636,-112.71357 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigation may contact them by email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. You can also call the NTSB Response Operations Center at 844-373-9922 or 202-314-6290.



Gabe's Burial Details

Gabe's burial will be on Friday, June 25 at 12:00 pm at El Camino Memorial Park in San Diego.  Anyone who would like to attend is invited.  The service will be graveside and there will be arrows pointing in the right direction from the entrance of the cemetery.  

The address is:
5600 Carroll Canyon Road
San Diego, CA 92121

A Celebration of Life is also being planned, and will likely be on Sunday, June 27 from 1:00 - 4:00 pm.  Details will be posted once they are confirmed.  Everyone is also welcome to attend this event.

The burial will not be recorded, but the Celebration of Life will either be live streamed or recorded for later viewing.


Gabe was a wonderful father, a loving husband and an all-around bright star...exuberant, adventurous and fun-loving. He just lit up a room, the campsite, the stage...wherever he was. We will miss Gabe's enthusiasm, music and incredible generosity.
 
Gabe is survived by a huge, loving family.



GILA BEND, Arizona  — Authorities said one person is dead and another has critical injuries after a plane crashed near the runway at Gila Bend Municipal Airport on Tuesday morning.

According to the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office, one occupant was pronounced dead at the scene and the second occupant of the plane was ejected during the crash and airlifted to a hospital with life-threatening injuries. 

Officials later confirmed the identity of the dead man as 56-year-old Gabriel Draguicevich. Peter Stein, 60, was identified as the passenger and he is still currently in critical condition.

The Federal Aviation Administration, which investigates all plane crashes, said the plane crashed when it was departing the airport around 8:20 a.m. and the plane caught fire after crashing.

Authorities have not specified what type of plane it was. 

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will lead the investigation along with the FAA.



Air Tractor AT-502B, N6088K: Fatal accident occurred June 15, 2021 in Paragould, Greene County, Arkansas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Little Rock, Arkansas 
Air Tractor, Olney, Texas


Location: Paragould, AR
Accident Number: CEN21FA270
Date & Time: June 15, 2021, 16:32 Local 
Registration: N6088K
Aircraft: Air Tractor 502B
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 137: Agricultural

On June 15, 2021, at 1632 central daylight time, an Air Tractor AT 502B airplane, N6088K, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident near Paragould, Arkansas. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 agricultural flight.

A witness reported that he observed the airplane about one mile away flying directly toward him. It was straight and level, about treetop height. Without warning, he observed a small puff of white smoke; the airplane immediately nosed down and impacted the ground. A post-crash fire ensued. The operator reported that, on the day of the accident, a second airplane had been flying in the vicinity
of the accident airplane. Both airplanes were going to and from the same loader throughout the day. Both airplanes had dispersed about 28 loads of fertilizer; during which, the accident pilot did not report any anomalies with the airplane. Shortly before the accident, the accident airplane was loaded with full fuel and fertilizer. It was actively spraying a field when the second pilot departed the area to refill fertilizer. When the second pilot returned, he observed the airplane burning on the ground about 0.5 miles east of the field it was spraying.

The airplane was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Air Tractor 
Registration: N6088K
Model/Series: 502B 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Agricultural aircraft (137)
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KJBR,262 ft msl 
Observation Time: 16:53 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 33°C /12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 10°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.01 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Paragould, AR
Destination: Paragould, AR

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: On-ground
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.103922,-90.7146 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Van's RV-6A, N74MS: Fatal accident occurred June 15, 2021 in Buckingham, Bucks County, Pennsylvania

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Allentown, Pennsylvania
Lycoming Aircraft Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

https://registry.faa.gov/N74MS

Location: Buckingham, PA
Accident Number: ERA21FA253
Date & Time: June 15, 2021, 10:30 Local 
Registration: N74MS
Aircraft: Vans RV6
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Personal

On June 15, 2021, about 1030 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Vans RV6A airplane, N74MS, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident in Buckingham, Pennsylvania. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight.

On the morning of the accident, the pilot flew from Doylestown Airport (DYL), Doylestown, Pennsylvania to Sky Manor Airport (N40), Pittstown, New Jersey. He arrived at N40 about 0827 and departed about 30 minutes later to meet friends for breakfast at South Jersey Regional Airport (VAY), Mount Holly, New Jersey. He arrived at VAY about 0913 and subsequently departed about 1013 to return to DYL.

About 1020, the pilot transmitted over the DYL common traffic advisory frequency that he had an emergency and was making a straight-in landing to runway 5. About 1 minute later, he transmitted that he had an inflight fire and was inbound to DYL to land on runway 5. There were no further communications from the pilot.

According to witnesses, the airplane was observed flying in a northwesterly direction. The engine sounded rough and was heard to sputter and then pop. The airplane appeared to be on fire and was trailing smoke. It banked right, then left, and was quickly descending while on a flight path toward DYL. The airplane was observed to clip trees, which was followed by the sound of an impact and visible flames. A review of video camera footage revealed that bluish gray smoke was trailing from the airplane before impact.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane struck a tree about 50 ft above ground level before it came to rest upright in a wastewater spray field on a 148° magnetic heading, about .5 nautical miles from runway 5.

Examination of the airplane revealed that it came to rest on top of a standpipe mounted sprinkler head which had vertically punctured through the right wing. The right wing remained attached to the fuselage and a large depression consistent with a tree strike was visible on the leading edge. The right-wing fuel tank was breached. The left wing remained attached to the fuselage, and the left-wing fuel tank was about half-full of fluid, which was consistent with 100 low lead aviation gasoline. The wing flaps and flight controls remained attached and flight control continuity was established for pitch, roll, and yaw.

Most of the instrument panel was consumed by fire, and the forward portion of the cabin back to the front of both seats had been exposed to the fire. The fuel selector handle was in the left-wing fuel tank position. The canopy displayed thermal, and impact damage, and was almost completely separated from the fuselage. The exterior of the fuselage and wings displayed sooting on the sides and top surfaces, with areas of heavy thermal and fire damage toward the front of the airplane, both near and adjacent to the firewall, and on the sides and bottom of the fuselage.

Examination of the propeller and engine revealed that the propeller remained attached to the crankshaft flange, and the engine remained attached to the engine mounts. The propeller blades displayed minimal damage.

The engine was damaged by fire; a crack was observed in the crankcase above the No. 1 cylinder, and a large hole was present in the crankcase above the No. 4 cylinder. The No. 4 connecting rod was separated from the connecting rod cap. The connecting rod large end was laying against the camshaft and the tappets for the No. 4 cylinder were exposed. A borescope inspection of the cylinders did not
reveal any anomalies. The oil sump contained ferrous and non-ferrous metal of various sizes and portions of the connecting rod cap material and connecting rod bolts from the No. 4 connecting rod. Drivetrain rotation was achieved, and thumb compression and valvetrain continuity were established for cylinder Nos. 1, 2, and 3.

The wreckage was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans 
Registration: N74MS
Model/Series: RV6 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDYL,394 ft msl 
Observation Time: 10:21 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C /16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 1800 ft AGL
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / ,
Lowest Ceiling: None 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Mount Holly, NJ (VAY)
Destination: Doylestown, PA (DYL)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: In-flight
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Latitude, Longitude: 40.327769,-75.114718 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

Martin Sailer, Jr., 79, of Upper Black Eddy, was killed when his plane crashed in a wooded area of Buckingham Township on Tuesday. He is pictured here with his grandson. 


DOYLESTOWN, Pennsylvania — Friends and family members are mourning the loss of a Bucks County man who was killed in a plane crash in Buckingham Township on Tuesday morning.

Martin Sailer Jr., 79, of Upper Black Eddy, was the pilot and sole occupant of a small plane that crashed in a wooded area near Cold Spring Creamery Road and Charter Club Drive around 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are working to determine the cause of the crash, an investigation that could take anywhere from 12 to 18 months, according to FAA officials.

Known to friends and loved ones as "Marty", Sailer was flying in a red-and-white, single-engine Vans RV-6 aircraft that he built for himself years ago.

Bob Ferguson, president and flight coordinator of Experimental Aircraft Association Chapter 78, said Sailer carried a wealth of knowledge about planes and aircraft.

"The knowledge that he had on aviation was mind-boggling," said Ferguson, who last spoke with Sailer and his wife several months ago at the EAA annual chapter dinner at Giuseppe's Pizza of Warminster.

At the annual air show at Doylestown Airport, Sailer would display his RV-6A aircraft, Ferguson said. He also volunteered with the chapter's Young Eagles Flights program, helping to train the next generation of flyers navigate the skies.

"He was a hell of a pilot, a first-class gentleman," recalls Lino Flego, a pilot and fellow EAA Chapter 78 member. "If you needed anything, he was right there for you."

Todd Sailer describes his father as a friendly, outgoing and loving person who took countless people with him on plane rides. From the time his father was a teenager, he always wanted to fly planes, he said. Growing up in Richboro, his father witnessed a plane landing, and from that point on, he made it his goal to navigate the skies.

"A lot of people told me they chose their career patch because of him," Sailer said. "He was always willing to mentor anyone."

Todd Sailer (left), with his father, Marty Sailer


In 1961, Sailer enlisted in the Navy, where he flew a submarine hunting aircraft. He then became a commercial pilot for Trans World Airlines, where he worked until his retirement.

Marty Sailer was a commercial airline pilot for Trans World Airlines for several decades.

Todd believes that in his father's final moments in the air, he went off course to avoid houses in a final act of thinking of others.

"He told me one time, 'In an emergency, you look for anywhere you can put it down to avoid casualties on the ground,'" Sailer said. "It's what he would have done, no doubt about it."









BUCKINGHAM TWP., Pennsylvania (WPVI) -- The pilot of a small plane was killed on Tuesday morning after the aircraft went down in a wooded area just behind some homes near Doylestown, Bucks County.

The call went out at approximately 10:30 a.m. for police, firefighters and medics to respond to the 3800 block of Charter Club Drive in Buckingham Township.

There, authorities confirmed a plane down in the trees behind the residential area.

The view from Chopper 6 showed the damaged red-and-white plane on the ground with firefighters nearby.

The lone occupant of the plane was pronounced dead at the scene, Buckingham Township police said.

The victim has been identified as 79-year-old Martin Sailer Jr. of Upper Black Eddy, Pennsylvania.

The FAA said Sailer was the only person aboard the aircraft, which is a Van's RV-6A.

"I saw the plane hit the top of trees and I was expecting to hear a crash but it was more of a thud," said Tom Kanyok, who lives about 200 yards from the crash site.

After hearing the crash, he and a neighbor went towards the sound to see if they could help.

"We got about a few steps into the woods but the flames were pretty much engulfed in front of the cockpit," said Kanyok.

Action News has learned the pilot was flying in the region for about two hours before the crash.

Officials say Sailer contacted the tower to say the plane was on fire and crashed as he was coming in for a landing.

The crash scene is about two miles away from the Doylestown Airport.

Both the NTSB and the FAA will be involved in the investigation.

Cirrus SR20 GTS G3, N89423: Fatal accident occurred June 15, 2021 near Truckee-Tahoe Airport (KTRK), Placer County, California

James Duncan Harrell, 24
Pilot, Rancher, MBA.


This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Reno, Nevada 
Cirrus Design Corporation; Duluth, Minnesota  

Sierra Skyport Ltd


Location: Truckee, CA 
Accident Number: WPR21FA228
Date & Time: June 15, 2021, 10:45 Local 
Registration: N89423
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20 
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On June 15, 2021, about 1045 Pacific daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corporation SR20 airplane, N98423, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident at the Truckee-Tahoe Airport (TRK), Truckee, California. The flight instructor was fatally injured, and the student pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

Review of recorded communication from the air traffic control tower revealed that controllers issued taxi instructions to the pilots to taxi to runway 20. The pilots transmitted that they were ready for takeoff from runway 20 and requested closed traffic. The controller subsequently reported the wind conditions and instructed the pilots to make right closed traffic prior to issuing a clearance for takeoff. No further radio communication with the pilots were received.

A pilot rated witness reported that, while standing on the airport ramp of TRK, he observed the accident airplane depart from runway 20. The airplane appeared to make a shallow right turn, consistent with a right crosswind and downwind turns. About the time the witness expected the wings to level, the airplane abruptly banked 90° to the right and pitched down in a nose low attitude. The witness said that simultaneously a parachute was deployed from the airplane and it descended below the tree line out of visual sight. That was followed by the sound of impact with terrain. The witness added that at the time of departure, they observed an airport sign that indicated a density altitude of 7,100 ft.

Recorded Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) showed that the airplane departed from runway 20 at 1742:49 ascended to 6250 ft mean sea level (msl) and start a right southwesterly turn. The data showed that the airplane completed the turn at 1744:05, on a southwesterly heading, at an altitude of 6,325 ft msl. At 1744:14, the data showed a right turn to a northerly heading at an altitude of 6,300 ft msl, followed by a descent. The airplane remained on a northerly heading and continued to descend until ADS-B contact was lost at 17:44:21, at an altitude of 6050 ft, about 116 ft south of the accident site as seen in figure 1.


Examination of the accident site by the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge revealed that the airplane impacted terrain about 1 mile south west of the departure end of runway 20. The airplane came to rest upright in an approximate 15° nose low attitude, on a heading of about 335° magnetic, at an elevation of 5,905 ft mean sea level. No visible ground scars were observed surrounding the wreckage. The parachute rocket motor was located about 450 ft southeast of the wreckage and the parachute cover was located about 250 ft south of the wreckage. The fuselage and wings were mostly intact, however, the forward portion of the fuselage exhibited impact damage. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORPORATION
Registration: N89423
Model/Series: SR20 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC 
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTRK,5900 ft msl
Observation Time: 11:45 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 22°C /-2°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots / 20 knots, 230°
Lowest Ceiling: 
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.27 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Truckee, CA
Destination: Truckee, CA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries:
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 39.305662,-120.15395 

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.

James Duncan Harrell



A pilot who died Tuesday in a plane crash in Martis Valley, near Truckee, has been identified by authorities.

James Duncan Harrell, 24, of Sacramento, died Tuesday morning when the plane he was flying crashed several minutes after taking off from the Truckee Tahoe Airport, according to the Placer County Sheriff’s Office. Another man, who remains unnamed, survived the crash and was reported as being in stable condition as of Tuesday afternoon, after having been transported to the Renown Regional Medical Center in Reno, Nevada.

The crashed plane was identified by the Federal Aviation Administration as a Cirrus SR20 GTS G3. The aircraft belonged to Mountain Lion Aviation, an aircraft rental service based in Nevada County, according to the FAA’s Aircraft Registry.

The crash occurred just five to 10 minutes after takeoff, and the aircraft was able to deploy a ballistic parachute before nosediving into the ground, according to a press release issued by authorities.

The Sheriff’s Office said that officials with the FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the crash, which has still not been determined.



Placer County Sheriff's Office 

June 15, 2021 at 10:45 a.m., Placer County Sheriff’s deputies and CalFire responded to a report of a plane crash in Martis Valley. Deputies were able to locate the downed single-engine plane, with two occupants. One occupant has been declared deceased, and the other is alive but injured. We will be assisting the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board as they conduct their investigation.



James Duncan Harrell