Friday, January 13, 2017

Cessna P206A Super Skylane, N4678F: Incident occurred January 12, 2017 in Yucca, Mohave County, Arizona

AGRICULTURAL CROP CONSULTANTS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N4678F

FAA Flight Standards District Office: Scottsdale

AIRCRAFT FORCE LANDED ON A DIRT ROAD NEAR YUCCA, ARIZONA 

Date: 12-JAN-17
Time: 21:14:00Z
Regis#: N4678F
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: P206
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: YUCCA
State: ARIZONA

Deicing fluid may be cause of sick flight attendants at Mineta San Jose International Airport







SAN JOSE, Calif. (KGO) --  First responders raced to the tarmac at Mineta San Jose International Airport Thursday after flight attendants on an Alaska Airlines plane got sick. Officials from the airline say the substance is believed to be residue from deicing, and that the materials are non-toxic.

A large emergency response met Alaska flight 322 from Seattle. The San Jose fire department got the call about an inbound plane with a problem just before 6:30 p.m. Officials say the plane has been taken out of service.

"We believed it to be a hazardous materials incident because there were some flight crew members who were feeling ill on board the aircraft," said Mitch Matlow of the SJFD.

Three flight attendants reported having symptoms in flight. One was taken to the hospital.

"One of them was talking about, he felt for ten minutes, he felt like his chest, something was wrong with him for ten minutes," said passenger Dean Bettis. "He felt woozy or something like that."

The fire department, Alaska Airlines and the airport are working together to determine what made the attendants sick.

"At this moment, we still don't know what the material was that the flight crew was exposed to, but apparently the exposure took place before passengers got on board," said Matlow.

The official cause may be under investigation, but passengers told ABC7 News the pilot made an announcement, offering an explanation.

Glynn, a passenger who wanted to be identified only by his first name, said, "The deicing fluid they put on in Seattle created some kind of powder that got in the air system. They were checking it out."

None of the 181 passengers on board reported getting sick.

Story and video:   http://abc7news.com

Steen Skybolt, N94RG: Fatal accident occurred January 12, 2017 in Era, Cooke County, Texas


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.


Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas
Lycoming Engines; Arlington, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N94RG

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA075
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 12, 2017 in Era, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/12/2017
Aircraft: FIELDS Steen Skybolt, registration: N94RG
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A witness reported that he was outside his house when he heard an airplane “flying aerobatics.” He said that he heard the airplane conduct two to three passes and that he could hear the engine “cycling under load as they do in airshows.” He then went to the other side of the house, at which point he saw the airplane in a hammerhead climb (climbing straight up); the airplane then entered a slow, spiraling descent straight down, during which he did not hear engine noise. The airplane made about four spirals before it went out of sight behind rising terrain. The witness added that it did not appear that any attempt was made to recover from the descent. He was uncertain about what altitude the airplane was at when it was at the top of the hammerhead maneuver. The airplane wreckage was found less than 1/4 mile from the pilot’s private grass airstrip. The examination of the wreckage revealed no preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Given the witness statement, it is likely that the pilot lost airplane control while conducting aerobatic flight maneuvers and that there was insufficient altitude to recover.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s loss of airplane control while conducting aerobatic flight maneuvers with insufficient altitude to recover.



HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On January 12, 2017, between 1100 and 1200 central standard time, an experimental, amateur-built Steen Skybolt airplane, N94RG, collided with terrain after a loss of control near Era, Texas. The pilot was fatally injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was owned and being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed near the accident site at the time of the flight, and a flight plan had not been filed. The flight departed from the pilot's private grass airstrip, located less than 1/2 mile from the accident site, between 1100 and 1200.

A witness reported that he was outside his house when he heard an airplane "flying aerobatics." He said that he heard the airplane conduct two to three passes and that he could hear the engine "cycling under load as they do in airshows." He then went to the other side of the house, at which point he saw the airplane in a hammerhead climb (climbing straight up); the airplane then entered a slow, spiraling descent straight down, during which the witness did not hear engine noise. Although he was certain the airplane was spiraling down and not in a flat spin, he was less certain if it was in a right or left spiral. The airplane made about four spirals before it went out of sight behind rising terrain. He added that it did not appear that any attempt was made to recover from the descent. He was uncertain about what altitude the airplane was at when it was at the top of the hammerhead maneuver. He said he saw the airplane sometime between 1100 and 1200 and that the temperature outside was very warm and the sky was "incredibly" clear. 

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with multiengine and single-engine airplane ratings; single-engine operations were limited to commercial privileges. He was issued a Federal Aviation Administration first-class medical certificate on March 29, 2016. At the time of his medical examination, the pilot reported a total of 2,250 hours of civil flight experience. The number of hours the pilot flew in the accident airplane could not be determined. 

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The experimental, amateur-built, open-cockpit biplane was manufactured in 1990. The airplane was equipped with a six-cylinder Lycoming IO-540-B1A5 engine, serial number L-634-48, that produced 290 horsepower at 2,575 rpm.

Although the airplane was purchased by the pilot around September 2016, the airplane's registration still indicated that it was registered to the previous owner. The airplane was kept in a hangar and operated out of the accident pilot's private grass airstrip near Era, Texas. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1053, the surface weather observation at Denton Enterprise Airport (DTO), Denton, Texas, located 20 nautical miles south of the accident site, was wind from 190° at 9 knots; visibility 10 miles; cloud condition 4,000 ft broken; temperature 22°C; dew point 17°C; and altimeter setting 30.10 inches of mercury (inHg). 

At 1153, the DTO surface weather observation was wind from 220° at 10 knots; visibility 10 miles; cloud condition 2,600 ft broken; 4,500 ft overcast; temperature 22°C; dew point 16°C; altimeter setting 30.09 inHg. 

At 1235, the DTO surface weather observation was wind from 341° at 14 knots; visibility 10 miles; cloud condition 2,400 ft broken; 3,300 ft broken; 4,700 ft overcast; temperature 15°C; dew point 8°C; altimeter setting 30.09 inHg. Remarks: wind shift at 1215. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The wreckage was located in a pasture about 1,100 ft from the departure end of the north runway of the pilot's grass airstrip on a magnetic heading of 350°. The damage to the engine cowling, cockpit, and wing surfaces indicated that the airplane collided with terrain in about a 45°-nose-down attitude. The engine compartment, fuselage, wings, and empennage exhibited crushing and buckling from the ground impact, but the airplane remained intact. There was no postimpact fire. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The elevator trim continuity was confirmed from the elevator trim control to the elevator trim tabs. 

One of the propeller blades was visible at the accident site, and it was bent backward about midspan, and it exhibited minimal damage on its chambered surface and flat side. Its blade tip exhibited abrasion and nicks along the leading edge of the blade. The propeller hub was found in 14 inches of soft, clay soil. The second blade was found underneath the wreckage in clay soil, and it exhibited twisting, extensive chordwise scratching along the entire span of the blade, and gouges and nicks to the blade's leading edge. 

The examination of the engine revealed drive train continuity of the crankshaft and camshaft when the propeller was turned. The accessory gears and the fuel pump gear rotated, and all six pistons moved up and down. The top spark plugs exhibited normal signatures and appeared to be almost new. Both the left and right magnetos were separated from the engine. The left magneto produced spark on all six towers. The right magneto was damaged from impact, and it produced no spark. The fuel servo was broken at the throttle plate. The fuel servo had residual fuel in it, and all fuel lines connected to the fuel servo had fuel in them. 

The engine rpm gauge indicated 2,450 rpm with 407.86 hours recorded. The airspeed indicator needle was found at 338 knots. The airplane's g-meter needle moved freely, but the g-meter indicators that recorded acceleration showed +10 and -5 gs. The engine rpm gauge, airspeed indicator, and g-meter were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for examination.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION 

The Dallas County Institute of Forensic Sciences, Dallas, Texas, performed an autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was "blunt force trauma," and the manner of death was "an accident." 

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory conducted toxicology testing on specimens for the pilot. The testing was negative for all tested substances. 

TESTS AND RESEARCH

The NTSB's Materials Laboratory examined the engine rpm gauge, airspeed indicator, and g-meter. The rpm gauge and airspeed indicator were disassembled and examined using a stereo microscope. No slap or impact marks were observed on the gauge or indicator dial faces. 

The rear housing of the g-meter was removed for operational examination. No impact marks were observed on its outer case (housing). With the housing removed, no damage was observed on the meter's internal mechanical parts. The gears, weights, and other mechanical parts moved freely. When the reset button was pressed, the meter's dial needles (g-force indicators) reset to their respective original positions. The g-meter appeared to be operational.

Tyler Barnes Foster 
November 09, 1989 - January 12, 2017


NTSB Identification: CEN17FA075
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, January 12, 2017 in Era, TX
Aircraft: FIELDS Steen Skybolt, registration: N94RG
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On January 12, 2017, between 1100 to 1200 central standard time, an experimental, amateur-built Fields Steen Skybolt airplane, N94RG, sustained substantial damage when it collided with terrain after a loss of control near Era, Texas. The pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by the pilot under the provisions of the 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the flight, which was not on a flight plan. The flight departed from the pilot's private grass airstrip located less than 1/2 mile from the accident site at an unknown time.

A witness reported that he was outside his house when he heard an airplane flying aerobatics. He said that he heard the airplane do 2 to 3 passes and he could hear the engine "cycling under load as they do in airshows." He went to the other side of the house where he could observe the airplane. He said he saw the airplane in a Hammerhead climb (going straight up in a climb), and then it entered a slow spiraling descent straight down. He did not hear the engine noise while the airplane was in the descent. He was certain it was spiraling down and not in a flat spin, but he was less certain if it was in a right or left spiral. He said he saw the airplane do about 4 spirals before it went out of sight behind the rising terrain. It did not appear to him that there was any attempt to recover from the descent. He clearly heard the engine during the climb, but did not hear the engine rev up during the descent. He was uncertain about what altitude the airplane was at when it was at the top of the hammerhead maneuver. He said he observed the airplane sometime between 1100 and 1200, and that the temperature outside was very warm and the sky was "incredibly" clear.

The accident site was in a pasture and the wreckage was located about 1,100 feet from the departure end of the north runway of the pilot's grass airstrip on a 350-degree bearing. The damage to the engine cowling, cockpit, and wing surfaces indicated that the airplane collided with the terrain in about a 45-degree nose down attitude. The engine compartment, fuselage, wings, and empennage exhibited crushing and buckling from the ground impact, but the airplane remained intact. There was no post-impact ground fire. Flight control continuity was confirmed from all flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. The elevator trim continuity was confirmed from the elevator trim control to the elevator trim tabs. The rudder trim tab was a fixed, non-adjustable trim tab. 

One of the propeller blades was visible at the accident site. It was bent backwards about mid-span and it exhibited minimal damage on either the chambered surface or the flat side of the blade. The propeller hub was located in 14-inches of soft clay soil. The second blade was underneath the wreckage in the clay soil. It exhibited blade twist, extensive chordwise scratching along the entire span of the blade, and gouges and nicks to the leading edge of the blade. 

The engine was a six-cylinder Lycoming IO-540-B1A5 engine, serial number L-634-48, that produced 290 horsepower at 2,575 rpm. The examination of the engine revealed drive train continuity of the crankshaft and camshaft when the propeller was turned. The accessory gears and the fuel pump gear rotated, and all six pistons moved up and down. The top spark plugs exhibited normal signatures and appeared to be almost new. Both the left and right magnetos were separated from the engine. The left magneto fired on all six towers. The right magneto was damaged from impact and no spark was produced. The fuel servo was broken at the throttle plate. The fuel servo had residual fuel in it and all fuel lines connected to the fuel servo had fuel in them. 

At the accident site, the airplane's engine rpm gauge indicated 2,450 rpm with 407.86 hours recorded. The airspeed indicator needle was found at 338 knots. The airplane's G-meter needle moved freely, but the G-meter indicators that recorded acceleration showed +10 and -5 Gs. The airplane's rpm gauge, airspeed indicator, and G-meter were sent to the National Transportation Safety Board's (NTSB) Materials Laboratory for examination. 

At 1053, the surface weather observation at the Denton Enterprise Airport (DTO), Denton, Texas, located 20 nm south of the accident site was: wind 190 at 9 knots; visibility 10 miles; cloud condition 4,000 ft broken; temperature 22 degrees C; dew point 17 degrees C; altimeter 30.10 inches of mercury. 

At 1153, the surface weather observation DTO was wind 220 at 10 knots; visibility 10 miles; cloud condition 2,600 ft broken; 4,500 ft overcast; temperature 22 degrees C; dew point 16 degrees C; altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury. 

At 1235, the surface weather observation DTO was wind 341 at 14 knots; visibility 10 miles; cloud condition 2,400 ft broken; 3,300 ft broken; 4,700 ft overcast; temperature 15 degrees C; dew point 8 degrees C; altimeter 30.09 inches of mercury. Remarks: wind shift at 1215.


Tyler Barnes Foster
November 09, 1989 - January 12, 2017

Tyler Barnes Foster passed away Thursday morning, January 12, 2017 doing what he loved most, flying at his home in Era Texas. He entered this world on November 9, 1989 to Thomas Wayne Foster and Valerie Ann Bowles Foster, and becoming baby brother to Sara Nichole Foster. 

He is survived by both his parents of Sanger, sister, Maternal Grandmother, Lois Bowles of Lewisville, Uncles; Lewis Foster & family of Brennen, Texas, Robert Foster & family of Coppell, Texas, John Foster & family of Flower Mound, Texas, Mike Bowles & family of Valley View, Aunts; Kim Beller & family of Coalgate, Oklahoma, Lauren Weliver of US, numerous cousins across the U.S., Great Uncles; Jim Anderson & family of Flower Mound, Texas, Jerry Anderson & family of Reidsville, North Carolina, Great Aunt, Faye Taylor of Denton, Texas, Great Aunt Ethel Lemon of Lewisville, Great Uncle Dick Bowles and family of Kansas City, MO and Dr. Hugh and Sandi Pruett more affectionately known to Sara and Tyler as Daddy Hugh and Mammy Sandi, who were like their own grandparents.

Tyler graduated from Sanger High School in 2008, having already earned his wings, soloing at age 17. His interest in all things mechanical and flying was apparent his entire 27 years. His passion lead into working and learning from his very first job at Tomlinson Avionics of Texas, where he flew his own plane to Gainesville Airport after school each day, followed by Napa Auto parts of Sanger, Nortex Cycles of Sanger, O'Reilly Auto Parts, Bulloch Manufacturing and Corple Corral. He attended NCTC working on his undergraduate classes and advanced onto flight school attending and earning additional flight certifications at ATP Flight School in Phoenix and Scottsdale, Arizona. Upon completion Tyler began working at US Aviation as a test pilot, and Pumpco Services. All of which lead to him reaching his dream of flying full time for a commercial airline. Currently Tyler was a First Officer flying Regional Jets for Sky West Airlines based in Denver, CO. Tyler had just completed the National Homeland Security Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) certification program and earning a medal for the Top Marksmanship Award.

We would like to acknowledge the many individuals that influenced Tyler and helped him to attain a level of expertise in general and aviation maintenance. From those at Sanger ISD, Tom Eiland and Airemasters, Chris and Gina Faircloth of Napa, Zack Zielinski of Nortex Cycle, Maj. (R) Mike Phillips, Daniel and Chris of O'Reilly's, Scott Bulloch and Rocky Tisdale of Bulloch Manufacturing, Tim, Chris and Lupe of US Aviation, Ronny Ortowski and Jake Shoemake of Pumpco. We would also like to acknowledge the men that encouraged and developed Tyler's flying skills and helped to guide in his flying career. Commercial airline Captains Jeff Rowland, Ben Huston, Wes Huston, Benjamin Huston, Dale Hendrickson, Don Maxwell, Daryn Maxwell, David Martin (USAF Ret. and US Team Captain for the World Aerobatics Championship) and Dave Enebo.

Memorial Services will be held on Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 10am at the Sanger Church of Christ, 400 Locust St. Sanger, TX 76266.

In lieu of flowers we ask that you make a donation to the Sanger Education Foundation for the Tyler Foster Endowment to further the dreams of those pursuing mechanics and/or aviation.

Sanger Education Foundation
PO Box 429
Sanger, TX 76266

SERVICES
Memorial Service
Wednesday, January 18, 2017
10:00 AM

Church of Christ 
100 N 5th Street 
Sanger, Texas

Source:   https://www.meaningfulfunerals.net


GAINESVILLE, Texas (AP) - The pilot of a single-engine plane has died after the aircraft crashed into a field north of Fort Worth.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the Steen Skybolt departed a private airstrip near Denton on Thursday for what was supposed to be a one-hour flight.

The wreckage was found late Thursday after family members reported the aircraft was missing.

Texas Department of Public Safety staff Sgt. Mark Tackett on Friday identified the pilot as 28-year-old Tyler Foster, who had only purchased the plane a few months earlier. He was the lone occupant.

FAA investigators were en route to the crash site and the National Transportation Safety Board is leading the investigation.

The cause of the crash is unclear.




Tyler Foster, a 27-year-old Era man, died Thursday night after crashing his bi-plane in a pasture near County Road 325 and FM51 in Cooke County, according to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Foster was a graduate of Sanger High School, according to Sanger ISD officials.

DPS troopers were called to assist in locating the pilot at about 8:30 p.m. The cause of the crash remains unknown. The Federal Aviation Administration is currently investigating the matter, along with the National Transportation Safety Board.

Source:   http://www.dentonrc.com




COOKE COUNTY --  The pilot of a small plane died Thursday after his plane crashed into a pasture in Cooke County.

Tyler Foster, 28, of Era was identified by the Texas Department of Public Safety as the pilot of the single-engine experimental Skybolt aircraft. The Skybolt is described by its maker, Steen Aero Lab, as an aerobatic biplane.

The plane left from a private grass strip just north of Denton around 4:30 p.m. and was expected to land an hour later. The family reported the plane missing Thursday after it did not return, said Lynn Lunsford, spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration.

The aircraft was found by authorities around 10:30 p.m. near Farm Road 51 and County Road 325 just outside the town of Era, about 30 miles north of Denton.

The cause of the crash is under investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, he said.

Source: http://www.star-telegram.com



COOKE COUNTY, Texas (KXII) -- An Era man is dead after a plane crash in Cooke County on Thursday.

After a several hour search for a missing pilot, authorities were able to locate the wreckage near County Road 325 and FM 51 in Cooke County.

Texas DPS Trooper Mark Tackett says they were called out to help locate the missing pilot, Tyler Foster, around 8:30 Thursday night.

Two hours later, deputies found Foster dead in the wreckage.

An FAA spokesman said Foster was flying an Steen Skybolt from a private grass airstrip north of Denton for what should have been a one-hour flight.

Foster and the wreckage from the plane was found near CR 325 and FM 51, hours after family members reported him missing.

Officials say the plane was purchased a few months ago.

"We have a young pilot, who for unknown reasons, crashed the plane in the middle of the pasture," Tackett said.

A friend of Foster's says the his location was last known at around 4:30 Thursday evening near Era.

The National Transportation Safety Board will take over the investigation as soon as they arrive.

Source:  http://www.kxii.com 

Cameron A315, Napa Valley Balloons Inc., N69520: Accident occurred November 14, 2016 in Winters, Yolo County, California (and) Incident occurred May 17, 2016 in Napa County, California

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

NAPA VALLEY BALLOONS INC: http://registry.faa.gov/N69520

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


Aviation Accident Factual Report -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA082
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, November 14, 2016 in Winters, CA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/06/2017
Aircraft: CAMERON A315, registration: N69520
Injuries: 1 Serious, 14 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a balloon reported that while aloft he observed the wind increase to about 10 miles per hour, so he briefed his passengers on how to brace for a “high wind landing” and possible basket tip-over. The pilot further reported that he descended to about 3 feet above ground, and once over the target landing area he “shut off [the] fuel tanks and burners then pulled the smart vent (rapid deflation valve).” Subsequently, on touch down the basket bounced once and skidded about 15 to 20 yards before stopping with the basket tipping over on its side. 

The pilot reported that he secured the basket and while the passengers were exiting the basket, his ground crew informed him that a passenger had injured her ankle. According to the pilot, the injured passenger did not speak English as her first language and he was unsure if she braced appropriately for the landing or if she sustained the serious injury while exiting the basket. The pilot reported that another passenger informed him that the passenger sustained the injury while she was exiting the basket.

The pilot did not report any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the balloon that would have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The passenger's improper egress from the balloon basket, which resulted in a serious injury.

Date:  17-MAY-16
Time:  14:45:00Z
Regis#:  N69520
Aircraft Make:  CAMERON
Aircraft Model:  A315
Event Type:  Incident
Damage:  None
Activity:  Sightseeing
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  NAPA
State:  California

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


HOT AIR BALLOON FORCE LANDED ON A LEVY 3 MILES FROM THE AIRPORT, PERSONS ON BOARD WERE RETRIEVED BY HELICOPTER, NO INJURIES, NO DAMAGE, NAPA, CALIFORNIA. 



NAPA (KPIX 5) – Tourists who were taking in the scenic Napa Valley on a hot air balloon ride Tuesday had their journey turn into a rescue mission, when the balloon went off course and made an emergency landing near the Napa River.

“They got a nice balloon ride and a free helicopter ride,” CHP flight officer Tom Lipsey told KPIX 5.

Lipsey said as CHP helicopters were out training, he noticed something colorful from the flight hanger.

“We looked over there, saw a hot air balloon that was pretty far south of where we normally see them,” he recalled.

A helicopter found the balloon on a remote levee, miles off course, near the Napa River. The pilot told Lipsey he didn’t have enough fuel to lift off.

“The winds were kind of shifting all over as we were landing, so I think it was just a really strange day for winds and maybe caught them off guard,” Lipsey said.

The balloon belongs to Napa Valley Balloon Inc. Representatives told KPIX 5 the people on the balloon ride were tourists that were part of a Robert Mondavi wine tasting trip.

The helicopter had to make multiple trips to rescue the 16 tourists and the pilot.

One of the tourists posted on Instagram a selfie from the chopper.

“I know they were taking a lot of selfies and videos of us flying over there so I am sure they got good memories there,” Lipsey said.

Napa Valley Balloon Inc. said the strong winds forced their pilot to land on the levee, but no one was ever in danger.

Story and video:  http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com



NAPA, California -- Tourists who were taking in the scenic Napa Valley on a hot air balloon ride Tuesday had their journey turn into a rescue mission when the balloon went off course and made an emergency landing near the Napa River, CBS San Francisco reported.

"They got a nice balloon ride and a free helicopter ride," California Highway Patrol flight officer Tom Lipsey told CBS SF.

Lipsey said as CHP helicopters were out training, he noticed something colorful from the flight hanger.

"We looked over there, saw a hot air balloon that was pretty far south of where we normally see them," he recalled.

A helicopter found the balloon on a remote levee, miles off course, near the Napa River. The pilot told Lipsey he didn't have enough fuel to lift off.

"The winds were kind of shifting all over as we were landing, so I think it was just a really strange day for winds and maybe caught them off guard," Lipsey said.

The balloon belongs to Napa Valley Balloon Inc. Representatives told CBS SF the people on the balloon ride were tourists that were part of a Robert Mondavi wine tasting trip.

The helicopter had to make multiple trips to rescue the 16 tourists and the pilot.

One of the tourists posted on Instagram a selfie from the chopper.

"I know they were taking a lot of selfies and videos of us flying over there so I am sure they got good memories there," Lipsey said.

Napa Valley Balloon Inc. said the strong winds forced their pilot to land on the levee, but no one was ever in danger.

Story and video:  http://www.cbsnews.com Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Napa Valley Balloons Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N69520

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25


Aviation Accident Factual Report -   National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA082
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, November 14, 2016 in Winters, CA
Aircraft: CAMERON A315, registration: N69520
Injuries: 1 Serious, 14 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of a balloon reported that while aloft he observed the wind increase to about 10 miles per hour, so he briefed his passengers on how to brace for a "high wind landing" and possible basket tip-over. The pilot further reported that he descended to about 3 feet above ground, and once over the target landing area he "shut off [the] fuel tanks and burners then pulled the smart vent (rapid deflation valve)." Subsequently, on touch down the basket bounced once and skidded about 15 to 20 yards before stopping with the basket tipping over on its side.

The pilot reported that he secured the basket and while the passengers were exiting the basket, his ground crew informed him that a passenger had injured her ankle. According to the pilot, the injured passenger did not speak English as her first language and he was unsure if she braced appropriately for the landing or if she sustained the serious injury while exiting the basket. The pilot reported that another passenger informed him that the passenger sustained the injury while she was exiting the basket. 

The pilot did not report any preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the balloon that would have precluded normal operation.

Date:  17-MAY-16
Time:  14:45:00Z
Regis#:  N69520
Aircraft Make:  CAMERON
Aircraft Model:  A315
Event Type:  Incident
Damage:  None
Activity:  Sightseeing
Flight Phase:  LANDING (LDG)
City:  NAPA
State:  California

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Sacramento FSDO-25

HOT AIR BALLOON FORCE LANDED ON A LEVY 3 MILES FROM THE AIRPORT, PERSONS ON BOARD WERE RETRIEVED BY HELICOPTER, NO INJURIES, NO DAMAGE, NAPA, CALIFORNIA. 



NAPA (KPIX 5) – Tourists who were taking in the scenic Napa Valley on a hot air balloon ride Tuesday had their journey turn into a rescue mission, when the balloon went off course and made an emergency landing near the Napa River.

“They got a nice balloon ride and a free helicopter ride,” CHP flight officer Tom Lipsey told KPIX 5.

Lipsey said as CHP helicopters were out training, he noticed something colorful from the flight hanger.

“We looked over there, saw a hot air balloon that was pretty far south of where we normally see them,” he recalled.

A helicopter found the balloon on a remote levee, miles off course, near the Napa River. The pilot told Lipsey he didn’t have enough fuel to lift off.

“The winds were kind of shifting all over as we were landing, so I think it was just a really strange day for winds and maybe caught them off guard,” Lipsey said.

The balloon belongs to Napa Valley Balloon Inc. Representatives told KPIX 5 the people on the balloon ride were tourists that were part of a Robert Mondavi wine tasting trip.

The helicopter had to make multiple trips to rescue the 16 tourists and the pilot.

One of the tourists posted on Instagram a selfie from the chopper.

“I know they were taking a lot of selfies and videos of us flying over there so I am sure they got good memories there,” Lipsey said.

Napa Valley Balloon Inc. said the strong winds forced their pilot to land on the levee, but no one was ever in danger.

Story and video:  http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com



NAPA, California -- Tourists who were taking in the scenic Napa Valley on a hot air balloon ride Tuesday had their journey turn into a rescue mission when the balloon went off course and made an emergency landing near the Napa River, CBS San Francisco reported.

"They got a nice balloon ride and a free helicopter ride," California Highway Patrol flight officer Tom Lipsey told CBS SF.

Lipsey said as CHP helicopters were out training, he noticed something colorful from the flight hanger.

"We looked over there, saw a hot air balloon that was pretty far south of where we normally see them," he recalled.

A helicopter found the balloon on a remote levee, miles off course, near the Napa River. The pilot told Lipsey he didn't have enough fuel to lift off.

"The winds were kind of shifting all over as we were landing, so I think it was just a really strange day for winds and maybe caught them off guard," Lipsey said.

The balloon belongs to Napa Valley Balloon Inc. Representatives told CBS SF the people on the balloon ride were tourists that were part of a Robert Mondavi wine tasting trip.

The helicopter had to make multiple trips to rescue the 16 tourists and the pilot.

One of the tourists posted on Instagram a selfie from the chopper.

"I know they were taking a lot of selfies and videos of us flying over there so I am sure they got good memories there," Lipsey said.

Napa Valley Balloon Inc. said the strong winds forced their pilot to land on the levee, but no one was ever in danger.

Story and video:  http://www.cbsnews.com

Maule MX-7-180B Star Rocket, N591SB: Accident occurred November 10, 2016 in Port Aransas, Nueces County, Texas

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N591SB 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Factual Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA068
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 10, 2016 in Port Aransas, TX
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/06/2017
Aircraft: MAULE MX7, registration: N591SB
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll the airplane encountered wind gusts. The pilot further reported that his “attention evidently wandered” and he did not correct for the wind gusts quick enough. Subsequently, the airplane weather vaned into the wind and ground looped. 

The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

A review of the local weather on the airfield, about the time of the accident, recorded the wind from 030 degrees true, at 14 nautical miles per hour (knots). The pilot landed on runway 30.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s failure to maintain directional control of the airplane during landing with a crosswind.