Friday, August 10, 2018

Loss of Control in Flight: Cessna 172R Skyhawk, N20JA; accident occurred August 08, 2018 at Greeley-Weld County Airport, Colorado

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N20JA

Location: Greeley, CO
Accident Number: CEN18CA323
Date & Time: 08/08/2018, 2000 MDT
Registration: N20JA
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The pilot and a safety pilot were practicing instrument maneuvers, approaches, and landings at different airports during the flight. The airplane entered the traffic pattern for a practice landing at an airport. According to the safety pilot, the airplane was high and slow during the final approach. About 10 ft above ground level, the airplane "floated a little longer," and the pilot initiated a go-around by applying full throttle. During the attempted go-around, both occupants applied conflicting "correction" inputs to the control yokes; the pilot applied back pressure, and the safety pilot applied forward pressure. The airplane stalled, the left wing impacted terrain, and the airplane came to rest upright adjacent to the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the forward fuselage and both wings.

Both pilots reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot statements were conflicting regarding the accident details and sequence of events. Based on the statements and airplane damage, it is likely that the conflicting control inputs resulted in the pilots' failure to maintain a proper airspeed and that the airplane entered an aerodynamic stall during the attempted go-around. Neither pilot reported that verbal communication was established during the landing sequence.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's and safety pilot's conflicting control inputs during landing, which resulted in their failure to maintain a proper airspeed and resulted in an aerodynamic stall. Contributing to the accident was the lack of communication between the pilot and safety pilot during the landing and go-around.

Findings

Aircraft
Airspeed - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Lack of communication - Flight crew (Factor)
Lack of communication - Pilot (Factor)
Use of equip/system - Pilot (Cause)
Use of equip/system - Other/unknown (Cause)
Lack of communication - Other/unknown (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach
Miscellaneous/other

Approach-VFR go-around
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)

Approach
Attempted remediation/recovery

Approach-VFR go-around
Aerodynamic stall/spin
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 25, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/03/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/03/2017
Flight Time:   164 hours (Total, all aircraft), 161 hours (Total, this make and model), 114 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 67 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 21 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 21, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/22/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 08/16/2017
Flight Time:  240 hours (Total, all aircraft), 207 hours (Total, this make and model), 197 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 64 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 35 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N20JA
Model/Series: 172 R
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1997
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17280253
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/30/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2299 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 46 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8765.4 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner: Jeppesen Employees Flying Association Inc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: GXY, 4696 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1945 MDT
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 130°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.18 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Precipitation
Departure Point: Fort Morgan, CO (FMM)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Greeley, CO (GXY)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1930 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Greeley-Weld County Airport (GXY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 4696 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 17
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Go Around; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 40.428611, -104.631944 (est)

Learjet 45, N818BD: Incident occurred August 08, 2018 In Denver, Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Windshield cracked in flight.

Poarch/Swinbank Investments LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N818BD

Date: 08-AUG-18
Time: 23:35:00Z
Regis#: N818BD
Aircraft Make: LEARJET
Aircraft Model: 45
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: DENVER
State: COLORADO

Delta Air Lines, McDonnell Douglas MD-88: Incident occurred August 08, 2018 at Hartsfield–Jackson Atlanta International Airport (KATL), Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Flight 1250: Reported loss of engine on departure, aircraft returned and ran off the runway on landing.

Date: 08-AUG-18
Time: 16:51:00Z
Regis#: UNK
Aircraft Make: MCDONNELL DOUGLAS
Aircraft Model: MD 88
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: COMMERCIAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 121
Aircraft Operator: DELTA AIRLINES
Flight Number: 1250
City: ATLANTA
State: GEORGIA

Cessna T337G, registered to Northern Air Inc and was operating under contract for the United States Forest Service, N255: Accident occurred August 08, 2018 at Lewiston-Nez Perce County Regional Airport (KLWS), Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Helena, Montana
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N255

Location: Lewiston, ID
Accident Number: WPR18LA215
Date & Time: 08/08/2018, 1828 PDT
Registration: N255
Aircraft: Cessna T337
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Unknown 

On August 8, 2018, about 1828 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna T337G airplane, N255, sustained substantial damage when it landed with its landing gear retracted on runway 30 at Lewiston Perce Nez Airport (LWS) Lewiston, Idaho. The commercial pilot and his passenger were not injured. The airplane was registered to Northern Air Inc, and was operating under contract for the United States Forest Service as an "air attack" firefighting support mission. Visual meteorological conditions existed at LWS for the landing. The flight originated from LWS about 5 hours before the accident.

According to the pilot, the airplane operated normally for the mission, and for most of the landing approach. However, when the pilot selected the landing gear to the extended position, the gear doors opened, the electric motor that pressurized the hydraulic extension system continued to run, but the landing gear failed to extend. The pilot pulled the circuit breaker for the pump motor and abandoned the approach. He then flew a short distance away from LWS so that he could attempt to troubleshoot and rectify the problem. The pilot cycled the landing gear control five or six times, but all efforts to operate the landing gear were unsuccessful. He then employed his passenger to assist him with running the checklists and other troubleshooting activities. The pilot and passenger determined that the landing gear system hydraulic fluid reservoir that was accessible to them in the cabin was empty. The pilot contacted his maintenance personnel by radio, and they assisted in additional attempts to correct the situation; these attempts included replenishing the reservoir with oil and water. Despite those efforts, the landing gear could not be successfully extended. The pilot decided to burn off extra fuel before returning to conduct a gear-up landing.

During the return approach, the pilot secured the front engine, and "bumped" the propeller with the starter to position the blades horizontally, in order to prevent damage from runway contact. The occupants unlatched a cabin door in order to enable assured opening after landing. The pilot landed the airplane gear up on runway 30, and the airplane slid to a stop within a few feet of the runway centerline. The pilot shut down the aft engine, and secured the airplane. Both occupants exited, and no fire or other problems occurred.

Post accident examination of the airplane revealed the runway slide had ground through several of the lower skin panels and structural members, substantially damaging the airplane. Examination of the landing gear system revealed that the circlips that retained the actuator rods in both the left and right actuators for the main landing gear "parachute" doors had been liberated from their retention grooves. Loss of this circlip enables hyper-extension of the actuator rod, and permits hydraulic fluid to exit the actuator.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N255
Model/Series: T337 G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: US Forest Service
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: LWS, 1442 ft msl
Observation Time: 1842 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 39°C / 5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , 90°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.85 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Departure Point: Lewiston, ID (LWS)
Destination: Lewiston, ID (LWS)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  46.375000, -117.010000 (est)

Avid Aircraft Magnum, N833RD: Accident occurred May 19, 2018 at Mineral Canyon Strip Airport (UT75), Moab, Utah

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N833RD

Location: Moab, UT
Accident Number: GAA18CA477
Date & Time: 05/19/2018, 1000 MDT
Registration: N833RD
Aircraft: Davidson, Ronald A. Avid
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Nose over/nose down
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot in the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that during the landing roll on the dirt surface, he pinned the tailwheel on the ground, and then he applied aft stick to keep the tailwheel on the ground. However, he was concerned about the condition of the last 1/3 of the runway, and he elected to stop prior to.

He reported that he applied the brakes "a little harder than normal" and the tail came off the ground. He released his brake application, but the tail continued to rise, and the airplane nosed over. Substantial damage was sustained to the vertical stabilizer and the rudder.

The pilot reported that he still had about 1,000ft of runway remaining, but he failed to recognize and correct the momentum of the rising tail in a timely manner.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/09/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1195.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 87.7 hours (Total, this make and model), 926.9 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 21.4 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 12.7 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8.6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Davidson, Ronald A.
Registration: N833RD
Model/Series: Avid Magnum
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2017
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: M76
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 04/12/2018, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1750 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 217.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCNY, 4560 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 17 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1553 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 38°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 29.95 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 19°C / 2°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Moab, UT (KCNY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Moab, UT (UT75)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0900 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Mineral Canyon Strip (UT75)
Runway Surface Type: Dirt
Airport Elevation: 3900 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 14
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2000 ft / 40 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Straight-in 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:  38.533333, -109.983333 (est)

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Cessna 207A Stationair 7, registered to and operated by Iliamna Air Taxi, N7379U: Accident occurred August 07, 2018 near Iliamna Airport (PAIL), Alaska

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Anchorage, Alaska

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N7379U

Location: Iliamna, AK
Accident Number: ANC18LA064
Date & Time: 08/07/2018, 1215 AKD
Registration: N7379U
Aircraft: Cessna 207
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled

On August 7, 2018, about 1215 Alaska daylight time, a wheel-equipped Cessna 207 airplane, N7379U, sustained substantial damage during a forced landing, about 1 mile southwest of the Iliamna Airport, Iliamna, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) on-demand cargo/U.S. mail flight under Title 14, CFR Part 135, when the accident occurred. The airplane was registered to, and operated by, Iliamna Air Taxi, Iliamna. The solo airline transport pilot sustained no injuries. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and VFR company flight following procedures were in effect. The flight originated at the Iliamna Airport about 1210, and was en route to Kokhanok, Alaska.

During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge on August 7, the pilot reported that after takeoff on runway 35 he started a climbing left turn as he headed towards Kokhanok. He said that as the airplane reached his intended altitude of 1,000 feet mean sea level, and as he began to configure the airplane for cruise flight, the engine began to run rough and lose power, so he elected to immediately return to the Iliamna Airport. He said that he switched fuel tanks and activated the auxiliary fuel pump in an effort to restore full engine power. He noted that the roughness improved momentarily, followed by a severe engine vibration, and complete loss of engine power. The pilot selected a forced landing area on tundra-covered terrain.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the landing gear, fuselage, and wings.

The airplane was equipped with a Continental Motors IO-520-F engine, and a detailed examination is pending. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N7379U
Model/Series: 207
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Iliamna Air Taxi Inc
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Commuter Air Carrier (135); On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: IlI, 192 ft msl
Observation Time: 1153 ADT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: -12°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 3400 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots / , 320°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 6500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 29.75 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Company VFR
Departure Point: Iliamna, AK (ILI)
Destination: Kokhanok, AK (9K2)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  59.745833, -154.917500

Aeroprakt A-20 Vista Cruiser SC, N9049K: Incident occurred August 07, 2018 at Durango-La Plata County Airport (KDRO), Colorado

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City

Lost control during landing, veered off the runway, hit a ditch and landing gear tore off.

http://registry.faa.gov/N9049K

Date: 07-AUG-18
Time: 14:30:00Z
Regis#: N9049K
Aircraft Make: EXPERIMENTAL
Aircraft Model: A20 VISTA CRUISER SC
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: DURANGO
State: COLORADO

Hard Landing: Cessna 172M Skyhawk, N9608H; accident occurred August 06, 2018 at Crystal River Airport (KCGC), Citrus County, Florida

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N9608H


Location: Crystal River, FL

Accident Number: GAA18CA478
Date & Time: 08/06/2018, 1030 EDT
Registration: N9608H
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported that the airplane landed hard, and the propeller struck the runway.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the engine mount.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's improper landing flare, which resulted in a hard landing.

Findings

Aircraft
Landing flare - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Hard landing (Defining event)

Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 76, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/07/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/19/2017
Flight Time:   (Estimated) 522 hours (Total, all aircraft), 37 hours (Total, this make and model), 368 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N9608H
Model/Series: 172 M
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 17266261
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection:  Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: CAG Aircraft Holdings LLC
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: Crystal River Aero Group, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCGC, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1435 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 92°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 50°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.17 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 22°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Crystal River, FL (CGC)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Crystal River, FL (CGC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0900 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: CRYSTAL RIVER-CAPTAIN TOM DAVI (CGC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 8 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 09
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4557 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 28.867222, -82.574722 (est)

Bell 206B JetRanger II, registered to Ranger Aviation Leasing and operated by Northwind Aviation, N607RA: Accident occurred August 07, 2018 in Basin City, Franklin County, Washington

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane, Washington
Rolls Royce; Indianapolis, Indiana
Bell Canada
Transportation Safety Board of Canada

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N607RA

Location: Basin City, WA
Accident Number: WPR18LA214
Date & Time: 08/07/2018, 1000 PDT
Registration: N607RA
Aircraft: Bell 206
Injuries: 1 Minor
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 137: Agricultural 

On August 7, 2018, about 1000 Pacific daylight time, a Bell 206B helicopter, N607RA, struck the ground during an agricultural spray run near Basin City Washington. The commercial pilot received minor injuries, and the helicopter was destroyed by a post-impact fire. The helicopter was registered to Ranger Aviation Leasing, and operated by Northwind Aviation as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 137 aerial application flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the time of the accident. The flight originated from a landing zone near the accident site.

The flight was a "rinse load" intended to clean the chemical hopper with a load of water. According to the pilot, he took off from the loading spot located on the southwest side of the field, with 60 gallons of clean water and about 25 gallons of fuel. He sprayed a portion of the north end of the field for about 3 to 4 seconds, turned off the spray, and proceeded to the east end of the field. He entered the field at a speed of about 50 to 55 mph and sprayed. He then turned off spray, and climbed to gain some altitude. When the helicopter was approximately midfield, at a speed of about 50 mph and "about power pole height," the pilot applied left tail rotor pedal and slightly lowered the collective control, in order to assist him in looking to his left to view his spray pattern. "Immediately after" those control inputs, the helicopter yawed quickly to the left, and began "shaking." The pilot pulled up on the collective control and applied right pedal to stop the left yaw. The helicopter continued to "shudder," and the pilot noticed that the helicopter was at a low airspeed and descending. He attempted to regain airspeed, and when the helicopter was about 5 to 10 ft above the ground, he attempted to level the helicopter in pitch before the skids contacted the ground. About that time the pilot observed that the torque gauge was reading about 108 to 110%.

The helicopter struck the ground hard, and fire erupted about 1 second later. The pilot exited the helicopter, but then reached in to close the throttle and turn the fuel valve off. He retrieved his mobile telephone and then moved away from the helicopter. The pilot estimated that from the time he climbed the helicopter until the accident was about 10 to 15 seconds.

The "loader" arrived on scene in the water truck within about 10 minutes of the accident. He and the pilot attempted to extinguish the fire, but were unsuccessful.

The wreckage was recovered to a secure facility for subsequent examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Bell
Registration: N607RA
Model/Series: 206 B
Aircraft Category: Helicopter
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Northwind Aviation
Operating Certificate(s) Held:  Agricultural Aircraft (137) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: 
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 135°
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Basin City, WA
Destination: Basin City, WA

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor
Latitude, Longitude:   46.607222, -119.291111 (est)

Boeing 737-82R (WL), Pegasus Airlines, TC-CPF: Accident occurred January 13, 2018 at Trabzon Airport (TZX), Turkey



NTSB Identification: DCA18WA080
Scheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign
Accident occurred Saturday, January 13, 2018 in Trabzon, Turkey
Aircraft: BOEING 737, registration:
Injuries: Unavailable

The foreign authority was the source of this information.

The Turkish Accident Investigation Board (KAIK) has notified the NTSB of an accident involving a Boeing 737 which occurred on January 13, 2018. The NTSB has appointed a U.S Accredited Representative to assist under the provisions of ICAO Annex 13, as the State of Manufacture and Design of the airplane.

All investigative information will be released by the KAIK.






Trabzon Gov. Yucel Yavuz said all 162 passengers and crew on board were evacuated and safe early Sunday. Yavuz said the cause of the accident was not yet known and the airport closed until 08:00 a.m. local (05:00 GMT).

Private Pegasus Airlines’ Boeing 737-800 departed from Ankara late Saturday. Photographs from the scene showed the plane stuck in mud.

A Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737 passenger plane is seen struck in mud on an embankment, a day after skidding off the airstrip, after landing at Trabzon airport on the Black Sea coast.

A passenger plane late Saturday skidded off the runway just metres away from the sea as it landed at an airport in northern Turkey, local media images showed.

The Pegasus Airlines flight had taken off smoothly from the capital Ankara and landed in Trabzon, but skidded off the runway in the northern airport. No one was injured or killed in the landing.

Dramatic images showed the plane dangerously hanging off a cliff several metres (feet) from the Black Sea, its wheels stuck in mud.

Other images showed smoke emanating from the trapped plane.

Pegasus Airlines confirmed in a statement Sunday there were no injuries among the 162 passengers onboard as well as two pilots and four cabin crew after they were evacuated.

The cause of the incident was not known but an investigation is under way, the Trabzon governor’s office said.

One of the passengers, Fatma Gordu, panic erupted onboard during the landing.

“We tilted to the side, the front was down while the plane’s rear was up. There was panic; people shouting, screaming,” she told state-run news agency Anadolu.

The airport was temporarily shut before reopening on Sunday morning.

https://www.alaturkaonline.com

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Fiery Helicopter Crashes Persist With Industry Slow to Upgrade Fuel Tanks: Safer fuel-tank technology has been available for decades, but isn’t used on some popular models

A survivor, lower right, walks away from the scene of a deadly tour helicopter crash along the jagged rocks of the Grand Canyon, in Arizona February 10, 2018. Airbus Helicopters EC130 B4, N155GC. The air-tour flight was operated by Papillon Airways Inc.


The Wall Street Journal
By Andy Pasztor
August  7, 2018 8:00 a.m. ET

After a rash of helicopter accidents several years ago ending in fatal fires, industry executives and regulators reached a high-profile compromise: Businesses could avoid rules mandating safety upgrades and retrofits but would be expected to make the changes on their own.

“You got our attention and we’re going to participate,” said Matthew Zuccaro, president of Helicopter Association International, the leading trade association, at the time.

But three years later, critics and even some industry leaders say some helicopter companies haven’t followed through to quickly and voluntarily install more durable, less fire-prone fuel tanks on an array of civilian helicopters. These vehicles are used for everything from sightseeing flights to utility repairs to emergency medical transportation.

Over roughly the past two decades, according to accident investigators and industry critics, there have been more than 170 fiery helicopter crashes in the U.S. alone, at least 80 avoidable fatalities and ballooning legal liabilities for both manufacturers and operators.

As retrofit efforts lag—only 20% of some widely used Airbus SE commercial models are fixed nationwide, for example—lawmakers, plaintiffs’ attorneys, other industry critics and members of a Federal Aviation Administration-created advisory committee are stepping up calls for strict federal mandates.

Attorney Gary Robb, who has represented scores of fire victims or their families over the years, says the FAA has encouraged a “regulatory loophole without any safety justification.”

In a June interview, acting FAA administrator Daniel Elwell said the agency is methodically “examining everything” surrounding the issue, but hasn’t decided whether mandates are necessary.

In a statement last month, an agency spokesman called the topic “a high priority for the FAA,” adding that officials are assessing the advisory group’s existing and anticipated recommendations for safety enhancements.

“The industry continues to make voluntary strides,” according to the statement, which pointed to crash-resistant systems available from seven different manufacturers. In March, the advisory panel told the FAA it would cost the industry roughly $184 million over 10 years to build and then operate all those choppers with fully compliant fuel systems.

Reducing such threats “may be hard and businesses will have to figure out how to make it work,” according to Rep. Ed Perlmutter, a Colorado Democrat who has been a prominent voice demanding change. “But it’s the right thing to do.”

Sometimes, a spectacular crash changes everything. That is what happened when five British tourists, including two newlyweds, died of burns and other injuries after a Papillon Airways sightseeing helicopter crashed and erupted in flames near a landing zone at the western part of the Grand Canyon in February.

In under three weeks, the operator announced plans to retrofit its entire air-tour fleet with crash-resistant fuel tanks. A company spokeswoman declined to comment.

Under voluntary efforts, the industry promised to make safety upgrades and retrofits intended to prevent fuel tanks from rupturing and killing pilots and passengers in otherwise survivable crashes. Industry leaders pledged to aggressively switch to more crash-resistant fuel systems on their own—either on assembly lines or by relying on retrofits—featuring stronger tanks, fuel lines and valves better able withstand impact. Mr. Zuccaro of the industry association called the change then “a major cultural shift.”

The basic technology dates back to the Vietnam War, and is standard on military choppers world-wide. If installed after aircraft are delivered, costs for some of the fixes run between $75,000 and $110,000 per helicopter. The price tag during initial assembly is a fraction of that amount.

Federal rules continue to permit production of various models, designed before the mid-1990s, lacking the most effective fuel-system upgrades.

The contrast between safety protections on new models—including totally automated recovery systems to help disoriented or confused pilots—and decades-old fire problems stemming from older designs, was highlighted last month at the Farnborough International Air Show. Mitch Snyder, president and chief executive of Textron Inc.’s Bell helicopter unit, practically invited the FAA to mandate tougher requirements.

Emphasizing that Bell embraced crash-resistant fuel systems on the production line ahead of FAA moves in the 1990s, Mr. Snyder told reporters “in some cases, safety costs more” and “it needs all of us to perform.” Bell would like chopper operators to upgrade tanks “in every single aircraft we have ever produced,” he said, adding “I do believe that regulation plays a role.”

On Tuesday, a Bell spokeswoman said she didn’t know what portion of the company’s fleet has been retrofitted.

Critics fault some manufacturers for moving too slowly to secure necessary federal certification for retrofit kits they could offer customers. Further delaying fixes, certain operators have balked at spending the money, adding the extra weight or taking aircraft out of service to do the work.

The U.S. helicopter unit of Airbus, for example, estimates that only about one of every five of a popular, single-engine line it sells is retrofitted with sturdier fuel tanks. The company didn’t have kits for any of those models available until early this year, but Airbus officials say they are now offering them at manufacturer’s cost through the end of 2018. A spokesman said the company anticipates demand for retrofits “equaling about another 20% of the fleet.”

The delays partly stem from the fact that there are so many different types of choppers requiring individual U.S. and European approvals for retrofit parts, plus “there’s a real fear” about unintended consequences affecting other onboard systems, according to Jeffrey Trang, the unit’s vice president for technology and flight operations.

Despite a drumbeat of deadly crashes and hefty damage awards, some industry spokesmen appear sanguine about progress. “Everybody would like to have it happen quickly,” the industry’s Mr. Zuccaro said in an interview earlier this year. “We’re trying to do it in a timely, logical and efficient manner,” he said, adding: “this is not something that you can snap your fingers, and in a day you have it.”

—Jim Carlton contributed to this article.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.wsj.com