Friday, August 02, 2019

Quicksilver MXII, N3889Z: Fatal accident occurred July 13, 2019 near Oliver Springs Inc. Airport (TN08), Anderson County, Tennessee


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N3889Z




Location: Oliver Springs, TN
Accident Number: ERA19FA225
Date & Time: 07/13/2019, 1718 EDT
Registration: N3889Z
Aircraft: QUICKSILVER MXII
Injuries: 1 Fatal 
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 13, 2019, at 1718 eastern daylight time, an experimental, amateur-built Quicksilver MXII, N3889Z was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from Oliver Springs Inc Airport (TN08), Oliver Springs, Tennessee. The non-certificated pilot, who was also the owner of the airplane was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

A witness observed the pilot perform an engine runup, taxi, then takeoff from runway 33. After takeoff, the airplane appeared to "crab into the wind." It then started turning right towards the trees bordering the east side of the airport, and he also noted that the wings were rocking. The airplane climbed over the trees then turned left and descended out of view. He then heard the airplane impact the terrain.

Another witness stated that the pilot purchased the airplane several weeks prior to the accident. He believed that pilot had flown the airplane "once or twice" before the accident flight. In addition, he further stated that he was surprised that the pilot elected to fly at the time of the accident because the air was becoming unstable and breezy.

Mobile phone video was reviewed at the site and it showed two individuals taxiing in the accident airplane toward the camera. The video was dated July 7, 2019. After the airplane came to a stop, the individual in the right seat was asked "what do you think about that?" and he responded "It still…pulls hard to the right."

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot did not possess an FAA-issued pilot or medical certificate.

According to FAA airworthiness and airplane maintenance records, the airplane was issued a special airworthiness certificate in the experimental amateur built category on May 11, 1983. It was a two place, open cockpit, high-wing, airplane of aluminum tubular and fabric construction, powered by a Rotax 503, 50 horsepower engine that drove a 3-blade propeller in a pusher configuration.

The airplane collided with terrain at a steep nose down attitude on a heading of about 200° magnetic about 800 ft northeast of runway 33 on flat grassy terrain. The wreckage path was compact; all engine, structural components and flight control surfaces were accounted for at the scene.

The 3-blade propeller remained attached to the flange and was intact except for several nicks and gouges on the leading edges of the blades. The engine remained attached to the fuselage keel beam (root assembly) and the propeller shaft remained attached to the propeller. The carburetor detached from the engine and was being held in place by the fuel lines. One of the fuel lines was torn and was leaking fuel. The 5-gallon fuel tank mounted on the fuselage keel beam forward of the engine was compromised and there was a strong smell of automobile fuel at the scene as well as browning of ground vegetation in the immediate vicinity of the wreckage site.

The empennage was in a vertical position off the ground. The elevator and rudder remained attached. The rudder trim was bent in a right 35° angle (left rudder deflection) and did not appear to be damaged. There was numerous bending of the fuselage tubes throughout the entire airframe. Both wings remained attached, the fabric covering the wings was torn in multiple locations, but the internal ribs and wing spars exhibited minor damage. Flight control continuity was confirmed from the flight control surfaces to the cockpit. The king-post and all structural cable assembly's remained attached to their respective locations. There was no post-accident fire.

Engine cylinder compression and powertrain continuity were established by rotating the propeller by hand 720°. The fuel filter container was clean and was about 1/2 full of fuel. When placed under pressure, fuel flowed smoothly from the fuel line into the carburetor. The carburetor was removed and disassembled. The carburetor gaskets were examined with no anomalies noted. The float assembly remained intact with no anomalies noted. The air filter was free of obstructions. The engine cylinder head was removed and revealed no anomalies. Two pistons appeared to be well lubricated, shiny with no damage or irregularity noted.

The Nos. 1 and 2 spark plugs were in "normal" condition when compared to the Champion Check A Plug Chart.

Oak Ridge Airport (OQT) Oak Ridge, Tennessee was located about 4 miles east of the accident site. The 1753 weather observation at OQT, included wind variable at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 30° C, dew point 21° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.06 inches of mercury.



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: QUICKSILVER
Registration: N3889Z
Model/Series: MXII
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: OQT, 800 ft msl
Observation Time: 1753 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 30°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.06 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Oliver Springs, TN (TN08)
Destination: Oliver Springs, TN (TN08)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 36.040556, -84.306111

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 

OLIVER SPRINGS, Tennessee (WATE) – The pilot killed in an experimental, amateur-built aircraft accident in Oliver Springs has been identified.

Patrick Scott Lucas, 45, from Morristown, Tennessee,  identified by the Anderson County Sheriff’s Office as the pilot in the accident. Lucas was the only person on board.

The Quicksilver MXII aircraft accident happened on a private airstrip 100 yards from the Oliver Springs Airport, on Smith Road just before 5:30 p.m. on Saturday.

Law enforcement and medical personnel, including a medical examiner, arrived to the scene shortly after, according to Anderson County Sheriff’s Office.

The Federal Aviation Administration investigation begins Sunday.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wate.com

Loss of Control in Flight: Diamond DA40, N388JP; accident occurred July 13, 2019 at Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport (KBJC), Denver, Colorado

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N388JP


Location: Denver, CO

Accident Number: GAA19CA409
Date & Time: 07/13/2019, 1450 MDT
Registration: N388JP
Aircraft: Diamond DA40
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

Analysis 

The pilot receiving instruction reported that, during landing in windy conditions, the airplane drifted left of the runway centerline. He added that he applied right rudder and aileron to correct, but when he realized the airplane "was going to drift to left of [the] runway," he initiated a go-around. The flight instructor reported that the airplane subsequently touched down "momentarily" and that he heard a "thump." The pilot then added power and made "several corrections" to maintain the runway heading and then established a climb. The instructor reported to the tower controller that the airplane may have struck a runway edge light. The pilot landed the airplane and taxied to the ramp without further incident.

During postaccident examination, white paint transfer marks were observed on the runway leading to a runway light. The airplane sustained substantial damage to both the left and right ailerons. The pilot added that airport personnel informed him that a runway light was damaged and would require replacement.

The chief pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The flight instructor reported that the wind was from 350° at 12 knots, gusting to 19 knots. The airport's automated weather observation station reported that, about 3 minutes before the accident, the wind was from 340° at 13 knots. The pilot landed the airplane on runway 30. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot receiving instruction failure to maintain the runway heading and bank control during landing in crosswind conditions, which resulted in a go-around and subsequent collision with a runway light.

Findings

Aircraft
Lateral/bank control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)
Heading/course - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Student pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Effect on operation
Runway/taxi/approach light - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-VFR go-around
Other weather encounter
Attempted remediation/recovery
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/03/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 07/13/2019
Flight Time: (Estimated) 137 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7 hours (Total, this make and model), 53 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 7 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 11/02/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/28/2019
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 23885 hours (Total, all aircraft), 54.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 16137 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 55.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 9.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Diamond
Registration: N388JP
Model/Series: DA40 Undesignated
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal; Utility
Serial Number: 40.388
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/10/2019, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.:
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1362 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-M1A
Registered Owner: Sml Aviation Llc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Western Air Flight Academy
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KBJC, 5595 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 2047 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 203°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 8000 ft agl
Visibility:   25 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 22000 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 340°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point: 32°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Longmont, CO (LMO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Denver, CO (BJC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1415 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: ROCKY MOUNTAIN METROPOLITAN (BJC)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 5673 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 30L
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 7002 ft / 75 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 39.905000, -105.114167 (est)

Abnormal runway contact: Aeros Skyranger II, N75561; accident occurred July 16, 2019 at Webber Jones Airport (ME03), Brownville, Piscataquis County, Maine

View of airplane’s impact with trees and damage to lower fuselage.


Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N75561 


Location: Brownville, ME
Accident Number: GAA19CA425
Date & Time: 07/16/2019, 1300 EDT
Registration: N75561
Aircraft: AEROS LTD SKYRANGER
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abnormal runway contact
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot reported that, during landing, the airplane bounced. He initiated a go around, but the airplane veered left, exited the runway to the left, and impacted trees.

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the lower fuselage.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 70, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/04/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 11/06/2017
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 257 hours (Total, all aircraft), 8 hours (Total, this make and model), 9 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: AEROS LTD
Registration: N75561
Model/Series: SKYRANGER II
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2004
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: SKR 0210262
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/15/2019, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1257 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 159.48 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: 912S
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KGNR, 400 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 22 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1656 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 270°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: Light and Variable 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction:
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration:  No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Brownville, ME (ME03)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Brownville, ME (ME03)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1240 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Airport Information

Airport: Webber Jones (ME03)
Runway Surface Type: Gravel
Airport Elevation: 400 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 19
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2500 ft / 40 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 45.336111, -69.050833 (est)

Van's RV-14A, N365EM: Accident occurred July 16, 2019 in Aumsville, Marion County, Oregon


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N365EM



Location: Aumsville, OR
Accident Number: WPR19LA189
Date & Time: 07/16/2019, 1321 PDT
Registration: N365EM 
Aircraft: Vans RV14
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 16, 2019, about 1321 Pacific daylight time, a Vans RV 14A airplane, N365EM, was destroyed following an in-flight fire near Aumsville, Oregon. The pilot sustained serious injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the fight that originated from Aurora State Airport (UAO) Aurora, Oregon at 1235 with the intended destination to Corvallis Municipal Airport (CVO) Corvallis, Oregon.

The pilot reported that he was in cruise flight at 1,500 ft above ground level when he lost all electrical instrumentations and smelled burning wiring. The pilot then initiated an emergency descent. A few seconds later, the smoke began to fill the cockpit and the fire started to enter the lower part of the cockpit by the rudder pedals. Once he landed, the pilot evacuated the airplane that continued to burn until the first responders extinguished the fire. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Vans
Registration: N365EM
Model/Series: RV14 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: Yes
Operator: Mitchell Eugene W
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site:
Condition of Light:
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point:
Destination:



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight and On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 44.887500, -122.871944




A pilot was treated and released from the hospital after crashing his plane Tuesday afternoon while attempting an emergency landing in a grass field east of Salem.

Eugene Mitchell, 73, of Portland, told deputies he experienced mechanical issues which led to the plane catching fire mid-flight while traveling from the Albany area to the Aurora Airport. Mitchell, an experienced pilot, suffered non-life threatening injuries.

He was the only occupant of the plane, according to Sgt. Jeremy Landers with the Marion County Sheriff's Office.

Units from Aumsville Fire District and Marion County Fire District #1 responded to a report of a single-engine aircraft crash near the intersection of Howell Prairie Road SE and Jordan Street SE before 1:30 p.m., according to dispatch records.

The plane came to rest south of Jordon, east of Howell Prairie, in an unharvested grass field, according to Aumsville Fire District Fire Chief Roy Hari.

The crash ignited a grass fire, which was contained in less than half an hour after burning an area of about 100 feet by 200 feet, according to Hari.

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board were notified of the crash.

Story and video ➤ https://www.statesmanjournal.com













A plane crashed into a field 10 miles southeast of Salem Tuesday afternoon after its pilot made an emergency landing, Marion County Sheriff's Office spokesman Jeremy Landers said.

The pilot, Eugene Mitchell, 73, of Portland, was able to escape the plane that was fully engulfed in flames and was taken to the hospital with nonlife-threatening injuries, Landers said in a press release.

Mitchell's plane caught fire mid-air while he flew from near Albany to the Aurora Airport, according to Landers. Mechanical issues caught the fire, Landers said.

Sheriff’s deputies responded to the crash near Jordan Street Southeast and Howell Prairie Road Southeast around 1:23 p.m.

No one else was in the plane, Landers said.

Landers also noted that Mitchell is a military veteran, "with flying experience dating back to Vietnam."

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Traffic Safety Board have been notified of the crash, Landers said.

Original article ➤ https://www.salemreporter.com

Stoddard-Hamilton Glasair II FT, C-GAFT: Accident occurred July 17, 2019 in Sequatchie, Tennessee


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf




Location: Sequatchie, TN
Accident Number: ANC19LA036 
Date & Time: 07/17/2019, 1523 CDT
Registration: C-GAFT
Aircraft: Stoddard Hamilton GLASAIR II
Injuries: 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 17, 2019, about 1523 central daylight time, a Fred Burr Glasair II FT experimental amateur built airplane, C-GAFT, made an emergency off-airport landing following a complete loss of engine power about 30 miles northwest of Sequatchie, Tennessee. The pilot sustained serious injuries, and the airplane sustained substantial damage. The airplane was registered to the pilot and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a visual flight rules personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Cleveland, Tennessee, about 1500.

According to the pilot, while in level cruise flight the electronic flight instrument system (EFIS) and electrical system failed, followed by a complete loss of engine power. He added that, he went through the airplane's checklists and systems, but was unable to restore engine power. He attempted to glide to a nearby airstrip but was unable and selected a field for an emergency landing. During the approach to the off-airport field, the airspeed diminished, and the airplane stalled prior to touchdown. Subsequently, the airplane landed hard, bounced, and nosed over.

The airplane has been recovered and a detailed inspection is pending.

The airplane is equipped with a Lycoming IO-320-E2D engine.




Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Stoddard Hamilton
Registration: C-GAFT
Model/Series: GLASAIR II FT
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:Yes 
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None




Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KCQN, 690 ft msl
Observation Time: 1853 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 23 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2800 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / 17 knots, 260°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 5500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Departure Point: Cleveland, TN (RZR)
Destination:




Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude: 35.518611, -85.433611 (est)



CHATTANOOGA, Tennessee — The FAA is investigating a plane crash on Cagle Mountain Wednesday evening that injured a pilot.

Sequatchie County Sheriff Coy Swanger said the plane crashed in a cow pasture at the end of White Oak Swamp Road.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said the pilot, Murray Alan Marien of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in Canada, was the only person on board the Stoddard-Hamilton Glasair II FT aircraft.

Sheriff Swanger said Marien was flying back from Georgia when he stopped for fuel at the Cleveland airport, and said he was forced to make an emergency landing in a field due to engine failure shortly after takeoff.

The sheriff said the plane flipped several times. After the crash, the United States Air Force picked up an emergency locator transmitter signal over emergency radio frequencies.

The Tennessee Highway Patrol and sheriff's office was notified of the signal coordinates, with lieutenant Brad Lund responding via a Jet Ranger helicopter.

Lund found Marien next to the crashed plane injured and lying on his back, saying he directed other first responders to the crash site.

The sheriff's office said Marien was alert and conscious, and tried to give them an idea of what happened. 

"His words to us were that he had lost all power and that basically he was trying to look for a place to land and try to set it down, and I mean as you can see we're standing in a cow pasture here that's not level, and he actually flipped the plane several times," said Swanger.

LIFE FORCE flew Marien to Erlanger Hospital and he is listed to be in fair condition.

Marien's family released a statement on Thursday: 

As we reflect on the recent events from yesterday and focus on Murray’s recovery, we would like to thank all the members of the first responder agencies who assisted with locating and treating Murray after the plane crash. From the United States Air Force identifying the crash site from the coordinates of the emergency transmitter beacon and notifying the Sequatchie County Sheriff’s Department to search the area to LIFE FORCE and Erlanger staff for stabilizing and treating Murray’s injuries. We are so grateful for the immediate response from all those involved and for the area residents keeping him in their thoughts and prayers. 

The FAA is investigating the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is working to determine the official cause.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wbir.com



DUNLAP, Tennessee  —  NewsChannel 9 has confirmed that the pilot's name is Murray Marien, who is from Canada.

In an email, Erlanger spokeswoman Jennifer Tittsworth tells NewsChannel 9 that Marien is now in fair condition.

She also released a statement from Marien's family:

"As we reflect on the recent events from yesterday and focus on Murray’s recovery, we would like to thank all the members of the first responder agencies who assisted with locating and treating Murray after the plane crash. From the United States Air Force identifying the crash site from the coordinates of the emergency transmitter beacon and notifying the Sequatchie County Sheriff’s Department to search the area to LIFE FORCE and Erlanger staff for stabilizing and treating Murray’s injuries. We are so grateful for the immediate response from all those involved and for the area residents keeping him in their thoughts and prayers."

UPDATE (Thursday morning):

According to the Canadian Civil Aircraft Registry, the plane that crashed in Sequatchie Co. last night is registered to Murray Marien from Saskatchewan, Canada.

It's unclear whether that is the identity of the pilot. 

Sheriff Coy Swanger says the wreckage has now been removed from the site, where the FAA and NTSB will go over it later on Thursday. The pilot told the Sheriff he experienced a loss of power and had to bring the plane down.

Authorities plan to release the pilot's identity later on Thursday.

UPDATE 11 P.M:

Sequatchie County Sheriff Coy Swanger says one man was flying the plane when it crashed into this cow pasture around 3:45 this afternoon.

No one else was on board.

We don’t know the pilot’s condition at this this time, but we do know he was airlifted to Erlanger.

The Sequatchie County Sheriff says when they arrive on scene, the pilot was conscious and speaking to them.

Sequatchie County Sheriff Coy Swanger says the pilot took off from Gainesville, Georgia and stopped in Cleveland, Tennessee to get gas.

His final destination was in Wisconsin.

After his pit stop, the plane started malfunctioning.

The pilot has not been identified.

But we do know, he’s not from the area, the sheriff says he’s Canadian.

The Sequatchie County Sheriff’s Office were alerted to the crash by the United States Military.

They picked up an emergency beacon signal with a GPS coordinate.

The Sequatchie County Sheriff’s Office will be handling the investigation with assistance from the NTSB and the FAA.

The FAA released a statement on the crash: "A Stoddard-Hamilton Glasair II FT crashed in Sequatchie County, Tenn., this evening. Only the pilot was aboard, local authorities will release the name and medical condition. The FAA will investigate, and the NTSB will determine the probable cause of the accident. Check with local authorities for information about the location of the accident and how they located the aircraft."

PREVIOUSLY:

Sequatchie County Sheriff Coy Swanger confirmed a private plane has crashed in Dunlap on Wednesday.

The pilot, a man in his mid-to-late 50s or 60s, was the only person on the plane, according to Swanger.

Swanger says the pilot is in "good spirits."

The crashed happened on White Oak Swamp Road.

The pilot has been taken on Life Force to Erlanger for medical attention.

No other injuries have been confirmed.

Story and video ➤ https://newschannel9.com




UPDATE: The pilot in the Stoddard-Hamilton Glasair II FT crash has been identified as Murray Alan Marien of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in Canada.

Marien's family released a statement:

As we reflect on the recent events from yesterday and focus on Murray’s recovery, we would like to thank all the members of the first responder agencies who assisted with locating and treating Murray after the plane crash. From the United States Air Force identifying the crash site from the coordinates of the emergency transmitter beacon and notifying the Sequatchie County Sheriff’s Department to search the area to LIFE FORCE and Erlanger staff for stabilizing and treating Murray’s injuries. We are so grateful for the immediate response from all those involved and for the area residents keeping him in their thoughts and prayers. 

Marien is said to be in fair condition in a local hospital.

As for how first responders found the aircraft Sequatchie County Sheriff Coy Swanger said they got a call from the US Military. 

"We got a phone call from the United States Military that they had intercepted an emergency beacon and gave us a GPS coordinate,” said Swanger.

Marien was alert and conscious when they responded to the crash and tried to give them an idea of what happened.

"His words to us were that he had lost all power and that basically he was trying to look for a place to land and try to set it down, and I mean as you can see we're standing in a cow pasture here that's not level, and he actually flipped the plane several times," said Swanger. 

The Federal Aviation Administration has taken over the investigation. 

PREVIOUS STORY: The Sequatchie County Sheriff's Office is investigating a plane crash on Cagle Mountain Wednesday evening.

Sequatchie County Sheriff Coy Swanger tells Channel 3, the plane crashed in a cow pasture at the end of White Oak Swamp Road.

A spokesperson for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) says the pilot was the only person on board the Stoddard-Hamilton Glasair II FT.

Sheriff Swanger says the pilot is from Canada and was flying back from Georgia. 

Sheriff Swanger says the pilot stopped for fuel at the Cleveland airport and said he was forced to make an emergency landing in a field, due to engine failure shortly after takeoff.

The sheriff says the plane flipped several times.

The pilot, whose name has not been released, was flown to Erlanger by Life Force. His condition is unknown at this time.

The FAA will investigate the crash and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will determine the cause of the crash.

The FAA is expected to start its investigation on Thursday.

Story and video ➤ https://www.wrcbtv.com

Loss of Control on Ground: North American AT-6F Texan, N7976A; accident occurred July 24, 2019 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N7976A

Location: Oshkosh, WI
Accident Number: CEN19CA237
Date & Time: 07/24/2019, 1200 CDT
Registration: N7976A
Aircraft: North American AT 6F
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal

Analysis 

The pilot reported he was returning to the airfield as part of an 11-ship formation. The wind at the airfield was from between 220° and 230° and 7 to 8 knots. He landed the tailwheel-equipped airplane on the left side of the runway and kept the tail up during landing rollout to allow for spacing with the other aircraft in the formation. When he began to lower the tail to the runway, the wind hit the airplane' left side and lifted the left wing. Despite the pilot's control inputs, the airplane crossed to the right side of the runway, continued into grass, and came to a stop facing south.

The left wingtip, aileron, and outboard aileron hinge struck the ground during the excursion, substantially damaging the airplane.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's loss of directional control during landing with a quartering tailwind, which resulted in a runway excursion and subsequent substantial damage.

Findings

Aircraft
Directional control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Tailwind - Effect on operation (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Other weather encounter

Landing-landing roll
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Runway excursion
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 61
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Unknown
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present:
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed:
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/03/2018
Flight Time:  2842 hours (Total, all aircraft), 380 hours (Total, this make and model), 73 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: North American
Registration: N7976A
Model/Series: AT 6F G
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1959
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate:
Serial Number: 121-43192
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tailwheel
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection:
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 5300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: R1340 SERIES
Registered Owner: Witham Warbirds Llc
Rated Power: 550 hp
Operator: Witham Warbirds Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Distance from Accident Site:
Observation Time:
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 8 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 220°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:
Altimeter Setting:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Flight Plan Filed:
Destination: Oshkosh, WI (OSH)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time:  CDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: Wittman Rgnl (OSH)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 808 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 36
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8002 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None

Latitude, Longitude: 43.991389, -88.560000 (est)